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Grammar: When to Use Do, Does, and Did

Grammar: When to Use Do, Does, and Did

3-minute read

  • 12th August 2022

Verbs are essential to creating complete sentences, as they help us express physical actions ( She jumped in the puddle) , mental actions ( He thought about puppies) , and states of being ( I am hungry) .

There are several types of verbs that can each be written in different tenses, so they can be tricky to work with, especially if English isn’t your first language . We’ve put together a guide to help you use one of the most common verbs, do , in your writing . Read on below to learn more!

Action Verbs

As the name suggests, action verbs are used to express actions completed by the subject of a sentence. The base verb do is conjugated according to the tense:

1. Present Tense

In the present tense, do takes the form do or does, depending on the subject:

Subject:Verb:
I/you/we/theyDo
He/she/itDoes

Consider the following examples:

We do our homework every night.

   She does her homework every night.

2. Past Tense

In the simple past tense , the base verb do takes the form did with all subjects:

Subject:Verb:
I/you/we/theyDid
He/she/itDid

   We did our homework last night.

   She did her homework last night.

Auxiliary Verbs

Auxiliary , or helping verbs, are used with another base verb to create negative sentences, questions, or add emphasis. Here’s how do should be used as an auxiliary verb:

1. Negative Sentences

Following the same subject–verb pairings introduced above, we combine the auxiliaries do , does , and did with the adverb not to create negative sentences:

   We do not do our homework every night.

   She did not do her homework last night.

Note that we can combine the auxiliary and the adverb to create the contractions don’t , doesn’t , and didn’t . You simply remove the space between the two words and replace the letter o in not with an apostrophe (’).

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Contractions are more common in conversations and informal writing and typically shouldn’t be used in formal writing (e.g., academic or business).

2. Questions

To create questions, the auxiliary is combined with the infinitive of another verb in this way: auxiliary verb + subject + infinitive verb .

●  Simple present questions:

Do they sell children’s books?

Does he speak English?

Note that the third person verb speaks isn’t spelled with the s when paired with the auxiliary to form a question.

●  Simple past questions:

Did you buy anything at the bookstore?

Did he learn how to speak English?

Note that did indicates the past tense, so the main verbs don’t also take the past tense (i.e., bought and learned ).

3. Emphasis

In positive sentences, we can also combine the auxiliaries do , does , and did with the main verb to emphasize that something is true:

   We do sell children’s books.

   He did learn to speak English.

Try saying these sentences aloud and adding emphasis to the auxiliary terms with your tone. It adds a dramatic effect!

Proofreading and Editing Services

Hopefully, this guide will help you feel more confident when using different forms of the verb do in your writing. If you’re still learning or want to be sure your work is error-free, our editors are ready to help. You can upload a free trial document today to learn more!

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Past simple or past continuous?

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The first one is more natural if you are referring to an action that was in progress at 8 o'clock. But it is not possible to omit the subject in English, pronoun " I " in this case.

If you are referring to an action that was concluded before 8 o'clock, you should use Past Perfect and a different preposition, " by 8 o'clock" in this case.

E.g.: I had finished my homework by 8 o'clock last night.

Both sentences are syntactically incorrect, i.e. the word order is not respected. 

You have two options: 1) to use a comma for emphasis: At 8 o'clock last night , I was doing my homework; 2) to put the whole adverbial phrase after the object: I was doing my homework at 8 o'clock last night .

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Two Minute English

Is Done or Has Been Done: Understanding When to Use Which

Marcus Froland

March 28, 2024

Grammar can be a tricky beast. Just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, another rule pops up to throw you for a loop. And let’s not even get started on the tangle that is past participles and passive voice. But worry not! We’re here to shed some light on one of the most common conundrums people face: understanding the difference between “is done,” “has been done,” “was done,” and “have/has done.”

This might seem like just another grammar topic, but getting it right can make or break your sentence structure. It’s about nailing down those subtle nuances that elevate your English from ‘good’ to ‘impressive.’ So if you’ve ever found yourself scratching your head, wondering which form to use in your writing or speech, stick around. You’re about to discover something that will sharpen your language skills.

In English grammar, the difference between “ is done ” and “ has been done ” lies in their use and meaning. “ Is done ” is used for actions that are completed very recently or emphasize the result in the present moment. For example, “The report is done.” On the other hand, “ has been done ” refers to actions that were finished at some unspecified time in the past and may still influence the present. It suggests an action’s completion without specifying when, like “The research has been done.”

The choice between “ was done ” and “ have/has done ” also depends on context. Use “ was done ” for actions completed in a specific past time frame, e.g., “The task was done yesterday.” In contrast, use “ have/has done ” (present perfect tense) to talk about past actions with relevance to the present moment without stating exactly when they happened, e.g., “I have finished my homework.”

In short, understanding these differences improves clarity in writing and speaking by correctly indicating when an action occurred or its relevance to now.

Cracking the Code of Passive Voice in English

Understanding the passive voice in English grammar involves grasping various forms like is done , was done , has been done , and had done . These forms help emphasize the action over the doer, making them essential in effective communication. The key lies in choosing the appropriate tense to reflect the time of the action and its relevance to the present. Let’s explore each passive form and its purpose:

  • Present Simple Passive : Indicates current completeness
  • Past Passive : Illustrates completed past actions
  • Present Perfect Passive : Focuses on past actions with present relevance
  • Past Perfect Passive: Highlights actions completed before other past actions
A correct understanding of the passive voice empowers you to communicate your thoughts effectively and adapt to various contexts.

Each passive form signifies a specific point in time or a relationship between actions. Here’s a detailed breakdown of passive forms and their intended use:

Passive Form Usage Example
An action that is complete in the present, performed by an unspecified person or entity. The project .
An action completed in the past with no present relevance. The report last week.
A past action that currently holds relevance or impacts the present situation. The proposal by the committee.
Passive An action performed and completed before another past event. The documents before the meeting.

By mastering the different uses of passive voice in English grammar, you can enhance your communication skills and express your thoughts with clarity and precision. In the following sections, we will dive deeper into each form to build your expertise.

Present Simple Passive: “Is Done” Explained

In American English grammar , the passive voice plays a crucial role, especially when the focus is on the result rather than the doer of the action. The present simple passive is an essential tool in various contexts, emphasizing the completion of tasks without specifying who did them. Let’s explore the role of passive voice in American English, its usage, and common scenarios where the present simple passive “is done” comes into play.

The Role of Passive Voice in American English

The passive voice is useful for putting emphasis on the action itself and the result, rather than who performed it. This form of expression serves as an important aspect of American English grammar , facilitating effective communication when the doer of an action is either unknown or unimportant. In these scenarios, the present simple passive, also known as “ is done, ” becomes essential in conveying the completion of tasks, projects, or other accomplishments.

Common Scenarios for Using “Is Done”

In various situations, “is done” can effectively illustrate the completion of a task. Some common scenarios include:

  • Task completion notifications
  • Finished projects
  • Completed dishes in a cooking context

In each of these examples, the use of “is done” allows readers to understand that the task is currently complete, regardless of who completed it. This present simple passive construction efficiently communicates this vital information through passive voice usage .

“The project is done , and the results will be presented at the meeting.”

In this example, by using “is done,” the focus is on the project’s completion rather than who completed it. Thus, the present simple passive effectively highlights the current state of project completion with no emphasis on the performer.

Scenario Present Simple Passive Example
Task completion notification The report and ready for review.
Finished project The website redesign , and it’s live now.
Completed dish The cake is done and cooling on the rack.

In summary, the present simple passive form “is done” holds significant value in American English grammar . When used in relevant contexts like task completion notifications, projects, and finished dishes, this construction effectively communicates the completion status without emphasizing the performer, instead focusing on the result itself.

Past Passive Construction: When to Use “Was Done”

Understanding the nuances of the passive voice can significantly enhance your writing skills. In this section, we will focus on the past passive construction and explore the usage of “was done” in various contexts.

The past passive construction , primarily conveyed using “was done”, is used to indicate past completions or actions that took place in a known time frame. The key to mastering this construction is to remember that the focus remains on the occurrence of the action and not the doer.

Now, let’s take a look at some passive voice examples and how “was done” may better suit the context.

Examples of “Was Done” in Context

Here, we will briefly discuss some scenarios where “was done” is the appropriate choice to use:

  • Shopping completed last week: “The shopping was done last week.”
  • Tasks requiring repetition: “The laundry was done yesterday, but it will need to be done again tomorrow.”
  • Past events with a specified time: “The cake was done for my birthday party.”

Note that in these examples, using “has been done” would be incorrect since it signifies a connection or relevance to the present, while “was done” clearly points to a past action with a specified time frame.

Remember, when referring to a past completed action with a defined time, “was done” is the most appropriate choice.

To further refine your understanding of “was done” and other passive voice examples , let’s examine a table comparing “is done” and “was done” in various contexts:

Example Is Done Was Done
An assignment “The assignment is done and ready for submission.” “The assignment was done last night.”
A painting “The painting is done and on display.” “The painting was done during the artist’s stay in France.”
House cleaning “The house cleaning is done before guests arrive.” “The house cleaning was done yesterday.”

By developing a solid understanding of the past passive construction and when to use “was done”, you can effortlessly convey past completed actions while retaining the passive voice’s focus on the action itself.

The Present Perfect Puzzle: “Have/Has Done”

In mastering English grammar, it’s essential to understand the use of the present perfect tense with “have done” and “has done.” The present perfect tense indicates that an action was completed at some unspecified time in the past and is still relevant in the present. This tense is particularly valuable in situations where the focus is more on the current relevance of a past action, rather than the action itself.

“I have done my homework.”

Take this example; the speaker conveys that the homework is now complete, with the main point of interest being that it will not need to be carried out again in the present. However, it’s important to remember that using present perfect tense with a specified time is a common mistake.

  • Incorrect: I have done my homework last night.
  • Correct: I did my homework last night.

When specifying a time frame, use the simple past passive form instead of the present perfect tense for accurate grammar usage.

Let’s dive deeper into the usage of “have done” and “has done” by examining examples involving everyday scenarios with the help of a table.

Subject Action Present Perfect Sentences
John (singular) Study for an exam John his studying for the exam.
Mary and Paul (plural) Clean the house Mary and Paul the house cleaning.
My cat (singular) Eat breakfast My cat eating its breakfast.
The employees (plural) Finish a project The employees have done the project.

As shown in the table, “has done” is used for singular subjects, while “have done” is used for plural subjects.

By fully understanding the nuances and rules of “have done” and “has done” in English grammar, you’ll be well-equipped to express actions that were completed in the past, communicate their current relevance, and ultimately, brighten your grammar skills.

Unveiling “Has Been Done”: Present Perfect Passive

In our journey to understand more complex grammar distinctions , the present perfect passive is a key concept. “Has been done” is often used in this form, emphasizing the connection between past actions and their present relevance. Let’s dive deeper into the nuances of this structure and how it differs from the present perfect .

When Past Actions Connect to the Present

Understanding when to use “has been done” relies on recognizing the action relevance between past and present. The present perfect passive is ideal for expressing completed actions with ongoing impacts. For instance, if a song has been performed so frequently that it no longer needs to be played, you might say, “The song has been played a thousand times, and the audience has had enough.”

“The sales targets have been met, so there’s no need for the team to work overtime.”

In the previous example, the sales targets were reached in the past, but the action has a critical relevance to the present – overtime is unnecessary. The present perfect passive with “has been done” emphasizes the state of completion that influences the present situation.

Distinguishing Between “Has Done” and “Has Been Done”

The grammatical distinction between “has done” and “has been done” can be challenging. The focus of the sentence and the speaker’s view on the action’s timeline will help you choose the most appropriate phrase. Here’s a comparative list to help you differentiate between the two:

Has Done Has Been Done
An active voice construction highlighting the subject’s action, i.e., Peter the dishes. A passive voice construction that shifts emphasis to the action or the result, i.e., The dishes have been done by Peter.
Emphasizes the subject’s completion with no connection to any other action, i.e., Susan has finished her homework. Signifies a passive completion with present implications, i.e., The homework has been completed, so students can relax.
Better choice when the performer of the action is essential to the meaning or category of the action, i.e., The committee has approved the proposal. Better choice when the performer is not crucial or unknown, i.e., The proposal has been approved.

As you hone your skills in using the present perfect passive and “has been done” correctly, you’ll discover the intricate relationship between grammar and meaning. This understanding will enable you to create even more richly nuanced texts and engaging content.

Past Perfect Passive: The Case for “Had Done”

Working with past perfect passive involves understanding the form “had done” and knowing when to use it. This grammatical construction allows you to express actions that were completed before another event took place in the past, providing valuable context for readers and clarifying the timeline of events.

Let’s consider an example. Imagine a situation in which, prior to going on a weeklong vacation, you managed to finish all your pending tasks. To describe this, you can say, “All my work had been done before I left for vacation.” In this sentence, the form “had been done” shows that the completion of tasks occurred before your departure.

By understanding how to use “had done” and incorporating it into your writing, you’ll be able to effectively communicate past events and highlight the order in which they took place. This essential skill will make your writing more precise, informative, and engaging for your readers.

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You are currently viewing What did you do last night? The Simple Past Tense in English

What did you do last night? The Simple Past Tense in English

  • Post author: Language Garage
  • Post published: April 30, 2024
  • Post category: English / Grammar / Verbs

Image by rohatcom68 from Pixabay

English has a few different ways to talk about things that happened in the past. In this post, we’re going to look at the most common tense that’s used, the simple past ( went , did , lived , worked , etc.):

  • We heard a great DJ last night.
  • I woke up very early this morning.
  • She did n’t work yesterday.
  • Did you see Bill last week?

English lessons. ESL, EFL, Learn English.

Forming the Simple Past Tense

Most English verbs form their past tense regularly, just by adding – ed . But a lot of the most common verbs are irregular. We won’t cover all of the details here, but if you’re interested, there are sections at the end of this post that give you a lot of details around spelling, pronunciation, and irregular forms. For now, just keep in mind a few quick points:

  • Regular verbs add – ed : talk > talked ; smile > smiled ; upload > uploaded
  • The – ed ending can be pronounced /t/ as in talked , /d/ as in smiled , or /id/ as in uploaded . There are predictable rules below explaining this, which we cover below.
  • There are some minor spelling changes to keep in mind, for example: just add – d to verbs that end in a vowel ( bake > baked ), change – y to – i if – y followed a consonant ( study > studied ) but not if – y follows a vowel ( stay > stayed ). If the verb ends in a single consonant in a stressed syllable, double it ( stop > stopped ; refer > referred ), but don’t double it if the syllable is unstressed ( travel > traveled ), at least not in American English.
  • Irregular verbs usually involve vowel changes ( take > took ; eat > ate ), and there are several typical patterns, but irregulars must be memorized. We divide them into categories and cover each one below.

Uses of the Simple Past Tense

The simple past tense is used to express a state or action that happened in the past. Often, but not always, you’ll see a past time adverbial used along with the simple past tense, for example yesterday , last week , last year , in 2001 , and so on. The time adverbials are all underlined in these examples:

  • I worked out and went for a run yesterday .
  • The DJ was amazing last night .
  • They had dinner and saw a movie last week .
  • Bob and John got a new apartment last month .
  • The family moved to Chicago in 2001 .
  • From 2004 to 2016 I lived in Los Angeles
  • Barack Obama was president of the US in 2011 .
  • My family had two dogs when I was a child .
  • Before coming to Venice , we visited Rome.

Of course, it isn’t necessary for a sentence with the simple past tense to include a time adverbial. In these cases, it’s understood from context or common knowledge that the action happened in the past.

  • Jill met David at a party.
  • We bought our car at this dealership.
  • I heard a really cool new DJ.
  • Mary went to college in a small town in Vermont.
  • Vikings were the first Europeans who came to North America.

There are other past tenses that are used in English, so it’s important to contrast the simple past tense with those other tenses in order to better understand when and how to use the simple past.

Complete each sentence with the simple past tense of the verb in parentheses.

  • We _____ for hours about the film after seeing it. (talk)
  • I ____ home all night. (be)
  • She _____ for that company for over ten years. (work)
  • Sam and Linda _____ their house about five years ago. (buy)
  • We _____ dinner late last night. (eat)
  • Peter last _____ his family about three months ago. (see)
  • She _____ her resume. (upload)
  • They _____ history together in college. (study)
  • I _____ dinner for some friends. (make)
  • Yuming _____ Chinese as a child. (speak)

Answers: 1. talked; 2. was; 3. worked; 4. bought; 5. ate; 6. saw; 7. uploaded; 8. studied; 9. made; 10. spoke

Contrast 1: The Simple Past and the Present Perfect

Notice something very important about time adverbials like yesterday , last week , last year , and in 2001 . They are all closed , meaning that they are finished and over . ( Yesterday is over; it’s today now. Last week is over, it’s this week now, 2001 is over, and so on.) This is important because English only uses the simple past in cases when the time frame is over/complete/finished. If the time frame is open or unfinished, especially if there’s an effect on the present or the possibility of continued action, the present perfect ( have done , have eaten , have worked ) is used instead. Compare:

  • I worked five days last week. Today is Wednesday, so I have worked three days this week. (I’ll probably work two more days.)
  • Bill saw four movies last month. Bill has only seen one movie this month. (Maybe he’ll see more, maybe he won’t.)
  • Sandra ate three meals yesterday. It’s 2pm, so she’s only eaten two meals so far today. (She’ll probably eat dinner, too.)
  • I saw my family five or six times last year. I haven’t seen this yet this year. (Hopefully I will.)

The adverb yet means “up until now” or “so far,” so it refers to an open/unfinished time frame. For this reason, you always use the present perfect (and not the simple past) with yet . Yet is usually used in questions or negatives. In affirmative statements or answers, use already .

  • Have you eaten yet? Yes, I’ve (already) eaten, so I’m not hungry.
  • Have the students all finished their term papers yet? No, they haven’t all finished their terms papers yet.
  • Has Sam met your brother yet? Yes, Sam has (already) met my brother.

Notice though that if you introduce a completed or finished time frame in the answer to a question in the present perfect, you must use the simple past.

  • Have you eaten yet? Yes, I have. I ate earlier today. I’m not hungry.
  • Have the students all finished their term papers yet? Yes, they have. They all finished their papers last week.
  • Has Sam met your brother yet? Yes, he has. They met at a party last month.

The adverb ever usually refers to open/unfinished time frames, something along the lines of “at any time during your life.” When it has this meaning, you always use the present perfect instead of the simple past. You’ll sometimes hear ever paired with before .

  • Have you ever visited Thailand?
  • Has John ever seen your new apartment?
  • Have you ever been seriously ill before?
  • Have you ever eaten Georgian food before?

Ever is only used in questions. In negative statements, use not ever or never . In affirmative statements, you don’t need to use any adverb, but you may hear before .

  • Have you ever visited Thailand? No, I’ve never visited Thailand. Yes, I have visited Thailand.
  • Has John ever seen your new apartment? No, he hasn’t ever seen my new apartment.
  • Have you ever been seriously ill? Yes, I’ve been seriously ill before.
  • Have you ever eaten Georgian food before? Yes, I’ve eaten Georgian food before. It’s delicious.

There is one situation where it’s correct to use the simple past with ever (or not ever / never ), and it makes perfect sense if you keep in mind that the simple past is used with closed or finished time frames. Imagine a situation where you expected your friend to call her brother at some point last week. There was no specific time other than “at any point last week.” In this case, you could ask:

  • Did you ever call your brother (last week)? No, I never called him. / No, I didn’t ever call him. Yes, I called him last Wednesday evening.

This has the same meaning of ever that we saw earlier, at any time , but now ever is in a closed time frame, last week . Compare:

  • Have you ever eaten sushi? (in your entire life) Yes, I’ve eaten sushi before. No, I’ve never eaten sushi.
  • Did you ever eat sushi at that new Japanese restaurant you wanted to go to last month? Yes, I ate sushi there last month like I said I would. No, I never ate sushi there (last month). Maybe I’ll go this month.

Choose the simple past or the present perfect.

  • I (haven’t eaten/didn’t eat) yet today.
  • When (have you met/did you meet) your husband?
  • It’s only Tuesday, but it feels like I (have worked/worked) for the entire week.
  • We (have gone/went) to Tokyo three years ago.
  • (Have you ever gone/Did you ever go) to South America?
  • Yes, we (have gone/went) to Brazil and Argentina about ten years ago.
  • Do you remember that book you were meaning to buy? (Have you ever bought/Did you ever buy) it?
  • I (have read/read) that book when I was in college. It’s fantastic.
  • So far, I (have only read/only read) about half of it, but I like it a lot.
  • How many times (have you seen/did you see) that film?

Answers: 1. haven’t eaten; 2. did you meet; 3. have worked; 4. went; 5. Have you ever gone; 6. went; 7. Did you ever buy; 8. read; 9. have only read; 10. Both are possible. Probably “have you seen” is the better answer, assuming that it’s a film that the listener really likes and may see again. But “did you see” is also possible if you’re talking about a finished time, for example when the listener was a child.

Contrast 2: The Simple Past and the Past Progressive

Most often, the simple past refers to a “point” action in the past. For example, imagine that you have a timeline with a line in the middle representing now . The right is the future, and the left is the past. You would represent most actions expressed in the simple past as a simple point, represented with the red X.

homework done last night

Each of the actions or states in these examples could be represented as that red X:

  • I ate breakfast early today.
  • She left work late last night.
  • I met my wife in 2006.
  • He wrote his first book in 1948.

The point doesn’t have to literally last a moment, it can last for quite a long time, as long as that amount or span of time is thought of a completed and finished point.

  • I worked from 10am until 7pm yesterday. (Here, the point lasts nine hours.)
  • They lived in San Francisco from 1995 until 2017. (This point lasts 22 years!)
  • Dinosaurs ruled the Earth for millions of years. (This is a much longer point!)

If there’s a background action happening when that point occurs, a bit like scenery on a stage behind where the action takes place, English uses the past continuous (or past progressive): was/were doing , going , sleeping , etc.. Take a look at these examples:

  • We were eating dinner when the phone rang.
  • We were eating dinner when someone knocked at the door.
  • We were eating dinner when the game started.

In each of these examples, there are point actions: the phone rang , someone knocked at the door , and the game started . And there’s one background action happening in all three cases: we were eating dinner . If we think of this as a timeline, we would have a simple past point, and then a longer-lasting past progressive. The red X is again the simple past, and the yellow, longer-lasting event is the past progressive, representing the time when we were eating dinner in those three examples.

homework done last night

Complete the sentences with the simple past or past progressive of the verb in parentheses.

  • I (work) at a restaurant when they (offer) me this new job.
  • I (get) a phone call when we (ate) dinner.
  • When no one (look) the child (eat) all the cookies.
  • Bill (run) into an old friend while he (wait) in line at the supermarket.
  • Meagan’s parents (sleep) when she (get) home last night.
  • It (rain) when I (wake) up this morning.

Answers: I worked at a restaurant when they offered me this new job. 2. I got a phone call when we were eating dinner. 3. When no one was looking the child ate all the cookies. 4. Bill ran into an old friend while he was waiting in line at the supermarket. 5. Meagan’s parents were sleeping when she got home last night. 6. It was raining when I woke up this morning.

Contrast 3: The Simple Past and the Past Perfect

If there are two actions or states that happened in the past, and it’s important to stress that one happened BEFORE the other, use the past perfect ( had done , had eaten , had worked ) to express the first, earlier action.

  • Bill had visited Paris in 2013 before he visited Madrid in 2015.
  • Mary had graduated from college before she started grad school.
  • We had just started to eat when the phone rang.

The past perfect is very often completely optional. It’s perfectly fine to say:

  • Bill visited Paris in 2013 before he visited Madrid in 2015.
  • Mary graduated from college before she started grad school.
  • We started to eat, and the phone rang.

Use the past perfect only when you need to, in order to stress or emphasize that one action (had) happened before another one happened.

Did in the Simple Past Tense

In the simple present tense, do (or does ) is used in negatives and questions, or in short answers and short forms.

  • Does she speak French? –Yes, she does . –No, she doesn’t .
  • She doesn’t speak French.
  • She speaks French better than he does .

In the past, simply use did instead of do or does .

  • Did she live in Paris? –Yes, she did . –No, she didn’t .
  • She didn’t live in Paris.
  • She lived in Paris for longer than he did .

Make sure you use the basic form of the verb after did . In other words, don’t say “Did she lived in Paris?” or “She didn’t lived in Paris.”

Regular Verbs in the Past Tense

There are only a few things to keep in mind about regular verbs in the past tense. First, there are three different pronunciations for the – ed ending, but they’re completely predictable based on the ending of the verb.




And there are also a few spelling rules to remember when adding – ed .

  • To most verbs, just add – ed. walk > walked, add > added, look > looked
  • If the verb ends in -e , just add -d. bake > baked, smoke > smoked, love > loved
  • If the verb ends in consonant + y , change the y to i and then add -ed . try > tried, dry > dried, study > studied
  • If the verb ends in vowel + y , just add -ed . stay > stayed, enjoy > enjoyed, obey > obeyed
  • If the verb is one syllable and ends in a consonant, double the consonant and add -ed. stop > stopped, bat > batted, sip > sipped
  • If the verb has more than one syllable and ends in a consonant, only double the consonant if the stress is on the last syllable. refer > referred, prefer > preferred, entrap > entrapped
  • If the verb has more than one syllable and ends in a consonant, don’t double the consonant if the last syllable is not stressed, at least not in American English. cancel > canceled, travel > traveled, label > labeled

Irregular Verbs in the Past Tense

A lot of very common verbs in English have irregular (or “strong”) simple past forms. These usually involve a vowel change, but there are a few other types of changes – including none at all – that you should know about. In this section we’ll divide irregular verbs into categories based on how they change in the past tense. These changes are grouped by pronunciation, not spelling. In just a few cases, the spelling is irregular.

A. Completely Different Words

be > was, were go > went

B. No Change

beat > beat bet > bet burst > burst cast > cast ( broadcast , forecast ) cost > cost cut > cut fit > fit hit > hit hurt > hurt let > let put > put quit > quit set > set shed > shed shut > shut split > split spread > spread

C. Vowel + Consonant Change or Other Changes

bend > bent build > built burn > burnt can > could creep > crept deal > dealt dream > dreamt (or dreamed ) feel > felt flee > fled hold > held keep > kept kneel > knelt have > had hear > heard lean > leant (or leaned ) leave > left lend > lent lose > lost make > made mean > meant say > said see > saw send > sent sleep > slept spend > spent sweep > swept weep > wept

D. /eh/ as in f e ll

bleed > bled breed > bred fall > fell feed > fed lead > led meet > met read > read

E. /ō/ as in br o ke

arise > arose awake > awoke break > broke choose > chose drive > drove freeze > froze ride > rode rise > rose sell > sold shine > shone speak > spoke steal > stole tell > told wake > woke write > wrote

F. /a/ as in beg a n

begin > began drink > drank ring > rang run > ran shrink > shrank sing > sang sink > sank sit > sat spit > spat spring > sprang stink > stank swim > swam

G. /ā/ as in bec a me

become> became come > came eat > ate forbid > forbade forgive > forgave give > gave lay > laid lie > lay (as in to recline , lie as in to tell an untruth is regular lied .) make > made pay > paid

H. – ought or – aught

bring > brought buy > bought catch > caught fight > fought seek > sought teach > taught think > thought

I.  /i/ as in d i d

bite > bit do > did hide > hid light > lit slide > slid

J. /oo/ as in t oo k

shake > shook stand > stood take > took understand > understood

K. /ew/ as in bl ew

blow > blew draw > drew fly > flew grow > grew know > knew throw > threw

L. /uh/ as in h u ng

cling > clung dig > dug hang > hung spin > spun stick > stuck sting > stung strike > struck swing > swung win > won

M. /ore/ as in wore

bear > bore swear > swore tear > tore wear > wore

N. /ou/ as in f ou nd

bind > bound find > found grind > ground wind > sound

O. /o/ as in g o t

forget > forgot get > got lose > lost shoot > shot

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UPDATED DAILY

as Helping Verbs
to Make Negative Sentences

______________________________________________________________

Present Tense Negative

do + not +

 

 Singular  Plural
do not ___

___

do not ___

___

do not ___

___

___

does not ___

____

does not ____

___

does not ___

____

Listen and repeat:

Next: Watch this video

did + not + main verb

did not ____

_____

did not ____

____

did not ____

____

____

did not ____

_____

did not ____

____

did not ____

____

Examples:

I on the weekend. (present tense negative).

I last weekend. (past tense negative)

He to go to the store. (present tense negative)

He to go to the store when he was younger. (past tense negative).

They any money. (present tense negative)

They any money last week. (past tense negative.)

Examples:

I the dishes every night. I the dishes last night.

She her grocery shopping at Cub. She her grocery shopping yesterday.

They their homework at the library. They their homework last night.

Their company business in Minnesota. They business here.

Examples:

I didn’t go to work yesterday.

She didn’t take the bus to work.

.

Examples:

I to do the dishes last night. I to do them now!

He his license! He get it!

Please, that hot pan on the counter!

He  to work last night. (incorrect)

He went to work last night. ( correct )

She to work on Sunday. (She to work on Sunday.)

It to me. (It to me.)

He . (He .)

Click here to take a quiz on the present tense

Click here to take a quiz on the past tense

Next: Lesson Four commands in English

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Sat / act prep online guides and tips, how to do homework: 15 expert tips and tricks.

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Coursework/GPA

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Everyone struggles with homework sometimes, but if getting your homework done has become a chronic issue for you, then you may need a little extra help. That’s why we’ve written this article all about how to do homework. Once you’re finished reading it, you’ll know how to do homework (and have tons of new ways to motivate yourself to do homework)!

We’ve broken this article down into a few major sections. You’ll find:

  • A diagnostic test to help you figure out why you’re struggling with homework
  • A discussion of the four major homework problems students face, along with expert tips for addressing them
  • A bonus section with tips for how to do homework fast

By the end of this article, you’ll be prepared to tackle whatever homework assignments your teachers throw at you .

So let’s get started!

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How to Do Homework: Figure Out Your Struggles 

Sometimes it feels like everything is standing between you and getting your homework done. But the truth is, most people only have one or two major roadblocks that are keeping them from getting their homework done well and on time. 

The best way to figure out how to get motivated to do homework starts with pinpointing the issues that are affecting your ability to get your assignments done. That’s why we’ve developed a short quiz to help you identify the areas where you’re struggling. 

Take the quiz below and record your answers on your phone or on a scrap piece of paper. Keep in mind there are no wrong answers! 

1. You’ve just been assigned an essay in your English class that’s due at the end of the week. What’s the first thing you do?

A. Keep it in mind, even though you won’t start it until the day before it’s due  B. Open up your planner. You’ve got to figure out when you’ll write your paper since you have band practice, a speech tournament, and your little sister’s dance recital this week, too.  C. Groan out loud. Another essay? You could barely get yourself to write the last one!  D. Start thinking about your essay topic, which makes you think about your art project that’s due the same day, which reminds you that your favorite artist might have just posted to Instagram...so you better check your feed right now. 

2. Your mom asked you to pick up your room before she gets home from work. You’ve just gotten home from school. You decide you’ll tackle your chores: 

A. Five minutes before your mom walks through the front door. As long as it gets done, who cares when you start?  B. As soon as you get home from your shift at the local grocery store.  C. After you give yourself a 15-minute pep talk about how you need to get to work.  D. You won’t get it done. Between texts from your friends, trying to watch your favorite Netflix show, and playing with your dog, you just lost track of time! 

3. You’ve signed up to wash dogs at the Humane Society to help earn money for your senior class trip. You: 

A. Show up ten minutes late. You put off leaving your house until the last minute, then got stuck in unexpected traffic on the way to the shelter.  B. Have to call and cancel at the last minute. You forgot you’d already agreed to babysit your cousin and bake cupcakes for tomorrow’s bake sale.  C. Actually arrive fifteen minutes early with extra brushes and bandanas you picked up at the store. You’re passionate about animals, so you’re excited to help out! D. Show up on time, but only get three dogs washed. You couldn’t help it: you just kept getting distracted by how cute they were!

4. You have an hour of downtime, so you decide you’re going to watch an episode of The Great British Baking Show. You: 

A. Scroll through your social media feeds for twenty minutes before hitting play, which means you’re not able to finish the whole episode. Ugh! You really wanted to see who was sent home!  B. Watch fifteen minutes until you remember you’re supposed to pick up your sister from band practice before heading to your part-time job. No GBBO for you!  C. You finish one episode, then decide to watch another even though you’ve got SAT studying to do. It’s just more fun to watch people make scones.  D. Start the episode, but only catch bits and pieces of it because you’re reading Twitter, cleaning out your backpack, and eating a snack at the same time.

5. Your teacher asks you to stay after class because you’ve missed turning in two homework assignments in a row. When she asks you what’s wrong, you say: 

A. You planned to do your assignments during lunch, but you ran out of time. You decided it would be better to turn in nothing at all than submit unfinished work.  B. You really wanted to get the assignments done, but between your extracurriculars, family commitments, and your part-time job, your homework fell through the cracks.  C. You have a hard time psyching yourself to tackle the assignments. You just can’t seem to find the motivation to work on them once you get home.  D. You tried to do them, but you had a hard time focusing. By the time you realized you hadn’t gotten anything done, it was already time to turn them in. 

Like we said earlier, there are no right or wrong answers to this quiz (though your results will be better if you answered as honestly as possible). Here’s how your answers break down: 

  • If your answers were mostly As, then your biggest struggle with doing homework is procrastination. 
  • If your answers were mostly Bs, then your biggest struggle with doing homework is time management. 
  • If your answers were mostly Cs, then your biggest struggle with doing homework is motivation. 
  • If your answers were mostly Ds, then your biggest struggle with doing homework is getting distracted. 

Now that you’ve identified why you’re having a hard time getting your homework done, we can help you figure out how to fix it! Scroll down to find your core problem area to learn more about how you can start to address it. 

And one more thing: you’re really struggling with homework, it’s a good idea to read through every section below. You may find some additional tips that will help make homework less intimidating. 

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How to Do Homework When You’re a Procrastinator  

Merriam Webster defines “procrastinate” as “to put off intentionally and habitually.” In other words, procrastination is when you choose to do something at the last minute on a regular basis. If you’ve ever found yourself pulling an all-nighter, trying to finish an assignment between periods, or sprinting to turn in a paper minutes before a deadline, you’ve experienced the effects of procrastination. 

If you’re a chronic procrastinator, you’re in good company. In fact, one study found that 70% to 95% of undergraduate students procrastinate when it comes to doing their homework. Unfortunately, procrastination can negatively impact your grades. Researchers have found that procrastination can lower your grade on an assignment by as much as five points ...which might not sound serious until you realize that can mean the difference between a B- and a C+. 

Procrastination can also negatively affect your health by increasing your stress levels , which can lead to other health conditions like insomnia, a weakened immune system, and even heart conditions. Getting a handle on procrastination can not only improve your grades, it can make you feel better, too! 

The big thing to understand about procrastination is that it’s not the result of laziness. Laziness is defined as being “disinclined to activity or exertion.” In other words, being lazy is all about doing nothing. But a s this Psychology Today article explains , procrastinators don’t put things off because they don’t want to work. Instead, procrastinators tend to postpone tasks they don’t want to do in favor of tasks that they perceive as either more important or more fun. Put another way, procrastinators want to do things...as long as it’s not their homework! 

3 Tips f or Conquering Procrastination 

Because putting off doing homework is a common problem, there are lots of good tactics for addressing procrastination. Keep reading for our three expert tips that will get your homework habits back on track in no time. 

#1: Create a Reward System

Like we mentioned earlier, procrastination happens when you prioritize other activities over getting your homework done. Many times, this happens because homework...well, just isn’t enjoyable. But you can add some fun back into the process by rewarding yourself for getting your work done. 

Here’s what we mean: let’s say you decide that every time you get your homework done before the day it’s due, you’ll give yourself a point. For every five points you earn, you’ll treat yourself to your favorite dessert: a chocolate cupcake! Now you have an extra (delicious!) incentive to motivate you to leave procrastination in the dust. 

If you’re not into cupcakes, don’t worry. Your reward can be anything that motivates you . Maybe it’s hanging out with your best friend or an extra ten minutes of video game time. As long as you’re choosing something that makes homework worth doing, you’ll be successful. 

#2: Have a Homework Accountability Partner 

If you’re having trouble getting yourself to start your homework ahead of time, it may be a good idea to call in reinforcements . Find a friend or classmate you can trust and explain to them that you’re trying to change your homework habits. Ask them if they’d be willing to text you to make sure you’re doing your homework and check in with you once a week to see if you’re meeting your anti-procrastination goals. 

Sharing your goals can make them feel more real, and an accountability partner can help hold you responsible for your decisions. For example, let’s say you’re tempted to put off your science lab write-up until the morning before it’s due. But you know that your accountability partner is going to text you about it tomorrow...and you don’t want to fess up that you haven’t started your assignment. A homework accountability partner can give you the extra support and incentive you need to keep your homework habits on track. 

#3: Create Your Own Due Dates 

If you’re a life-long procrastinator, you might find that changing the habit is harder than you expected. In that case, you might try using procrastination to your advantage! If you just can’t seem to stop doing your work at the last minute, try setting your own due dates for assignments that range from a day to a week before the assignment is actually due. 

Here’s what we mean. Let’s say you have a math worksheet that’s been assigned on Tuesday and is due on Friday. In your planner, you can write down the due date as Thursday instead. You may still put off your homework assignment until the last minute...but in this case, the “last minute” is a day before the assignment’s real due date . This little hack can trick your procrastination-addicted brain into planning ahead! 

body-busy-meme-2

If you feel like Kevin Hart in this meme, then our tips for doing homework when you're busy are for you. 

How to Do Homework When You’re too Busy

If you’re aiming to go to a top-tier college , you’re going to have a full plate. Because college admissions is getting more competitive, it’s important that you’re maintaining your grades , studying hard for your standardized tests , and participating in extracurriculars so your application stands out. A packed schedule can get even more hectic once you add family obligations or a part-time job to the mix. 

If you feel like you’re being pulled in a million directions at once, you’re not alone. Recent research has found that stress—and more severe stress-related conditions like anxiety and depression— are a major problem for high school students . In fact, one study from the American Psychological Association found that during the school year, students’ stress levels are higher than those of the adults around them. 

For students, homework is a major contributor to their overall stress levels . Many high schoolers have multiple hours of homework every night , and figuring out how to fit it into an already-packed schedule can seem impossible. 

3 Tips for Fitting Homework Into Your Busy Schedule

While it might feel like you have literally no time left in your schedule, there are still ways to make sure you’re able to get your homework done and meet your other commitments. Here are our expert homework tips for even the busiest of students. 

#1: Make a Prioritized To-Do List 

You probably already have a to-do list to keep yourself on track. The next step is to prioritize the items on your to-do list so you can see what items need your attention right away. 

Here’s how it works: at the beginning of each day, sit down and make a list of all the items you need to get done before you go to bed. This includes your homework, but it should also take into account any practices, chores, events, or job shifts you may have. Once you get everything listed out, it’s time to prioritize them using the labels A, B, and C. Here’s what those labels mean:

  • A Tasks : tasks that have to get done—like showing up at work or turning in an assignment—get an A. 
  • B Tasks : these are tasks that you would like to get done by the end of the day but aren’t as time sensitive. For example, studying for a test you have next week could be a B-level task. It’s still important, but it doesn’t have to be done right away.
  • C Tasks: these are tasks that aren’t very important and/or have no real consequences if you don’t get them done immediately. For instance, if you’re hoping to clean out your closet but it’s not an assigned chore from your parents, you could label that to-do item with a C.

Prioritizing your to-do list helps you visualize which items need your immediate attention, and which items you can leave for later. A prioritized to-do list ensures that you’re spending your time efficiently and effectively, which helps you make room in your schedule for homework. So even though you might really want to start making decorations for Homecoming (a B task), you’ll know that finishing your reading log (an A task) is more important. 

#2: Use a Planner With Time Labels

Your planner is probably packed with notes, events, and assignments already. (And if you’re not using a planner, it’s time to start!) But planners can do more for you than just remind you when an assignment is due. If you’re using a planner with time labels, it can help you visualize how you need to spend your day.

A planner with time labels breaks your day down into chunks, and you assign tasks to each chunk of time. For example, you can make a note of your class schedule with assignments, block out time to study, and make sure you know when you need to be at practice. Once you know which tasks take priority, you can add them to any empty spaces in your day. 

Planning out how you spend your time not only helps you use it wisely, it can help you feel less overwhelmed, too . We’re big fans of planners that include a task list ( like this one ) or have room for notes ( like this one ). 

#3: Set Reminders on Your Phone 

If you need a little extra nudge to make sure you’re getting your homework done on time, it’s a good idea to set some reminders on your phone. You don’t need a fancy app, either. You can use your alarm app to have it go off at specific times throughout the day to remind you to do your homework. This works especially well if you have a set homework time scheduled. So if you’ve decided you’re doing homework at 6:00 pm, you can set an alarm to remind you to bust out your books and get to work. 

If you use your phone as your planner, you may have the option to add alerts, emails, or notifications to scheduled events . Many calendar apps, including the one that comes with your phone, have built-in reminders that you can customize to meet your needs. So if you block off time to do your homework from 4:30 to 6:00 pm, you can set a reminder that will pop up on your phone when it’s time to get started. 

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This dog isn't judging your lack of motivation...but your teacher might. Keep reading for tips to help you motivate yourself to do your homework.

How to Do Homework When You’re Unmotivated 

At first glance, it may seem like procrastination and being unmotivated are the same thing. After all, both of these issues usually result in you putting off your homework until the very last minute. 

But there’s one key difference: many procrastinators are working, they’re just prioritizing work differently. They know they’re going to start their homework...they’re just going to do it later. 

Conversely, people who are unmotivated to do homework just can’t find the willpower to tackle their assignments. Procrastinators know they’ll at least attempt the homework at the last minute, whereas people who are unmotivated struggle with convincing themselves to do it at a ll. For procrastinators, the stress comes from the inevitable time crunch. For unmotivated people, the stress comes from trying to convince themselves to do something they don’t want to do in the first place. 

Here are some common reasons students are unmotivated in doing homework : 

  • Assignments are too easy, too hard, or seemingly pointless 
  • Students aren’t interested in (or passionate about) the subject matter
  • Students are intimidated by the work and/or feels like they don’t understand the assignment 
  • Homework isn’t fun, and students would rather spend their time on things that they enjoy 

To sum it up: people who lack motivation to do their homework are more likely to not do it at all, or to spend more time worrying about doing their homework than...well, actually doing it.

3 Tips for How to Get Motivated to Do Homework

The key to getting homework done when you’re unmotivated is to figure out what does motivate you, then apply those things to homework. It sounds tricky...but it’s pretty simple once you get the hang of it! Here are our three expert tips for motivating yourself to do your homework. 

#1: Use Incremental Incentives

When you’re not motivated, it’s important to give yourself small rewards to stay focused on finishing the task at hand. The trick is to keep the incentives small and to reward yourself often. For example, maybe you’re reading a good book in your free time. For every ten minutes you spend on your homework, you get to read five pages of your book. Like we mentioned earlier, make sure you’re choosing a reward that works for you! 

So why does this technique work? Using small rewards more often allows you to experience small wins for getting your work done. Every time you make it to one of your tiny reward points, you get to celebrate your success, which gives your brain a boost of dopamine . Dopamine helps you stay motivated and also creates a feeling of satisfaction when you complete your homework !  

#2: Form a Homework Group 

If you’re having trouble motivating yourself, it’s okay to turn to others for support. Creating a homework group can help with this. Bring together a group of your friends or classmates, and pick one time a week where you meet and work on homework together. You don’t have to be in the same class, or even taking the same subjects— the goal is to encourage one another to start (and finish!) your assignments. 

Another added benefit of a homework group is that you can help one another if you’re struggling to understand the material covered in your classes. This is especially helpful if your lack of motivation comes from being intimidated by your assignments. Asking your friends for help may feel less scary than talking to your teacher...and once you get a handle on the material, your homework may become less frightening, too. 

#3: Change Up Your Environment 

If you find that you’re totally unmotivated, it may help if you find a new place to do your homework. For example, if you’ve been struggling to get your homework done at home, try spending an extra hour in the library after school instead. The change of scenery can limit your distractions and give you the energy you need to get your work done. 

If you’re stuck doing homework at home, you can still use this tip. For instance, maybe you’ve always done your homework sitting on your bed. Try relocating somewhere else, like your kitchen table, for a few weeks. You may find that setting up a new “homework spot” in your house gives you a motivational lift and helps you get your work done. 

body-focus-meme

Social media can be a huge problem when it comes to doing homework. We have advice for helping you unplug and regain focus.

How to Do Homework When You’re Easily Distracted

We live in an always-on world, and there are tons of things clamoring for our attention. From friends and family to pop culture and social media, it seems like there’s always something (or someone!) distracting us from the things we need to do.

The 24/7 world we live in has affected our ability to focus on tasks for prolonged periods of time. Research has shown that over the past decade, an average person’s attention span has gone from 12 seconds to eight seconds . And when we do lose focus, i t takes people a long time to get back on task . One study found that it can take as long as 23 minutes to get back to work once we’ve been distracte d. No wonder it can take hours to get your homework done! 

3 Tips to Improve Your Focus

If you have a hard time focusing when you’re doing your homework, it’s a good idea to try and eliminate as many distractions as possible. Here are three expert tips for blocking out the noise so you can focus on getting your homework done. 

#1: Create a Distraction-Free Environment

Pick a place where you’ll do your homework every day, and make it as distraction-free as possible. Try to find a location where there won’t be tons of noise, and limit your access to screens while you’re doing your homework. Put together a focus-oriented playlist (or choose one on your favorite streaming service), and put your headphones on while you work. 

You may find that other people, like your friends and family, are your biggest distraction. If that’s the case, try setting up some homework boundaries. Let them know when you’ll be working on homework every day, and ask them if they’ll help you keep a quiet environment. They’ll be happy to lend a hand! 

#2: Limit Your Access to Technology 

We know, we know...this tip isn’t fun, but it does work. For homework that doesn’t require a computer, like handouts or worksheets, it’s best to put all your technology away . Turn off your television, put your phone and laptop in your backpack, and silence notifications on any wearable tech you may be sporting. If you listen to music while you work, that’s fine...but make sure you have a playlist set up so you’re not shuffling through songs once you get started on your homework. 

If your homework requires your laptop or tablet, it can be harder to limit your access to distractions. But it’s not impossible! T here are apps you can download that will block certain websites while you’re working so that you’re not tempted to scroll through Twitter or check your Facebook feed. Silence notifications and text messages on your computer, and don’t open your email account unless you absolutely have to. And if you don’t need access to the internet to complete your assignments, turn off your WiFi. Cutting out the online chatter is a great way to make sure you’re getting your homework done. 

#3: Set a Timer (the Pomodoro Technique)

Have you ever heard of the Pomodoro technique ? It’s a productivity hack that uses a timer to help you focus!

Here’s how it works: first, set a timer for 25 minutes. This is going to be your work time. During this 25 minutes, all you can do is work on whatever homework assignment you have in front of you. No email, no text messaging, no phone calls—just homework. When that timer goes off, you get to take a 5 minute break. Every time you go through one of these cycles, it’s called a “pomodoro.” For every four pomodoros you complete, you can take a longer break of 15 to 30 minutes.

The pomodoro technique works through a combination of boundary setting and rewards. First, it gives you a finite amount of time to focus, so you know that you only have to work really hard for 25 minutes. Once you’ve done that, you’re rewarded with a short break where you can do whatever you want. Additionally, tracking how many pomodoros you complete can help you see how long you’re really working on your homework. (Once you start using our focus tips, you may find it doesn’t take as long as you thought!)

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Two Bonus Tips for How to Do Homework Fast

Even if you’re doing everything right, there will be times when you just need to get your homework done as fast as possible. (Why do teachers always have projects due in the same week? The world may never know.)

The problem with speeding through homework is that it’s easy to make mistakes. While turning in an assignment is always better than not submitting anything at all, you want to make sure that you’re not compromising quality for speed. Simply put, the goal is to get your homework done quickly and still make a good grade on the assignment! 

Here are our two bonus tips for getting a decent grade on your homework assignments , even when you’re in a time crunch. 

#1: Do the Easy Parts First 

This is especially true if you’re working on a handout with multiple questions. Before you start working on the assignment, read through all the questions and problems. As you do, make a mark beside the questions you think are “easy” to answer . 

Once you’ve finished going through the whole assignment, you can answer these questions first. Getting the easy questions out of the way as quickly as possible lets you spend more time on the trickier portions of your homework, which will maximize your assignment grade. 

(Quick note: this is also a good strategy to use on timed assignments and tests, like the SAT and the ACT !) 

#2: Pay Attention in Class 

Homework gets a lot easier when you’re actively learning the material. Teachers aren’t giving you homework because they’re mean or trying to ruin your weekend... it’s because they want you to really understand the course material. Homework is designed to reinforce what you’re already learning in class so you’ll be ready to tackle harder concepts later.

When you pay attention in class, ask questions, and take good notes, you’re absorbing the information you’ll need to succeed on your homework assignments. (You’re stuck in class anyway, so you might as well make the most of it!) Not only will paying attention in class make your homework less confusing, it will also help it go much faster, too.

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What’s Next?

If you’re looking to improve your productivity beyond homework, a good place to begin is with time management. After all, we only have so much time in a day...so it’s important to get the most out of it! To get you started, check out this list of the 12 best time management techniques that you can start using today.

You may have read this article because homework struggles have been affecting your GPA. Now that you’re on the path to homework success, it’s time to start being proactive about raising your grades. This article teaches you everything you need to know about raising your GPA so you can

Now you know how to get motivated to do homework...but what about your study habits? Studying is just as critical to getting good grades, and ultimately getting into a good college . We can teach you how to study bette r in high school. (We’ve also got tons of resources to help you study for your ACT and SAT exams , too!)

These recommendations are based solely on our knowledge and experience. If you purchase an item through one of our links, PrepScholar may receive a commission.

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Ashley Sufflé Robinson has a Ph.D. in 19th Century English Literature. As a content writer for PrepScholar, Ashley is passionate about giving college-bound students the in-depth information they need to get into the school of their dreams.

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Yes I have done it before today [closed]

Question : have you done the Homework? Answer : Yes I have done it before today..

Is it Correct if I did my homework yesterday itself and I use present perfect answer the question? Since I can't say yesterday in present perfect, can I say before today?

  • present-perfect

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  • Correct in what way? –  Lawrence Commented May 9, 2018 at 14:08
  • Can I use present perfect to answer the question since I cant use yesterday in present perfect . can I say before today instead of yesterday? @Lawrence –  TheMdsami33 Commented May 9, 2018 at 14:52
  • It sounds a bit odd. Perhaps it's because that uses have as a straight verb (I have [ done whatever ]), as opposed to an auxiliary verb ( have done ). It seems to answer a question like "Have you ever done done this?" rather than the one your question poses. However, I'm not a linguist, so I'll leave it to the more technically-minded among us to present a proper answer. There may also be material already in the database. Click the present-perfect tag to get a list of those questions to look at. –  Lawrence Commented May 9, 2018 at 15:25
  • What does "before today" mean? Is it yesterday? Is it last night? Is it two days ago? Maybe you meant to say " earlier today"? –  Mari-Lou A Commented May 9, 2018 at 17:33
  • Probably technically "correct" from a grammar standpoint, but quite ambiguous. Should only be used if the intent is to create confusion. –  Hot Licks Commented May 9, 2018 at 17:50

It seems that the main issue is that you don't know how to combine an explicit mention of yesterday with the present perfect. The standard way of doing it is by making yesterday a supplement , something not integrated into the syntactic structure of the sentence. Like this:

Q: Have you done your homework? A: Yes I have, yesterday .

It is true that

Time adjuncts like last week, two minutes ago , etc., which refer to times wholly before now, are incompatible with the present perfect.

( CGEL , p. 143). The reson is that

The present perfect involves reference to both past and present time: it is concerned with a time-span beginning in the past and extending up to now. It is not used in contexts where the 'now' component of this is explicitly or implicitly excluded.

Nevertheless, note that such adjuncts are allowed if they appear as supplements (something that is not integrated into the syntactical structure of the sentence). Thus, we are allowed to say

A: Yes I have, yesterday.

Here are some examples of similar usage from published literature (the supplemental time adjunct is in boldface):

"Have you been there?" "Yes I have, last time he was in London ." (source) 'Yes, we have, yesterday .' (source) "Yes, they have, on that fateful day ." (source) "Yes Ivana she has, some five years ago. " (source) "Yes, she has. Last night ." ( source. Here the temporal adjunct appears on its own as a verbless and subjectless sentence, which could equally well appear as a supplement.)

The reason why this works is that supplements are only required to be semantically compatible with the rest of the sentence, whereas integrated parts of the sentence must be syntactically compatible as well. CGEL explains it like this (pp. 1351-1352):

[Integrated constructions require] that the complement be syntactically licensed, whereas in supplementation it is, as we said above, a matter of semantic compatibility. Compare: [7]  i  a.   The stipulation that Harry could not touch the money until he was eighteen                annoyed him enormously.           b.  * The codicil that Harry could not touch the money until he was eighteen                annoyed him enormously.       ii  a.   This stipulation—that Harry could not touch the money until he was                eighteen—annoyed him enormously.           b.   The codicil in the will—that Harry could not touch the money until he was                eighteen—annoyed him enormously.

A codicil is 'an addition or supplement that explains, modifies, or revokes a will or part of one' (see e.g. here ). CGEL continues:

The examples in [i] belong to the integrated head + complement construction. Stipulation licenses a declarative complement, but codicil does not: hence the ungrammaticality of [ib]. In [ii] the content clause is a supplement, interpreted as specifying the content of its anchor NP [noun phrase; an anchor is what the supplement is related to semantically, but not syntactically]. And this time the codicil example is acceptable: the NP it heads denotes an addition to a will and hence has propositional content which can be specified by a declarative content clause.

Why the sentence you tried doesn't work

Now let's discuss why

[1] I have done it before today.

doesn't work in your case.

It is an acceptable sentence of English, but it is probably not how that conversation would actually go. In your context, it sounds awkward. To explain why, let's consider the following sentence:

[2] I have borrowed this car three times before today. (source)

This implies that the speaker borrowed the car a total of four times: three times before today, and then also today.

So [1] would make sense in the following situation: Kim and Alex have just completed some activity that lots of people find frightening although it is actually perfectly safe. It is Alex's first time doing that, and he got really scared. Kim, however, was calm, and Alex is wondering how Kim managed to stay so calm. Kim says, 'Oh, I've done it before today.'

What a native speaker would actually say

While Yes I have, yesterday is prefectly fine, other responses to Have you done your homework? are perheps even more likely:

Yes, I have. Yes, I did it yesterday.

Note that especially in American English, the question itself could be in the preterite:

Did you do your homework?

Is this is case of ellipsis?

It has been suggested that what we have here is a case of ellipsis, i.e. that [3] i is an ellipted version of [3] ii, where the boldfaced words in ii are the ones that were ellipted, while '___'s mark the positions in i where the ellipsis occured:

[3]   i   Yes I have ___, ___ yesterday.        ii   Yes I have done it , I did it yesterday.

An important thing to realize about ellipsis is that it should be invoked only when other kinds of analyses fail—the burden on proof is on those who claim something is an ellipsis, not those who claim it is not. This follows from principle that the elliptical construction must be grammatically 'defective': therefore, if it can be shown that a construction is not 'defective', then it is not an instance of ellipsis. There are other principles as well. ComGEL gives five such principles (pp. 884-887):

(a) The ellipted words are precisely recoverable; (b) The elliptical construction is grammatically 'defective'; (c) The insertion of the missing words results in a grammatical        sentence with the same meaning as the original sentence; (d) The missing word(s) are textually recoverable, and; (e) are present in the text in exactly the same form.

In light of these, let's compare [3] with a pradigmatic case of ellipsis:

[4]  i  A:   You had better stay at home.     B:   Yes, I'd better.       ii                                                                  B:   Yes, I'd better stay at home .

(a) In [4], stay at home is the only realistic option for the ellipted part. Not so in [3]. Any of the following would also work:

done my homework, I did/finished it done it, I did/finished my homework done my homework, I did/finished my homework done my homework, I did/finished my homework

done it, I was done with it

and many others.

(b) In [4], i is indeed grammatically defective: had better requires a complement. [3] i, however, is not defective, because yesterday is a supplement (this is what I explained in the main part of my answer).

(c) This one is OK in [4]. It may be OK in [3]. The problem is that [3] ii consists of two independent clauses connected by just a comma. Normally this is not OK: independent clauses should either be explicitly coordinated by a connection (e.g. since ) or else joined by a semi-colon. As it is, it looks like a comma splice. However, maybe we can say that [3] ii is an instance of asyndetic coordination.

(d) and (e) Definitiely satisfied in [4]. Maybe it is also OK in [3]. Ellipsis normally allows trivial changes to accomodate agreement for number, person, and tense. For example, consider

She hasn't written it yet, but I'm sure she soon will ___ ,

where the position of the ellipted part is indicated by '___'. What is ellipted (i.e. what should appear in place of '___') is write it , even though what we have in the first part is written it .

So perhaps it is not that big a deal that we have two ellipses, both of the verb *do , which is the present perfect in the first ellipsis, but in the preterite in the second. Note that in the second ellipsis, we have also ellipted the subject, I .

In the end, I would say that on ballance, the ellipsis analysis in [3] does not look more persuasive than my original suggestion that yesterday is a supplement. Properties (a) and (b) are the most important characteristics of ellipses, and they do not seem to hold for [3].

linguisticturn's user avatar

  • 1 If someone had asked me "Have you done your homework?", I would probably have answered, "Yes, I did it yesterday." Or I might have said, "Yes, I have." In the second case, "...done my homework" is "understood". –  tautophile Commented May 9, 2018 at 16:44
  • @tautophile Agreed; what you say is what a native speaker is most likely to say in this situation. I interpreted the OP's question as mostly about how to combine yesterday with the present perfect. I think that's an interesting question, given that time adjunct like yesterday are not licensed by the present perfect. And yet we do often combine the two, and I thought it would be interesting to explain how we do that. But I have included your comments in the answer (the new last section, 'What a native speaker would actually say'). Thanks! –  linguisticturn Commented May 9, 2018 at 17:43
  • @linguisticturn Thank you so much .. first time i got my answer here.. I fully understood your explanation.. I doubt is cleared now. –  TheMdsami33 Commented May 10, 2018 at 6:03
  • @TheMdsami33 You're welcome! (BTW, it should be My doubt is cleared now. :) ) –  linguisticturn Commented May 10, 2018 at 13:03
  • @linguisticturn by mistake I typed that.. last question , A witness claimed he saw a thief or A witness claimed he had seen a thief... newspaper it was written : A witness claimed he saw a theif. I think this is Reported Speech , and A witness claimed he had seen a thief , is correct? –  TheMdsami33 Commented May 10, 2018 at 14:16

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How to Get Your Homework Done Fast

Last Updated: June 24, 2024 Fact Checked

Staying Focused

Getting organized, staying motivated, expert q&a.

This article was co-authored by Jake Adams . Jake Adams is an academic tutor and the owner of Simplifi EDU, a Santa Monica, California based online tutoring business offering learning resources and online tutors for academic subjects K-College, SAT & ACT prep, and college admissions applications. With over 14 years of professional tutoring experience, Jake is dedicated to providing his clients the very best online tutoring experience and access to a network of excellent undergraduate and graduate-level tutors from top colleges all over the nation. Jake holds a BS in International Business and Marketing from Pepperdine University. There are 8 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,155,169 times.

Doing homework can be both time-consuming and frustrating, and you probably want to do more with your free time than just homework. When you have a lot of work to do, it can be tough to work efficiently. By staying focused, organizing and planning, and motivating yourself, you can get your homework done in a timely manner and move onto more fun and exciting activities. But you should start with putting away all distractions such as your devices unless you need them.They are normally the main distraction. You should also work in a quiet place so you are not attempted to go and do something else. For example, you should not work near your TV because you will be tempted to go and watch it.

Step 1 Work in a comfortable, well-lit environment.

  • Download website-blocking apps such as Freedom or SelfControl to stay focused while using your computer for homework. Some, such as the Chrome extension Strict Workflow, even have the added bonus of preventing you from cancelling the timer once it has started.

Step 3 Set a timer.

  • If one subject or type of assignment is taking much more time than the others, you may want to ask for a little extra help in that area from your teacher or parent.
  • If you get distracted or go off-task, don't make excuses for yourself. (e.g. "I won't be able to focus until I do this anyway." or "I'm sure it will only take a minute or two."

Step 1 Get your supplies in order.

  • Consider consolidating your multiple different subject folders and notebooks into one big binder separated by tab dividers. This way, all of your schoolwork will be in one place.

Step 2 Make a homework plan for the evening.

  • Decide how much time you want to spend on your homework collectively.
  • Make a list of all the different tasks you need to finish.
  • Estimate how much time you’ll be able to spend on each task to finish your homework when you want to.
  • Work straight through your list and cross tasks off as you go. [7] X Research source

Step 3 Start your homework soon after you get home from school.

  • A ten page essay that’s due in a week that you haven’t started should be labeled an “A” or “B” while a short five question worksheet due in three days may be labeled a “C”.
  • Make sure you don't wait until the last second to get assignments done.

Step 1 Take breaks.

  • Try eating celery sticks and apple slices with peanut butter.

Step 3 Reward yourself with a fun post-homework activity.

Supercharge Your Studying with this Expert Series

1 - Study For Exams

Reader Videos

  • Wear something very comfortable while you work. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Make sure to hand in all assignments on time. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Try using a planner to help you remember the tasks that you need to complete. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0

Tips from our Readers

  • If you set a timer, it can motivate you to get your homework done more quickly. Be sure to take a 2-5 minute break in between. For example, if you're going to do an assignment that you expect to take 30 minutes, set a timer for 15 minutes. Take a 2-minute break when the timer goes off, then set your timer again for 15 minutes.
  • It can be good to have friends over if they help motivate you and are interested in getting their homework done quickly as well. They might be a distraction at times but it can also be easier to work when there are people around you who are working too.
  • If you drink something cold during your breaks it can help make you more alert so that you'll finish faster. It might also help to do it at night rather than during the day so you feel more time pressure.
  • Try to get your homework done as much as you can in school. You could do it during a flex or study hall. If your teacher gives you time in class to work on it, use it.

homework done last night

  • Take your time. If you rush through your homework and don’t try your best, you might end up getting a bad grade. Thanks Helpful 177 Not Helpful 19

You Might Also Like

Concentrate on Your Homework

  • ↑ http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/creating-ideal-homework-environment-for-kids-with-adhd-0913164
  • ↑ http://info.achs.edu/blog/never-do-homework-in-bed-3-reasons-why
  • ↑ https://childmind.org/article/strategies-to-make-homework-go-more-smoothly/
  • ↑ https://learningcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/take-charge-of-distractions/
  • ↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/homework.html
  • ↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/homework.html
  • ↑ https://ofy.org/blog/homework-hacks-8-tips-get-done-faster/
  • ↑ Jake Adams. Academic Tutor & Test Prep Specialist. Expert Interview. 20 May 2020.

About This Article

Jake Adams

To get your homework done fast, work in a comfortable, well-lit area that doesn't have any distractions. Also, try setting a timer with however many minutes you want to finish your homework in so you can glance at it as you work and see if you're spending too much time on something. You can also make a to-do list before you get started so you don't waste any time figuring out what you need to be working on. To stay motivated, have a snack and some water nearby, and reward yourself with a fun activity once all your homework is done. To learn how to get organized so it's easier to do your homework, scroll down! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Fill in the blank with the most suitable verb: I ________ my homework very quickly last night. have did do am

A verb is used to express an occurrence, action, or state. it is the grammatical centre of the predicate in a sentence. an auxiliary verb is a verb which gives is used in the formation of tenses, moods, tones, etc. option c is correct as the subject is i and last night suggests the use of past simple tense (did). do (did) is used as a main and an ordinary verb here which means 'carried out an action in the past'. the other options are wrong as the main verb is missing and there is no need to use an auxiliary verb. the correct answer is c)did.

What We Lost During Last Night’s Cringeworthy Debate

T he first presidential debate of this protracted presidential season was a horror show. Preceded by what seemed like weeks of excited speculation, idiotic predictions, and presumptive pre-debate analysis, when the debate actually happened, it demonstrated the dire choice that the two major political parties have given the electorate: pick the ranting liar and fear-mongering xenophobe, or choose the befuddled, stumbling man whose attempts to explain policy. (“I support Roe v. Wade , which had three trimesters”?) It was painful to watch.

One might rightly wonder what purpose presidential debates serve, particularly this year. We already know both candidates pretty well, and if we don’t, we have four more months to learn that Trump neither cares for the duties of office or the complexities of foreign affairs (and cultures), but does possess a talent for stirring up prejudice, for making people laugh, and for making them fearful. He does not answer questions. Last night, he avoided the question on the war in Gaza. He punted on the opioid crisis and climate change. He makes no appeal to decency, which is Biden’s forte (or was). But decency without backbone is what makes Biden appear, well, doddery. And we can watch that too until November. In fact, this otherwise consequential president seemed most focused when he talked about hitting a golf ball.

Read More: Calls for Biden to Step Aside Are About to Get Deafening

Part of the problem is that we live in a visual age. As a result, though we value them, our presumptive leaders become leaders even if they lack oratorical skills. In fact, it’s not surprising that the first well-known presidential debate , in 1960, occurred when television was a relatively new medium, and it did Richard Nixon no favors. No one remembers what he said, just how he looked. (Actually, the first televised debate, between candidates Adlai Stevenson and Dwight Eisenhower , took place four years earlier but without them; they used stand-ins, Eleanor Roosevelt and Margaret Chase Smith.) Before that, presidents depended on radio, with Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “fireside chats” bringing him, and his voice, with its powers of persuasion, into one’s home. Before that, we debated in the public square of newspapers. Word, skillfully written, can change minds. Consider Lincoln and Douglas, a debate for a seat in the Senate, and the rest is history.

So oratory matters. The ability to persuade, through words, mattered. It still does, which is why last night’s debate was so chilling. When William Jennings Bryan was nominated by Democrats as their presidential candidate for the third time in 1908, even though he’d been unsuccessful twice before, it was because of his oratorical gift. His voice, once heard, was never forgotten. He could address a crowd of 20,000 and make the audience feel as though he spoke directly to each and everyone one of them and he understood what they needed. They called him the “Great Commoner.” He even started a newspaper so he could write column after column and deliver what amounted to sermons.

And, like all good orators, he knew how to perform. He did not want his tie too straight. Bryan practiced parts of his famous “Cross of Gold” speech , one of the most famous in American political history, for months and months before he delivered it in 1896 at the Democratic National Convention. He bounded onto the stage, raised his arms, and then spoke in the lyrical, cadenced phrases of Scripture. “We are fighting in the defense of our homes, our families, and posterity,” Bryan declared. “We have petitioned, and our petitions have been scorned; we have entreated, and our entreaties have been disregarded; we have begged, and they have mocked when our calamity came. We beg no longer; we entreat no more; we petition no more.” It was good stuff.

Read More: These Are the Biggest Moments in the First Presidential Debate

But performance needs substance. And so Bryan would eventually meet his nemesis when he was confronted by an orator even more practiced, clever, and dramatic than he. That was Clarence Darrow, the celebrated lawyer in rumpled clothes whose talent for mesmerizing juries with his impression of humility (some of which was genuine) was unparalleled. Though not a politician, or at least not a professional one, Darrow was a man who could deliver a rational argument with much emotion. It was a winning combination.

Take his defense of Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb, two teenagers accused of the gruesome and motiveless murder of 14 year-old Bobby Franks. Darrow had Leopold and Loeb plead guilty to avoid a jury trial so he could argue before the judge that their lives should be spared. Claiming Leopold and Loeb were just adolescents, the products of genetics and environment, Darrow said they were essentially without free will. “They killed,” said Darrow, “because hey were made that way.” At the same time, let us not blindly and cruelly call for yet another death, he implored the judge. Let us acknowledge that capital punishment grows out of our primitive need for vengeance, and let’s acknowledge that our killing two defective, two abnormal adolescents would not prevent other impaired boys or malevolent men or vicious women from committing murder.

“I sometimes wonder whether I am dreaming, whether I am not living in centuries long gone by, when savagery roamed wild, and the world was wet with human blood?” he concluded at the trial’s end. It was a consummate performance: a rational argument topped off by an emotional one. Leopold and Loeb received life sentences.

When Darrow and Bryan confronted each other in the courtroom, both of them, like Biden and Trump, were considered past their prime. Certainly they weren’t vying for the Oval Office, and their confrontation took place in a court of law, not on a television set. But they were jousting over the meaning of America and America’s future with far more passion, compassion, and reasonableness than anything that happened last night on the debate stage. For all his faults, Bryan was an optimistic idealist who thought he could improve the lives of ordinary men and women. He was a progressive who sincerely believed—and fought for—such reforms as the government ownership of utilities, a graduated income tax, currency reform, woman's suffrage and, for better and worse, Prohibition, which, in his mind, would help purify the nation by abolishing alcoholism, child abuse, and violence against women.

But when he wanted to turn the country into a Christian theocracy, Darrow objected. Their showdown took place in the summer of 1925 over a law recently passed by the Tennessee legislature that barred teaching the theory of evolution in public schools. It later became known, famously, as the Scopes Trial .

Darrow volunteered to defend the young schoolteacher who had purposefully broken the law (to test it), and he mustered, once again, all his oratorical skills. “Ignorance and fanaticism are ever busy and needs feeding,” Darrow declared. “Today it is the public school teachers, tomorrow the private. The next day the preachers and the lecturers, the magazines, the books, the newspapers. After a while, it is the setting of man against man and creed against creed until with flying banners and beating drums we are marching backward to the glorious ages of the sixteenth century when bigots lighted fagots to burn the men who dared to bring any intelligence and enlightenment and culture to the human mind."

“No subject possesses the minds of men like religious bigotry and hate,” Darrow concluded, “and these fires are being lighted today in America.”

He spoke without notes. He was persuasive and passionate. That’s what I thought about—what we had lost—as I watched last night’s sad, cringeworthy debate.

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Winning Mega Millions numbers for July 2, 2024. Anyone win last night's drawing jackpot?

homework done last night

The  Mega Millions  jackpot continued to rise after no tickets matched all six numbers from Friday night's drawing .

Grab your tickets  and let's see if you're the game's newest millionaire.

Here are the numbers  for the Tuesday, July 2, lottery drawing jackpot worth $137 million with a cash option of $63.0 million.

Mega Millions, Powerball: What to do if you win the Powerball or Mega Millions jackpot

Mega Millions numbers 7/2/24

Tuesday night’s winning numbers  were 4, 8, 19, 31, 45, and the Mega Ball was 11. The Megaplier was 4X.

Did anyone win Mega Millions last night, Tuesday, July 2nd, 2024?

No one matched all six numbers  to win the Mega Millions jackpot.

One ticket sold in California and a ticket bought in Texas matched all five numbers except for the Mega Ball worth $1 million.

Powerball winning numbers: Anyone win Wednesday night’s lottery drawing jackpot?

How many Mega Millions winning numbers do you need to match to win a prize?

You only need to match one number in Mega Millions to win a prize . However, that number must be the Mega Ball, worth $2.

What is the Mega Millions payout on matching 2 lottery numbers?

Matching two numbers won't win anything in Mega Millions unless one of the numbers is the Mega Ball. A ticket matching one of the five numbers and the Mega Ball is worth $4. Visit www.megamillions.com for a complete list of payout information.

Mega Millions numbers you need to know: Most commonly drawn numbers

How much is the Mega Millions drawing jackpot?

The Mega Millions jackpot for Friday's drawing rose to an estimated $162 million with a cash option of $74.5 million, according to  megamillions.com .

When is the next Mega Millions drawing?

Drawings are held two times per week at approximately 10 p.m. CT every Tuesday and Friday. You can watch drawings via YouTube .

How much is a Mega Millions ticket?

A Mega Millions ticket costs $2 per play. For an additional $1, players can add the Megaplier to potentially increase their winnings outside of the jackpot.

How to play Mega Millions

Here's how to play Mega Millions :

Mega Millions, Powerball numbers: Want to win the lottery? Here are luckiest numbers, places to play

Powerball winning numbers

The  winning numbers  for Monday night's drawing were 5, 6, 36, 53, 69, and the Powerball is 8. The Power Play was 2X.

How much is the Powerball drawing jackpot?

The  current Powerball jackpot  is worth an estimated $138 million with a cash option of $65.8 million, after no one matched all six Powerball numbers from Monday night's drawing .

Mega Millions 2024 lottery jackpot winners

Here is the list of 2024 Mega Millions jackpot wins, according to  megamillions.com :

  • $1.13 billion — March 26; New Jersey .
  • $560 million — June 4; Illinois .

Mega Millions numbers: Anyone win Friday night's drawing jackpot?

Top 10 Mega Millions lottery jackpots

Here are the all-time top 10 Mega Millions jackpots, according to  megamillions.com :

  • $1.58 billion — Aug. 8, 2023; Florida.
  • $1.537 billion — Oct. 23, 2018; South Carolina.
  • $1.35 billion — Jan. 13, 2023; Maine.
  • $1.337 billion — July 29, 2022; Illinois.
  • $1.13 billion — March 26, 2024; New Jersey.
  • $1.05 billion — Jan. 22, 2021; Michigan.
  • $656 million — Mar. 30, 2012; Kansas, Illinois, Maryland.
  • $648 million — Dec. 17, 2013; California, Georgia.
  • $560 million — June 4, 2024; Illinois
  • $543 million — July 24, 2018; California.

Top 10 U.S. lottery jackpots

Here are the nation's all-time top 10 Powerball and Mega Millions jackpots, according to  powerball.com :

  • $2.04 billion,  Powerball  — Nov. 7, 2022; California.
  • $1.765 billion, Powerball — Oct. 11, 2023; California.
  • $1.586 billion,  Powerball  — Jan. 13, 2016; California, Florida, Tennessee.
  • $1.58 billion, Mega Millions  — Aug. 8, 2023; Florida.
  • $1.537 billion,  Mega Millions  — Oct. 23, 2018; South Carolina.
  • $1.35 billion, Mega Millions — Jan. 13, 2023; Maine.
  • $1.337 billion,  Mega Millions  — July 29, 2022; Illinois.
  • $1.33 billion,  Powerball  — April 6, 2024; Oregon.
  • $1.13 billion,  Mega Millions  — March 26, 2024; New Jersey.
  • $1.08 billion,  Powerball  — July 19, 2023; California.

Chris Sims is a digital content producer for Midwest Connect Gannett. Follow him on Twitter:  @ChrisFSims .

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Which is the right response for the question "Did you do your homework?"

I am trying to refresh my grammar and I want to remember what was the right past tense for this question

Did you do your homework? Yes I did it Yes I have done it Yes I had done it

Which is correct and when should I use others ?

3 Answers 3

“Yes, I did it” is the right answer to “Did you do your homework?”. But it would be more likely for the question to be “Have you done your homework?”, to which the answer is “Yes, I have done it” (or in speech, nearly always “Yes, I’ve done it”).

The difference is that “Did you do your homework?” is asking about the past —— did you, at some time in the past, do your homework? “Have you done your homework?” is asking about the present situation — are you, right now, in a state of having done your homework?

Mike Scott's user avatar

  • I think "Did you do your homework?" would be idiomatic in American English, but I'll leave it to the Americans to suggest what the natural reply would be. –  Kate Bunting Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 7:52
Yes I did it
Yes I have done it

are correct and good responses to the question. It would be normal to reflect the form of the question, so if asked "Did you do your homework?" you would normally say "Yes, I did it." If asked "Have you done your homework?" (which means the same thing) you would answer "Yes, I have done it."

"Yes I had done it" is pluperfect tense and incorrect here.

DJClayworth's user avatar

Did you do your homework?

Have you done your homework?

Yes I have.

chasly - supports Monica's user avatar

You must log in to answer this question.

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homework done last night

Grammar Quiz

If I ……………………..the homework last night, I…………………..bonus today.

A. Had done/would get 

B. had done/would have got

C. done/would get 

D. does/will get

Select your answer:          

Next Quiz >

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We should wash fruit and vegetables ______ we eat or cook them.

B. As soon as

Parents are recommended to collaborate with teachers in educating children.

FIND THE CLOSEST MEANING

B. cooperate

C. separate

D. disagree

How to use : Read the question carefully, then select one of the answers button.

GrammarQuiz.Net - Improve your knowledge of English grammar, the best way to kill your free time.

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Powerball winning numbers for June 24, 2024. Anyone win last night’s lottery drawing jackpot?

The  Powerball  lottery jackpot continues to grow after no one matched all six numbers from  Saturday night's drawing .

Grab your tickets  and let's  check your numbers  to see if you're the game's newest millionaire.

Here are the numbers for the Monday, June 24, Powerball jackpot worth an estimated $84 million with a cash option of $40.4 million.

Powerball, Mega Millions: Want to win the lottery? Here are luckiest numbers, places to play

Powerball numbers 6/24/24

The  winning numbers  for Monday night's drawing were 5, 6, 36, 53, 69, and the Powerball is 8. The Power Play was 2X.

Did anyone win Powerball last night, Monday, June 24th, 2024?

No one matched all six numbers  to win the Powerball jackpot.

Nobody matched all five numbers except for the Powerball worth $1 million.

Double Play  numbers are 1, 31, 33, 54, 60 and the Powerball is 26.

A sinle ticket sold in Kentucky matched all six numbers worth $10 million, and no one matched all five numbers except for the Powerball worth $500,000.

Powerball winner? Lock up your ticket and go hide. What to know if you win the jackpot

How many Powerball numbers do you need to win a prize?

You only need to match one number in Powerball to win a prize. However, that number must be the Powerball worth $4. Visit powerball.com for the entire prize chart.

What is the Powerball payout on matching 2 lottery numbers?

Matching two numbers won't win anything in Powerball unless one of the numbers is the Powerball. A ticket matching one of the five numbers and the Powerball is also worth $4. Visit powerball.com for the entire prize chart.

Powerball numbers you need to know: These most commonly drawn numbers could help you win

How much is the Powerball drawing jackpot?

The Powerball jackpot for Wednesday, June 26, 2024, rose to an estimated $95 million with a cash option of $45.7 million, according to  powerball.com .

When is the next Powerball drawing?

Drawings are held three times per week at approximately 10:59 p.m. ET every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday.

How much is a Powerball lottery ticket?

A single Powerball ticket costs $2. Pay an additional $1 to add the Power Play for a chance to multiply all Powerball winnings except for the jackpot. Players can also add the Double Play for one more $1 to have a second chance at winning $10 million.

How to play Powerball

Mega Millions numbers: Anyone win Friday night's drawing jackpot?

Mega Millions winning numbers

Friday night’s  winning numbers  were 3, 18, 27, 40, 44, and the Mega Ball was 19.

The Mega Millions  continued to rise after no one matched all six numbers from Friday night's drawing .

How much is the Mega Millions drawing jackpot?

The  current Mega Millions jackpot  is now worth an estimated $97 million, with a cash option of $46.4 million.

Powerball 2024 drawing jackpot winners

Here is the list of 2024 Powerball jackpot wins, according to  powerball.com :

  • $842.4 million — Jan. 1; Michigan .
  • $1.362 million — April 6; Oregon .
  • $214.9 million — May 6, Florida .
  • $222.6 million — June 10, New Jersey .

Powerball Top 10 lottery drawing jackpot results

Here are the all-time top 10 Powerball jackpots, according to  powerball.com :

  • $2.04 billion — Nov. 7, 2022; California.
  • $1.765 billion — Oct. 11, 2023; California.
  • $1.586 billion — Jan. 13, 2016; California, Florida, Tennessee.
  • $1.326 billion — April 6, 2024; Oregon.
  • $1.08 billion — July 19, 2023; California.
  • $842 million — Jan. 1, 2024; Michigan.
  • $768.4 million — March 27, 2019; Wisconsin.
  • $758.7 million — Aug. 23, 2017; Massachusetts.
  • $754.6 million — Feb. 6, 2023; Washington.
  • $731.1 million — Jan. 20, 2021; Maryland.

Powerball numbers: Anyone win Saturday night’s lottery drawing jackpot?

Powerball, Mega Millions history: Top 10 U.S. lottery drawing jackpot results

Here are the nation's all-time top 10 Powerball and Mega Millions jackpots, according to  powerball.com :

  • $2.04 billion,  Powerball  — Nov. 7, 2022; California.
  • $1.765 billion, Powerball — Oct. 11, 2023; California.
  • $1.586 billion,  Powerball  — Jan. 13, 2016; California, Florida, Tennessee.
  • $1.58 million, Mega Millions  — Aug. 8, 2023; Florida.
  • $1.537 billion,  Mega Millions  — Oct. 23, 2018; South Carolina.
  • $1.35 billion, Mega Millions — Jan. 13, 2023; Maine.
  • $1.337 billion,  Mega Millions  — July 29, 2022; Illinois.
  • $1.326 billion, Powerball — April 6, 2024; Oregon
  • $1.13 billion, Mega Millions — March 26, 2024; New Jersey.
  • $1.08 billion, Powerball — July 19, 2023; California.

Chris Sims is a digital content producer at Midwest Connect Gannett. Follow him on Twitter:  @ChrisFSims .

  • Share full article

Advertisement

All Democratic Governors Attend White House Meeting With Biden

Gavin Newsom, Gretchen Whitmer and Andy Beshear were among those attending Wednesday’s meeting in person. At least a dozen governors were joining remotely.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan sitting at a table at the National Governors Association Winter Meeting at the White House last year.

By Campbell Robertson

  • July 3, 2024

All of the country’s Democratic governors were in attendance either virtually or in person at a meeting with President Biden on Wednesday night, the White House said, amid the ongoing political fallout from his performance at last Thursday’s debate.

Among those at the White House were Gavin Newsom of California, Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan and Andy Beshear of Kentucky. All three have been floated as potential presidential candidates themselves.

Maura Healey of Massachusetts, Kathy Hochul of New York, JB Pritzker of Illinois and Tim Walz of Minnesota were also at the meeting in person. Mr. Walz, the chairman of the Democratic Governors Association, organized a call with the governors on Monday to discuss concerns about Mr. Biden’s debate performance, which led to Wednesday’s meeting.

Fourteen governors were joining the meeting remotely, including Josh Shapiro of Pennsylvania, Roy Cooper of North Carolina and Katie Hobbs of Arizona.

Biden ‘in It to Win It,’ Democratic Governors Say

After a meeting with president biden, some of the country’s democratic governors said they had pledged their support, despite what one governor called his “bad performance” during the first presidential debate..

President Joe Biden is in it to win it. And all of us said we pledged our support to him because the stakes could not be higher. We, like many americans, are — we’re worried. We’re worried because the threat of a Trump presidency is not theoretical for governors. We’ve served when Donald Trump was president and the threats to our nation were real. The Trump presidency was chaos, destruction. A Biden presidency was dealing with Covid, using the science, investing in infrastructure, and working to the middle class. We came in and we were honest about the feedback that we were getting. We were honest about the concerns that we were hearing from people. And we were also honest about the fact that as the president continued to tell us and show us that he was all in, that we said that we would stand with him because, as Governor Walz said, the president has always had our backs. We’re going to have his back as well. Do you think he’s fit for office. Yes, fit for office. The president has three and a half — three and a half years of delivering for us, going through what we’ve all been through. None of us are denying: Thursday night was a bad performance. It was a bad — it was a bad hit, if you will, on that. But it doesn’t impact what I believe he’s delivering.

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In public comments, many Democratic governors have said that they fully support Mr. Biden. Dan McKee of Rhode Island told a local news outlet on Wednesday that he was going to the meeting in person “to express support for the president.”

Wes Moore of Maryland, who was also attending in person, told CBS News on Sunday that he would not seek the nomination should Mr. Biden step aside. “Joe Biden is not going to take himself out of this race, nor should he,” he said.

Some have said that they saw the meeting as a chance for a frank discussion with Mr. Biden about his health. Mr. Beshear told CNN on Tuesday that the governors wanted to “make sure he’s doing OK.”

Josh Green of Hawaii, who was participating remotely, said in an interview on Wednesday that he would be listening for the president’s own thoughts about his capacity for a second term.

A physician who led Hawaii’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, Dr. Green said the president had been “on top of it” in their work together on the Maui wildfire. But he noted that both Mr. Biden and former President Donald J. Trump “are older and both are going to have challenges over the next four years.”

Reporting was contributed by Grace Ashford , Mike Baker , Katie Glueck , Jack Healy , Shawn Hubler , Ernesto Londoño , Eduardo Medina , Simon Romero , Jenna Russell and Mitch Smith .

Campbell Robertson reports on Delaware, the District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia, for The Times. More about Campbell Robertson

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  5. holiday homework done

COMMENTS

  1. Grammar: When to Use Do, Does, and Did

    Consider the following examples: We did our homework last night. She did her homework last night.. Auxiliary Verbs. Auxiliary, or helping verbs, are used with another base verb to create negative sentences, questions, or add emphasis.Here's how do should be used as an auxiliary verb:. 1. Negative Sentences. Following the same subject-verb pairings introduced above, we combine the ...

  2. Difference between past perfect and past simple with specified time

    I already did it last week. Neither sentence is particularly natural in BrE. Already tends to be used with a time period that extends up to a time referred to. The first is very unnatural. A: Do your homework before it gets too late. B I've already done it.. My mother told me (at some time in the past) to do my homework but I'd already done it.

  3. Past simple or past continuous?

    E.g.: I had finished my homework by 8 o'clock last night. Both sentences are syntactically incorrect, i.e. the word order is not respected. You have two options: 1) to use a comma for emphasis: At 8 o'clock last night, I was doing my homework; 2) to put the whole adverbial phrase after the object: I was doing my homework at 8 o'clock last night.

  4. Is Done or Has Been Done: Understanding When to Use Which

    Correct: I did my homework last night. When specifying a time frame, use the simple past passive form instead of the present perfect tense for accurate grammar usage. Let's dive deeper into the usage of "have done" and "has done" by examining examples involving everyday scenarios with the help of a table.

  5. What did you do last night? The Simple Past Tense in English

    The DJ was amazing last night. They had dinner and saw a movie last week. Bob and John got a new apartment last month. The family moved to Chicago in 2001. From 2004 to 2016 I lived in Los Angeles; Barack Obama was president of the US in 2011. My family had two dogs when I was a child. Before coming to Venice, we visited Rome.

  6. What did you (do) ______ last night?

    B. these ; that. C. this ; those. D. this ; that. How to use : Read the question carefully, then select one of the answers button. GrammarQuiz.Net - Improve your knowledge of English grammar, the best way to kill your free time. What did you (do) ______ last night? - I (do) ______ my homework. A. do/does B. do/do C. do/did D. did/did - Past ...

  7. I ___do my homework last night

    I ___do my homework last night. A. not could. B. didn´t can. C. couldn´t. D. can´t. Select your answer: Next Quiz >. Random Topics: Conditional Sentence Type 1 Too / Very / So Interrogative Pronoun Transitional Words Third Conditional Will and Will not Describing Words Present Continuos Tense Wish, Unless, If sentence.

  8. R3 Do And Did

    They do not do their homework at the library. They didn't do their homework last night. Their company doesn't do business in Minnesota. They never did business here. The past tense form of "do" is "did." Did + not = didn't. Examples: I didn't go to work yesterday. She didn't take the bus to work. Separating the contraction ...

  9. How to Do Homework: 15 Expert Tips and Tricks

    Here's how it works: first, set a timer for 25 minutes. This is going to be your work time. During this 25 minutes, all you can do is work on whatever homework assignment you have in front of you. No email, no text messaging, no phone calls—just homework. When that timer goes off, you get to take a 5 minute break.

  10. Past Continuous Quiz

    You can do this grammar quiz online or print it on paper. It tests what you learned on the Past Continuous page. 1. My brother and sister _____ playing tennis at 11am yesterday. 2. _____ you still working at 7pm last night? 3. At 8.30am today I _____ driving to work. 4. We _____ sleeping when the police came.

  11. present perfect

    It is true that. Time adjuncts like last week, two minutes ago, etc., which refer to times wholly before now, are incompatible with the present perfect. ( CGEL, p. 143). The reson is that. The present perfect involves reference to both past and present time: it is concerned with a time-span beginning in the past and extending up to now.

  12. Irregular Verbs

    Last night I in my bed for the first time (sleep) My friend me for many years when I him last week (not see, meet) The sun before I to bed (set, go) As soon as he had done his homework he out to play. (run) anyone? (your dog, ever, bite) Shakespeare a lot of plays and poems (write) Denise your uncle last Friday (meet).

  13. Which is correct: "Did I my homework last night?" or "Did I do my

    Did I do is most correct as it has correct grammar and such. English (US) French (France) German Italian Japanese Korean Polish Portuguese (Brazil) Portuguese (Portugal) Russian Simplified Chinese (China) Spanish (Mexico) Traditional Chinese (Taiwan) Turkish Vietnamese

  14. Simple Past and Past Continuous Exercise (4)

    Last night, while I was doing my homework, Angela (call) .She said she (call) me on her cell phone from her biology classroom at UCLA. I asked her if she (wait) for class, but she said that the professor was at the front of the hall lecturing while she (talk) to me. I couldn't believe she (make) a phone call during the lecture. I asked what was going on.

  15. How to Stay Up All Night Doing Homework

    Schedule in a ten minute break every two hours. Use this time to get up and walk around and give your brain a break. 5. Pump yourself up with a nap. If you're tired before starting your work, take a caffeine nap. Drink a cup of coffee, then immediately take a 20-minute nap.

  16. 3 Ways to Get Your Homework Done Fast

    Every 25 minutes or so, take about 5 minutes to stretch and walk around to give your brain and body a quick rest. [11] 2. Eat snacks and drink water. Drink plenty of water and eat light, healthy, tasty snacks while you work to enjoy foods that you like, enhance your memory, and revitalize your brain and body.

  17. I ________ my homework very quickly last night.

    View Solution. Q 5. Fill in the blank with the most suitable verb to complete the sentence: The professor often makes the student _____ a lot of homework. View Solution. Click here:point_up_2:to get an answer to your question :writing_hand:fill in the blank with the most suitable verbi my homework very quickly last night.

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    Tuesday night's winning numbers were 4, 8, 19, 31, 45, and the Mega Ball was 11. The Megaplier was 4X. The Megaplier was 4X. Did anyone win Mega Millions last night, Tuesday, July 2nd, 2024?

  20. Which is the right response for the question "Did you do your homework?"

    are correct and good responses to the question. It would be normal to reflect the form of the question, so if asked "Did you do your homework?" you would normally say "Yes, I did it." If asked "Have you done your homework?" (which means the same thing) you would answer "Yes, I have done it." "Yes I had done it" is pluperfect tense and incorrect ...

  21. Biden issues a warning about the power of the presidency

    The notably political speech comes at a critical moment for Biden's campaign as he tries to beat back persistent concerns about his age exacerbated by his performance in last week's ...

  22. Powerball drawing 6/26/24: Winning numbers, last night's ...

    The winning numbers for Wednesday night's drawing were 4, 9, 36, 47, 56, and the Powerball is 7. The Power Play was 5X. The Power Play was 5X. Did anyone win Powerball last night, Wednesday, June ...

  23. What did you (do) ______ last night?

    A. a gerund. B. an infinitive phrase. C. a prepositional phrase. D. an adverb. How to use : Read the question carefully, then select one of the answers button. About grammarquiz.net. GrammarQuiz.Net - Improve your knowledge of English grammar, the best way to kill your free time. What did you (do) ______ last night?

  24. If I ……………………..the homework last night, I…………………..bonus today. A. Had

    Other quiz: Conjunctions › View. We should wash fruit and vegetables _____ we eat or cook them. A. After. B. As soon as. C. Because. D. Before

  25. CNN's Daniel Dale fact checks Trump's and Biden's claims made in debate

    CNN's Daniel Dale fact checks the false claims made by former President Donald Trump and President Joe Biden during the CNN Presidential Debate.

  26. Powerball drawing 6/22/24: Winning numbers, last night's ...

    The winning numbers for Saturday night's drawing were 4, 5, 15, 32, 62, and the Powerball is 21. The Power Play was 2X. The Power Play was 2X. Did anyone win Powerball last night, Saturday, June ...

  27. Biden's mental fitness could have been better covered leading up to the

    President Joe Biden's White House repeatedly and aggressively shot down reports on the president's age and any possible limitations on his ability to perform all the duties of his office. But ...

  28. Powerball drawing 6/24/24: Winning numbers, last night's ...

    The winning numbers for Monday night's drawing were 5, 6, 36, 53, 69, and the Powerball is 8. The Power Play was 2X. The Power Play was 2X. Did anyone win Powerball last night, Monday, June 24th ...

  29. Inside Biden's Camp David Debate Prep

    Inside Biden's Camp David Debate Prep. President Biden's aides are working to position him as a campaign-season fighter who can counterpunch on the fly and combat voters' concerns about his age.

  30. All Democratic Governors Attend White House Meeting With Biden

    All of the country's Democratic governors were in attendance either virtually or in person at a meeting with President Biden on Wednesday night, the White House said, amid the ongoing political ...