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Game Board Book Report Project

Assembled Project Size:   Width = 15 inches   Height = 12 inches

Are you looking for a fun idea that requires students to design a game all about their books?

Your students will have fun playing their games together after they have finished these engaging projects!

You can read more detailed information about this resource by clicking ==>  HERE .

A Note About Your Purchase:  You will be emailed a download link for the resource(s) that you purchase so that you can download, save, print, and use the resource(s)  today!

A very DETAILED description about this resource set is provided below.

Game board book report project templates, what's included.

Game Board Book Report Projects: Do you want an fun and challenging book report project idea for your students that also involves them designing a game about their books?

These game board shaped graphic organizers will provide you with all of the teaching resources that you need for your students to create property names and trivia cards for a game based on their books.

This fun book report project will involve your students in creating 22 property names and 15 question and answer trivia cards . I have designed the templates for this project to be similar to the popular board game Monopoly.

The written responses that are required of students for this project will make them have to think about their characters and settings in a whole new way! When these unique book report projects are completed, your students can have fun playing each others' games before you display them on your classroom bulletin board.

Above:  Elementary Classroom Bulletin Board Display of Game Board Book Report Projects

This uniquely shaped book report project contains 4 worksheet templates that assemble into a game board. The finished game board project measures 15 inches in width and 12 inches in height. (see example below.)

Everything that you need to complete these game board book report projects is included in this set of teaching resources. All that you will need is scissors, glue, tape, and coloring pencils.

There are 20 printable worksheets and template pages in this set of reading resources, as well as a 5 page color bulletin board display banner.

These finished game board book report projects will make a colorful and dynamic bulletin board display of your students' work.

Traditionally, requiring students to write questions and answers about a story is a task most students find quite boring. By using this creative book report project idea that contains Monopoly style graphic organizers, your students will be anxious to roll the dice and play each others' fun game board book reports!

Note :  Due to spelling differences in English (Examples: color/colour and favorite/favourite), there are two separate sets of  worksheets and templates included in this set of teaching resources.

You can select the version ( U.S. or U.K. spelling rules) that contains the spelling that is used in the country where you live. 

The worksheets and templates that are shown on this page use  U.S. spelling rules .

Assembling Directions:

This set of teaching resources includes assembling directions on how to prepare and assemble this game board book report project.

Below is an example of the two assembling directions worksheets.

Grading Rubric:

A book report grading rubric is included in this set of teaching resources.

I believe that it is important for students to evaluate their own work, so my book report rubric contains an assessment section for both students and teachers .

When students evaluate their book report projects, they color in the faces on their grading rubric worksheets. When a teacher evaluates the projects, the teacher circles the small numbers inside each box on the printable worksheets.

Below is an example of my game board book report grading rubric.

First Draft Worksheets:

I believe that the writing process is important and that teachers should use process writing whenever possible.

For this reason, my students never begin their book report projects by writing on their final draft game board templates, instead they write on first draft worksheets.

Next, my students edit and revise their written work on their own, with a partner, or in individual writing conferences with me.

For this game board book report project students complete the following tasks:

  • Choose 22 property titles based on the settings and characters in the book
  • Write 15 questions
  • Write 15 answers to the questions

This set of teaching resources contains 3 printable worksheets for students to write their first drafts on.

First Draft Worksheet #1: Students write the title, author, and genre of the book.

Students choose 22 property titles based on the settings and characters in their books and write them in the boxes on the first draft worksheet.

First Draft Worksheets #2 and #3: Students write 15 questions and answers based on the characters and plot of their books.

Black and White Game Board Templates:

This book report project contains 4 templates that are cut out and glued together to form a game board that measures 15 inches in width and 12 inches in height.

Inside the two stars , students draw and color picture s of their favorite parts of the book.

Above: Game Board Black and White Templates  4 worksheets that are cut out and then glued together to form a game board.

This game board book report set includes 15 Trivia Cards.  Students write their questions on the front of the cards and their answers on the back of the cards .

Color Game Board Templates:

When I am first introducing my students to a new book report project, I believe that it is important for them to have a visual example of what a completed project looks like.

I always complete an example of this game board book report project before I introduce this assignment to my students. Before my students begin writing their first drafts, I show them my finished game board project. This visual example immediately grabs my students' attention and they are excited to start working on this project from the very beginning.

My students also enjoy hearing about the book that I chose to do my book report project on. This is also a wonderful opportunity to share a book that I would like to encourage my students to read.

To save you time in coloring your example that you show to your students, I have included color game board templates in this teaching resources set. I display my finished game board book report at the front of my classroom so that students can refer to it as they are completing their own projects.

Since this project is time consuming to complete a teacher example of, I have included a completed version of my example using the book Matilda by Roald Dahl.

Free 5 Page Bulletin Board Display Banner:

I know that it takes teachers a lot of time to design and assemble their classroom bulletin board displays.

Many teachers spend their valuable time cutting out large display letters or making a banner at home on their own computers.

In order to help save you time in assembling a bulletin board display featuring your students' game board projects, I have designed a 5 page banner that is included for free in this set of teaching resources.

If you have access to a laminating machine, I recommend that you laminate your banner so that it will be more durable and you can use it again in the future.

Above: Game Board Bulletin Board Banner  5 printable worksheets that are glued together to form a long bulletin board display banner.

Free bulletin board display accent pieces:.

You will be able to design a colorful and dynamic classroom bulletin board display using your students' finished game board book report projects.

These game board graphic organizers are a unique and fun way to get your students excited about completing a writing assignment about the books that they have read. Your students will enjoy thinking up unique property titles for their games, as well as writing challenging questions about their books.

My students have enjoyed playing each others' games when they have finished these game board projects.

We keep these finished game boards in the classroom all year long. When students finish reading a book that another student has designed a game for, they can play the game that was created for that specific book.

This is a great activity for students to do when they have finished their work early, and it doesn't involve you creating a game for each novel. I hope that your students enjoy creating and playing these game board book report projects!

Above:  Example of a student's finished book report project for  The Bridge to Teribithia by Katherine Paterson. 

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1.  Reading

  • Book Report Projects   - Make Reading Fun With These Unique Templates!
  • Projects For Favorite Books  - EXTRA LARGE Group & Student Projects For Novels and Read Aloud Books
  • Value Pack   - 27 Book Report Projects
  • Free Sight Word Flashcards   -   Fry   -   Dolch
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  • Reading Overview  -  Book Report Tips

2.  Writing

  • Fun Creative Writing Templates
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Engage Your Students in Fun Reading Activities This Year More Than 25 Creative Book Report Projects to Choose From!

  • VIEW ALL BOOK REPORT PROJECTS
  • Cheeseburger  -   Wanted Poster
  • Rocket  -   Monopoly Gameboard
  • Dive Into Reading Fish  - Sandwich
  • Castle - Main Character Body

Extra Large Group Projects For Favorite Novels and Read Aloud Books

  • VIEW ALL BOOK TITLES
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory  by Roald Dahl
  • The Enormous Crocodile  by Roald Dahl
  • The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
  • How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss
  • Shiloh  by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

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how to make a game for book report

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12 creative book report ideas your students will love

12 Creative Book Report Projects Your Students Will Love

Whether you’re teaching a whole-class novel, or finishing a round of independent reading or literature circles, post-reading assessments are always more engaging when they’re more than just a test or essay.

Below, you’ll discover a dozen fun book report ideas for your middle or high school ELA students, curated by a team of experienced English teachers.

Choose your favorite projects to offer to students as options on a book report project choice board.

how to make a game for book report

Create a Board Game

When I gave “create a board game about the book you read” as a book report option for my students, I was pleasantly surprised at the results! Quite a few students excitedly chose this option and created some really fun-looking games centered on their books. 

This is a great project choice if you’re looking for something that students can’t create by just Googling the book.

Here are some tips and suggestions for assigning a board game book report:

  • Give clear parameters and requirements to keep students on track, such as requiring game elements to represent certain literary elements of the book they read.
  • Provide suggestions for game components and materials – encourage students to consider the game play and elements of their favorite board games and to use materials they already have at home to create them.
  • For a whole-class novel study, consider allowing students to work in teams to create the novel-based board games, then setting aside a class period for students to play each others’ games and see who wins!

If you’re looking to save time… clear directions handouts, lots of suggestions, and a handy grading rubric for a board game post-reading assessment are all included in this resource . Take a look! 

For more independent reading response ideas, check out this post with ideas for fun post-reading projects.

how to make a game for book report

Create a Journey Box

Engaging students in authentic conversations about books is a passion for Carolyn of Middle School Café .  In traditional oral book reports, students simply get up in front of the class and read a summary of the book they read.  Carolyn found this method of oral book reports painful for both her and her students.

Wanting to find a way to help her students talk about their book and keep her class engaged, Carolyn began incorporating Journey Box Book Reports.  A journey box is a shoebox (or bag) that contains artifacts from the story that help the reader share important events from the story. 

Students predetermine what events of the story are most important to share, then they create an artifact to share with the class or small group as they explain the plot.  As an example, Carolyn had a student who read The Diary of Anne Frank.   He created a small 3D tree that he displayed on the desk as he shared about how Anne looked out the window and dreamed of her former life.  It’s a small piece of the story that helps the student explain the plot point and gives the audience something visual to look at and stay engaged. 

Journey Box Book Reports have been successful for Carolyn in both her middle school and high school classrooms.  She does suggest, if using Journey Boxes in older grades, to have students share their stories in small groups.  

how to make a game for book report

Create a Literary Food Truck

If there’s one thing kids love, it’s food – especially high schoolers – and with this in mind, one of Simply Ana P’s favorite ways to recap a class novel or an independent reading unit is with Literary Food Trucks. This is definitely not a new idea, but it’s one that will have you coming back for seconds 🙂 

Ana first tried this project at the end of The Odyssey , where students were able to decide which book(s) they wanted to make the focus of their trucks. The main requirement was that every single choice made had to be intentional and clearly relevant. With this in mind, students could start the planning process. 

You can make the truck’s requirements as simple or as detailed as you prefer, but Ana recommends having students plan: 

  • Truck name, design, and branding colors
  • Menu design and items (5 items minimum)
  • Employee uniforms
  • Merch 

Ana includes a writing component by having her students defend all of their selections in the form of a proposal. This is later used in their presentations, and the better (more intentional) their proposal is, the more likely they will win the class vote. This proposal can be anywhere from a few paragraphs to a few pages, depending on what writing goals you have for them, and should definitely include text evidence. 

Part of the beauty of this type of project is that it can be done digital or paper-based. Ana likes to walk her students through a Canva tutorial, where there are even menu templates that students can use so they don’t feel overwhelmed starting from scratch. Or, for more creative students, they can create their trucks on chart paper, poster board, or even 3D dioramas.  After students finish making their food trucks, it’s always fun to take a day for the in-class Food Festival, where students are invited to bring in items from their menus or simply some type of snacks. Some students get super hype about this day and even make/wear aprons or themed employee uniforms. Students are able to walk around, visiting each of their trucks, and casting their votes for Best Food, Most Relevant, and Most Detailed. Have fun and bon appetit !

how to make a game for book report

Create a Mood Board

It can be hard to come up with creative post-reading assessments for your students when they’re done with a full class novel, literature circles, or a choice reading unit. In an attempt to combine 21 st century skills with literary analysis, Samantha from Samantha in Secondary decided to try something a little different. Enter: The Mood Board.

A mood board combines images to elicit a feeling from a viewer much like a writer does with words. The possibilities for using a mood board with your class are endless. Students can create a mood board for an overall book, a character, an event, a theme, a poem, etc. Then, have your students carefully curate a board that is aesthetically pleasing and considers color, space, and design in the execution. As students explain why they’ve made the choices they have, the upper-level thinking comes naturally.

Canva is an excellent tool to use to create your mood boards. Having students interact with software they may be unfamiliar with is a meaningful learning experience in and of itself. If you want to learn more about how to use mood boards in your own classroom, click here to read Samantha’s blog post about it or check out the resource she created that includes done-for-you student instructions, examples, and a rubric here .

how to make a game for book report

Create a New App

How would a character’s life change if there was just the perfect app to solve their conflict??

This is the question Krista from @whimsyandrigor poses to her students as they finish a novel and begin to reflect on the character’s journey. Students begin by discussing all of the details surrounding the protagonist and what they experienced. In small groups and in whole-class discussions, students discuss the conflicts, both internal and external, and then brainstorm all of the realistic and not-so-realistic ways the character could have addressed their problems.

Once students have generated a healthy list of ideas, Krista tells them they get to become an app developer and they must create an app that would greatly benefit a character from their reading.

The requirements are:

  • The app cannot already exist.
  • The app can be totally unrealistic/not probable.
  • The app developer must be able to explain how its features would benefit the character.
  • The developer must also create an icon for the App Store.

Here is a print-and-go handout students use to get designing. 

Here are some example apps students could create: to help Will from Jason Reynolds’s Long Way Down , maybe an app that predicts his future would help him decide what to do once he steps off the elevator. Or maybe Romeo from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet would have benefited from a life-detection app that would accurately determine whether or not someone was actually dead.

When students sette on the conflict they want to address and the app that would help, they write a Spill the TEA paragraph, as explained by Krista in this YouTube video .  Using this paragraph organization strategy, students will introduce their app, use evidence to explain how it is necessary for the character, and explain how the app would have benefited or changed the protagonist’s journey.

Now they get to be a graphic designer as they design the app’s icon. Students may want to peruse the actual App Store to get ideas about how an icon is designed, what elements must be present, and how to create something that is eye-catching.

If space allows, Krista encourages you to display the icons and Spill the TEA paragraphs in the hallway for other students to see the in-depth critical thinking and character analysis your students did after finishing a novel. 

Who says technology is only a distraction for our students?! This activity proves technology can help students dive deep into a text and its characters!

how to make a game for book report

Write a Vignette

Lesa from SmithTeaches9to12 often focuses on character-based activities for novel studies including a character profile activity , character conversations through text messages , or the writing of a good vignette. 

Vignettes can be a great way to assess students’ literary analysis skills and understanding of the text. Students write a short piece of about 500 words that is descriptive of a particular moment in time focusing on one of the book’s characters. These moments could be placing the character in a new setting, writing about a particular moment in the story that was less developed, or even extending to a moment beyond the book’s conclusion. Lesa provides students with some mentor texts, including “My Name” by Sandra Cisneros in The House on Mango Street or “The Prisoner Van” by Charles Dickens in Sketches by Boz or even one from a novel being read in class. Review the stories for structure, language choice, sentence structure, use of figurative language, and so on. This helps to co-create the criteria for the assignment. Then students write their own vignette. Build in some peer review as an accountability piece and voila!

how to make a game for book report

Create a Character Collage

It’s safe to say that most English teachers have a bin of cut-up magazines somewhere in their classrooms. While these tattered copies of People and Us Weekly have definitely seen better days, they live on in the many collage creations of our students.

Katie from Mochas and Markbooks loves to use collages as visual representations of comprehension. After reading a novel or short story, creating a character collage to show how a character has evolved from beginning to end requires students to use higher order thinking skills to analyze, synthesize and demonstrate their understanding of characterization by dividing their page in half and choosing words and images to represent the character at the start and conclusion of the story on each side.

The results will show the depth of your students’ interpretation of character as well as their ability to use critical and creative thinking skills to represent their knowledge.

Other ways to use this idea instead of showing character evolution are to show two different sides to a character, for example, who they are with different people in their lives. 

If you are looking for other ways to incorporate collage and magazines into your post-reading assessments, check out this blog post for more ideas!

how to make a game for book report

Design Shoe Charms

Crocs are not Olivia ’s shoe of choice, but when she noticed her students bedazzling their plastic footwear with shoe charms, it was a learning opportunity she just couldn’t pass up. Here’s how to make it work in your classroom:

First, have your students choose a character from the book they have finished reading. Then encourage them to find quotes from the book that reveal the character’s interests, values, or personality. Once they have found their quotes (she has her students find 4), tell them to design and color shoe charms that represent those interests, values, or personality traits. This helps students with inferencing, textual evidence, and even symbolism!

When your students have finished making their shoe charms, they can either tape the charms to their shoes for a fabulous, foot-themed fashion show, or they can glue them to a picture of a Croc for quirky classroom décor. Check out this Instagram post to see the charms Olivia’s students came up with!

how to make a game for book report

Create a Movie Poster

When was the last time you went to the movies? Did you notice the posters along the way? If yes then you have walked down the movie studio promotional lane. Like trailers, studios create movie posters to grab the attention of movie-goers before they even enter the theater. Yes, you may have already purchased your movie ticket, but those posters were created for the future. After you finish watching Sonic 2 , what movie will you see next? You probably already pointed to that poster on the way into the theater and said, “That looks like it is going to be good. I want to see that!”   As a post reading idea, Sharena from The Humble Bird Teacher has her students create movie posters based on the text read in class. This allows her to complete a formative assessment on what the students learned from the text. Before having her class create a movie poster, she shows them examples of posters from different genres such as drama, action, family-friendly, and comedy. Then she hands out a piece of construction paper and goes over the basic requirements. On the movie poster, the students are required to have their actors names or image (characters), the title of the movie, a visual (setting or symbol from the story), and a tagline, and a short two to three sentence summary of the movie. Once her students are finished with the assignment, she displays them outside the classroom, so the students can have their own movie studio promotional lane.  If you are looking for more after reading ideas, click here .

how to make a game for book report

Try Novel Engineering

Whether you’ve been hoping to collaborate with another department, or just really want to try something new, Novel Engineering is an amazing way to get students thinking outside of the box ! Staci from Donut Lovin’ Teacher has found that Novel Engineering requires students to actively comprehend and interact with a novel and get creative about how to help improve the lives of characters! Basically, students work to create a product that will help solve a character’s problem. Here’s how it works…

Before reading : Choose a narrative text where the character faces tangible conflicts. Model and practice the design process in small ways. Try using picture books like Mucha! Muncha! Mucha! in order for students to see and practice what they’ll be doing with a text at grade-level.

While reading : Emphasize the conflicts characters face and give students time to brainstorm possible products that would help solve said problem. Make sure students record evidence from the text so they can later justify the need for the product they design.

After reading : Give students time to draft, craft, and improve their designs that will help solve a problem faced by a character. You can give students options where they draw their creation, make their creation, or even plan a digital app like this, depending on time and resources. Whatever you choose, students will be sure to be pushed to use some skills they may not always practice in an ELA classroom!

Staci has some FREE Novel Engineering Digital Planning Pages or you can read more about her experience with novel engineering on the Donut Lovin’ Teacher blog .

how to make a game for book report

Create a Tik Tok Video

How many times have you passed a group of students filming a TikTok in a hallway? Have you had students ask to film in your class once they finish assignments? You are not alone. Students love TikTok and Yaddy from Yaddy’s Room has figured out how to get students using TikTok for academic purposes!

Yaddy likes to challenge students to create TikTok videos that track a character’s development, encapsulates the main theme of the story, or that exemplifies a key conflict. These easy, low stress videos are great at getting even reluctant students to participate.

To incorporate TikTok videos as a means of assessing students after a novel or story, try the following steps:

1)      Get students to brainstorm which part of the novel they would like to use for their video.

2)      Ask students to start combing TikTok for an audio that fits with the portion of the text they chose

3)      Ask them to plan out how they will realize their vision

4)      Rehearse and film!

5)      Bonus: ask students to upload their videos to Google Drive and share the link with you so that you can make QR codes to post around your classroom!

Want to get started using TikTok videos for book reports? Check on Yaddy’s free planning sheet here !

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FREE Board Game Templates for Book Report and Math Activities

This post may contain affiliate links, view our disclosure policy for details.

This post is brought to you in partnership with Advancement Courses.

Spring break and summer are quickly approaching, and that means you might be running out of ideas to keep your students engaged.

Below, I’ve created several free board game book report templates that you can turn into math activities, plus a bonus free printable book report overview template!

blank game board book report templates for math

Blank templates are a great starting point and give students an advantage while allowing them to be creative in their own designs. I have seven single-page board game templates plus one giant board (four pages put together) that you can print as needed. Some are colorful, some are black and white, but all are blank and ready for your creative design!

I recommend printing your game board(s) on card stock and laminating them to make sure they last as long as possible. Read a book as a class, have each student or group of students create a game board that pairs with locations and characters in the book, then let the games begin!

How Do I Use the Free Blank Game Board Templates?

Simply print one or all the game board templates for your students’ book reports, and let the students choose which game board they want to design on! Make sure they include in their game board design:

  •  Locations
  • Transportation
  • Monetary Amounts or Relevant Numbers
  • Students’ Names

PRINT HERE –> Game Board Templates PDF

Or via google drive here: blank game board templates pdf.

NOTE – I have found that many school districts black external Google Drive files.

Types of Math Games to Use with Game Board Templates:

Strategy games, adding / subtracting games, multiplication games, money games, fraction / decimal games, ideas on how to create math activities from children’s books:.

There are many ways to create math games from children’s books. Students can choose to utilize one portion of the book and turn it into a game. For example, if the main character goes to the grocery store for his mother, students can choose to create a grocery-themed game.

Or they can turn the entire plot into a creative game. If the book follows an adventurous journey, the creative game can feature locations on the journey with the goal of reaching the final destination from the book.

Free BONUS Printable Book Report:

My Favorite Book Printable Activity page

If you need a shorter “book report” worksheet-style template, then this “My Favorite Book” worksheet is just what you need! It’s perfect for any age from kindergarten through 5th grade. Students fill in each of the blanks on one side, and then draw and color a scene from the book on the blank side of the “book”!

These make great classroom assignments to line on your door, art wall or school hallway!

PRINT HERE: My Favorite Book Worksheet

I found my inspiration for the math activity game boards from a professional development course I was introduced to recently, Teaching Math with Children’s Literature from Advancement Courses. Advancement Courses has over 200 graduate-level professional development courses in 19 different subject areas (K-12), and many of them are pre-approved depending on your state and district.

How handy! Courses cover both traditional academic topics as well as emerging trends and even teacher wellness. They even offer group discounts! Plus, you can save 20% off any course right now when you use the code SALARY20 at checkout.

Advancement courses for teachers

Their website is super easy to navigate and find the perfect course for you. You can narrow down your search by location, subject, grade level and Common Core. You can even filter by popular courses to see what other teachers are taking!

I absolutely love cross-over topics in education where one lesson can cover two areas of learning, and Advancement Courses has many courses that fit the bill, including the Teaching Math with Children’s Literature course that was my inspiration for these activities. Two other courses that caught my eye were Reaching and Teaching Gifted Students in the Regular Classroom and Motivating Unmotivated Students (Research and Practice) .

All of the courses through Advancement Courses are online and self-paced so you can take up to 6 months to effectively complete your coursework. I love this because I enjoy taking the time to process and research ideas as I am working through a course. You can see all the professional development course options here .

More About Advancement Course Credits:

Advancement Courses offers over 200 online courses available for graduate credit through CAEP and regionally accredited university partners or for continuing education units (CEUs) that meet state requirements. Choose whether you need Graduate Credit or Continuing Education credit. Once your course is completed, you’ll receive a transcript or certificate of completion. Find out how you can save 20% off any course using the code SALARY20 at checkout!

Check out all of the available Continuing Education Courses for Teachers here! 

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10 creative ideas for homeschool book reports

by Kim Kautzer | May 10, 2021 | Books and Reading

Do your kids roll their eyes at the thought of having to write another boring book report? If so, they’ll jump for joy at the chance to try these creative ideas for book reports in your homeschool. There’s something for everyone, including your:

  • Letter writer
  • Game creator
  • Imaginative child

So ditch the traditional book report! Instead of squashing your children’s love of books, invite them to extend the reading experience by wrapping it up with a delightful book-themed activity.

Which one will they choose first?

1. Design a Game

Make a game based a book you recently read. It can be a board game, card game, guessing game, or other idea. Write step-by-step directions and rules that are easy to follow. Gather any extra supplies needed to play the game, and then try it out with a friend or family member.

2. Plan a Birthday Gift 

Imagine that you’ve been invited to a birthday party for one of the book’s characters, and you want to bring  the perfect gift ! Consider the character’s personality, likes, and dislikes before deciding on a gift he or she would really love and use. Create a greeting card to go along with your gift. In the greeting, explain to your friend from the book why you chose this gift.

3. Walk in a Character’s Shoes

In a good novel, the main character must make some hard choices. Think about a book you read recently. Write 5-10 questions that will give this character a chance to talk about the choices they faced. Then, answer the questions as if you were the character . As you write your answers, talk about the events, thoughts, and feelings that surrounded your choices and discuss the impact of your decision(s).

Kids will jump for joy at the chance to try these ideas for creative book reports, which feature crafts, mapmaking, lists, letter-writing, and so much more!

4. Prepare a Lesson

Do you love history? Nature? Boating? Knitting? Basketball? Read a nonfiction book about a topic that interests you. Now, pretend that you get to be the teacher and  create a lesson that will teach something you learned from the book. Your lesson can explain a concept or idea, teach some facts, or explain how to do something. Write the information in a logical order. Finally, present your lesson to a sibling, friend, or parent.

5. Create a Brochure

Does your novel take place in a different city, state, country, or planet? Think about the sites in the story that would be educational, fun, or exciting to visit. Whether the story setting is real or imaginary, design a travel brochure to entice visitors. Include maps, drawings, photos, text, bulleted lists, and attention-grabbing section titles. For content ideas, try this list of Things to Include in a Travel Brochure . It may also be helpful to look at some real travel brochures.

6. List Character Traits

What makes a book’s protagonist, or hero, likeable? What makes the antagonist, or “bad guy,” unlikeable? Write down the names of four or more characters from your book and list each one’s traits . (Remember that likeable characters can sometimes be jealous, angry, or selfish. Likewise, “bad guys” can sometimes demonstrate positive character qualities.)

7. Jump into a Book!

Pretend you’re going to join the characters in your book for a week. Make a list of all the things you’ll need to pack . Plan carefully, because you won’t be able to go home for (or buy) anything you forgot!

8. Make a Diorama

Creative ideas for book reports include projects like dioramas, which are short on writing and long on fun.

A diorama is a miniature 3-dimensional scene that recreates a setting . It can feature models of buildings, plants, animals, or people set against a background. A diorama can use photos and paper, or it can include 3-dimensional materials such as Styrofoam, plastic figurines, or natural items such as twigs, shells, or pebbles.

Make a diorama in a shoebox to represent a scene or main event from your book. Then write a vivid description of the scene OR explain what happened at this scene during one of the main events of the book.

9. Write to the Author

Write a letter to the author of a book you recently read.

  • Mention this book, plus any others that you have read by this author.
  • Tell the author three things about the book you just read (something you did or didn’t like; your opinions about the characters, setting, and plot; why you did or didn’t like the way the story ended; an idea for a sequel; etc.)
  • Ask the author 2-3 questions. These can either be personal questions (favorite childhood memory, number of brothers or sisters, favorite book, favorite place to visit) or they can be about the process of writing this book.

10. Make a Timeline and Map

After reading a biography or historical-fiction novel , make a timeline to show the main events of the story. Use drawings, clipart, or magazine cutouts to illustrate events along the timeline. Then draw a map showing the location(s) where the story took place.

Writing About Books: Book Reports and Beyond

Looking for more ways to engage your kids with books?  Writing About Books: Book Reports and Beyond  offers loads of ideas that  get kids talking and writing about the books they’re reading , from the earliest picture books to high-school level novels. It also includes printable reading logs for all ages, book-themed journal prompts, and loads of additional creative ideas for book reports. Sprinkle them into your weekly reading and writing lessons and watch your children make more  meaningful connections with the books they read .

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Creating Board Games Based on Children’s Literature

by susantara | Apr 23, 2015 | Creativity , Teach Our Children Well | 0 comments

Creating Board Games Based on Children’s Literature

One of my favorite aspects of teaching is sharing quality literature with children – which is rooted in positive, engaging experiences I had reading and discussing books with my own children. When my daughter and son were in elementary school, they rarely were seen without books in their hands. They toted them around wherever they went. When my son was five, he began creating movie posters and sequels based on favorite books. It was something he loved to do! Some of my favorite family memories revolved around J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter book series. My daughter began reading the series  when she was in third grade and introduced us to the first movie, which got us hooked. From then on, we spent summers anticipating the release of a new book or movie in the series. We completed the series through a combination of reading aloud and listening to audiobooks together.

Following the release of the fifth book, we created a Harry Potter Monopoly board game as a family project just for fun. But it could have been a great school project, as well. Creating a literature-based board game is a creative alternative to the standard book report. Comprehension can be demonstrated through the creation of questions written on cards, directions located on the board, and/or illustrations. For example, cards and game spaces could reference positive events that move a player forward and negative events that set a player back. Creating a board game also can be a means of reinforcing lessons in social studies, science, and math, and integrating technology. It even could be an alternative form of autobiography. The level of technology used in creating a board game can be varied according to factors such as student capabilities and home or classroom resources.

The rather involved and high-tech process of creating our Harry Potter game touched upon numerous learning standards for English Language Arts (ELA); Math, Science, and Technology; and the Arts. This post will describe in detail instructions for creating board games from books. It also will describe the specific procedures involved in designing our Harry Potter Monopoly game.

Choosing a Theme and Format

  • Store-bought board games

After reading the book, the first step in creating your own game is to choose a theme. The rich details in the Harry Potter series offer endless possibilities. However, virtually any book or series that appeals to a child could be incorporated into a game. For example, picture books written by Eric Carle or Jan Brett are well suited to the basic Candyland format.

It goes without saying that there are many different kinds of board games. The next step is to examine a number of pre-existing games. Consider theme, rules, design, and whether they are based on skill, chance, cooperation, or a combination. After comparing and contrasting a few different games, you can begin thinking about what kind of game you would like to create. We chose to create a Monopoly game, which is a fairly complicated undertaking. However, simpler formats could be based on examples such as Candyland, Slides and Ladders, Trivial Pursuit, or Sorry.

Designing the Layout

Materials: 

  • Paper (larger is better)
  • Pencils, pens, makers, and/or crayons

After selecting a format and a theme, it’s time to design the board by sketching a rough version on a piece of paper. For example, you could create a meandering design like Candyland or a grid of squares like Chutes and Ladders.

Game templates (click to view and/or download)

This step might involve some mathematical computations, in order to create evenly sized spaces or determine how many spaces can fit. Now is not the time to make a final version of your game board. It is best to wait until the rest of the materials have been created so you can test it out to see if it really works.

We examined our store-bought Monopoly game and plotted the individual spaces on our Harry Potter board by identifying significant locations and innovations mentioned in the books. After reading the fifth book in the series, we decided on the following color-coded spaces:

Purple: Wizard Chess, Quidditch

Light blue: Privet Drive, The Burrow, Grimmauld Place

Magenta: Platform 9 ¾, The Leaky Cauldron (pub/bed and breakfast), Eeylops Owl Emporium

Orange: Flourish & Blotts (bookstore), Madam Malkins’ Robes for All Occasions, Ollivander’s (wand shop)

Red: The Three Broomsticks (pub), Zonko’s Joke Shop (had we made the game after reading subsequent books, this would have been Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes) , Honeydukes (sweets shop)

Yellow: The Infirmary, The Library, Slytherin House

Green: Hufflepuff House, Ravenclaw House, Gryffindor House

Dark blue: Dumbledore’s Study, Ministry of Magic

There also were four spaces related to transportation (Hogwarts Express, The Knight Bus, Portkey, and Floo Powder) and two related to magical inventions (Invisibility Cloak and Time Turner). There were two special spaces: Snape’s Dungeon (lose a turn) and Lab Fee (make a payment). There were three Trivia Challenge spaces and three Chance spaces. When a player lands on these spaces, he or she chooses either a Trivia Challenge or Chance card (described below). The four corner spaces were: “Go” (collect money), Azkaban (jail), Free Parking, and “Go to Azkaban.”

Creating Cards

Materials:     

  • White cardstock or blank, unlined index cards
  • Scissors and/or a paper cutter
  • Stamps, stickers, pens, colored pencils, or crayons (low tech version)
  • Ink jet printer, page layout or drawing program, Internet access, browser, and clip art (high tech version)

Cards are an optional but effective means to demonstrate comprehension and incorporate the book’s events into the game. Blank index cards work well. They can be used whole or cut in half. First, write questions or statements on the front of the card. You could include positive events that move a player forward and negative events that set a player back. Then decorate the back with stamps, stickers, simple drawings that are easily reproduced, or even digital images.

If you decide not to use cards, directions and/or illustrations on the game board can serve the same purpose. For example, you could write directions on individual spaces that reflect events in the book. One (Winnie-the-Pooh related) example could be: “Tigger is stuck in a tree; go back three spaces.”

Here is an example of a Simple Board Game Template.

Our Harry Potter Monopoly game required two sets of cards. First, we created “Trivia Challenge” cards. For these, we came up with multiple-choice format questions about characters, places, and events in the books. This activity was rather time-consuming; we ended up with 250 cards and could have kept going! We started by writing the questions on index cards but then decided to give them a more “professional” appearance by putting them into a desktop publishing program, with 15 cards per sheet. (Correct answers were indicated in purple ink.) After formatting all of our comprehension questions, I searched for and then downloaded a whimsical PDF image of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. I used the image to create a design to be printed on the back of the cards. Finally, I printed the cards on cardstock, front and back, and we cut them to size.

HP Trivia cards

After completing the set of Trivia Challenge cards, we made “Chance” cards with Harry Potter scenarios and consequences that involved going to a certain space on the board or paying or receiving money. This was fun for everyone. A couple examples we came up with were: “You came out in the wrong fireplace; go back 3 spaces” and, “Snape caught you wandering the corridor at night; advance to Snape’s Dungeon (but don’t collect any money for passing ‘Go’).” After creating about 50 of these cards, I designed a back, printed the cards on cardstock, and then we cut them out.

HP chance cards

Creating Game Pieces

Materials (choose one of the following):

  • Flattened marbles (in different colors)
  • Small, polished stones with or without stickers
  • Light cardboard (cereal box weight) and pens and/or pictures and glue
  • Small, dull stones, Mod Podge, glitter, a small paintbrush, and small photos or other images
  • Any other small objects

Almost any small objects can be used for game pieces. The most important considerations are that they can fit on the board spaces and be easily distinguished from one another. You can make a simple game piece by putting a sticker onto a smooth stone. Or you could make a simple cardboard game piece by drawing a picture or design on a small piece of light cardboard. (Alternatively, you could glue a picture or photo onto the cardboard.) Cut out the game piece. Next, cut a ½” rectangle from the same kind of cardboard. Cut a slit in the middle of the rectangle, going halfway through. Also cut a slit of the same length in the bottom of the playing piece, and fit the two pieces together to create a standing figure. Or simply save game pieces from commercial games.

We made magical game pieces out of small, smooth stones. First, I downloaded and printed images of several of the most prominent Hogwarts students onto plain white paper. For a low-tech alternative, children could draw and label their own characters on paper, cut out Harry Potter character images from print ads, or use stickers. We carefully cut around the images and then decoupaged the images onto the stones using Mod Podge mixed with a bit of fine glitter. We applied three coats of the Mod Podge and allowed the stones to dry between coats. Once the final coat dried, we had magically sparkling, beautiful, and durable game pieces.

HP game pieces

Printing Currency (for Harry Potter Monopoly)

  • White cardstock
  • Internet access
  • Ink jet printer

We decided that our Harry Potter Monopoly game could be played either with regular Monopoly money or wizard money. Conveniently, the Harry Potter section of the Activity Village Web site ( http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/harry_potter_coins.htm ) contained free downloads of galleons, sickles, and knuts. I printed out several sheets of all three kinds of wizard currency, on white cardstock. Then we cut out the coins. We had to make lots of them! It became clear that players could accumulate ridiculous amounts of galleons (the largest coin) during the game, so we decided to use regular Monopoly $50, $100, and $500 bills to represent 50, 100, and 500 galleons , respectively.

HP money

Creating Mortgage Cards (for Monopoly)

  • Page layout or drawing program
  • Colored pencils or crayons

To make mortgage cards, I returned to the file in which I created board spaces. I enlarged the spaces, eliminated the images, and listed the rental amounts. There is actually a “dollars to galleons” converter on my favorite  Harry Potter website , and I determined rental amounts by using the regular Monopoly properties as a guide. We decided to include both dollar and wizard currency amounts on the mortgage cards. This fairly time-consuming step was one I did on my own. After printing the mortgage cards, we colored them in manually with colored pencils because we liked the effect.

DSCF4878

Testing the Game

Before making the final version, it is highly recommended that you test the game by playing it a few times. That way, you can discover what elements need to be changed, eliminated, or added in order to make it work better. Refrain from making the final version until you have it just how you want it.

Before testing the game, it’s good to talk about how to help the creator(s) of the game by providing kind and constructive criticism. For example, you could establish a rule that before someone suggests an improvement, he or she must say one good thing about the game. Suggestions must be useful and neither critical nor hurtful. In the end, the creator(s) of the game has the final say.

When we tested our Harry Potter game, we found it cumbersome to work with a large amount of galleons, so we decided to also use regular Monopoly $10 and $20 bills to represent 10 and 20 galleons. We also realized that, depending on the age, math ability, and attention level of the players, using three types of wizard coins might slow down the game too much. Therefore, we added an option to use only galleons (the coin with the highest value). If players decide to use only galleons, they would also determine whether or not to round sickles to the nearest galleon. For example, if there are 17 sickles in a galleon and the cost of a given property is 20 galleons, 12 sickles, and 18 knuts, players could decide to simply consider the price to be 20 galleons, or to go an extra step and round the number of sickles up or down to the nearest galleon. In this case, 12 sickles would be rounded up, making the price 21 galleons.

We also realized that we needed to spell out on an instruction sheet the number of knuts in a sickle and the number of sickles in a galleon. In addition, we had to determine a realistic reward for answering a Trivia Challenge question correctly. Finally, we found it necessary to designate in writing the number of coins and bills players would receive at the beginning of the game.

 Constructing the Game Board

Recommended materials:

  • Corrugated cardboard, illustration board, a cereal box (unfolded and trimmed), or an old, unwanted game board
  • Poster paper or tag board
  • Elmer’s glue and paintbrush
  • Permanent markers (Sharpies work well)

Optional materials:

  • Double-sided tape or spray adhesive
  • Wrapping paper, mulberry paper, etc.
  • Clear contact paper
  • Waxed paper
  • Magazine photos
  • Colored paper
  • Aluminum foil

You can be as creative as you want with this step—though simpler tends to be better. In general, games are easier to play when the board is less cluttered. Begin by sketching the design using a pencil and a ruler. You could draw directly on cardboard, draw on poster paper and then glue the paper to the board, and/or cover the board by gluing wrapping paper or mulberry paper all around it. You could paint the board; glue on felt shapes, colored paper, or foil; draw on the board with permanent markers; create a collage out of magazine or book illustrations; or create designs, logos, etc. using a computer. To better preserve the board, consider laminating it with clear contact paper. (If you are drawing on poster paper that will be glued to the board, laminate the poster paper prior to gluing.) Make sure that the spaces are large enough for the game pieces to fit on them. We found that cutting the board in half is an easier alternative to creating a board that folds. If you use glue, you can prevent warping by wrapping the board(s) in waxed paper and pressing them overnight (or longer) under a stack of heavy books.

To make our Harry Potter game, I formatted the spaces in Quark Xpress (desktop publishing software), using the regular Monopoly board as a guide. This was the most time-consuming step. It involved searching the Internet for free and appropriate clip art to download. (Alternatively, children’s drawings could be used.) Images for the board spaces were comprised of: chapter illustrations from the books, stills from the Harry Potter movies, and general clip art found on teacher Web sites.

After selecting images for all of the spaces, I converted U.S. dollars to wizard currency with the help of The Harry Potter Lexicon Wizarding World Currency Converter . At the bottom of each of the spaces, I listed a price for that “property” both in wizard money and dollars to give players some flexibility about which kind of currency they want to use in any given game. After listing all of the prices (using the regular Monopoly board as a guide), the game spaces were ready to be printed onto cardstock and cut to size. We printed the game pieces with the colors at the top of the spaces already filled in and decided we didn’t like the way they looked. So we printed the game pieces a second time, leaving the color rectangles empty, and then colored them in ourselves with colored pencils. We all agreed that the colored pencil effect looked much better.

To assemble the game board, we lined up all of the spaces on a large piece of illustration board to make sure everything fit together all right. I cut the board in half (for more convenient storage) and used Elmer’s glue to cover each half with dark green mulberry paper embellished with gold threads. Next, we glued decorations to the center of the board (spaces for the Trivia and Chance cards, game logo, the Hogwarts shield, an illustration of Harry, and gold stars). Then I carefully arranged the game spaces onto clear contact paper (with the front of the game spaces against the sticky side of the contact paper), put glue on the back of the game spaces, attached the contact paper to the game board (making sure that the spaces lined up precisely), smoothed the contact paper down, and trimmed the edges. To prevent the board from warping, we individually wrapped both halves in waxed paper and pressed them under piles of books for 24 hours.

DSCF4866

Packaging and Storing

  • Shoe box or larger box
  • Permanent markers
  • Rubber bands
  • Ziplock bags
  • Small tin container (such as Altoids; optional) or fabric pouch

The final step is to organize and package all of the parts to the game. To keep the game intact, you’ll want to rubber-band cards together and keep game pieces and other paraphernalia in plastic ziplock bags and/or small tin containers. If you can’t find a box large enough for storing the game board, then store everything but the game board in a shoebox, and rubber-band the board to the shoebox, or just keep the board and shoebox next to each other. In a classroom setting, it’s preferable to store the board inside the box if at all possible. Decorate the box so it can be identified clearly. When the game and packaging is complete, the game can become part of the classroom resources for indoor recess or center time, or an addition to your family’s game library. Students or siblings can exchange their games with one another and enjoy playing one anothers’ games.

In our case, we rubber-banded the three sets of cards (Trivia Challenge, Chance, and mortgage) separately. Then we put the three different kinds of “coins” into ziplock bags. We stored game pieces and dice in a revamped Altoids tin. First, we created a “Game Pieces” label for the top of the tin. We laminated the label with wide tape and then attached it to the tin with double-sided tape. Then we measured and hot-glued a piece of felt to the inner, bottom surface of the tin to make a nice cushion for the game pieces. We stored everything (cards, money, game pieces) in a shoebox. We sometimes used glass jewels for hotels and tiny, colored pebbles (fish tank gravel) for houses. Other times, we used the regular Monopoly houses and hotels for our Harry Potter Monopoly set, but left them in the regular Monopoly set until they were needed.

DSCF4869

For our family, the process of creating a Harry Potter Monopoly game was much more involved than we initially anticipated. However, my children got to practice a variety of skills, had a great time demonstrating their comprehension of the Harry Potter book series, and were obviously proud of the way it turned out. The finished product was a beautiful, one-of-a-kind game that everyone was eager to play.

PlayingGame

© Susan Meyer and River Bliss Photography, 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material, including all text and photos, without express and written permission from this website’s author/owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Susan Meyer and River Bliss Photography (susantarameyer.com) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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The Joy of Teaching

Sharing creative ideas and lessons to help children learn.

how to make a game for book report

Book Report Project Ideas and Forms: Trading cards, book mobiles, and more.

May 8, 2015 by Evan-Moor | 1 Comment

how to make a game for book report

Use these free printables for creative book reports from Evan-Moor’s How to Report on Books :

  •   A character trading card project: This book project focuses on recalling facts about a character and creating trading cards.

how to make a game for book report

  • Book mobile project: This book project guides students in identifying setting/characters and problem/solution, and in creating a mobile.Tips: glue white paper to backs of construction paper for the illustrations (step #1); add a length of construction paper to increase the long strip to form a ring (step #2.)

how to make a game for book report

  • An exciting event pop-up: This book report project focuses on summarizing an exciting event from a fiction book and includes instructions on making a pop-up book report form.

how to make a game for book report

Other engaging book report ideas include:

how to make a game for book report

  • Cereal box book report
  • Trivia/board games
  • Sandwich book report

See our Book Report Fun Pinterest board for more book report ideas such as making character puppets, comic strips, posters, story bags, puzzles, and awards.

Image of Theresa Wooler

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Cereal Box Book Reports – A Fun Alternative!

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If you’ve never tried Cereal Box Book Reports, I suggest you give it a try! Teachers are always looking for unique ways to assess their students’ comprehension of fiction books and novels they have read. Many teachers find traditional book report alternatives to be extremely helpful in getting students excited about reading. Sometimes, however, students crave s omething a little bit different . Enter Cereal Box Book Reports!

Cereal Box Book Reports

A few years ago, I started using  Cereal Box Book Reports  as a Reading  project. My students LOVED making them, I noticed a big difference in their engagement in the book report process, and they were so excited to share their final projects. We even left the finished products on display in the classroom!

CEREAL BOX BOOK REPORTS

how to make a game for book report

I suggest having a parent helper work with you to cover all the cereal boxes with white bulletin board paper before you introduce the projects. It saves a TON of work!

Before we began the project, I gave each student a scoring rubric so they knew exactly what was expected. We went over the rubric together. 

Then, I explained that cereal names must correlate to the novel they had chosen to read. These two projects were for the books  Charlotte’s Web  and  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone .

My students loved having the freedom to choose their own novel (pre-approved) and get creative in matching the theme of their cereal box book report to the book! 

While creating their reports, students wrote the book summaries on one side panel of the cereal box.  They identified and described the setting and main characters on the other side panel.

On the back of the cereal box book report, students created a fun game or activity related to the book. Some made a word search, while others designed mazes, word scrambles, or riddles. 

The title, name of the author, and book ratings were added to the top of the cereal box book reports.

how to make a game for book report

You can either create your own rubric and project directions for your own students, or if you would like to save time, check out my popular, ready-to-print Cereal Box Book Report Packet !

Cereal Box Book Reports

Take a closer look at the complete cereal box book report project below:

how to make a game for book report

Looking for some more fun and creative book report ideas?  I’ve put together a list of  10 Book Report Projects that Kids Love .  Sometimes a fun book project is not enough, especially for those reluctant readers. Based on my experience, here is a helpful list of  25 of the best books for Tweens .

Save This Cereal Box Book Reports Post for Later!

Cereal Box Book Report

Shelly Rees

Hi, I’m Shelly! Thank you for being here. I love helping third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers with fun and engaging activities that require no to little prep! Let me help you by taking some of the stress and work off your plate.

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How to Write a Book Report

Use the links below to jump directly to any section of this guide:

Book Report Fundamentals

Preparing to write, an overview of the book report format, how to write the main body of a book report, how to write a conclusion to a book report, reading comprehension and book reports, book report resources for teachers .

Book reports remain a key educational assessment tool from elementary school through college. Sitting down to close read and critique texts for their content and form is a lifelong skill, one that benefits all of us well beyond our school years. With the help of this guide, you’ll develop your reading comprehension and note-taking skills. You’ll also find resources to guide you through the process of writing a book report, step-by-step, from choosing a book and reading actively to revising your work. Resources for teachers are also included, from creative assignment ideas to sample rubrics.

Book reports follow general rules for composition, yet are distinct from other types of writing assignments. Central to book reports are plot summaries, analyses of characters and themes, and concluding opinions. This format differs from an argumentative essay or critical research paper, in which impartiality and objectivity is encouraged. Differences also exist between book reports and book reviews, who do not share the same intent and audience. Here, you’ll learn the basics of what a book report is and is not.

What Is a Book Report?

"Book Report" ( ThoughtCo )

This article, written by a professor emeritus of rhetoric and English, describes the defining characteristics of book reports and offers observations on how they are composed.

"Writing a Book Report" (Purdue OWL)

Purdue’s Online Writing Lab outlines the steps in writing a book report, from keeping track of major characters as you read to providing adequate summary material.

"How to Write a Book Report" ( Your Dictionary )

This article provides another helpful guide to writing a book report, offering suggestions on taking notes and writing an outline before drafting. 

"How to Write a Successful Book Report" ( ThoughtCo )

Another post from ThoughtCo., this article highlights the ten steps for book report success. It was written by an academic advisor and college enrollment counselor.

What’s the Difference Between a Book Report and an Essay?

"Differences Between a Book Report & Essay Writing" ( Classroom)

In this article from the education resource Classroom,  you'll learn the differences and similarities between book reports and essay writing.

"Differences Between a Book Report and Essay Writing" (SeattlePi.com)

In this post from a Seattle newspaper's website, memoirist Christopher Cascio highlights how book report and essay writing differ.

"The Difference Between Essays and Reports" (Solent Online Learning)

This PDF from Southampton Solent University includes a chart demonstrating the differences between essays and reports. Though it is geared toward university students, it will help students of all levels understand the differing purposes of reports and analytical essays.

What’s the Difference Between a Book Report and a Book Review?

"How to Write a Book Review and a Book Report" (Concordia Univ.)

The library at Concordia University offers this helpful guide to writing book report and book reviews. It defines differences between the two, then presents components that both forms share.

"Book Reviews" (Univ. of North Carolina)

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s writing guide shows the step-by-step process of writing book reviews, offering a contrast to the composition of book reports.

Active reading and thoughtful preparation before you begin your book report are necessary components of crafting a successful piece of writing. Here, you’ll find tips and resources to help you learn how to select the right book, decide which format is best for your report, and outline your main points.

Selecting and Finding a Book

"30 Best Books for Elementary Readers" (Education.com)

This article from Education.com lists 30 engaging books for students from kindergarten through fifth grade. It was written by Esme Raji Codell, a teacher, author, and children's literature specialist.

"How to Choose a Good Book for a Report (Middle School)" (WikiHow)

This WikiHow article offers suggestions for middle schoolers on how to choose the right book for a report, from getting started early on the search process to making sure you understand the assignment's requirements.

"Best Book-Report Books for Middle Schoolers" (Common Sense Media)

Common Sense Media has compiled this list of 25 of the best books for middle school book reports. For younger students, the article suggests you check out the site's "50 Books All Kids Should Read Before They're 12."

"50 Books to Read in High School" (Lexington Public Library)

The Lexington, Kentucky Public Library has prepared this list to inspire high school students to choose the right book. It includes both classics and more modern favorites.

The Online Computer Library Center's catalogue helps you locate books in libraries near you, having itemized the collections of 72,000 libraries in 170 countries.

Formats of Book Reports

"Format for Writing a Book Report" ( Your Dictionary )

Here, Your Dictionary supplies guidelines for the basic book report format. It describes what you'll want to include in the heading, and what information to include in the introductory paragraph. Be sure to check these guidelines against your teacher's requirements.

"The Good Old Book Report" (Scholastic)

Nancy Barile’s blog post for Scholastic lists the questions students from middle through high school should address in their book reports.

How to Write an Outline

"Writer’s Web: Creating Outlines" (Univ. of Richmond)

The University of Richmond’s Writing Center shows how you can make use of micro and macro outlines to organize your argument.

"Why and How to Create a Useful Outline" (Purdue OWL)

Purdue’s Online Writing Lab demonstrates how outlines can help you organize your report, then teaches you how to create outlines.

"Creating an Outline" (EasyBib)

EasyBib, a website that generates bibliographies, offers sample outlines and tips for creating your own. The article encourages you to think about transitions and grouping your notes.

"How to Write an Outline: 4 Ways to Organize Your Thoughts" (Grammarly)

This blog post from a professional writer explains the advantages of using an outline, and presents different ways to gather your thoughts before writing.

In this section, you’ll find resources that offer an overview of how to write a book report, including first steps in preparing the introduction. A good book report's introduction hooks the reader with strong opening sentences and provides a preview of where the report is going.

"Step-by-Step Outline for a Book Report" ( Classroom )

This article from Classroom furnishes students with a guide to the stages of writing a book report, from writing the rough draft to revising.

"Your Roadmap to a Better Book Report" ( Time4Writing )

Time4Writing offers tips for outlining your book report, and describes all of the information that the introduction, body, and conclusion should include.

"How to Start a Book Report" ( ThoughtCo)

This ThoughtCo. post, another by academic advisor and college enrollment counselor Grace Fleming, demonstrates how to write a pithy introduction to your book report.

"How to Write an Introduction for a Book Report" ( Classroom )

This brief but helpful post from Classroom  details what makes a good book report introduction, down to the level of individual sentences.

The body paragraphs of your book report accomplish several goals: they describe the plot, delve more deeply into the characters and themes that make the book unique, and include quotations and examples from the book. Below are some resources to help you succeed in summarizing and analyzing your chosen text.

Plot Summary and Description

"How Do You Write a Plot Summary?" ( Reference )

This short article presents the goals of writing a plot summary, and suggests a word limit. It emphasizes that you should stick to the main points and avoid including too many specific details, such as what a particular character wears.

"How to Write a Plot for a Book Report" ( The Pen & The Pad )

In this article from a resource website for writers, Patricia Harrelson outlines what information to include in a plot summary for a book report. 

"How to Write a Book Summary" (WikiHow)

Using Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone as an example, this WikiHow article demonstrates how to write a plot summary one step at a time.

Analyzing Characters and Themes

"How to Write a Character Analysis Book Report" ( The Pen & The Pad )

Kristine Tucker shows how to write a book report focusing on character. You can take her suggestions as they are, or consider  incorporating them into the more traditional book report format.

"How to Write a Character Analysis" (YouTube)

The SixMinuteScholar Channel utilizes analysis of the film  Finding Nemo to show you how to delve deeply into character, prioritizing inference over judgment.

"How to Define Theme" ( The Editor's Blog )

Fiction editor Beth Hill contributes an extended definition of theme. She also provides examples of common themes, such as "life is fragile."

"How to Find the Theme of a Book or Short Story" ( ThoughtCo )

This blog post from ThoughtCo. clarifies the definition of theme in relation to symbolism, plot, and moral. It also offers examples of themes in literature, such as love, death, and good vs. evil.

Selecting and Integrating Quotations

"How to Choose and Use Quotations" (Santa Barbara City College)

This guide from a college writing center will help you choose which quotations to use in your book report, and how to blend quotations with your own words.

"Guidelines for Incorporating Quotes" (Ashford Univ.)

This PDF from Ashford University's Writing Center introduces the ICE method for incorporating quotations: introduce, cite, explain.

"Quote Integration" (YouTube)

This video from The Write Way YouTube channel illustrates how to integrate quotations into writing, and also explains how to cite those quotations.

"Using Literary Quotations" (Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison)

This guide from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Writing Center helps you emphasize your analysis of a quotation, and explains how to incorporate quotations into your text.

Conclusions to any type of paper are notoriously tricky to write. Here, you’ll learn some creative ways to tie up loose ends in your report and express your own opinion of the book you read. This open space for sharing opinions that are not grounded in critical research is an element that often distinguishes book reports from other types of writing.

"How to Write a Conclusion for a Book Report" ( Classroom )

This brief article from the education resource  Classroom illustrates the essential points you should make in a book report conclusion.

"Conclusions" (Univ. of North Carolina)

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Writing Center lays out strategies for writing effective conclusions. Though the article is geared toward analytical essay conclusions, the tips offered here will also help you write a strong book report.

"Ending the Essay: Conclusions" (Harvard College Writing Center)

Pat Bellanca’s article for Harvard University’s Writing Center presents ways to conclude essays, along with tips. Again, these are suggestions for concluding analytical essays that can also be used to tie up a book report's loose ends.

Reading closely and in an engaged manner is the strong foundation upon which all good book reports are built. The resources below will give you a picture of what active reading looks like, and offer strategies to assess and improve your reading comprehension. Further, you’ll learn how to take notes—or “annotate” your text—making it easier to find important information as you write.

How to Be an Active Reader

"Active Reading Strategies: Remember and Analyze What You Read" (Princeton Univ.)

Princeton University’s McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning recommends ten strategies for active reading, and includes sample diagrams.

"Active Reading" (Open Univ.)

The Open University offers these techniques for reading actively alongside video examples. The author emphasizes that you should read for comprehension—not simply to finish the book as quickly as possible.

"7 Active Reading Strategies for Students" ( ThoughtCo )

In this post, Grace Fleming outlines seven methods for active reading. Her suggestions include identifying unfamiliar words and finding the main idea. 

"5 Active Reading Strategies for Textbook Assignments" (YouTube)

Thomas Frank’s seven-minute video demonstrates how you can retain the most important information from long and dense reading material.

Assessing Your Reading Comprehension

"Macmillan Readers Level Test" (MacMillan)

Take this online, interactive test from a publishing company to find out your reading level. You'll be asked a number of questions related to grammar and vocabulary.

"Reading Comprehension Practice Test" (ACCUPLACER)

ACCUPLACER is a placement test from The College Board. This 20-question practice test will help you see what information you retain after reading short passages.

"Reading Comprehension" ( English Maven )

The English Maven site has aggregated exercises and tests at various reading levels so you can quiz your reading comprehension skills.

How to Improve Your Reading Comprehension

"5 Tips for Improving Reading Comprehension" ( ThoughtCo )

ThoughtCo. recommends five tips to increase your reading comprehension ability, including reading with tools such as highlighters, and developing new vocabulary.

"How to Improve Reading Comprehension: 8 Expert Tips" (PrepScholar)

This blog post from PrepScholar provides ideas for improving your reading comprehension, from expanding your vocabulary to discussing texts with friends.

CrashCourse video: "Reading Assignments" (YouTube)

This CrashCourse video equips you with tools to read more effectively. It will help you determine how much material you need to read, and what strategies you can use to absorb what you read.

"Improving Reading Comprehension" ( Education Corner )

From a pre-reading survey through post-reading review, Education Corner  walks you through steps to improve reading comprehension.

Methods of In-text Annotation

"The Writing Process: Annotating a Text" (Hunter College)

This article from Hunter College’s Rockowitz Writing Center outlines how to take notes on a text and provides samples of annotation.

"How To Annotate Text While Reading" (YouTube)

This video from the SchoolHabits YouTube channel presents eleven annotation techniques you can use for better reading comprehension.

"5 Ways To Annotate Your Books" ( Book Riot )

This article from the Book Riot  blog highlights five efficient annotation methods that will save you time and protect your books from becoming cluttered with unnecessary markings.

"How Do You Annotate Your Books?" ( Epic Reads )

This post from Epic Reads highlights how different annotation methods work for different people, and showcases classic methods from sticky notes to keeping a reading notebook.

Students at every grade level can benefit from writing book reports, which sharpen critical reading skills. Here, we've aggregated sources to help you plan book report assignments and develop rubrics for written and oral book reports. You’ll also find alternative book report assessment ideas that move beyond the traditional formats.

Teaching Elementary School Students How to Write Book Reports

"Book Reports" ( Unique Teaching Resources )

These reading templates courtesy of Unique Teaching Resources make great visual aids for elementary school students writing their first book reports.

"Elementary Level Book Report Template" ( Teach Beside Me )

This   printable book report template from a teacher-turned-homeschooler is simple, classic, and effective. It asks basic questions, such as "who are the main characters?" and "how did you feel about the main characters?"

"Book Reports" ( ABC Teach )

ABC Teach ’s resource directory includes printables for book reports on various subjects at different grade levels, such as a middle school biography book report form and a "retelling a story" elementary book report template.

"Reading Worksheets" ( Busy Teacher's Cafe )

This page from Busy Teachers’ Cafe contains book report templates alongside reading comprehension and other language arts worksheets.

Teaching Middle School and High School Students How to Write Book Reports

"How to Write a Book Report: Middle and High School Level" ( Fact Monster)

Fact Monster ’s Homework Center discusses each section of a book report, and explains how to evaluate and analyze books based on genre for students in middle and high school.

"Middle School Outline Template for Book Report" (Trinity Catholic School)

This PDF outline template breaks the book report down into manageable sections for seventh and eighth graders by asking for specific information in each paragraph.

"Forms for Writing a Book Report for High School" ( Classroom )

In this article for Classroom,  Elizabeth Thomas describes what content high schoolers should focus on when writing their book reports.

"Forms for Writing a Book Report for High School" ( The Pen & The Pad )

Kori Morgan outlines techniques for adapting the book report assignment to the high school level in this post for The Pen & The Pad .

"High School Book Lists and Report Guidelines" (Highland Hall Waldorf School)

These sample report formats, grading paradigms, and tips are collected by Highland Hall Waldorf School. Attached are book lists by high school grade level.

Sample Rubrics

"Book Review Rubric Editable" (Teachers Pay Teachers)

This free resource from Teachers Pay Teachers allows you to edit your book report rubric to the specifications of your assignment and the grade level you teach.

"Book Review Rubric" (Winton Woods)

This PDF rubric from a city school district includes directions to take the assignment long-term, with follow-up exercises through school quarters.

"Multimedia Book Report Rubric" ( Midlink Magazine )

Perfect for oral book reports, this PDF rubric from North Carolina State University's Midlink Magazine  will help you evaluate your students’ spoken presentations.

Creative Book Report Assignments

"25 Book Report Alternatives" (Scholastic)

This article from the Scholastic website lists creative alternatives to the standard book report for pre-kindergarteners through high schoolers.

"Fresh Ideas for Creative Book Reports" ( Education World )

Education World offers nearly 50 alternative book report ideas in this article, from a book report sandwich to a character trait diagram.

"A Dozen Ways to Make Amazingly Creative Book Reports" ( We Are Teachers )

This post from We Are Teachers puts the spotlight on integrating visual arts into literary study through multimedia book report ideas.

"More Ideas Than You’ll Ever Use for Book Reports" (Teachnet.com)

This list from Teachnet.com includes over 300 ideas for book report assignments, from "interviewing" a character to preparing a travel brochure to the location in which the book is set.

"Fifty Alternatives to the Book Report" (National Council of Teachers of English)

In this PDF resource from the NCTE's  English Journal,  Diana Mitchell offers assignment ideas ranging from character astrology signs to a character alphabet.

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42 Creative Book Report Ideas for Students

Inspire your students to share their love of books.

how to make a game for book report

Responding to what you read is an important literacy skill. Reading about other people’s experiences and perspectives helps kids learn about the world. And although students don’t need to dive deeply into every single book they read, occasionally digging into characters, settings, and themes can help them learn to look beyond the prose. Here are 42 creative book report ideas designed to make reading more meaningful.

1. Concrete Found Poem

A student sample of a concrete found poem

This clever activity is basically a shape poem made up of words, phrases, and whole sentences found in the books students read. The words come together to create an image that represents something from the story.

2. Graphic Novel

Have students rewrite the book they are reading, or a chapter of their book, as a graphic novel. Set parameters for the assignment such as including six scenes from the story, three characters, details about the setting, etc. And, of course, include detailed illustrations to accompany the story.

3. Book Snaps

A picture of a piece of text with comments and visuals added as commentary as an example of creative book report ideas

Book Snaps are a way for students to visually show how they are reacting to, processing, and/or connecting with a text. First, students snap a picture of a page in the book they are reading. Then, they add comments, images, highlights, and more.

4. Diary Entry

Have your students place themselves in the shoes of one of the characters from their book and write a first-person diary entry of a critical moment from the story. Ask them to choose a moment in the story where the character has plenty of interaction and emotion to share in a diary entry.

5. Character To-Do List

A hand written character to do list

This fun activity is an off-the-beaten-path way to dive deep into character analysis. Get inside the head of the main character in a book and write a to-do list that they might write. Use actual information from the text, but also make inferences into what that character may wish to accomplish.

6. Mint Tin Book Report

A mint tin is converted to a book report with an illustration on the inside lid and cards telling about different parts of the book inside as an example of creative book report ideas

There are so many super-creative, open-ended projects you can use mint tins for. This teacher blogger describes the process of creating book reports using them. There’s even a free template for cards that fit inside.

7. Fictional Yearbook Entries

Ask your students to create a yearbook based on the characters and setting in the book. What do they look like? Cut out magazine pictures to give a good visual image for their school picture. What kind of superlative might they get? Best looking? Class clown? What clubs would they be in or lead? Did they win any awards? It should be obvious from their small yearbooks whether your students dug deep into the characters in their books. They may also learn that who we are as individuals is reflected in what we choose to do with our lives.

8. Book Report Cake

A purple cake made from paper cut into slices

This project would be perfect for a book tasting in your classroom! Each student presents their book report in the shape of food. See the sandwich and pizza options above and check out this blog for more delicious ideas.

9. Current Events Comparison

Have students locate three to five current events articles a character in their book might be interested in. After they’ve found the articles, have them explain why the character would find them interesting and how they relate to the book. Learning about how current events affect time, place, and people is critical to helping develop opinions about what we read and experience in life.

10. Sandwich Book Report

A book report made from different sheets of paper assembled to look like a sandwich as an example of creative book report ideas

Yum! You’ll notice a lot of our creative book report ideas revolve around food. In this oldie but goodie, each layer of this book report sandwich covers a different element of the book—characters, setting, conflict, etc. A fun adaptation of this project is the book report cheeseburger.

11. Book Alphabet

Choose 15 to 20 alphabet books to help give your students examples of how they work around themes. Then ask your students to create their own Book Alphabet based on the book they read. What artifacts, vocabulary words, and names reflect the important parts of the book? After they find a word to represent each letter, have them write one sentence that explains where the word fits in.

12. Peekaboo Book Report

A tri-fold science board decorated with a paper head and hands peeking over the top with different pages about the book affixed

Using cardboard lap books (or small science report boards), students include details about their book’s main characters, plot, setting, conflict, resolution, etc. Then they draw a head and arms on card stock and attach them to the board from behind to make it look like the main character is peeking over the report.

13. T-Shirt Book Report

A child wears a t-shirt decorated as a book report as an example of creative book report ideas

Another fun and creative idea: Create a wearable book report with a plain white tee. Come up with your own using Sharpie pens and acrylic paint. Get step-by-step directions .

14. Book Jacket

Have students create a new book jacket for their story. Include an attractive illustrated cover, a summary, a short biography of the author, and a few reviews from readers.

15. Watercolor Rainbow Book Report

This is great for biography research projects. Students cut out a photocopied image of their subject and glue it in the middle. Then, they draw lines from the image to the edges of the paper, like rays of sunshine, and fill in each section with information about the person. As a book report template, the center image could be a copy of the book cover, and each section expands on key information such as character names, theme(s), conflict, resolution, etc.

16. Act the Part

Have students dress up as their favorite character from the book and present an oral book report. If their favorite character is not the main character, retell the story from their point of view.

17. Pizza Box Book Report

A pizza box decorated with a book cover and a paper pizza with book report details as an example of creative book report ideas

If you’re looking for creative book report ideas that use upcycled materials, try this one using a pizza box. It works well for both nonfiction and fiction book reports. The top lid provides a picture of the book cover. Each wedge of the pizza pie tells part of the story.

18. Bookmark

Have students create a custom illustrated bookmark that includes drawings and words from either their favorite chapter or the entire book.

19. Book Reports in a Bag

A group of students pose with their paper bag book reports

Looking for book report ideas that really encourage creative thinking? With book reports in a bag, students read a book and write a summary. Then, they decorate a paper grocery bag with a scene from the book, place five items that represent something from the book inside the bag, and present the bag to the class.

20. Reading Lists for Characters

Ask your students to think about a character in their book. What kinds of books might that character like to read? Take them to the library to choose five books the character might have on their to-be-read list. Have them list the books and explain what each book might mean to the character. Post the to-be-read lists for others to see and choose from—there’s nothing like trying out a book character’s style when developing your own identity.

21. File Folder Book Report

A manilla file folder decorated with elements of a book report as an example of creative book report ideas

Also called a lap book, this easy-to-make book report hits on all the major elements of a book study and gives students a chance to show what they know in a colorful way.

22. Collage

Create a collage using pictures and words that represent different parts of the book. Use old magazines or print pictures from the Internet.

23. Book Report Triorama

A pyradimal shaped 3D book report with illustrations and words written on all sides

Who doesn’t love a multidimensional book report? This image shows a 3D model, but Elisha Ann provides a lesson to show students how to glue four triangles together to make a 4D model.

24. Timeline

Have students create a timeline of the main events from their book. Be sure to include character names and details for each event. Use 8 x 11 sheets of paper taped together or a long portion of bulletin board paper.

25. Clothes Hanger Book Report Mobile

A girl stands next to a book report mobile made from a wire hanger and index cards as an example of creative book report ideas

This creative project doesn’t require a fancy or expensive supply list. Students just need an ordinary clothes hanger, strings, and paper. The body of the hanger is used to identify the book, and the cards on the strings dangling below are filled with key elements of the book, like characters, setting, and a summary.

26. Public Service Announcement

If a student has read a book about a cause that affects people, animals, or the environment, teach them about public service announcements . Once they understand what a PSA is, have them research the issue or cause that stood out in the book. Then give them a template for a storyboard so they can create their own PSA. Some students might want to take it a step further and create a video based on their storyboard. Consider sharing their storyboard or video with an organization that supports the cause or issue.

27. Dodecahedron Book Report

A dodecahedrom 3D sphere made into a book report

Creative book report ideas think outside the box. In this case, it’s a ball! SO much information can be covered on the 12 panels , and it allows students to take a deep dive in a creative way.

28. Character Cards

Make trading cards (like baseball cards) for a few characters from the book. On the front side, draw the character. On the back side, make a list of their character traits and include a quote or two.

29. Book Report Booklets

A book made from folded grocery bags is the template for a student book report as an example of creative book report ideas

This clever book report is made from ordinary paper bags. Stack the paper bags on top of each other, fold them in half, and staple the closed-off ends of the bags together. Students can write, draw, and decorate on the paper bag pages. They can also record information on writing or drawing paper and glue the paper onto the pages. The open ends of the bags can be used as pockets to insert photos, cut-outs, postcards, or other flat items that help them tell their story.

30. Letter to the Author

Write a letter to the author of the book. Tell them three things you really liked about the story. Ask three questions about the plot, characters, or anything else you’re curious about.

31. Book Report Charm Bracelet

A decorated paper hand with paper charms hanging off of it

What a “charming” way to write a book report! Each illustrated bracelet charm captures a character, an event in the plot, setting, or other detail.

32. Fact Sheet

Have students create a list of 10 facts that they learned from reading the book. Have them write the facts in complete sentences, and be sure that each fact is something that they didn’t know before they read the book.

33. Cereal Box TV Book Report

A book report made from cardboard made to resemble a tv set as an example of creative book report ideas

This book report project is a low-tech version of a television made from a cereal box and two paper towel rolls. Students create the viewing screen cut-out at the top, then insert a scroll of paper with writing and illustrations inside the box. When the cardboard roll is rotated, the story unfolds.

34. Be a Character Therapist

Therapists work to uncover their clients’ fears based on their words and actions. When we read books, we must learn to use a character’s actions and dialogue to infer their fears. Many plots revolve around a character’s fear and the work it takes to overcome that fear. Ask students to identify a character’s fear and find 8 to 10 scenes that prove this fear exists. Then have them write about ways the character overcame the fear (or didn’t) in the story. What might the character have done differently?

35. Mind Maps

Mind maps can be a great way to synthesize what students have learned from reading a book. Plus, there are so many ways to approach them. Begin by writing a central idea in the middle of the page. For example, general information, characters, plot, etc. Then branch out from the center with ideas, thoughts, and connections to material from the book.

36. Foldables

A book report made from a paper background and attached flaps as an example of creative book report ideas

From Rainbows Within Reach , this clever idea would be a great introduction to writing book reports. Adapt the flap categories for students at different levels. Adjust the number of categories (or flaps) per the needs of your students.

37. Board games

This is a great project if you want your students to develop a little more insight into what they’re reading. Have them think about the elements of their favorite board games and how they can be adapted to fit this assignment. For more, here are step-by-step directions .

38. Comic strips

A girl stands holding a comic strip book report as an example of creative book report ideas

If you’re looking for creative book report ideas for students who like graphic novels, try comic strips. Include an illustrated cover with the title and author. The pages of the book should retell the story using dialogue and descriptions of the setting and characters. Of course, no comic book would be complete without copious illustrations and thought bubbles.

39. Timeline

Create a timeline using a long roll of butcher paper, a poster board, or index cards taped together. For each event on the timeline, write a brief description of what happens. Add pictures, clip art, word art, and symbols to make the timeline more lively and colorful.

40. Cereal Box

Recycle a cereal box and create a book report Wheaties-style. Decorate all sides of the box with information about the book’s characters, setting, plot, summary, etc.

41. Wanted Poster

how to make a game for book report

Make a “wanted” poster for one of the book’s main characters. Indicate whether they are wanted dead or alive. Include a picture of the character and a description of what the character is “wanted” for, three examples of the character showing this trait, and a detailed account of where the character was last seen.

42. Movie Version

If the book your students have read has been made into a movie, have them write a report about how the versions are alike and different. If the book has not been made into a movie, have them write a report telling how they would make it into a movie, using specific details from the book.

What creative book report ideas did we miss? Come share in our We Are Teachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.

Plus, check out the most popular kids’ books in every grade..

Book reports don't have to be boring. Help your students make the books come alive with these 42 creative book report ideas.

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  • Published: 30 Tháng Năm, 2024
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Không quan trọng bạn đang học cấp hai hay đang thực hiện một dự án cấp đại học; viết một bài báo cáo sách rõ ràng và ấn tượng không phải là điều dễ dàng. Nhưng điều này không hoàn toàn đúng, vì bạn cần biết cách thực hiện.

Trong hướng dẫn này, chúng tôi sẽ hướng dẫn bạn các bước khác nhau để viết báo cáo sách. Từ việc chuẩn bị cho đến viết một bản tóm tắt cốt truyện hấp dẫn cho đến việc tạo ra một phân tích phê bình mạnh mẽ, chúng tôi sẽ chia sẻ các ví dụ khác nhau và cách tốt nhất để viết báo cáo cuốn sách có thể giúp bạn đạt điểm cao.

Hãy tiếp tục đọc những mẹo đơn giản này và bạn sẽ sớm nắm vững các bước và gây ấn tượng với giáo viên và giáo sư của mình!

1. Chuẩn bị viết báo cáo sách

Trước khi bạn bắt đầu viết báo cáo cuốn sách, một chút chuẩn bị có thể giúp ích rất nhiều trong việc giúp quá trình viết dễ dàng hơn.

Bước đầu tiên trong việc học cách viết báo cáo sách là thu thập tất cả thông tin bạn cần. Khi bạn đã hiểu rõ mọi chuyện, việc sắp xếp suy nghĩ của bạn chỉ còn là vấn đề đơn giản. Thực hiện theo các bước sau.

  • Đọc sách : Bắt đầu bằng cách đọc toàn bộ cuốn sách, ngay cả khi nó là cuốn sách phi hư cấu, để hiểu câu chuyện và các điểm quan trọng trong cốt truyện. Ghi chú trong khi đọc để xác định các nhân vật chính, chủ đề chính và các sự kiện chính. Hãy nhớ làm nổi bật những đoạn văn đáng nhớ hoặc những ví dụ cụ thể nổi bật.
  • Tìm hiểu nhiệm vụ: Đảm bảo bạn biết các yêu cầu, như phông chữ, số từ chính xác và mọi nguyên tắc cụ thể. Tìm hiểu xem báo cáo cuốn sách nên bao gồm phân tích quan trọng, ý kiến ​​cá nhân hay phân tích nhân vật.
  • Phác thảo báo cáo của bạn : Tạo dàn ý cơ bản để định hướng cho bài viết của bạn. Chia báo cáo của bạn thành các phần hợp lý, như đoạn giới thiệu, tóm tắt cốt truyện, đoạn nội dung và đoạn kết luận. Điều này cũng liên quan đến việc ghi lại các yếu tố chính để đưa vào mỗi phần, chẳng hạn như một câu luận điểm hoặc những điểm chính trong lập luận của bạn.
  • Thông tin cơ sở nghiên cứu : Google tên sách, phong cách viết của tác giả, ngày xuất bản và mô tả ngắn gọn để biết thêm ngữ cảnh. Bạn cũng có thể muốn khám phá bìa sách để xem nó có thể ảnh hưởng như thế nào đến sự hiểu biết của bạn về cuốn sách.
  • Sắp xếp suy nghĩ của bạn: Nghiên cứu đã tìm thấy mối liên hệ trực tiếp giữa việc ghi chú và thành công trong học tập, cho thấy tầm quan trọng của ghi chú trong nhiều bối cảnh khác nhau. Sắp xếp các ghi chú của bạn để tập trung vào các chủ đề chính, các khía cạnh quan trọng của cốt truyện và suy nghĩ cá nhân của bạn. Sau đó, hãy suy nghĩ về cách bạn sẽ phân tích phong cách viết và cách sử dụng các biện pháp văn học của tác giả.

2. Viết phần giới thiệu

Phần giới thiệu tạo tiền đề cho toàn bộ báo cáo cuốn sách của bạn. Đây là cơ hội tốt nhất để bạn thu hút sự chú ý của người đọc đồng thời cung cấp cho họ những thông tin cơ bản quan trọng và trình bày các điểm chính của bạn. Đây là cách bạn có thể tạo một đoạn giới thiệu thu hút người đọc và khiến họ muốn tìm hiểu thêm.

  • Giới thiệu sách : Luôn bắt đầu bằng tên sách trong dấu ngoặc kép hoặc in nghiêng, sau đó thêm tên tác giả ngay sau đó. Điều quan trọng nữa là cung cấp ngày xuất bản và bất kỳ bối cảnh lịch sử nào có liên quan đến việc hiểu cuốn sách, chẳng hạn như xung đột đang diễn ra hoặc một phát minh gần đây.
  • Cung cấp một cái nhìn tổng quan ngắn gọn : Cung cấp một bản tóm tắt rất ngắn gọn về toàn bộ cuốn sách để giúp người đọc biết được điều gì sẽ xảy ra. Làm nổi bật thể loại của cuốn sách và mô tả ngắn gọn về bối cảnh. Bạn cũng nên đề cập đến việc đó là sách hư cấu hay phi hư cấu.
  • Trình bày luận điểm luận văn : Đây gần như là điểm hoặc lập luận trọng tâm mà báo cáo của bạn sẽ đưa ra. Điều này có thể đòi hỏi bạn phải thực hành một chút nhưng hãy xây dựng một tuyên bố luận điểm rõ ràng phản ánh phân tích của bạn về cuốn sách. Luận án của bạn phải tiết lộ các chủ đề chính, các yếu tố chính và các ví dụ cụ thể mà bạn sẽ thảo luận trong các đoạn nội dung.
  • Thu hút người đọc : Mở đầu bằng một câu hấp dẫn, chẳng hạn như một câu trích dẫn sinh động trong cuốn sách hoặc một sự thật thú vị về tác giả. Bạn cũng có thể đặt câu hỏi hoặc đưa ra một tuyên bố gây ngạc nhiên liên quan đến chủ đề chính của cuốn sách. Khi làm điều này, hãy nhớ sử dụng ngôn ngữ sinh động để khiến người đọc tò mò.
  • Luôn rõ ràng và súc tích : Tránh tải phần giới thiệu có quá nhiều chi tiết. Hãy nhớ rằng bạn muốn để lại cho người đọc những thông tin vừa đủ để họ khao khát thêm thông tin. Giữ nó ngắn gọn và tập trung.
  • Thực hành tuyên bố luận án của bạn : Đừng chỉ bám vào tuyên bố luận điểm đầu tiên mà bạn tạo ra. Hãy sửa lại nó một vài lần cho đến khi nó minh họa được lập luận chính của bạn một cách rõ ràng và thú vị.
  • Hãy cụ thể : Đảm bảo tuyên bố luận điểm phải cụ thể và liên quan trực tiếp đến phân tích mà bạn sắp trình bày.
  • Xem trước cấu trúc : Đưa ra gợi ý về những gì người đọc sẽ tìm thấy trong các đoạn nội dung, như phân tích chủ đề hoặc phân tích nhân vật.

3. Viết tóm tắt cốt truyện

Khi phần tóm tắt cốt truyện của bạn được viết tốt, người đọc sẽ có được ý tưởng hay về câu chuyện. Họ cũng sẽ tìm hiểu các khía cạnh quan trọng của các sự kiện và chủ đề của cuốn sách.

  • Luôn bắt đầu với những điều cơ bản. Nêu ngắn gọn tựa sách và tên nhân vật chính.
  • Cung cấp một bản tóm tắt ngắn gọn về bối cảnh để giúp người đọc hình dung được câu chuyện đang diễn ra ở đâu.
  • Bước tiếp theo là phác thảo các sự kiện chính, bao gồm việc xác định các diễn biến chính hoặc các điểm cốt truyện xác định câu chuyện.
  • Tóm tắt diễn biến cốt truyện từ đầu đến cao trào và giải quyết, tập trung vào xung đột trung tâm và các sự kiện chính của cuốn sách.
  • Tránh tiết lộ nội dung: Để báo cáo cuốn sách dài hơn, hãy cẩn thận đừng tiết lộ quá nhiều về phần kết.
  • Bám sát câu chuyện: Đảm bảo bản tóm tắt của bạn thể hiện chính xác phong cách viết của tác giả và chủ đề của cuốn sách.
  • Tiếp tục ghi chú: Khi bạn viết phần tóm tắt, hãy tham khảo lại những ghi chú bạn đã thực hiện khi đọc. Điều này sẽ đảm bảo bạn đã nắm bắt được tất cả các điểm chính.

Khi viết tóm tắt cốt truyện, điều quan trọng là phải giữ nó ngắn gọn và rõ ràng. Đừng cố gắng chen vào từng chi tiết nhỏ nhất; chỉ làm nổi bật những điểm cốt truyện thiết yếu. Nếu có liên quan, hãy đề cập đến các biện pháp văn học quan trọng mà tác giả đã sử dụng. Đây thường là những yếu tố như điềm báo hoặc biểu tượng nhưng đừng đi sâu vào chi tiết khi đề cập đến những yếu tố này.

Kết nối các sự kiện lớn với chủ đề chính hoặc thông điệp cơ bản của cuốn sách. Điều này sẽ giúp cho thấy hành động của các nhân vật chính định hình diễn biến câu chuyện như thế nào.

Trong suốt quá trình này, điều quan trọng là phải giữ thái độ trung lập và theo trình tự thời gian. Phần tóm tắt cốt truyện phải là sự kể lại câu chuyện một cách khách quan chứ không phải là một lời phê bình chủ quan. Lưu ý kiến ​​cá nhân để phân tích và kết luận. Cùng với đó, hãy đảm bảo trình bày các sự kiện trong câu chuyện theo đúng thứ tự diễn ra trong sách. Điều này giúp giữ cho dòng chảy hợp lý.

4. Viết phân tích

Viết một bài phân tích mạnh mẽ có thể đưa báo cáo cuốn sách của bạn lên một tầm cao mới. Nó cũng có thể cho thấy mức độ hiểu biết của bạn về chủ đề, nhân vật và chi tiết chính của cuốn sách. Dưới đây là cách tạo ra một bản phân tích chu đáo:

  • Làm nổi bật các chủ đề chính: Xác định các chủ đề chính của cuốn sách và cách chúng tác động đến câu chuyện. Sau đó, bạn phải giải thích những chủ đề này ảnh hưởng như thế nào đến nhân vật chính và sự phát triển của họ trong suốt câu chuyện. Cung cấp các ví dụ cụ thể minh họa cách tác giả khám phá các chủ đề này.
  • Tiến hành phân tích nhân vật: Tập trung vào nhân vật chính, giải thích động cơ của họ, điều gì khiến họ đánh dấu và vai trò của họ trong cốt truyện. Sau khi làm điều đó, hãy phân tích hành động của họ định hình câu chuyện như thế nào và chúng phát triển theo thời gian như thế nào. Thảo luận về mối quan hệ giữa nhân vật chính và những người khác để tiết lộ thêm về động lực của mối quan hệ trong cuốn sách.
  • Kiểm tra các thiết bị văn học : Các báo cáo về sách thường thiếu sót khi bỏ qua phong cách viết và cách sử dụng các biện pháp văn học. Giải nén biểu tượng, hình ảnh hoặc mô-típ làm sâu sắc thêm chủ đề của cuốn sách hoặc nâng cao cốt truyện. Đề cập đến việc những thiết bị này đóng góp như thế nào vào tác động tổng thể của cuốn sách.
  • Cung cấp những hiểu biết quan trọng : Phân tích cách tác giả viết để tác động đến giọng điệu của cuốn sách. Điều quan trọng là so sánh cuốn sách với các tác phẩm khác của cùng tác giả hoặc những cuốn sách tương tự để đưa ra quan điểm. Cung cấp cho người đọc một bài đánh giá ngắn gọn về cuốn sách trong báo cáo nêu bật điểm mạnh và điểm yếu của cuốn sách đồng thời hỗ trợ phân tích của bạn.
  • Luôn tập trung vào các chi tiết chính : Giữ phân tích phù hợp với tuyên bố luận điểm của bạn và chỉ thảo luận về các điểm có liên quan. Hãy chắc chắn sắp xếp phân tích của bạn theo cách có ý nghĩa đối với người đọc.

5. Viết kết luận

Kết luận là bước cuối cùng trong quy trình và nếu bạn làm đúng, bạn có thể có trong tay một báo cáo khá tốt. Phần này sẽ tóm tắt cuốn sách của bạn một cách gọn gàng bằng cách tóm tắt các điểm chính và đưa ra ý kiến ​​cuối cùng. Đây là cách để đi về nó.

  • Trình bày lại luận điểm : Bắt đầu kết luận của bạn bằng cách trình bày lại luận điểm nhưng theo cách khác. Mục tiêu ở đây là tóm tắt lập luận chính của bạn, gắn nó với phân tích của bạn về chủ đề, nhân vật và cốt truyện của cuốn sách.
  • Tóm tắt lại những điểm chính : Cung cấp một bản tóm tắt ngắn gọn về những điểm chính mà bạn đã thảo luận trong các đoạn nội dung, như chủ đề chính, sự phát triển nhân vật và phong cách viết được sử dụng. Bạn cũng nên nêu bật những hiểu biết quan trọng nhất mà báo cáo cuốn sách của bạn đưa ra mà không tạo ra sự lặp lại.
  • Kết nối với phần giới thiệu : Liên kết kết luận của bạn với đoạn giới thiệu bằng cách tham khảo câu nói hoặc câu hỏi ban đầu được đặt ra ở phần đầu. Điều này sẽ tạo ra cảm giác thỏa mãn về sự kết thúc trong báo cáo của bạn.
  • Đưa ra những suy nghĩ cuối cùng : Nếu thích hợp, hãy chia sẻ ý kiến ​​cá nhân của bạn về toàn bộ cuốn sách và liệu nó có đáp ứng được mong đợi của bạn hay không. Đề xuất những người có thể thích đọc cuốn sách này và đưa ra lời khuyên.
  • Để lại ấn tượng mạnh mẽ : Kết thúc phần kết luận của bạn bằng một tuyên bố mạnh mẽ khiến người đọc suy nghĩ về cuốn sách và những phân tích của bạn. Bạn cũng có thể cân nhắc việc liên kết các chủ đề hoặc bài học của cuốn sách với những ý tưởng rộng hơn hoặc những cuốn sách khác.

Lời khuyên bổ sung để viết báo cáo sách

Trước khi bạn vội vàng bắt đầu viết, đây là một số lời khuyên thiết thực cần ghi nhớ:

  • Tìm một cuốn sách thú vị : Chọn một cuốn sách mà bạn thực sự quan tâm. Sự nhiệt tình của bạn sẽ phản ánh trong bài viết của bạn và giúp bạn có động lực trong suốt quá trình viết.
  • Đọc không mệt: Đây là một sai lầm lớn vì bạn sẽ không thể tiếp thu một cách hiệu quả tất cả những gì cuốn sách cung cấp. Hãy nhớ rằng đây là một báo cáo về cuốn sách chứ không chỉ đọc để giải trí. Vì vậy, hãy luôn chọn đọc bằng con mắt mới mẻ để xác định chính xác các yếu tố chính và ghi chú.
  • Sử dụng trích dẫn một cách tiết kiệm : Chỉ bao gồm những trích dẫn có tác động mạnh nhất hỗ trợ trực tiếp cho phân tích của bạn.
  • Tìm một góc nhìn khác : Điều này đặc biệt có thể áp dụng nếu bạn đang viết báo cáo về một cuốn sách nổi tiếng. Cố gắng đưa ra một quan điểm hoặc cách giải thích mới để làm rung chuyển mọi thứ một chút. Xin lưu ý, điều quan trọng là không nên ép buộc. Góc nhìn mới mà bạn mang đến vẫn phải phù hợp với chủ đề của cuốn sách.
  • Ở lại chủ đề: Khi một cuốn sách thú vị, bạn có thể muốn đưa vào và liên kết từng yếu tố riêng lẻ. Đừng làm thế. Đảm bảo mỗi đoạn văn phù hợp với tuyên bố luận điểm của bạn và cung cấp những hiểu biết có giá trị.
  • Đọc lại và sửa lại : Kiểm tra độ rõ ràng, lỗi chính tả và ngữ pháp để đảm bảo báo cáo của bạn được trau chuốt và có cấu trúc tốt.

Viết báo cáo sách dễ dàng với Smodin

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BOOK REPORT Board Game |Fun Creative Challenging|Distance Learning

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Board Game Book Report - use with any novel

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Los Angeles Angels | Angels drop another tight home game against…

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Los Angeles Angels

Los angeles angels | angels drop another tight home game against luis gil, yankees, logan o’hoppe’s solo home run is all the angels can muster against gil, who allows just two hits in eight innings and strikes out nine while handing them their fourth loss in five games, 2-1.

how to make a game for book report

New York Yankees starting pitcher Luis Gil throws to the plate during the first inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson throws to the plate during...

Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson throws to the plate during the first inning of their game against the New York Yankees on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Angels shortstop Zach Neto, center, reacts as he misses a...

Angels shortstop Zach Neto, center, reacts as he misses a catch as he trips over the New York Yankees’ Juan Soto, left, in front of second baseman Luis Rengifo and umpire Vic Carapazza, resulting in a runner’s interference call during the first inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto, front, collides with Angels...

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto, front, collides with Angels shortstop Zach Neto while trying to get back to second base as Neto attempted to make a catch on a ball hit by Giancarlo Stanton during the first inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. Stanton was called out on the play and Soto was also called out on base runner’s interference. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto, right, reacts after being...

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto, right, reacts after being called out for interfering with Angels shortstop Zach Neto, left, while trying to get back to second base on a ball hit by Giancarlo Stanton during the first inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. Stanton was called out on the play and Soto was also called out on base runner’s interference. The Angels lost, 2-1. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto (22) reacts to umpire...

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto (22) reacts to umpire Vic Carapazza in front of Angels second baseman Luis Rengifo, top right, and shortstop Zach Neto, bottom right, after he is called out on runner’s interference during the first inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto, center, reacts between Angels...

The New York Yankees’ Juan Soto, center, reacts between Angels second baseman Luis Rengifo, left, and shortstop Zach Neto, right, after he is called out on runner’s interference during the first inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone, left, argues with umpires...

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone, left, argues with umpires during the first inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. Boone argued after Juan Soto was called out at second base for runner’s interference. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone, left, argues a runner’s...

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone, left, argues a runner’s interference call on Juan Soto, not pictured, with umpires Vic Carapazza (19) and Adam Hamari (78) during the first inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone, left, is ejected by...

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone, left, is ejected by second base umpire Vic Carapazza during the first inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. Boone argued after Juan Soto was called out at second for runner’s interference. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson gets set to pitch during...

Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson gets set to pitch during the second inning of their game against the New York Yankees on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Aaron Judge runs to second base...

The New York Yankees’ Aaron Judge runs to second base as Alex Verdugo grounds out during the first inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

New York Yankees starting pitcher Luis Gil reacts on the...

New York Yankees starting pitcher Luis Gil reacts on the mound during the first inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Anthony Rizzo celebrates in the dugout...

The New York Yankees’ Anthony Rizzo celebrates in the dugout after a runner’s interference call broke up a possible Angels double play during the second inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Angels manager Ron Washington, right, talks with third base umpire...

Angels manager Ron Washington, right, talks with third base umpire Manny Gonzalez during the second inning of their game against the New York Yankees on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson throws to the plate during...

The New York Yankees’ Giancarlo Stanton breaks his bat as he grounds out during the third inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Giancarlo Stanton reacts after breaking his...

The New York Yankees’ Giancarlo Stanton reacts after breaking his bat while hitting a pop fly during the third inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, runs the bases...

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, runs the bases behind Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson after hitting a solo home run during the fourth inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, gestures as he...

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, gestures as he scores after hitting a solo home run, as Angels catcher Logan O’Hoppe looks on during the fourth inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, center, gestures as he...

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, center, gestures as he crosses home plate after hitting a solo home run as Angels catcher Logan O’Hoppe, left, kneels at the plate and home plate umpire Brian Walsh watches during the fourth inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Verdugo reacts in front of Angels...

The New York Yankees’ Verdugo reacts in front of Angels catcher Logan O’Hoppe after hitting a solo home run during the fourth inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, celebrates with teammate...

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, celebrates with teammate Gleyber Torres after hitting a solo home run during the fourth inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo is congratulated by teammates...

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo is congratulated by teammates in the dugout after hitting a solo home run during the fourth inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson throws to the plate during...

Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson throws to the plate during the second inning of their game against the New York Yankees on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Angels shortstop Zach Neto, right, reacts to an out on...

Angels shortstop Zach Neto, right, reacts to an out on New York Yankees star Aaron Judge to end the top of the fifth inning on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

New York Yankees starting pitcher Luis Gil leaves the mound...

New York Yankees starting pitcher Luis Gil leaves the mound after the fifth inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Aaron Judge bats away his gum...

The New York Yankees’ Aaron Judge bats away his gum after striking out during the seventh inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Anthony Volpe reacts at the plate...

The New York Yankees’ Anthony Volpe reacts at the plate as he swings during the seventh inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The New York Yankees’ Anthony Volpe smiles as he heads...

The New York Yankees’ Anthony Volpe smiles as he heads home after a throwing error on his triple during the seventh inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The Angels’ Logan O’Hoppe, left, celebrates with teammate Mickey Moniak...

The Angels’ Logan O’Hoppe, left, celebrates with teammate Mickey Moniak after hitting a home run during the seventh inning of their game against the New York Yankees on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

New York Yankees relief pitcher Clay Holmes throws to the...

New York Yankees relief pitcher Clay Holmes throws to the plate during the ninth inning of their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

New York Yankees catcher Jose Trevino, left, and relief pitcher...

New York Yankees catcher Jose Trevino, left, and relief pitcher Clay Holmes congratulate each other after the final out of their 2-1 victory over the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

New York Yankees outfielders Alex Verdugo, left, Juan Soto, center,...

New York Yankees outfielders Alex Verdugo, left, Juan Soto, center, and Aaron Judge celebrate after their 2-1 victory over the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, and Anthony Volpe...

The New York Yankees’ Alex Verdugo, right, and Anthony Volpe celebrate after their 2-1 victory over the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Angels manager Ron Washington, left, talks with assistant coach Jayson...

Angels manager Ron Washington, left, talks with assistant coach Jayson Nix prior to their game against the New York Yankees on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone watches from the dugout...

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone watches from the dugout before their game against the Angels on Wednesday night at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

ANAHEIM — The Angels spent another night pestering one of the best teams in baseball as they appear ready to enter June with a little less gloom.

The New York Yankees lost their manager to an ejection in the first inning on Wednesday yet still managed to maintain their resolve.

Angels starter Tyler Anderson walked an early tightrope before the Yankees ultimately pulled off a 2-1 victory before a mostly pro-New York crowd.

Unlike the series opener, when the Angels produced an eighth-inning rally for a victory , the offense mustered little against Yankees rookie phenom Luis Gil. The right-hander allowed just one hit until Logan O’Hoppe tagged him for a seventh-inning home run.

The difference ended up being an overthrow to third base on a seventh-inning triple by Anthony Volpe, who was able to dust himself off and walk to the plate when the relay from second baseman Luis Rengifo rolled into the Angels’ dugout.

Yet not everybody was willing to consider two tight games against a top team as a reason to celebrate.

“We have to win (Thursday) and I think we can have that (positive) mindset moving forward,” O’Hoppe said. “We’ve got to win a series against a good club and we’ll cross that bridge when we get there.”

Until the seventh inning, the rule book had been kind to the Angels, who ended up losing for the fourth time in five games. Yankees manager Aaron Boone was tossed in the opening inning when he argued an interference call.

The Yankees loaded the bases against Anderson after three batters, but on a pop-up in the middle of the infield by Giancarlo Stanton, Angels shortstop Zech Neto backed into Juan Soto while trying to make the catch. Umpires already called for an infield fly, to retire Stanton and Soto was ruled out when Neto crashed into him.

“I was just trying to catch the ball,” Neto said. “I wasn’t trying to do it on purpose. It was just bad timing on his part, I guess. But there was no intention for me to get in his way or for him to get into my way.”

Said crew chief Vic Carapazza to a pool reporter: “The only time (runners) are protected is if he was on the base just standing there. So I had him interfering with the infielder and called the infield fly first, which now the batter is out. The interference after that was the second out.”

Carapazza said he did not think Soto tried to intentionally interfere with Neto.

Again in the third inning, more hijinks on the bases ensued when the Yankees’ Anthony Rizzo was hit in the foot by a ground ball while running between second and third base. While Rizzo was called out, the move prevented the Angels from pulling off a double play.

“Kind of some strange stuff,” Anderson said.

New York finally broke through in the fourth when Alex Verdugo hit a home run down the line in right field, much to the delight of the Yankee fans seated up and down the first-base line.

Anderson (5-5) gave up one run despite allowing four hits and six walks in five innings. Five Angels pitchers combined to walk nine batters.

After Volpe’s triple and run scored when Rengifo’s throw got past both third baseman Luis Guillorme and reliever Hunter Strickland, who was backing up the play, the Angels finally found the scoreboard.

O’Hoppe’s sixth home run of the season, just cleared the wall in right center on an 0-and-1 changeup from Gil. It was just the second home run allowed this month by Gil, who owned May with a 6-0 record in six starts and a 0.70 ERA.

Gil (7-1) gave up the lone run over eight innings with nine strikeouts. Yankees starters extended their MLB-record run to 16 consecutive starts of at least five innings and two runs or less.

Volpe also extended his hitting streak to 21 games by delivering two hits.

And yet the Angels managed to hang into the bitter end, making things interesting in the ninth inning against Clay Holmes, who blew the save opportunity Tuesday.

Trailing by a run, Rengifo singled to lead off the ninth and immediately went to second base on a wild pitch. Tuesday’s hero Taylor Ward walked, but Willie Calhoun grounded into a 4-6-3 double play.

Rengifo was left on third base as the tying run when O’Hoppe grounded out to third base to end the game.

“We hung in the game,” Manager Ron Washington said. “We didn’t give ourselves a chance early in the game but we had the winning run on the bag, we had the tying run on the bag. We just didn’t come through.”

The Angels (21-34) are now 7-20 at home, while playing .500 baseball on the road. They haven’t won a series at home all season, are 8-20 in games decided by one or two runs overall and 3-14 in those tight games at Angel Stadium.

Bench coach Brad Ausmus, who managed the Angels in 2019, took over after Boone was ejected.

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Hunter Strickland, Luis Garcia, Matt Moore and closer Carlos Estevez recorded 12 consecutive outs on Tuesday, giving the Angels time to rally past the Yankees, but the bullpen still had a 4.71 ERA through 56 games.

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  1. BOOK REPORT- Board Game! Fun Easy Directions Artistic Creative Challenging

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COMMENTS

  1. Game Board Book Report Project

    For this game board book report project students complete the following tasks: This set of teaching resources contains 3 printable worksheets for students to write their first drafts on. First Draft Worksheet #1: Students write the title, author, and genre of the book. Students choose 22 property titles based on the settings and characters in ...

  2. 12 Creative Book Report Projects Your Students Will Love

    Create a Board Game. When I gave "create a board game about the book you read" as a book report option for my students, I was pleasantly surprised at the results! Quite a few students excitedly chose this option and created some really fun-looking games centered on their books.

  3. FREE Board Game Templates for Book Report and Math Activities

    Free BONUS Printable Book Report: If you need a shorter "book report" worksheet-style template, then this "My Favorite Book" worksheet is just what you need! It's perfect for any age from kindergarten through 5th grade. Students fill in each of the blanks on one side, and then draw and color a scene from the book on the blank side of ...

  4. Game Ideas: How to Make a Game Board Based on a Book

    The book report is becoming obsolete in some schools as teachers strive to give their students assignments that are creative, hands-on and that require critical thinking skills. ... Make your own game pieces in the form of characters from the book if you are feeling creative. Type the instructions for your game. Keep them simple—more than ...

  5. 42 Creative Book Report Ideas for Every Grade and Subject

    Browse book report board game resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, a marketplace trusted by millions of teachers for original educational resources. 40. Cereal Box . Recycle a cereal box and create ampere buy report Wheaties-style. Decorate all sides of the cabinet is information about and book's characters, setting, plot, summary, etc.

  6. 10 creative ideas for homeschool book reports

    1. Design a Game. Make a game based a book you recently read. It can be a board game, card game, guessing game, or other idea. Write step-by-step directions and rules that are easy to follow. Gather any extra supplies needed to play the game, and then try it out with a friend or family member. 2. Plan a Birthday Gift.

  7. Creating Board Games Based on Children's Literature

    Creating a literature-based board game is a creative alternative to the standard book report. Comprehension can be demonstrated through the creation of questions written on cards, directions located on the board, and/or illustrations. For example, cards and game spaces could reference positive events that move a player forward and negative ...

  8. Create A Game book report

    For your book report you will be creating a board game. After you have read your book, do the following things: Create a playing board designed with a path of spaces leading from "Start" to "Finish". In each space you will mention events that happened in your book. Include the main idea, some of the important details and action events ...

  9. Book Report Project Ideas and Forms: Trading cards, book mobiles

    A character trading card project: This book project focuses on recalling facts about a character and creating trading cards. Book mobile project: This book project guides students in identifying setting/characters and problem/solution, and in creating a mobile.Tips: glue white paper to backs of construction paper for the illustrations (step #1 ...

  10. PDF Game Board Book Report

    Glue this piece on last, making sure to line up the top and left edges. 5. Now cut out the whole game board along the black outer borders. Glue this piece in the middle of the game board (at a slanted angle) so that it covers the middle section where all the pieces meet together. Cut out your 15 trivia cards.

  11. Results for make a board game book report

    Looking for a fun and creative book report project? Middle or high school students will really get into creating their own board game based on their book.This project can be used as a post-reading assessment for a whole class novel, short story, independent reading, or even a long poem. Works of fiction are the most effective to use this project with.This product is no-prep, so can you can ...

  12. 26 EPIC Book Report Ideas

    These ideas are great for book report ideas for 5th grade and elementary age students. Make a diorama - these still my children's favorite. Create a book jacket - different than the original. Kids will love making these book report t-shirts. Present an oral book report - dress up as your favorite character.

  13. Cereal Box Book Reports

    On the back of the cereal box book report, students created a fun game or activity related to the book. Some made a word search, while others designed mazes, word scrambles, or riddles. The title, name of the author, and book ratings were added to the top of the cereal box book reports. You can either create your own rubric and project ...

  14. Board Game Book Report Template: Make Your Own Board Game Based ...

    Students love this creative Create Your Own Board Game book report and it is a great way to recycle/reuse materials too. Students are responsible for creating the Game Board, Game Pieces and completing a Game Directions sheet and Book Summary sheet. Board Game Book Report product includes: - Create a Game Project Information

  15. 12 Creative Book Report Projects Your Students Will Love

    Create a Board Game. When I gave "create a board game around the volume thou read" such a get report option for my students, I was pleasantly surprised at the results! Quite an few students excitedly chose this select and created some really fun-looking games centring on their books.

  16. Free Book Report Templates: Printable for Grades 3-5

    Four different activities are ready to print to help you take a new spin on your next book report assignment for fiction or nonfiction books. Students will love filling in their mini book report one-pagers or making their selections from the choice board to share details about what they read. Get My Book Report Template Printables.

  17. Create a Board Game Book Report Project

    Middle or high school students will really get into creating their own board game based on their book. This project can be used as a post-reading assessment for a whole class novel, short story, independent reading, or even a long poem. Works of fiction are the most effective to use this project with. This product is no-prep, so can you can ...

  18. How to Write a Book Report

    The body paragraphs of your book report accomplish several goals: they describe the plot, delve more deeply into the characters and themes that make the book unique, and include quotations and examples from the book. Below are some resources to help you succeed in summarizing and analyzing your chosen text.

  19. How to Write a Book Report

    Here's how to write a book report: Read the book carefully: Start by reading the book thoroughly. Take notes on key points, characters, themes, and any passages that stand out. Create an Outline: Organize your thoughts and notes into an outline. This will be your roadmap and will help keep your writing focused.

  20. 42 Creative Book Report Ideas for Every Grade and Subject

    Also called a lap book, this easy-to-make book report hits on all the major elements of a book study and gives students a chance to show what they know in a colorful way. 22. Collage. Create a collage using pictures and words that represent different parts of the book. Use old magazines or print pictures from the Internet. 23. Book Report Triorama

  21. Design A Game Book Report by Ruth S.

    Students will be motivated to work for the extra bonus points that are offered! A note to parents is also included with all the instructions about the report and a slip to send back to you. Complete instructions are included. Design a Game Book Report An amazing book report. Students create games based on stories they've read.

  22. How To Write a Book Report?

    Arrange your notes to focus on the main themes, important aspects of the plot, and your personal thoughts. Then, think about how you'll analyze the author's writing style and use of literary devices. 2. Write the Introduction. The introduction sets the stage for your entire book report.

  23. Results for Game Board Book Report Project

    This adaptable project can be used as a final project for a book report, literature unit, or history unit. Students will use their knowledge of the book or unit and create a board game. Games can also be used in class as a fun way to review. This could easily be adjusted to fit most grades. A great activity for the day before a break!

  24. Angels drop another tight home game against Luis Gil, Yankees

    The Angels (21-34) are now 7-20 at home, while playing .500 baseball on the road. They haven't won a series at home all season, are 8-20 in games decided by one or two runs overall and 3-14 in ...