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  • Ghostbusters

Egon Spengler: There's something very important I forgot to tell you.

Peter Venkman: What?

Spengler: Don't cross the streams.

Venkman: Why?

Spengler: It would be bad.

Venkman: I'm fuzzy on the whole good/bad thing. What do you mean, "bad"?

Spengler: Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously and every molecule in your body exploding at the speed of light.

Ray Stantz: Total protonic reversal.

Venkman: Right. That's bad. Okay. All right. Important safety tip. Thanks, Egon.

[The Ghostbusters have just completed a hunt in a hotel]

Peter Venkman: We came, we saw, we kicked its ass!

Hotel Manager: Did you see it? What was it?

Ray Stantz: [holding up the steaming ghost-trap] We got it!

Hotel Manager: What is it? Will there be any more of them?

Stantz: Sir, what you had there is what we refer to as a focused, non-terminal repeating phantasm, or a Class Five full-roaming vapor. Real nasty one, too!

Venkman: Let's talk seriously, now. [Spengler holds up four fingers behind the Manager] For the entrapment, we're gonna have to ask you for four big ones. Four-thousand dollars for that. But we are having a special this week on proton charging and storage of the beast, [Spengler holds up one finger] and that's only going to come to one-thousand dollars, fortunately.

Hotel Manager: Five thousand dollars? I had no idea it would be so much. I won't pay it.

Venkman: Well, that's all right. We can just put it right back in there.

Stantz: We certainly can, Dr. Venkman.

Hotel Manager: No, no, no, no! All right! I'll pay anything!

Venkman: Thanks so much.

(EPA agent Walter Peck is visiting the Ghostbusters' home base but is frustrated at their stonewalling)

Walter Peck: And where do you put these ghosts, once you catch them?

Peter Venkman: In a storage facility.

Peck: And may I see this storage facility?

Venkman: No.

Peck: Why not?

Venkman: Because you did not use the magic word.

Peck: What is the magic word, Mr. Venkman?

Venkman: "Please."

Peck: [chuckles] May I please see the storage facility?

Venkman: Why do you want to see the storage facility?

Peck: Well, because I'm curious. I want to know more about what you do here! Frankly, there have been a lot of wild stories in the media and we want to assess for any possible environmental impact from your operation! For instance, the presence of noxious, possibly hazardous waste chemicals in your basement! Now you either show me what is down there, or I come back with a court order.

Venkman: You go get a court order! And I'll sue your ass for wrongful prosecution.

Peck: You can have it your way, Mr. Venkman.

[The Ghostbusters are studying the blueprints of Dana's apartment building and uncover some startling facts]

Egon Spengler: The structure of this roof cap is exactly like the kind of telemetry tracker that NASA uses to identify dead pulsars in deep space.

Ray Stantz: Cold riveted girders with cores of pure selenium.

Peter Venkman: [to jailbirds] Everyone getting this so far? So what? I guess they just don't make them like they used to.

Stantz: [slaps Venkman up the head] No! Nobody ever made them like this! The architect was either a certified genius or an authentic wacko!

Venkman: Ray, for a moment, pretend that I don't know anything about metallurgy, engineering, or physics, and just tell me what the hell is going on.

Stantz: You never studied. The whole building is a huge super-conductive antenna that was designed and built expressly for the purpose of pulling in and concentrating spiritual turbulence. Your girlfriend, Pete, lives in the corner penthouse of Spook Central.

Venkman: She's not my girlfriend. I find her interesting because she's a client and because she sleeps above her covers. Four feet above her covers! She barks, she drools, she claws...

Spengler: It's not the girl, Peter, it's the building! Something terrible is about to enter our world, and this building is obviously the door. The architect's name was Ivo Shandor. I found it in Tobin's Spirit Guide. He was also a doctor. Performed a lot of unnecessary surgery. And then in 1920, he founded a secret society.

Venkman: Let me guess: Gozer worshippers?

Spengler: Right.

Venkman: [to Stantz] "No studying"!

Spengler: After the First World War, Shandor decided that society was too sick to survive. And he wasn't alone; he had close to a thousand followers when he died. They conducted rituals up on the roof, bizarre rituals intended to bring about the end of the world, and now it looks like it may actually happen!

Venkman: [singing] So be good, for goodness sake! Whoa! Somebody's coming! Somebody's coming!

Ray Stantz: We have to get out of here. We've gotta get a judge or something.

Zeddemore: Hey, wait a minute! Hold it! Now are we actually gonna go before a federal judge, and tell him that some moldy Babylonian god is gonna drop in on Central Park West and start tearing up the city?!

Spengler: Sumerian, not Babylonian.

Venkman: Yeah. Big difference.

Zeddemore: No offense, guys, but I gotta get my own lawyer.

Ray Stantz: Everything was fine with our system until the power grid was shut off by dickless here.

Walter Peck: They caused an explosion!

Mayor: Is this true?

Peter Venkman: Yes it's true. This man is has no dick.

Peck: Jeez! [charges at Venkman]

Mayor: Break it up! Hey, break this up! Break it up!

Peck: Alright, alright, alright!

Venkman: Well, that's what I heard!

[The Ghostbusters try to convince New York's Mayor to let them go and face the ghost threat all over the Big Apple]

Peter Venkman: Well, you can believe Mr. Pecker...

Walter Peck: My name is "Peck."

Venkman: Or you can accept the fact that this city is headed for a disaster of biblical proportions.

Mayor: What do you mean, "biblical"?

Ray Stantz: What he means is Old Testament, Mr. Mayor, real wrath-of-God type stuff!

Venkman: Exactly.

Stantz: Fire and brimstone coming down from the sky! Rivers and seas boiling!

Spengler: Forty years of darkness! Earthquakes, volcanoes!

Winston Zeddemore: The dead rising from the grave!

Venkman: Human sacrifice! Dogs and cats, living together! Mass hysteria!

Mayor: Enough, I get the point! And what if you're wrong?

Venkman: If we're wrong, then nothing happens! We go to jail; peacefully, quietly. We'll enjoy it! But if we're right, and we can stop this thing... Lenny, you will have saved the lives of millions of registered voters.

Walter Peck: I don't believe you're seriously considering listening to these men!

Mayor: [to officers while pointing at Peck] Get him outta here.

[Gozer materializes in front of the Ghostbusters in the form of a woman.]

Ray Stantz: Gozer the Gozerian? Good evening. As a duly-designated representative of the City, County and State of New York, I order you to cease any and all supernatural activity and return forthwith to your place of origin, or to the next convenient parallel dimension.

Peter Venkman: That 'oughta do it. Thanks very much, Ray.

Gozer: Are you a god?

Ray Stantz: [looks at Venkman, who nods] Err... No.

Gozer: Then... DIIIIIIIIE! [sends the Ghostbusters sprawling with lightning bolts]

Winston Zeddmore: Ray, when someone asks you if you're a god, you say "YES!"

Gozer: Sub-creatures! Gozer the Gozerian, Gozer the Destructor, Volguus Zildrohar, the Traveller has come! Choose and perish!

Ray Stantz: What do you mean, choose? We don't understand!

Gozer: Choose! Choose the form of the Destructor!

Peter Venkman: Oh, I get it. Real cute! [to the others] Whatever we think of- if we think of J. Edgar Hoover, J. Edgar Hoover will appear and destroy us, okay? So empty your heads, don't think of anything. We've only got one shot at this.

Gozer: The choice is made!

Venkman: Whoa! Hold on!

Gozer: The Traveller has come!

Venkman: Nobody chose anything! [turns to Egon] Did you think of anything?

Egon Spengler: No.

Venkman: [to Winston] Did you?

Winston Zeddmore: My mind is totally blank.

Venkman: I didn't think anything. [All three slowly turn to look at Ray]

Stantz: I couldn't help it. It just popped in there.

Venkman: [sternly] What? What "just popped in there?"

Stantz: I- I- I tried to think...

Spengler: Look! [They all look over one side of the roof]

Stantz: No! It can't be!

Venkman: What is it?

Stantz: It can't be!

Venkman: What did you do, Ray?!

Zeddemore: Oh no! [They all see a giant cubic white head topped with a sailor hat]

Stantz: [sighs, resigned] It's the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man.

[Watching the gigantic Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man stamping towards them]

Ray Stantz: I tried to think of the most harmless thing. Something I loved from my childhood. Something that could never ever possibly destroy us. Mr. Stay Puft!

Peter Venkman: Nice thinkin', Ray.

Stantz: We used to roast Stay Puft Marshmallows on the fire at Camp Waconda...

Venkman: Ray has gone bye-bye, Egon. What you got?

Egon Spengler: Sorry, Venkman, I'm terrified beyond the capacity for rational thought

Egon Spengler: I have a radical idea. If the door swings both ways, we could reverse the particle flow through the gate.

Peter Venkman: How?

Spengler: We'll cross the streams.

Venkman: Excuse me, Egon, you said crossing the streams was bad.

Ray Stantz: Cross the streams...

Venkman: You're gonna endanger us, you're gonna endanger our client. The nice lady who paid us in advance before she became a dog.

Spengler: Not necessarily. There's definitely a very slim chance we'll survive. [team ponders]

Venkman: I love this plan! I'm excited to be a part of it. Let's do it!

Winston Zeddmore: This job is definitely not worth eleven-five a year!

They're Here To Save The World.

Coming To Save The World This Summer.

We're Ready To Believe You.

Who ya gonna call? Ghostbusters!

The supernatural spectacular

They ain't afraid of no ghost.

The world's most successful comedy

Dr. Peter Venkman : Alice, I'm going to ask you a couple of standard questions, okay? Have you or any of your family been diagnosed schizophrenic? Mentally incompetent?

Librarian Alice : My uncle thought he was Saint Jerome.

Dr. Peter Venkman : I'd call that a big yes. Uh, are you habitually using drugs? Stimulants? Alcohol?

Librarian Alice : No.

Dr. Peter Venkman : No, no. Just asking. Are you, Alice, menstruating right now?

Library Administrator : What has that got to do with it?

Dr. Peter Venkman : Back off, man. I'm a scientist.

Dr. Peter Venkman : We came, we saw, we kicked its ass!

Dr. Peter Venkman : We've been going about this all wrong. This Mr. Stay Puft's okay! He's a sailor, he's in New York; we get this guy laid, we won't have any trouble!

Dr. Peter Venkman : NOBODY steps on a church in my town.

Dr. Raymond Stantz : My parents left me that house. I was born there.

Dr. Peter Venkman : You're not gonna lose the house, everybody has three mortgages nowadays.

Dana Barrett: That's the bedroom, but nothing ever happened in there.

Peter Venkman: What a crime.

Ray Stantz: You know, it's just occurred to me. We really haven't had a successful test of this equipment.

Egon Spengler: I blame myself.

Peter Venkman: So do I.

Ray Stantz: Well, no sense in worrying about it now.

Peter Venkman: Why worry? Each one of us is wearing an unlicensed nuclear accelerator on his back.

Ray Stantz: Yep. Well, let's get ready. Switch me on.

[Egon turns on Ray's proton pack, and he and Peter back away from Ray uneasily]

[ EPA agent Walter Peck is visiting the Ghostbusters]

Peter Venkman: Can I help you?

Walter Peck: I'm Walter Peck, I'm with the Environmental Protection... [Venkman shakes hands with Peck and still has Ectoplasm on his hands] ...Agency, the third district.

Peter Venkman: [wipes the Ectoplasm on Peck's Suit] Great, how's it going down there?

Walter Peck: Are you Peter Venkman?

Peter Venkman: Yes, I'm... Dr. Venkman.

Walter Peck: Exactly what are you a doctor of, Mr. Venkman?

Peter Venkman: Well, I have a PhD in Parapsychology and Psychology.

Walter Peck: I see. And now, you catch ghosts.

Peter Venkman: Yeah, you can say that.

Walter Peck: And how many ghosts have you caught, Mr. Venkman?

Peter Venkman: I'm not at liberty to say.

Peter Venkman: Into a storage facility.

Walter Peck: And would the storage facility be located on these premises?

Peter Venkman: Yes.

Walter Peck: And may I see this storage facility?

Peter Venkman: No.

Walter Peck: And why not, Mr. Venkman?

Peter Venkman: Because you did not use the magic word.

Walter Peck: What is the magic word, Mr. Venkman?

Peter Venkman: "Please."

Walter Peck: May I please see the [chuckles] storage facility, Mr. Venkman?

Peter Venkman: Why do you want to see the storage facility?

Walter Peck: Well, because I'm curious. I want to know more about what you do here. Frankly, there have been a lot of wild stories in the media and we want to assess for any possible environmental impact from your operation. For instance, the presence of noxious, possibly hazardous waste chemicals in your basement. Now you either show me what is down there, or I come back with a court order.

Peter Venkman: You go get a court order, and I'll sue your ass for wrongful prosecution.

Walter Peck: You can have it your way, Mr. Venkman.

Walter Peck: I am Walter Peck, sir, and I'm prepared to make a full report. These men are consummate snowball artists. They use sensitive nerve gases to induce hallucinations. People think they're seeing ghosts, and they call these bozos, who conveniently show up to deal with the problem with a fake electronic light show.

Venkman: Yes it's true. This man has no dick.

Walter Peck: Jeez! [charges at Venkman; everybody tries to pull them apart]

Police Sergeant: Break it up! Hey, break this up! Break it up!

Walter Peck: Alright, alright, alright!

Peter Venkman: Well, that's what I heard!

Mayor: This is City Hall! Now what am I gonna do here, John? What is this?

Fire Commissioner: All I know is that was no light show we saw this morning. I've seen every kind of combustion known to man, but this beats the Hell out of me.

Police Commissioner: The walls in the 53rd precinct were bleeding. How do you explain that?

Archbishop: [enters City Hall] Good afternoon, gentlemen.

Mayor: Oh... Your Eminence. [kisses Archbishop's ring]

Archbishop: How are you, Lenny?

Mayor Lenny: You're looking good, Mike. [gives Mike a friendly tap] We're in a real fix, here. What do you think I should do?

Mike: Lenny, officially, the Church will not take any position on the religious implications of these phenomena. Personally, Lenny, I think it's a sign from God. But don't quote me on that.

Peter Venkman: I think that's a smart move, Mike.

Mayor Lenny: Now, I'm not gonna call a press conference and tell everyone to start praying.

Winston Zeddemore: I'm, uh, Winston Zeddemore, Your Honor. I've only been with the company for a couple of weeks, but I gotta tell you: these things are real. Since I joined these men, I have seen sh*t that'll turn you white!

Peter Venkman: ...or you could accept the fact that this city is headed for a disaster of biblical proportions.

Mayor Lenny: What do you mean, "biblical"?

Ray Stantz: What he means is Old Testament, Mr. Mayor. Real Wrath-of-God type stuff!

Peter Venkman: Exactly.

Ray Stantz: Fire and brimstone coming down from the skies! Rivers and seas boiling!

Egon Spengler: 40 years of darkness! Earthquakes, volcanoes!

Peter Venkman: Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together, mass hysteria!

Mayor Lenny: Enough, I get the point! And what if you're wrong?

Peter Venkman: If I'm wrong, then nothing happens! We go to jail; peacefully, quietly. We'll enjoy it! But if I'm right, and we can stop this thing... Lenny, you will have saved the lives of millions of registered voters. [Mayor slightly smiles and the Archbishop of New York nods in agreement]

Walter Peck: I don't believe you're seriously considering listening to these men.

Mayor: [contemplates; to officers while pointing at Peck] Get him outta here.

Peter Venkman: [waving] Bye.

Walter Peck: I'll fix you, Venkman. I'm gonna fix you!

Peter Venkman: I am going to send you a nice fruit basket. I'm gonna miss him!

Walter Peck: All right, all right!

Mayor Lenny: Alright, we've got work to do. Now what do you need from me?

Gozer the Gozerian: Sub-creatures. Gozer the Gozerian, Gozer the Destructor, Volgus Zildrohar, the Traveler has come. Choose and perish.

Ray Stantz: What do you mean, choose? We don't understand.

Gozer the Gozerian: Choose. Choose the form of the Destructor.

Peter Venkman: Oh, I get it! I get it. Oh! Very cute. [to the others] "Whatever we think of." If we think of J. Edgar Hoover, J. Edgar Hoover will appear and destroy us, okay? So empty your heads. Empty your heads. Don't think of anything. We've only got one shot at this.

Gozer the Gozerian: The choice is made.

Peter Venkman: Whoa! Ho-ho--! Whoa!

Gozer the Gozerian: The Traveler has come.

Peter Venkman: Nobody "choosed" anything! [turns to Egon] Did you choose anything?

Peter Venkman: [to Winston] Did you?

Winston Zeddemore: My mind is totally blank.

Peter Venkman: I didn't choose anything! [All three slowly turn to confront Ray]

Ray Stantz: I couldn't help it. It just popped in there.

Peter Venkman: [sternly] What? What just popped in there?

Ray Stantz: I-- I-I tried to think--

Egon Spengler: LOOK! [They all look over one side of the roof]

Ray Stantz: No! It can't be!

Peter Venkman: What is it?

Ray Stantz: It can't be!

Peter Venkman: What did you do, Ray?

Winston Zeddemore: Oh, sh*t!

[They all see a giant cubic white head topped with a sailor hat]

Ray Stantz: [resigned] It's the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.

[the Ghostbusters watch the gigantic form of Mr. Stay-Puft stomping towards them]

Peter Venkman: Well, there's something you don't see every day.

Ray Stantz: I tried to think of the most harmless thing. Something I loved from my childhood, something that could never, ever possibly destroy us: Mr. Stay-Puft.

Ray Stantz: We used to roast Stay Puft Marshmallows, on the fire at Camp Waconda. [feeling as if he's about to cry]

Peter Venkman: Ray has gone bye-bye, Egon. What have you got left?

Egon Spengler: Sorry, Venkman. I'm terrified beyond the capacity for rational thought.

[the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man growls at the Ghostbusters]

Winston Zeddemore: [stunned] Oh, no.

Peter Venkman: Mother pus-bucket. [Mr. Stay Puft growls and crushes a church] Nobody steps on a church in my town!

Ray Stantz: 1...2...3... Roast 'im! [he and the other Ghostbusters set Mr. Stay Puft on fire, and he starts climbing the building]

Peter Venkman: Whoa! [he and the other Ghostbusters hide]

Ray Stantz: Funny, us going out like this: Killed by a 100-foot Marshmallow Man.

Peter Venkman: We've been going about this all wrong. This Mr. Stay-Puft is okay. He's a sailor, he's in New York. We get this guy laid, we won't have any trouble.

[Mr. Stay-Puft continues climbing building]

Egon Spengler: I have a radical idea. The door swings both ways. We could reverse the particle flow through the gate.

Ray Stantz: How?

Egon Spengler: [reluctantly] We'll cross the streams.

Peter Venkman: Excuse me, Egon, you said crossing the streams was bad.

Ray Stantz: Cross the streams.

Peter Venkman: You're gonna endanger us, you're gonna endanger our client. The nice lady who paid us in advance before she became a dog.

Egon Spengler: Not necessarily. There's definitely a very slim chance we'll survive. [team ponders]

Peter Venkman: I love this plan! I'm excited to be a part of it! Let's do it!

Winston Zeddemore: This job is definitely not worth $11,500 a year!

[Last line]

Winston Zeddemore: I love this town!

Ray If someone asks you if you're a god you say yes

Peter Venkman: All right. This chick is toast!

[The Ghostbusters form a line and slowly, confidently advance on Gozer.]

Peter Venkman: Got your stick?

Ray, Egon, Winston: [together] Holdin'!

Peter Venkman: Heat 'em up!

Ray, Egon, Winston: [together] Smokin'!

Peter Venkman: Make 'em haaard!

Ray, Egon, Winston: [together] Ready!

Peter Venkman: Let's show this prehistoric b*tch how we do things downtown.

Dr. Ray Stantz: Personally, I liked the University. They gave us money and facilities, we didn't have to produce anything! You've never been out of college! You don't know what it's like out there! I've worked in the private sector. They expect results.

Winston Zeddemore: Ah, If there's a steady paycheck in it?, I believe anything you say.

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20 Things You Might Not Know About Ghostbusters

By sean hutchinson | jul 14, 2016.

Dan Aykroyd, Bill Murray, and Harold Ramis in Ghostbusters (1984).

As Paul Feig's reboot of Ivan Reitman's classic sci-fi-horror-comedy readies to hit theaters, we're looking back at the film that started it all.

1. DAN A YKROY D FOUND INSPIRATION FOR THE MOVIE IN HIS FAMILY 'S HISTORY .

Dan Aykroyd grew up surrounded by spiritualists . His great-grandfather, Samuel A. Aykroyd, was a noted nineteenth century psychic investigator who conducted séances at the Aykroyd family farmhouse in eastern Ontario with a medium named Walter Ashurst. This predilection for the paranormal was passed down to Aykroyd’s grandfather, Maurice, who was an engineer for the Bell Telephone Company. Maurice allegedly tried to use his know-how to create a high-vibration crystal radio that could contact the spirit world. Dan's father, Peter, kept a sizeable library of books about spooky subjects (including his great grandfather’s séances), which kept ghosts and ghouls in the back of young Aykroyd’s mind. After he left Saturday Night Live  in 1979, he read an article about parapsychology in an  American Society of Psychical Research  publication, which inspired Ghostbusters .

2. GHOSTBUSTERS COULD HAVE BEEN MUCH DIFFERENT—AND M UCH BIGGER .

Aykroyd found comedic inspiration in films like Bob Hope's  The Ghost Breakers , the horror-comedies of Abbott and Costello, and Bowery Boys fare like  Spook Busters and Ghost Chasers.  He went wild writing his original script, which took place in the future and had a much darker tone. The actors he had in mind for the three main protagonists were himself, John Belushi, and Eddie Murphy. His concept involved dozens of Ghostbuster groups fighting specters across time and different dimensions. The now-iconic Stay Puft Marshmallow Man—which is in the climax of the finished film—appeared much earlier (on page 20) and was one of 50 large-scale monsters that the Ghostbusters would do battle with. Eventual director Ivan Reitman estimated that the first script would have cost up to $300 million to produce—and that was in 1984.

3. J OHN BELUSH I STILL APPEARS IN THE F INAL FILM, IN SPIRIT .

Part of the reason Aykroyd had to recontextualize and rethink his idea—other than its implausible potential budget—was the tragic death of his fellow former SNL castmate John Belushi, whom he envisioned as the sarcastic Peter Venkman. The role was later immortalized by Bill Murray, another SNL  alum, but the writers still wanted to honor Belushi by somehow involving him in the movie. When it came time to think up the design for the first ghost the group is commissioned to bust, Aykroyd conceived of a gross-looking, gluttonous, party-guy persona for the apparition as an ironic homage to his friend Belushi. The ghost made it to the screen and was later christened “Slimer.”

4. THE MOVIE HAD TO BE MADE IN A VERY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME .

Once Aykroyd nailed down the general concept and the narrative of the film (but before he'd penned the final draft ),  he brought on Ivan Reitman, not only to direct, but also to sell the movie to a major motion picture studio. Reitman had previously directed the popular Bill Murray comedies Meatballs and Stripes —both of which had been co-written by another eventual Ghostbuster, Harold Ramis. Since Reitman had a relationship with Columbia Pictures (which produced Stripes ), he approached pragmatic studio head Frank Price with Aykroyd’s outrageous one-sentence pitch—“Ghost janitors in New York”—in May 1983. While admittedly skeptical, Price was attracted to the project because the tripartite of comedy geniuses who had agreed to play the leads: Aykroyd, Murray, and Ramis.

Price asked Reitman just how much the outrageous-sounding movie would cost, and the director allegedly threw out a random guesstimate of $30 million. Price agreed on the budget and the movie with one stipulation—that it must have a firm release in June 1984, in time for the summer season. This was no small detail, considering this gave them only 12 months to finish the script, shoot the film, and create and finish the special effects. The rushed production schedule immediately forced Aykroyd, Ramis, and Reitman to retreat to rented houses on Martha’s Vineyard for a marathon three-week writing session to complete the final shooting script. Afterward, they immediately began prepping the shoot and scouting locations.

5. SIGOURNEY WEAVER GAVE A UNIQUE AUDITION.

ghostbusters define bad

Despite the fact that the film began production with its three leads already cast, Reitman needed the right actress for another vital part of the film. For the role of Venkman’s headstrong love interest, Dana Barrett, Reitman chose Sigourney Weaver. She was eager to do a comedy after her amazing performance as Ripley in Ridley Scott’s Alien, so she tried something altogether different for her audition . She offered up a wordless scene where she turned into one of the grotesque dogs that do Gozer’s bidding, an act that allegedly involved writhing across the casting couch and loudly snarling at Reitman. The director was impressed—if not a little scared—and she got the part.

6. THE PART OF LOUIS TULLY WAS ORIGINALLY WRITTEN FOR ANOTHER SECOND CITY ALUM.

For the loveable loser-turned whacked-out demon “Keymaster of Gozer” Louis Tully, Aykroyd thought of actor John Candy. The Canadian comedian had previously worked with him in 1941 and The Blues Brothers; with Reitman, Ramis, and Murray in Stripes ; and for Ramis again in National Lampoon’s Vacation . But Candy envisioned Louis as a stern German man with a thick accent who kept dozens of dogs in his apartment. He also wanted the character rewritten and made into a starring role. Filmmakers preferred the original character that Aykroyd and Reitman had developed, so they gave the role to another member of the Second City troupe, Rick Moranis. The soft-spoken, bespectacled comic brought his own brand of misfit comedy and improv styles to the now-classic character—and he also provided his own wardrobe.

7. "EGON SPENGLER" WAS INSPIRED BY A FRIEND, AN INTELLECTUAL, AND AN UNKNOWN.

When trying to come up with the perfect name for his character—who was the brains of the Ghostbusters—co-writer Harold Ramis combined both personal and academic inspirations. “Egon” was the first name of Egon Donsbeck, a Hungarian exchange student at Stephen K. Hayt Elementary School who was Ramis' classmate when he grew up in Chicago. “Spengler” came from German historian and philosopher Oswald Spengler. For the "look" of his character, Ramis copied the style of an unknown guy he'd seen on the cover of an abstract architectural journal. He thought the man’s old three-piece tweed suit, wire-rim glasses, and puffed-up hair were perfect for his geeky parapsychologist.

8. GHOSTBUSTERS IS THOUG HT OF AS A NEW YORK MOVIE, BUT SOME SIMPLE MOVIE MAGIC WENT INTO MAKING ITS VARIOUS LOCATIONS .

ghostbusters define bad

Come to New York and you can visit some key Ghostbusters   locations . The exterior of the fully functioning FDNY Hook & Ladder #8 building at 14 North Moore Street in TriBeCa served as the Ghostbusters’ base of operations—definitely not a “demilitarized zone,” as Egon said. The building at 55 Central Park West housed the apartments of Dana Barrett and Louis Tully. The main branch of the New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street is recognizable for the lions guarding its entrance, and Columbia University’s Havemeyer Hall  served as the Weaver Hall Department of Psychology  building that the guys are kicked out of at the beginning of the movie. Then there’s the legendary restaurant  Tavern on the Green , where Louis was attacked by one of Gozer’s dogs.

But none of these places appear exactly as they do onscreen. The interior of the Ghostbusters' firehouse was actually an abandoned fire station in Los Angeles, and the rooftop temple scenes at Dana’s apartment were filmed at a huge set built on Stage 16 at Columbia Pictures (large-scale matte paintings were used for long shots). The early library scene where Egon is introduced was in fact filmed at the New York Public Library, but the scene where the three Ghostbusters come across the old librarian ghost in the stacks was actually shot across the country at the Los Angeles Public Library. Similarly, the Sedgewick Hotel—where the guys bust Slimer—wasn’t in New York at all; the exterior and interior shots were taken at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles.

9. THE ECTOMOBILE WAS ONE A KIND—AND THEN I T B ROKE DOWN .

Out of the handful of iconic details from Ghostbusters is the Ectomobile, a 1959 Cadillac ambulance outfitted with gadgets and gizmos to help the guys bag pesky poltergeists. In a typical movie production, several similarly-adorned vehicles are used for stylistic and insurance purposes. (The production of Back to the Future,  for instance, used three different DeLoreans.) Because the filming of Ghostbusters was so rushed, only one Ectomobile was put together. Naturally, everyone on set was very cautious around the then-25-year-old jalopy. While they handled the ambulance with care, the car broke down at the end of a shot of the Ecto driving across the Manhattan Bridge. Luckily, this didn't happen until after main production wrapped in New York City, but still, the car was DOA and wasn’t available for use again.

10. ONE VISUAL EFFECT SHOT OF SLIMER INVOLVED SOME SP RAY PAINT AND A PEANUT .

Visual effects supervisor Richard Edlund and his team—who also worked on such films as Raiders of the Lost Ark,  the original Star Wars  trilogy, and Poltergeist —were given only 10 months to design, storyboard, build, and shoot every special effect in the film. The quick turnaround forced workers like animation supervisor Terry Windell to have to think on their feet, especially when the deadline got very tight. When a wide shot that featured Slimer quickly floating around a chandelier in the Sedgewick Hotel scene wasn’t coming out right, and time was running out, Windell spraypainted a small peanut green in order to mimic the green ghoul. The seconds-long shot depicted Slimer blurred and spinning, so detail wasn’t a factor, and the shot was used in the final print of the film. Windell revealed that the extreme tactics taken for certain shots proved that the effects team was “totally serious about making it stupid.”

11. DIRECTOR IVAN REITMAN MA DE A COUPLE OF UNORTHODOX APPEARANCES IN THE MOVIE .

You won't see Reitman in Ghostbusters , but still, he does have a presence: For the noises of Slimer pigging out on a pile of food before he famously slimes Peter Venkman, Reitman stepped in to provide the gross-out grub-gorging sounds. Reitman’s naturally deep voice also proved perfect for the moment when Dana becomes possessed and says “There is no Dana, only Zuul,” which was later enhanced with special effects for a truly spooky result.

12. BILL MURRAY'S CADDYSHACK CHARACTER, CARL SPACKLER, APPEARED IN ONE SCENE THAT WAS CUT .

It isn’t specified, but the voice and mannerisms of the character that Murray plays opposite Dan Aykroyd in this deleted scene is eerily similar to Carl Spackler , the lowly groundskeeper he portrayed in the 1980 comedy masterpiece Caddyshack (which was directed and co-written by Harold Ramis). The scene was cut for time, mostly to get to the scene where Louis Tully is attacked by the demon dog chasing him, but one doesn’t have to wonder what it would have been like if the worlds of Caddyshack and Ghostbusters had collided in such a fashion.  

13. O NE OF THE FILM'S PRODUCERS CREATED THAT ICONIC LOGO .

The most indelible icon from Ghostbusters  is the famous “no-ghost” logo that appeared on the guys' car, their uniforms, and widely among advertisements and promotions for the movie. Associate producer Michael C. Gross , a bit of a renaissance man, designed the image. Prior to getting into the movie business as a producer, Gross served as an art consultant for The Muppets, John Lennon, and The Rolling Stones. He also served as art director for National Lampoon  and Esquire in the 1970s.  

14. P RODUCTION SHUT DOWN CENTRAL PARK WE ST, AND ISAAC ASIMOV WASN'T PLEASED .

While shooting exteriors in front of Dana’s apartment building, the production had permission to temporarily shut down traffic in the area surrounding West 65 th Street and Central Park West. What they didn’t know was that it would disrupt traffic throughout Manhattan. During rush hour, cars backed up to Columbus Circle, eventually going all the way downtown. In fact, Aykroyd was concerned that they had inadvertently pushed the traffic jam all the way to the Brooklyn Bridge. After receiving complaints, cast and crew members jokingly told others that the delay was caused by Francis Ford Coppola’s production of The Cotton Club,  which was shooting in New York at the same time. One particularly ornery Upper West Side resident who complained was author Isaac Asimov, who stumbled on to the set and told Aykroyd that they were “inconveniencing” him. Aykroyd, a lifelong fan of the writer, smoothed things over by using the opportunity to lavish praise on the irritated Asimov.

15. “ CROSSING THE STREAMS ” WAS MAD E UP ON THE SPOT .

The deus ex machina of the Ghostbusters crossing the streams of the proton packs helped them to—spoiler alert—defeat the Marshmallow Man and the evil demon Gozer at the end of the film. According to Ramis, this activity didn't appear in script. He and Aykroyd were unsure how to get the Ghostbusters out of the final scene alive, and because the nuclear technology behind the proton packs was “explained” with humorous techno-babble and mostly left up to the audience’s imagination, they came up with the idea of crossing the streams—an act which would somehow cause a cataclysmic shift in our dimension. After this decision was made, they added in some foreshadowing of the event to an earlier scene, only to revisit the concept in the climactic standoff at the end.

16. ON SET, THE MARSHMALLOW WAS REALLY SHAVING CREAM .

Once the Ghostbusters cross the streams, the rift between the two dimensions causes the Marshmallow Man to explode, raining down marshmallow on the unsuspecting New Yorkers below. But getting that amount of actual marshmallows to dump on the film’s extras was implausible. Instead, Edlund’s team collected 500-gallon batches of shaving cream to substitute for the remnants of Mr. Stay-Puft. William Atherton, who played EPA villain Walter Peck, was skeptical about having such a large amount of heavy cream dropped on him, so they tested the idea on a stuntman using only 75 pounds, and it knocked him to the ground. The stuntman was okay, and another smaller batch was collected to dump on Atherton for the final take in the film.

17. THE MOVIE ALMOST HAD TO CHANGE ITS NAME .

Once production wrapped, Reitman faced a situation that would possibly have derailed the whole movie. In the 1970s, Universal Studios had produced a live-action TV series titled The Ghost Busters , and their lawyers threatened legal action if the name of the movie wasn’t changed. Reitman, who had shot footage of the leads referring to themselves as the Ghostbusters and of massive crowds shouting “Ghostbusters! Ghostbusters!” was in deep trouble.

Luckily, Frank Price—the head of Columbia Pictures and the man who originally green-lit the movie—was moving to Universal Studios to become the new studio head there, and allowed Reitman to keep the name for the film. But the legal snafu reared its head again when a TV cartoon was made out of the movie. To satisfy Universal, the Saturday- morning fare was labeled The Real Ghostbusters , so as to not legally confuse the two properties.

18. HUEY LEWIS WAS NOT A FAN OF THE THEME SONG .

Because his song "Holiday Road" was featured prominently in National Lampoon's Vacation (directed by Harold Ramis), Fleetwood Mac guitarist Lindsey Buckingham was allegedly approached about a theme song for the film, but he passed on the project. Reitman hoped that Huey Lewis & The News would take the job, and even used their hit “ I Want a New Drug ” as a temporary filler song while cutting the film. Lewis declined as well, because he had already agreed to contribute the song “ Back in Time ” to Back to the Future and didn’t want to do any more soundtrack work. The filmmakers then approached Ray Parker Jr., who had sung hits with Raydio ("Jack and Jill") and was finding success as a solo artist as well. Unfortunately, the titular tune —with the often quoted “Who you gonna call?” and “I ain’t afraid of no ghosts!”—bore a striking resemblance to Lewis' "I Want a New Drug," so much so that the song's publishers sued for plagiarism. The suit was settled out of court, but you can decide for yourself with the mashup of the two songs above.

19. ELMER BERNSTEIN EXPERIMENTED WITH NEW INSTRUMENTS ON THE SOUNDTRACK.

Composer Elmer Bernstein wanted to go beyond a conventional orchestra for Ghostbusters, so he used both new and old technology. He included the then-cutting-edge Yamaha DX-7 synthesizer to create weird sounds that orchestral instruments couldn’t conjure up, and even employed an Ondes Martenot —a relatively obscure early electronic instrument created in 1928 by inventor Maurice Martenot—for additional otherworldly tones. You can hear it in the beginning and middle of the song above.

20. IVAN REITMAN WAS PETRIFIED DURING THE FILM'S FIRST TEST SCREENING .

On paper and out of context, Ghostbusters was an admittedly outrageous prospect for a feature film. During the movie’s first test screening, held for 200 random people at Columbia Pictures Studio only three weeks after principal photography wrapped, Reitman was utterly terrified. He was not only uncertain about the fundamental plot of the film, he was also concerned that perhaps-too-absurd major details (like the Marshmallow Man) might take audiences "out" of the movie. In addition, only one fully-completed effect shot was available for the test screening—one of the film's opening scenes, where an old librarian ghost transforms into a frightening ghoul. Reitman waited in the wings during the scene, and when audiences burst out laughing one second and hid their eyes the next, he knew that his fears were unfounded. And Reitman knew he had a major hit on his hands while walking around New York City during the second week of the film’s release, where he saw street vendors selling bootleg Ghostbusters T-shirts.

Additional Sources: Ghostbusters Blu-ray special features Esquire 's Oral History Peter Aykroyd's A History of Ghosts: The True Story of Séances, Mediums, Ghosts, and Ghostbusters

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In 2016, the Ghostbusters reboot didn’t change movies. But the backlash was a bad omen.

The way we talk about some movies changed, and not for the better.

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The Ghostbusters from the 2016 reboot standing in front of an old car with the Ghostbusters logo.

None of the Ghostbusters movies are particularly good, though you might argue the original was great, in the way that cult comedy classics from the 1980s often take on a life of their own with people who grew up wearing out their VHS copies or rewatching them on TV whenever they aired. But without the nostalgia factor in play, each successive Ghostbusters film or property, at best, feels like a funny idea for a sketch stretched out to feature-length, then buoyed by its performers’ name recognition and irresistible comic performances and, eventually, nostalgia.

That’s one reason why the mid-decade announcement of a new “gender-swapped” version of Ghostbusters — which, like the 1984 original, would star four performers, some familiar faces from Saturday Night Live, but this time they’d be women — was met with skepticism. Was there really enough life in Ghostbusters to sustain a whole new reboot?

That skepticism, a familiar response to most announcements of reboots and remakes, was justifiable; one clear trend of the 2010s was the never-ending resurrection of pop culture properties we thought were long over, mostly with no good reason beyond “nostalgia sells.” But more generalized skepticism over the idea of an all-woman Ghostbusters was quickly eclipsed by a bizarrely overblown backlash, months before the film even came out.

In the end, the movie was merely fine . But in retrospect, the Great Ghostbusters Apocalypse of spring 2016 was a harbinger of things to come, and a window into the ways the internet can fan the flames and provide a platform for the toxic corners of pop culture fandoms to act on their worst impulses.

The Ghostbusters ladies firing pink laser-like guns.

The attacks on Ghostbusters and subsequent movies set a template for a different, degraded kind of criticism

In some ways, the Ghostbusters backlash was a sequel to Gamergate , which began with the bizarre and misogynistic harassment of a number of women in the gaming world, grew into a full-blown online troll onslaught, and eventually became a blueprint for recruiting mostly young men to the burgeoning alt-right . The Ghostbusters backlash was also perpetuated largely by a violently vocal minority and took some of the same shape as Gamergate, particularly in the ways it targeted women and people of color.

The casting of the film’s four stars — Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones — was declared to be a “SJW” capitulation to “political correctness,” and Jones, the only woman of color in the cast, became the target of a particularly hateful online assault led by self-styled provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos (who was eventually banned from Twitter as a result). Yiannopoulos’s campaign against Jones ultimately reached the point where it became part of the 2016 election cycle and a flashpoint in the alt-right’s culture war .

And that was part of the point; as one Twitter user who spent months relentlessly attacking the Ghostbusters filmmakers and cast proclaimed , “Ghostbusters 2016 is a declaration of a culture war.”

The vicious threats and blatantly racist attacks were clearly the product of the worst parts of Ghostbusters ’ so-called “fandom.” The same tactics would be repeated in later assaults on other movies deemed too “political” by the alt-right, which was a not-so-coded way of saying movies that featured women and people of color in lead roles in franchise films they considered to belong to the “true” fans, rather than the films’ creators: Black Panther , Captain Marvel , Star Wars: The Last Jedi , and more. In most cases, the attacks usually happened before anyone had seen the films, prompting review aggregation websites like Rotten Tomatoes to update their policies around audience scores to prevent trolls from artificially deflating scores before a movie’s release date.

The harm also extended beyond attacks on specific people associated with the movies, by making it nearly impossible to have a conversation about Ghostbusters — or Captain Marvel or The Last Jedi or any other similarly targeted property — that was actually about the movies. Instead of talking about the movies on their merits, we are left talking about the bad-faith attacks.

It’s important to delineate between the attacks faced by Ghostbusters and subsequent films, and discussions about how films handle race or gender. The latter have become an increasingly big part of our cultural conversations this decade, in which Hollywood has seemingly only begun to wake up to how its risk-averse business models and outmoded ideas of what moviegoers want have affected the stories and voices it invests in.

The Ghostbusters stand in front of a fire truck.

But those are conversations about inclusion , about making room for more people to bring their art to an audience, because a culture always benefits from a richer array of voices. The attacks on Ghostbusters and subsequent films were fundamentally about exclusion — about keeping certain artists and voices out .

The attacks did indeed end up excluding some people, though maybe not precisely the ones the trolls were targeting. It’s not the creative voices who are permanently harmed. Figures like Leslie Jones and, later, Star Wars actress Kelly Marie Tran (who ended up deleting her social media accounts after suffering racist harassment following The Last Jedi ) were affected by the attacks. But movies that give a platform to people who’ve historically been marginalized by Hollywood aren’t going to stop being made. The success of films like Black Panther has made sure of that. Instead, it’s the audience’s voice that has gotten smothered.

How the Ghostbusters blowback has hurt popular art

What may have been affected most was the way we’ve talked about movies in the years following the attacks on Ghostbusters and others. Part of the fun of cinema is that it’s a communal activity. We watch movies together, we talk about them together, we argue, and when we keep doing that, the art lives on.

But movies that were targeted by hostile “fans” or trolls have run into a snag.

None of the targeted movies were complete disasters. But some of them were only okay. The Ghostbusters reboot, when it finally came out on July 11, 2016, was kind of a funny movie , but it didn’t seem destined for the cult status of the original. A few years later, 2019’s Captain Marvel , starring Brie Larson, played it far too safe to actually be a good movie. Other films, like the all-female Oceans 8, drew similarly tepid reviews .

To even start a conversation about either of those films, however, requires clarifying that the reason you’re not a fan of the movie has nothing to do with those reasons, the ones the trolls yell about. Similarly, if you didn’t like one of the targeted films that was praised by critics and beloved by many moviegoers, like Black Panther or The Last Jedi , you might feel compelled to explain that you didn’t like it, but not because you’re racist or misogynist (which is already a hard way to start a conversation). To admit you didn’t like one of these movies as much as someone else, it seems, is to enter a minefield and risk having to be associated with people whose behavior you find reprehensible.

Nobody should have to defend a movie they didn’t connect with, or that they have well-reasoned arguments about, just because some bad-faith actors got mad online. But that’s what the trolls wanted: to divide people and frustrate their attempts to enjoy and learn from art and one another, and thus keep people out of the conversation who, because their identity or ideology didn’t fit studios’ idea of the “mainstream,” haven’t historically been championed by Hollywood.

It’s still too soon, I think, to know if these effects will last into the future, or if it will someday become easier to discuss legitimate complaints with these or other movies once the circumstances around their releases are forgotten. I hope the passage of time will help. But at the end of this decade, I don’t feel optimistic about it.

Still, I think great, robust conversations about popular art are worth fighting for. And I hope that one thing we’ve learned from Ghostbusters and the many films that came after is that criticism and vigorous, healthy debate aren’t just good for art; they’re good for our humanity, too.

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Ghostbusters Wiki

Ghostbuster

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A Ghostbuster is a person or even in a few cases a spirit itself that performs duties of removal of a spirit (aka: ghost, apparition, the undead). Officially the Ghostbusters are paranormal investigators , not ghosthunters. Catching ghosts just happens to be their primary form of business. Sometimes removal doesn't mean through means of weapons as a spirit may leave due to fulfillment, being remembered, or destruction of an object attaching them to this world. However, most hauntings are of unhappy spirits, and like humans may have negative reasons for being there.

What does a ghostbuster do?

In the Ghostbusters universe a ghostbuster will at the request of a client come to the scene of a possible haunting and investigate the scene. The use of a P.K.E. meter will be used to detect a spirit. Ecto-goggles or a Ghost Sniffer may also be used.

After the spirit is found the ghostbusters will use a Proton Pack with a proton gun to blast a ghost to get them under control. This may require more than one ghostbuster to do. Then the Trap is thrown near the ghost and then activated. This will suck the ghost in the trap. After the ghost is trapped, it is then dumped into the larger Containment Unit .

Some ghosts are too powerful or weak to trap and can only be destroyed.

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Ghostbusters, common sense media reviewers.

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Paranormal '80s classic has some scares, innuendo.

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A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this movie.

A rare movie where scientists save the day. Friend

Main characters use science and work as a team to

No meaningful diversity, especially among speaking

Plenty of blasting from special ghost-busting lase

A fantasy scene implies Ray receives oral pleasure

"S--t" is said three times, "bitch" once, "ass" an

Coke is seen a few times, a Twinkie is used as a m

Lots of smoking, mostly by Peter and Ray, who ofte

Parents need to know that Ghostbusters is an iconic '80s movie that mixes a ton of humor -- some of the jokes holding up poorly over time -- in with its story about catching scary ghosts and the possible end of the world. The scariest part is probably the large dogs with glowing eyes that attack and possess…

Positive Messages

A rare movie where scientists save the day. Friendship is also an important theme, though the friends are far from perfect. Curiosity and teamwork.

Positive Role Models

Main characters use science and work as a team to save NYC. But Peter Venkman especially is a flawed role model. He and Dana's neighbor Louis both chase women in ways that are now widely recognized as harassment. It's played for laughs, seemingly chalked up to "boys will be boys." Dana winds up receptive to Peter's aggressive advances, which include kissing her on the chest while she's unconscious and a barrage of innuendo-laced comments while he's on this job and she's his client.

Diverse Representations

No meaningful diversity, especially among speaking roles, despite setting in ultra-diverse NYC. Ernie Hudson's Winston Zeddemore does get hired as a Ghostbuster midway through the film and doesn't fall into stereotypes about Black men, but he has minimal dialogue. Fatphobia in the form of Slimer, a green ghost whose voracious appetite and rolls of fat are meant to incite disgust in viewers. Casual on-screen ableism -- several disparaging remarks about people being "crazy" or "schizo" -- is slightly offset by the knowledge that one of the film's writers and leading actors, Dan Aykroyd, is neurodivergent and has Tourette's . Most flagrant is the film's objectification of women, in one case a college student who is hit on by a male professor. Sexual harassment by two men in important roles, including main character Peter Venkman, is played for laughs. Venkman still "gets the girl" as if Dana is a trophy to be won.

Did we miss something on diversity? Suggest an update.

Violence & Scariness

Plenty of blasting from special ghost-busting lasers. A hotel ballroom is destroyed, and another building explodes, with main characters running for their lives. Ghosts take over NYC, many scary-looking (with decomposing skeletal appearances and wicked grins). Two characters are possessed by large dog-like creatures. One has arms and grabs a character through a chair; she screams as she's hurled through the room. A building crumbles; pieces fall on a crowd below, who also almost get smashed by a 50-foot walking marshmallow. Mentions of religious sacrifice. A demi-god attacks with lightning bolts coming from her arms. Dana is possessed and, without her consent, writhes, sensually bares her shoulders and leg, and makes sexual advances on Peter. While she's unconscious, Peter puts her to bed and kisses her clothed chest before leaving. Dana's neighbor follows her down the hallway to her apartment door, repeatedly asking her out and ignoring her polite declines; she has to literally squeeze into her apartment and slam the door in his face. The film doesn't critique the harassment.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Violence & Scariness in your kid's entertainment guide.

Sex, Romance & Nudity

A fantasy scene implies Ray receives oral pleasure from a ghost; you see his pants mysteriously unzipped down to his underwear and his eyes cross in pleasure. Dana makes bold sexual advances while possessed, writhing around and showing lots of leg. She even says, "Do you want this body?" "Take me now," and "I want you inside me" to Peter, who jokes that she already has more than one person inside her. Plus a few kisses and plenty of innuendo, including a joke about getting the Stay Puft Marshmallow "laid."

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Sex, Romance & Nudity in your kid's entertainment guide.

"S--t" is said three times, "bitch" once, "ass" and other versions a few times, "pissed," "hell," "mother puss bucket," "schizo," and jokes about an EPA official having no "d--k."

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Coke is seen a few times, a Twinkie is used as a metaphor, and one of the Ghostbusters shouts, "it's Miller time." Cheez-Its and Budweiser are consumed. A montage shows the Ghostbusters on the cover of some prominent magazines like Time and The Atlantic with voices of Casey Kasem and Larry King in background.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Lots of smoking, mostly by Peter and Ray, who often have a cigarette dangling from their lips while catching ghosts. They also share a bottle of hard alcohol after being fired from their jobs and are seen drinking beer a few times. A ghost chugs wine that goes right through him.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Drinking, Drugs & Smoking in your kid's entertainment guide.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Ghostbusters is an iconic '80s movie that mixes a ton of humor -- some of the jokes holding up poorly over time -- in with its story about catching scary ghosts and the possible end of the world. The scariest part is probably the large dogs with glowing eyes that attack and possess two characters, though the now-dated special effects may not faze older kids. There's some strong language (including "s--t" a few times) and some sexually charged scenes, including one in which a character fantasizes briefly about a ghost giving him oral pleasure and another where a possessed woman writhes around and says "I want you inside me" to a male character, who laughs it off. Keep an eye out for two male characters who aggressively pursue women and cross professional and physical boundaries; their behavior is played for laughs and even presented as romantic, at least for the main character. Two Ghostbusters do a lot of smoking, often dangling a cigarette out of their mouths while trying to catch ghosts. To stay in the loop on more movies like this, you can sign up for weekly Family Movie Night emails .

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Community Reviews

  • Parents say (75)
  • Kids say (158)

Based on 75 parent reviews

Bonafide Classic!!!

Not for kids, what's the story.

In GHOSTBUSTERS, the comedic team of Bill Murray , Dan Aykroyd , and Harold Ramis fight ghosts and ghouls as paranormal sanitation workers. With fully charged proton packs strapped to their backs, they venture around New York City exterminating pesky apparitions. Peter Venkman (Murray) falls for Dana Barrett ( Sigourney Weaver ), a professional musician who unwillingly becomes the gatekeeper for an apocalyptic spiritual dimension. The team, along with a late-hire Ghostbuster played by Ernie Hudson , face off against demonic forces with cataclysmic magnitude. One indelible scene involves the eradication of a 50-foot Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.

Is It Any Good?

Director Ivan Reitman 's movie succeeds in combining comedy, action, and some scary stuff. Although Ghostbusters has some frightening moments -- and its "boys will be boys" handling of romance holds up extremely poorly -- Murray, Aykroyd, and Ramis provide enough comic relief to lighten the fears. Considering its 1984 release date, the film's special effects are impressive, though today's kids may find them eye-roll-inducing. Younger kids might need their eyes covered during scary moments, and post-viewing conversations about what constitutes sexual harassment would not go amiss.

Talk to Your Kids About ...

Families can talk about what defines a hero. Besides Ghostbusters , what other movies feature scientists and professors who save the day?

Talk about how the scares mix with humor. For kids normally scared of things like ghosts, how did the humor help? How did seeing a creature like the 50-foot Stay Puft Marshmallow Man make you laugh, even though the Ghostbusters were in danger?

In what ways do Peter Venkman and Dana's neighbor Louis demonstrate unacceptable behavior toward women? What other ways are there to express interest in someone without crossing personal and professional boundaries?

Do you believe in ghosts? Why, or why not?

How do the characters in Ghostbusters demonstrate curiosity and teamwork ? Why are these important character strengths ?

Movie Details

  • In theaters : June 1, 1984
  • On DVD or streaming : September 16, 2014
  • Cast : Bill Murray , Dan Aykroyd , Sigourney Weaver , Harold Ramis
  • Director : Ivan Reitman
  • Inclusion Information : Female actors
  • Studio : Sony Pictures
  • Genre : Comedy
  • Topics : Magic and Fantasy , Friendship , Monsters, Ghosts, and Vampires
  • Character Strengths : Curiosity , Teamwork
  • Run time : 107 minutes
  • MPAA rating : PG
  • Last updated : October 21, 2023

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All the Main Villains in the ‘Ghostbusters’ Movies Ranked Worst to Best

Olivia Wilde as Gozer in 'Ghostbusters: Afterlife'

Now that we have four Ghostbuster s movies , it’s time to take a look at all the main villains that span the franchise. Ghostbusters (1984), Ghostbusters II (1989), Ghostbusters: Answer the Call (2016), and Ghostbusters: Afterlife (2021) all feature supernatural entities of all shapes and sizes, many of which have become as iconic as some of the human characters.

Whether it’s a creepy oil painting that has the soul of an ancient sorcerer trapped inside, a giant anthropomorphic marshmallow, evil hellhounds that can cause a genuine fear of refrigerators, or a Sumerian demigod who’s definitely a fan of Ziggy Stardust, there’s “something strange” in every single one of the movies. So, who ya gonna call?

Ghostbusters Reboot Rowan

Well, that would be us, because we’ve decided to rank all the main Ghostbusters villains from worst to best. We’ve already ranked all the Ghostbusters , so now it’s time to put on your proton packs and light ’em up, because every single entry on this list don’t look good!

If you ain’t afraid of no ghost, then read on and find out how we’ve ranked all the main Ghostbusters villains…

7. Ivo Shandor — Ghostbusters: Afterlife

To much surprise, Ivo Shandor (JK Simmons) appears in the flesh in Ghostbusters: Afterlife . The Gozer worshipper is mentioned in the original film, and is the main villain in “Ghostbusters: The Video Game” (2009), so it’s fair to say that he’s a pretty important character in Ghostbusters lore.

Ivo Shandor Ghostbusters Afterlife

So why is his role in the latest sequel ridiculously short-lived, when he’s even played by such a well-known actor? Seeing him wake from his century-long slumber in the Gozer temple is actually pretty unsettling, but within seconds, Gozer (Olivia Wilde) tears him in half like a piece of paper, which is one of a few things fans don’t like about Ghostbusters: Afterlife .

6. Rowan — Ghostbusters: Answer the Call  

Critiquing a villain such as Rowan (Neil Casey) from Ghostbusters: Answer the Call isn’t always easy, largely because he’s one that’s of the dual-faced variety, or triple-faced, if you count his brief time possessing the body of useless secretary Kevin (Chris Hemsworth).

Ghostbusters Reboot Rowan

His human-counterpart isn’t much to write home about, as he’s nothing more than a modern-day Ivo Shandor, obsessed with bringing about the end of humanity, except without the interesting motivation (humanity being too sick to survive). But at least the giant Ghostbusters logo-version of Rowan looks pretty cool, which is one of a handful of things the Ghostbusters reboot gets right .

Related: All 4 ‘Ghostbusters’ Movies Ranked Worst to Best

5. Gozer — Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters: Afterlife

Seeing Gozer (Slavitza Jovan in the original/Olivia Wilde in Ghostbusters: Afterlife ) so low might leave you looking like you’ve seen a ghost. While responsible for iconic lines like “Are you a god?” and bringing about the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man, we still think Gozer leaves a lot to be desired.

Gozer Ghostbusters

There’s no denying that Gozer looks very cool, with the scales and spikes and that retro flat-top, but the truth is that we don’t really see the demigod do all that much (not unless you count the destruction the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man causes in New York City). Gozer might be an iconic villain, but their time in both the original film and the 2021 sequel is criminally short-lived,

4. Janosz Poha – Ghostbusters II 

While Janosz Poha (Peter MacNicol) isn’t the main Ghostbusters II villain, he does, for the best part of the film, act on behalf of Vigo the Carpathian (played by Wilhelm von Homburg, and voiced by Max Von Sydow), who, until the final act, is trapped inside an oil painting. In fact, Janosz possesses many qualities that Vigo doesn’t!

Janosz Poha Ghostbusters 2

He’s quirky, funny, and above all, he’s very creepy in a few scenes, with his two visits to Dana Barrett’s apartment ( Sigourney Weaver ) being among them (especially the one in which he poses as a ghostly nanny and kidnaps Dana’s baby, Oscar!). Janosz is, of course, being possessed by Vigo, but Peter MacNicol delivers a hilarious performance as both ‘versions’ of the character.

3. Vigo the Carpathian — Ghostbusters II

It wasn’t easy placing Vigo the Carpathian above Janosz Poha, but the fact is that, despite being trapped inside a painting for most of the movie, the ancient sorcerer is very unsettling. But it isn’t just the painting that’s creepy — it’s the backstory we get from the Ghostbusters.

Ghostbusters II

They explain that, upon being decapitated centuries ago (after being killed in many other ways, but to no avail!), Vigo’s severed head spoke the words, “Death is but a door. Time is but a window. I’ll be back!” The third act’s physical version of Vigo might not be that great, but we think he’s at his most frightening when he isn’t moving!

Related: ‘Ghostbusters 2’ Is a Better Sequel Than ‘Ghostbusters: Afterlife’ — Here’s Why!

2. Terror Dogs — Ghostbusters and Ghostbusters: Afterlife

Okay, who brought the dog?! We toyed with the idea of splitting the Terror Dogs into two entries, with one being those from the original film, and the second being the Ghostbusters: Afterlife versions. However, ultimately, we don’t think there’s a great deal of difference between the two portrayals (except for some CGI, of course).

Terror Dogs Ghostbusters

With that said, while it’s the Keymaster and the Gatekeeper in both movies (AKA “Zuul” and “Vinz Clortho”, respectively), Gozer’s minions are, without argument, at their most terrifying in the 1984 classic. Perhaps it’s the old-school special effects, but either way, the Terror Dogs definitely deserve second place.

1. Stay Puft Marshmallow Man — Ghostbusters

Many pedantic fans will most likely point out the fact that the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man is Gozer, as he’s a manifestation of the demigod, inadvertently brought about by Ghostbuster Ray Stantz (Dan Aykroyd). But for all intents and purposes, the Stay Puft is also a Ghostbusters villain in his own right, and is generally considered an entirely separate entity.

Stay Puft Ghostbusters

So, is he at the top because he has been immortalized through all sorts of Ghostbusters merchandize over the decades? Nope — we actually think there’s something pretty nightmarish about him! Yes, he might rock that friendly smile, but we’re not fooled, and to quote Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis), he terrifies us beyond the capacity for rational thought!

Phoebe Ghostbusters Afterlife

Jason Reitman ‘s Ghostbusters: Afterlife is now available to add to your collection. The movie stars franchise newcomers McKenna Grace (Phoebe), Finn Wolfhard (Trevor), Lucky (Celeste O’Connor), Logan Kim (Podcast), Carrie Coon (Callie), and Paul Rudd (Gary Grooberson).

The long-awaited sequel also features cameos from original Ghostbusters Peter Venkman ( Bill Murray ), Ray Stantz (Dan Aykroyd), and Winston Zeddemore (Ernie Hudson), as well as Janine Melnitz (Annie Potts) and Dana Barrett (Sigourney Weaver). Sadly, Louis Tully ( Rick Moranis ) doesn’t appear.

Ghostbusters Afterlife

All five original actors also appeared in the 2016 reboot Ghostbusters: Answer the Call , alongside Melissa McCarthy (Abby Yates), Leslie Jones (Patty Tolan), Kristen Wiig (Erin Gilbert), and Kate McKinnon (Jillian Holtzmann). However, they played completely different characters, as the reboot isn’t canon with the other three Ghostbusters movies.

How would you rank the main villains in the Ghostbusters movies ?

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Ghostbusters

Leslie Jones, Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, Chris Hemsworth, and Kristen Wiig in Ghostbusters (2016)

Following a ghost invasion of Manhattan, paranormal enthusiasts Erin Gilbert and Abby Yates, nuclear engineer Jillian Holtzmann, and subway worker Patty Tolan band together to stop the other... Read all Following a ghost invasion of Manhattan, paranormal enthusiasts Erin Gilbert and Abby Yates, nuclear engineer Jillian Holtzmann, and subway worker Patty Tolan band together to stop the otherworldly threat. Following a ghost invasion of Manhattan, paranormal enthusiasts Erin Gilbert and Abby Yates, nuclear engineer Jillian Holtzmann, and subway worker Patty Tolan band together to stop the otherworldly threat.

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  • Ivan Reitman
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  • 2.5K User reviews
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  • 60 Metascore
  • 5 wins & 24 nominations

International Trailer #2

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Ed Begley Jr.

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  • Trivia Although Harold Ramis passed away in 2014 and thus could not make a cameo alongside his fellow castmates, there is a bust of Ramis' head just outside of Erin's university office near the beginning of the film. The bust was later donated to the Harold Ramis Film School at Chicago's Second City, where Ramis began his career.
  • Goofs When you see the second shot of the outside of the Chinese restaurant/Ghostbusters base of operation (right after the subway train encounter), you can see the Ecto in the garage...this is before they even got the car from Patty. However, this mistake was digitally removed for the Blu-ray release.

Patty Tolan : [about Rowan's huge transformation] What part of "small and friendly" did he not understand?

  • Crazy credits In the post-credit scene after the credits are over, you see the girls in their lab. Patty has on a headset and is listening to an audio tape, repeating one section several times. Erin asks if she has something. Patty answers, "What's Zuul?"
  • Alternate versions Extended BluRay version is 2hs 13 mins long.
  • Connections Featured in The Ellen DeGeneres Show: Zooey Deschanel/Kelly Clarkson/Paul Feig/Bonnie Raitt/Stephen 'tWitch' Boss (2016)
  • Soundtracks Ghostbusters Written and Performed by Ray Parker Jr. (as Ray Parker, Jr.) Courtesy of Raydio Music Corp.

User reviews 2.5K

  • Dec 14, 2019

Reboots & Remakes

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  • July 15, 2016 (United States)
  • United States
  • Official Site
  • Ghostbusters: Answer the Call
  • Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  • Columbia Pictures
  • LStar Capital
  • Village Roadshow Pictures
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  • $144,000,000 (estimated)
  • $128,350,574
  • $46,018,755
  • Jul 17, 2016
  • $229,147,509

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  • Runtime 1 hour 57 minutes
  • Dolby Digital
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  • Dolby Surround 7.1

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The Worst Ghostbusters Movie Isn't the One You Think (According to Critics)

The Ghostbusters film series introduces many new ideas over four entries. But when they're ranked, the worst entry is an unexpected one.

The Ghostbusters franchise isn't as grand as the Star Wars franchise or as globe-trotting as Indiana Jones . But what it lacks in those areas it makes up for with comedy,  amazing visual effects and a premise unlike anything audiences had ever seen before. Since the first film, the franchise has continued sequels that directly link to the original or serve as reboots. At first, many would expect the least popular entry in the franchise, to critics, would be the reboot. However, the results are as startling as the library ghost from the first film.

This article compiles an average score of all critic ratings from Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes to decipher where each film ranks and if the first truly deserves the reception it's gotten. Nevertheless, each movie has qualities that make it special in its own rights, and all of them promise hilarious and often exhilarating moments busting ghosts. That being said, with Ghostbusters: Afterlife enjoying a theatrical run, let's look at which of the films got the best reception.

RELATED:  Ghostbusters' Dan Aykroyd Says Paul Rudd Is The Next Bill Murray

4. Ghostbusters II - 54.5/100

Ghostbusters II was released in 1989 and hit audiences at a time when sequels weren't nearly as beloved as they are now. As a result, the reviews of the film reflected the audience's disinterest in a movie that didn't branch out far from the original. The film follows the Ghostbusters, now disbanded, as they struggle to survive in a city that seems to have forgotten the events of the original. Lacking the respect they once had, the two must band together again to study a supernatural slime that feeds on negativity. Even with the original cast returning, the lack of originality or newness hinders the film. However, as the years have progressed, viewers have rekindled an appreciation for the film that wasn't seen on release day.

3. Ghostbusters: Afterlife - 55.5/100

Ghostbusters: Afterlife is a direct sequel to the original films, specifically the first, and follows the grandchildren of Egon Spengler following his death. Living on a farm in a small town, his grandchildren have to uncover and fight an even greater supernatural threat. While the film's theatrical run hasn't been completed, critics have already shared their opinions, which have been mixed to positive. Overall, the movie relies on nostalgia but doesn't skimp on any of the tropes that make the franchise as iconic as it has been. But with Jason Reitman taking over the reins of the franchise firm his father, Ivan, it's not hard for the series to keep the same energy that made it such a hit in the past.

RELATED:  Why Ghostbusters: Afterlife's Reviews Are So Mixed

2. Ghostbusters: Answer the Call - 67/100

Ghostbusters (2016), or Ghostbusters: Answer the Call, is the most surprising entry on the list because the reboot has been notorious for heavy criticism. The film follows a similar story structure to the original entry, with two scientists opening a business to capture and study paranormal creatures . But, of course, the more adept they get at Ghostbusting, the more dangers arise that eventually put all of New York City at risk. As a standalone film, critics have cited that Ghostbusters can hold its own, for the most part, but still relies on the tropes that made the original great. Nevertheless, the comedic talents in the film help carry it and provide genuine laughs.

1. Ghostbusters - 84/100

The original Ghostbusters was released in 1984 and has since stood the test of time as a creative and hilarious film. Ghostbusters follows Ray Stantz (Dan Aykroyd), Peter Venkman (Bill Murray) and Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis) who cut their losses and opened up a business to hunt and catch ghosts . At first, the idea seems foolish, but as more paranormal activity arises, the team gets more recognition, adds a new member, Winston Zeddemore (Ernie Hudson), and fights off the end of the world. Upon release, the film received generally positive reviews , with many loving its blend of comedy and action. Overall, the film is unlike anything that had ever been done and continues to be the standard for the franchise.

To see how the franchise's latest installment stacks up, Ghostbusters: Afterlife is in theaters now. 

KEEP READING:  Ghostbusters: Afterlife's Carrie Coon Debunks A Long-Running David Fincher Myth

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Why The ‘Ghostbusters’ Backlash Is A Sexist Control Issue

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When I was 11, I saw “ Ghostbusters .” I thought it was funny.

Since the “Ghostbusters” reboot was announced, we’ve learned that, for a great many people, their emotional relationship with the original “Ghostbusters” is substantially more fraught. There were those who thrilled to the idea that, after 20-plus years of rumors and false starts, we’d finally get more “Ghostbusters.” And, there were those who objected to reviving the franchise, arguing that any attempt to recapture the original glory was doomed to fail.

Then there are the Ghostbros, the noisiest if not most numerous contingent, for whom reviving the franchise with women in the leading roles is the ultimate desecration. It would have been one thing to pass the torch, as Ivan Reitman had originally planned , with a sequel in which the classic quartet trained a newer, spryer group in the finer points of busting ghosts. But effectively redoing the original movie with the genders flipped smacks of political correctness and revisionist history. Or at least, that seemed to be the argument, insofar as one could extract a series of propositions and conclusions from the wailing and gnashing of teeth.

READ MORE: Leslie Jones in ‘Ghostbusters’: This Is Not the Black Hero We Were Hoping to See

It’s tempting to dismiss the objections to the “Ghostbusters” reboot as manbaby hissyfits. Take the video in which James Rolfe, who bills himself as the Angry Video Game Nerd, announced that he wouldn’t review the movie, or even see it, because “If you already know you’re going to hate it, why give them your money?” Or the movie’s IMDb page, which users have deluged with 1-out-of-10 ratings , despite the fact that few if any of them have seen it.

Let’s stipulate that initial trailers for the new “Ghostbusters” did not suggest greatness. Was it really the worst trailer in movie history, as its record-setting number of YouTube downvotes suggests? And why the especial dudgeon for this particular reboot, when so many others are greeted with mild, wait-and-see skepticism, or even full-throated enthusiasm?

Ghostbusters

Yes, as a handful of people were quick to point out when I cracked a joke about the situation on Twitter, some of the low IMDb ratings come from women, or at least people who set their profiles as such. But a cursory look at the demographic breakdown of IMDb votes reveals a profound imbalance : Nearly eight times as many male voters as female, with women ranking the movie twice as high as men. (There’s a disparity among professional reviews as well, though not nearly so pronounced.) Even if it’s not the only factor, it takes some seriously tortured logic to argue that gender has nothing to do with the anti-“Ghostbusters” backlash.

Just for the sake of argument, let’s remove gender from the equation. Is there anything to the backlash beyond anger that someone took down the “No Girls Allowed” sign outside the Ghostbusters clubhouse? Can a remake, reboot, or sequel actually harm the original? It’s not as if prints of the new “Ghostbusters” were made from melted-down copies of the old one, any more than Baz Luhrmann sneaked into people’s houses and burned their copies of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby.” (Although come to think of it, I haven’t seen mine in a while.) It’s not like “Apocalypse Now,” where Francis Ford Coppola physically recut the original negative in order to make “Apocalypse Now Redux,” or “Star Wars,” where George Lucas tweaked the original trilogy’s closing moments to make for a neater join with the prequels. The copy of the 1984 “Ghostbusters” on your shelf or in your iTunes is exactly the same one it’s always been.

So what changes, and what’s at stake? The movie is immutable, but time marches on, and we are borne along with it. Cultural products seem like fixed points in the stream, but the further we move from them, the more tenuous the connective tissue, and the more it needs protection.. It’s not “Ghostbusters” itself that’s in flux, but our individual relationships to it, if we had them in the first place.

For writers like the Ringer’s Lindsay Zoladz and Vulture’s Jada Yuan , who were obsessed with the original movie as girls, the new “Ghostbusters” is a long-overdue vindication of the idea that you don’t need to be a man to strap on a proton pack. For James Rolfe, the new movie’s very existence is a blot on the original, a permanent asterisk next to its name. “I hear that all the time, ‘the female ‘Ghostbusters,’” he says. “Does that mean we have to call the original ‘the male ‘Ghostbusters?’”

Intentionally or not, Rolfe’s complaint cuts to the heart of the matter. (The Ghostbros’ lack of self-awareness is a gift that never stops giving.) We’ve long had the habit of using the universal to refer to men while shunting women into their own subcategory, but the original “Ghostbusters” already was “the male ‘Ghostbusters,'” whether we called it that or not. It’s a movie in which virtually all significant characters are men, and one in which, to contemporary eyes, Peter Venkman’s aggressive pursuit of Dana Barrett borders between creepy pick-up-artistry and outright stalking.  A “female ‘Ghostbusters'” throws that into stark relief. It doesn’t make the original movie or less flawed, but it might make its flaws harder to overlook.

As you grow up, your perspectives on your childhood change, and that never stops changing. Movies, perhaps uniquely, allows us to imagine ourselves as we were when we first watched them — at least, until something comes along and disrupts that relationship.

Melissa McCarthy, Kate McKinnon, Kristen Wiig and Leslie Jones in Ghostbusters

Franchise extensions go to great lengths not to upset original fans, and that includes the new “Ghostbusters.” Director Paul Feig told Yuan that he and co-screenwriter Katie Dippold started by making a list of everything from the original movie that fans would be disappointed not to see in the new one, which hardly sounds like the work of two people out to destroy a franchise. (If anything it’s evidence for the opposing view, which complains that the new movie is too faithful to the original.) Nevertheless, because of the new film, the 1984 movie is now a “Ghostbusters,” not the “Ghostbusters” — unless you, quite sensibly, argue that “Ghostbusters II,” or the Ghostbusters cartoon, or the Ghostbusters comic book, already made that distinction necessary.

The underlying fear is fans of the original “Ghostbusters” are no longer in control of what their fandom means. As a Reddit user put it in a post called “Childhood Ruined,” “I have a Ghostbusters shirt that I purchased a few years ago. It is one of my favourite shirts. Whenever I would wear it, myself and others get this fond feeling of nostalgia. That nod from a fellow fan when they saw the shirt was a nice connection to have with other people. Unfortunately, I no longer feel comfortable wearing the shirt. The reason is because the meaning has now changed. Instead of being a fun reminder of a time long ago, it is now a political statement…. The good feelings that were once there, are now tainted with the controversy surrounding the new film. The pride of wearing the logo, has now been replaced with frustration and negative feelings.”

READ MORE: ‘Ghostbusters’ Review: A Feminist Blockbuster That Could Have Been Better

What’s changed isn’t the movie, or even what it means to the writer, so much as what it signifies: what he thinks liking it says about him. And now, if I like “Ghostbusters,” I have to worry about people thinking I’m a feminist? Nuh uh. No thank you . He’s lost control of the place that  “Ghostbusters” has in the culture, and he doesn’t like how that feels. (Incidentally, he gave in a day later, in in a second post to the Men’s Rights subreddit, admitted that it was about the fact that the new Ghostbusters are women, and decried the “pandering” of casting a female lead in the “Star Wars” spinoff “Rogue One.”)

Hollywood has never been more obsessively attuned to the fans’ interests. Warner Bros. spent tens of thousands of dollars flying journalists to the set of Zack Snyder’s “Justice League” in an effort to placate complaints about “Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice,” and Neil Blomkamp’s forthcoming “Alien” sequel will reportedly disregard the series’ divisive third and fourth installments altogether.

So it goes with the new “Ghostbusters.” If the original movie’s fans could bring themselves to see it, they’d find a movie that bends over backward to pander to them. One cameo by an original cast member is a sly gag; six is tiresome. But it’s also determined to hew its own path, and to let people who have a problem with women busting ghosts know that they need to suck it up and get used to it. Fandom is a valuable commodity, but it’s also a trap; fans, like any other group, often don’t know what they want until they get it. (I’m reminded of “The Simpsons'” Poochie episode, where an attempt to focus-group a RV program leads to a request for “a realistic down-to-earth show that’s completely off the wall and swarming with magic robots.”)

Feig’s “Ghostbusters” is designed to please existing fans, but more importantly, it’s designed to make new ones. You need only look at that instantly famous photo of two young girls in coveralls and homemade proton packs beaming at the chance to be in Kristen Wiig ‘s presence to know it’s succeeded.

“Ghostbusters” opens in theaters on Friday, July 15.

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Screen Rant

The original ghostbusters were the worst part of afterlife (and that's good).

Ghostbusters: Afterlife made good on its promise to reunite the original Ghostbusters - a moment which was one of the least exciting in the film.

Warning: SPOILERS ahead  for Ghostbusters: Afterlife .

New franchise installment   Ghostbusters: Afterlife   kept its promise to reunite the original Ghostbusters, a moment that was arguably the worst part of the film – and that's a good thing. The return of Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and Ernie Hudson reprising their respective roles as Peter Venkman, Ray Stantz, and Winston Zeddemore, has been highly anticipated and teased, with Aykroyd even featured in one of the film's theatrical trailers. As it turns out, however, the third-act arrival of the three original Ghostbusters feels hasty and borderline unnecessary. Strangely, though, that's good for the future of the franchise.

In creating  Ghostbusters: Afterlife , writer/director Jason Reitman and co-writer Gil Kenan had the unenviable task of creating something new while simultaneously honoring the original 1984 film and sidestepping perceived mishaps in 1989's canon  Ghostbusters 2 and the 2016  Ghostbusters reboot. This multi-generational aspect is even present behind the scenes of  Afterlife , considering that Jason Reitman is the son of Ivan Reitman, the director of the first two  Ghostbusters films. Thankfully, like Jason Reitman himself,  Ghostbusters: Afterlife embraces the legacy of its DNA even while venturing forward into new territory.

Related:  Ghostbusters: Afterlife Credits Scene Creates A Lazy Fire Station Plot Hole

Afterlife  frankly doesn't have room for the original Ghostbusters, who appear for just one scene.  And while the return of Murray, Aykroyd, and Hudson elicited cheers and applause from audiences, their arrival in the third act threatens to slow down a climactic battle between  Afterlife 's new crew and a resurrected Gozer the Gozerian (who also arguably didn't need to return). As satisfying as it is to see Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and Ernie Hudson back in uniform, it's hard not to want to check in with Phoebe (Mckenna Grace) and her family while the camera is on the original Ghostbusters. Rather than being a disappointment, this speaks to how well  Afterlife establishes its own protagonists and gets audiences invested in their story.

In fact, the reason the return of the original Ghostbusters threatens to fall flat in  Afterlife is entirely due to how well the younger Reitman's film addresses the idea of legacy in its main story. Where all the other  Ghostbusters films have been about ghosts,  Afterlife 's primary focus is family. There's no better way to honor and push beyond what came before than by literally exploring it with brand-new characters with their own motivations. By centering around the family Egon Spengler abandoned ,  Afterlife  lets the audience rediscover their love of  Ghostbusters through main characters Phoebe, Callie (Carrie Coon), and Trevor (Finn Wolfhard) - characters who take the franchise in a new direction by having motivations unrelated to busting ghosts.

Even outside of Spengler's family, Afterlife 's new characters are almost all believable and hilarious. It's hard to be too nostalgic for the original Ghostbusters while watching Logan Kim's dorky-but-lovable Podcast or Paul Rudd's charming Gary Grooberson. Add in the deadpan Phoebe, relatable Trevor, and Coon's sympathetic portrayal of Callie, and  Afterlife has a bevy of interesting, funny characters who can carry the film on their own. That isn't even to mention the masterful way Reitman and co. incorporated the late Harold Ramis' Egon Spengler into the story - a character, and actor, who gives the film its true power by passing the torch.

Ghostbusters: Afterlife is full of Easter eggs and references, and the return of the original team ultimately feels more like an extended callback than a crucial part of the story. The film does have a post-credits scene, however, that hints at a potential return of the legacy Ghostbusters in a sequel. Time will tell on that front, but for now,  Ghostbusters: Afterlife is a shining example of how to retool a classic franchise for a new era.

Next:  Ghostbusters: Afterlife's Revelation 6:12 Explained

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Meaning of ghostbuster in English

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  • The ghostbuster did his thing and the hauntings stopped .
  • A team of ghostbusters spent all night investigating strange goings-on at a farm cottage , only to find squirrels .
  • They don't like the term "ghostbusters," but the two women will investigate activities believed to be coming "from the other side ."
  • clairvoyant
  • escapologist
  • illusionist
  • spiritual healer

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Translations of ghostbuster.

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Ghostbusters

Ghostbusters is a 1984 film , about three unemployed parapsychology professors who start a business capturing ghosts. It was followed by a sequel, Ghostbusters II , in 1989, by a reboot film, Ghostbusters: Answer the Call , in 2016, and by another sequel, Ghostbusters: Afterlife in 2021.

ghostbusters define bad

  • 1 Dr. Ray Stantz
  • 2 Winston Zeddemore
  • 4 About Ghostbusters
  • 7 External links

Dr. Ray Stantz [ edit ]

  • Personally, I liked the University. They gave us money and facilities, we didn't have to produce anything! You've never been out of college! You don't know what it's like out there! I've worked in the private sector. They expect results .

Winston Zeddemore [ edit ]

  • Ah, If there's a steady paycheck in it, I'll believe anything you say.
  • [last line] I love this town!

Dialogue [ edit ]

About ghostbusters [ edit ].

  • Roger Ebert , Review of Ghostbusters (1 January 1984)

Taglines [ edit ]

  • Catching the un-dead is their life. It's not a pretty job...especially the way they do it. But somebody has to.
  • They're Here To Save The World.
  • Coming To Save The World This Summer.
  • We're Ready To Believe You.
  • Who ya gonna call? Ghostbusters!
  • The supernatural spectacular
  • They ain't afraid of no ghost.
  • The world's most successful comedy
  • No spook, specter, or haunt will ever be safe again.

Cast [ edit ]

  • Bill Murray - Dr. Peter Venkman
  • Dan Aykroyd - Dr. Raymond Stantz
  • Harold Ramis - Dr. Egon Spengler
  • Sigourney Weaver - Dana Barrett
  • Rick Moranis - Louis Tully
  • Annie Potts - Janine Melnitz
  • Ernie Hudson - Winston Zeddmore
  • William Atherton - Walter Peck
  • David Margulies - Mayor
  • Slavitza Jovan - Gozer
  • Paddi Edwards - Gozer (voice)
  • Ivan Reitman - Zuul (voice)/Slimer (voice)

External links [ edit ]

  • Ghostbusters quotes at the Internet Movie Database
  • Ghostbusters at Rotten Tomatoes

ghostbusters define bad

  • Action films
  • Adventure films
  • Comedy horror films
  • Fantasy films
  • Science fiction films
  • American films
  • Films directed by Ivan Reitman
  • Ghost films
  • Science fantasy films
  • Demon films
  • Screenplays by Dan Aykroyd
  • Screenplays by Harold Ramis
  • Films set in New York City
  • Films featuring puppetry
  • United States National Film Registry films
  • Films set in apartment buildings
  • American films with live action and animation

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COMMENTS

  1. Ghostbusters Quotes

    It would be bad. Venkman: I'm fuzzy on the whole good/bad thing. What do you mean, "bad"? Spengler: Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously and every molecule in your body exploding at the speed of light. Ray Stantz: Total protonic reversal. Venkman: Right. That's bad. Okay. All right. Important safety tip. Thanks, Egon.

  2. Ghostbusters Define "Bad"

    I'm a little fuzzy on bad. Let's define "bad."

  3. Ghostbusters quotes ... Movie Quotes Database

    Alice (librarian): My uncle thought he was Saint Jerome. Dr. Peter Venkman: I'd call that a big yes. View Quote Dr. Peter Venkman: Hey Egon, you know, this reminds me of the time that you tried to drill a hole through your head. Dr. Egon Spengler: That would have worked if you hadn't stopped me.

  4. Ghostbusters (1984)

    Ghostbusters: Directed by Ivan Reitman. With Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Sigourney Weaver, Harold Ramis. Three parapsychologists forced out of their university funding set up shop as a unique ghost removal service in New York City, attracting frightened yet skeptical customers.

  5. Ghostbusters

    Ghostbusters is a 1984 American supernatural comedy film directed and produced by Ivan Reitman, and written by Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis. It stars Bill Murray, Aykroyd, and Ramis as Peter Venkman, Ray Stantz, and Egon Spengler, three eccentric parapsychologists who start a ghost-catching business in New York City.

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    7. "EGON SPENGLER" WAS INSPIRED BY A FRIEND, AN INTELLECTUAL, AND AN UNKNOWN. When trying to come up with the perfect name for his character—who was the brains of the Ghostbusters—co-writer ...

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  8. Ghostbuster

    A Ghostbuster is a person or even in a few cases a spirit itself that performs duties of removal of a spirit (aka: ghost, apparition, the undead). Officially the Ghostbusters are paranormal investigators, not ghosthunters. Catching ghosts just happens to be their primary form of business. Sometimes removal doesn't mean through means of weapons as a spirit may leave due to fulfillment, being ...

  9. GHOSTBUSTER

    informal us / ˈɡoʊst.bʌs.tɚ / uk / ˈɡəʊst.bʌs.tə r/ Add to word list a person who claims that they can get rid of ghosts and evil spirits: On the show, young ghostbusters hunt down evil spirits. A team of 20 ghostbusters is due to begin an investigation at the school after reports of paranormal activity. Fewer examples

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    The Stay-Puft Man is the Child of The Pillsbury DoughBoy and the Michelin Man. The gigantic Stay-Puft attacked New York in 1984 in Godzilla-like fashion - right down to the actor in the suit that portrayed him onscreen (sorry to spoil the illusion). True, Mr. Stay-Puft didn't exist before his starring role in Ghostbusters - but he was inspired ...

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  15. Ghostbusters (2016)

    Following a ghost invasion of Manhattan, paranormal enthusiasts Erin Gilbert and Abby Yates, nuclear engineer Jillian Holtzmann, and subway worker Patty Tolan band together to stop the otherworldly threat. Director Paul Feig Writers Katie Dippold Paul Feig Ivan Reitman Stars Melissa McCarthy Kristen Wiig Kate McKinnon See production info at IMDbPro

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    The original Ghostbusters was released in 1984 and has since stood the test of time as a creative and hilarious film. Ghostbusters follows Ray Stantz (Dan Aykroyd), Peter Venkman (Bill Murray) and Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis) who cut their losses and opened up a business to hunt and catch ghosts.At first, the idea seems foolish, but as more paranormal activity arises, the team gets more ...

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  18. Ghostbusters (1984)

    No, it's not actually bad. It's an all-time great comedy, pretty universally recognised as such. You are free to not like it, of course, for whatever reason, but your dislike just makes it bad for you. In the grand pretending-to-be-objective theatre of popular opinion, it's a fantastic comedy. 19.

  19. Why everyone was wrong about Ghostbusters II

    Released in June 1989, Ghostbusters II was a commercial hit, but a critical bomb, blasted by critics for being an ectoplasm-drenched re-run of the original. Worse yet, the bad reception seemed to ...

  20. The Original Ghostbusters Were The Worst Part of Afterlife (And That's

    Warning: SPOILERS ahead for Ghostbusters: Afterlife. New franchise installment Ghostbusters: Afterlife kept its promise to reunite the original Ghostbusters, a moment that was arguably the worst part of the film - and that's a good thing. The return of Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and Ernie Hudson reprising their respective roles as Peter Venkman, Ray Stantz, and Winston Zeddemore, has been ...

  21. Ghostbusters 2016: Was it really that bad?

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  22. GHOSTBUSTER

    informal uk / ˈɡəʊst.bʌs.tə r/ us / ˈɡoʊst.bʌs.tɚ / Add to word list a person who claims that they can get rid of ghosts and evil spirits: On the show, young ghostbusters hunt down evil spirits. A team of 20 ghostbusters is due to begin an investigation at the school after reports of paranormal activity. Fewer examples

  23. Ghostbusters

    Ghostbusters is a 1984 film, about three unemployed parapsychology professors who start a business capturing ghosts.It was followed by a sequel, Ghostbusters II, in 1989, by a reboot film, Ghostbusters: Answer the Call, in 2016, and by another sequel, Ghostbusters: Afterlife in 2021. Directed by Ivan Reitman and written by Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis. ...