PrepScholar

Choose Your Test

Sat / act prep online guides and tips, the complete ib extended essay guide: examples, topics, and ideas.

International Baccalaureate (IB)

body-notes-notetaking-cc0-pixabay

IB students around the globe fear writing the Extended Essay, but it doesn't have to be a source of stress! In this article, I'll get you excited about writing your Extended Essay and provide you with the resources you need to get an A on it.

If you're reading this article, I'm going to assume you're an IB student getting ready to write your Extended Essay. If you're looking at this as a potential future IB student, I recommend reading our introductory IB articles first, including our guide to what the IB program is and our full coverage of the IB curriculum .

IB Extended Essay: Why Should You Trust My Advice?

I myself am a recipient of an IB Diploma, and I happened to receive an A on my IB Extended Essay. Don't believe me? The proof is in the IBO pudding:

body_ibeescore.png

If you're confused by what this report means, EE is short for Extended Essay , and English A1 is the subject that my Extended Essay topic coordinated with. In layman's terms, my IB Diploma was graded in May 2010, I wrote my Extended Essay in the English A1 category, and I received an A grade on it.

What Is the Extended Essay in the IB Diploma Programme?

The IB Extended Essay, or EE , is a mini-thesis you write under the supervision of an IB advisor (an IB teacher at your school), which counts toward your IB Diploma (learn more about the major IB Diploma requirements in our guide) . I will explain exactly how the EE affects your Diploma later in this article.

For the Extended Essay, you will choose a research question as a topic, conduct the research independently, then write an essay on your findings . The essay itself is a long one—although there's a cap of 4,000 words, most successful essays get very close to this limit.

Keep in mind that the IB requires this essay to be a "formal piece of academic writing," meaning you'll have to do outside research and cite additional sources.

The IB Extended Essay must include the following:

  • A title page
  • Contents page
  • Introduction
  • Body of the essay
  • References and bibliography

Additionally, your research topic must fall into one of the six approved DP categories , or IB subject groups, which are as follows:

  • Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature
  • Group 2: Language Acquisition
  • Group 3: Individuals and Societies
  • Group 4: Sciences
  • Group 5: Mathematics
  • Group 6: The Arts

Once you figure out your category and have identified a potential research topic, it's time to pick your advisor, who is normally an IB teacher at your school (though you can also find one online ). This person will help direct your research, and they'll conduct the reflection sessions you'll have to do as part of your Extended Essay.

As of 2018, the IB requires a "reflection process" as part of your EE supervision process. To fulfill this requirement, you have to meet at least three times with your supervisor in what the IB calls "reflection sessions." These meetings are not only mandatory but are also part of the formal assessment of the EE and your research methods.

According to the IB, the purpose of these meetings is to "provide an opportunity for students to reflect on their engagement with the research process." Basically, these meetings give your supervisor the opportunity to offer feedback, push you to think differently, and encourage you to evaluate your research process.

The final reflection session is called the viva voce, and it's a short 10- to 15-minute interview between you and your advisor. This happens at the very end of the EE process, and it's designed to help your advisor write their report, which factors into your EE grade.

Here are the topics covered in your viva voce :

  • A check on plagiarism and malpractice
  • Your reflection on your project's successes and difficulties
  • Your reflection on what you've learned during the EE process

Your completed Extended Essay, along with your supervisor's report, will then be sent to the IB to be graded. We'll cover the assessment criteria in just a moment.

body-lightbulb-idea-pixabay-cc0

We'll help you learn how to have those "lightbulb" moments...even on test day!  

What Should You Write About in Your IB Extended Essay?

You can technically write about anything, so long as it falls within one of the approved categories listed above.

It's best to choose a topic that matches one of the IB courses , (such as Theatre, Film, Spanish, French, Math, Biology, etc.), which shouldn't be difficult because there are so many class subjects.

Here is a range of sample topics with the attached extended essay:

  • Biology: The Effect of Age and Gender on the Photoreceptor Cells in the Human Retina
  • Chemistry: How Does Reflux Time Affect the Yield and Purity of Ethyl Aminobenzoate (Benzocaine), and How Effective is Recrystallisation as a Purification Technique for This Compound?
  • English: An Exploration of Jane Austen's Use of the Outdoors in Emma
  • Geography: The Effect of Location on the Educational Attainment of Indigenous Secondary Students in Queensland, Australia
  • Math: Alhazen's Billiard Problem
  • Visual Arts: Can Luc Tuymans Be Classified as a Political Painter?

You can see from how varied the topics are that you have a lot of freedom when it comes to picking a topic . So how do you pick when the options are limitless?

body-pen-A+-test-grade-exam-cc0-pixabay

How to Write a Stellar IB Extended Essay: 6 Essential Tips

Below are six key tips to keep in mind as you work on your Extended Essay for the IB DP. Follow these and you're sure to get an A!

#1: Write About Something You Enjoy

You can't expect to write a compelling essay if you're not a fan of the topic on which you're writing. For example, I just love British theatre and ended up writing my Extended Essay on a revolution in post-WWII British theatre. (Yes, I'm definitely a #TheatreNerd.)

I really encourage anyone who pursues an IB Diploma to take the Extended Essay seriously. I was fortunate enough to receive a full-tuition merit scholarship to USC's School of Dramatic Arts program. In my interview for the scholarship, I spoke passionately about my Extended Essay; thus, I genuinely think my Extended Essay helped me get my scholarship.

But how do you find a topic you're passionate about? Start by thinking about which classes you enjoy the most and why . Do you like math classes because you like to solve problems? Or do you enjoy English because you like to analyze literary texts?

Keep in mind that there's no right or wrong answer when it comes to choosing your Extended Essay topic. You're not more likely to get high marks because you're writing about science, just like you're not doomed to failure because you've chosen to tackle the social sciences. The quality of what you produce—not the field you choose to research within—will determine your grade.

Once you've figured out your category, you should brainstorm more specific topics by putting pen to paper . What was your favorite chapter you learned in that class? Was it astrophysics or mechanics? What did you like about that specific chapter? Is there something you want to learn more about? I recommend spending a few hours on this type of brainstorming.

One last note: if you're truly stumped on what to research, pick a topic that will help you in your future major or career . That way you can use your Extended Essay as a talking point in your college essays (and it will prepare you for your studies to come too!).

#2: Select a Topic That Is Neither Too Broad nor Too Narrow

There's a fine line between broad and narrow. You need to write about something specific, but not so specific that you can't write 4,000 words on it.

You can't write about WWII because that would be a book's worth of material. You also don't want to write about what type of soup prisoners of war received behind enemy lines, because you probably won’t be able to come up with 4,000 words of material about it. However, you could possibly write about how the conditions in German POW camps—and the rations provided—were directly affected by the Nazis' successes and failures on the front, including the use of captured factories and prison labor in Eastern Europe to increase production. WWII military history might be a little overdone, but you get my point.

If you're really stuck trying to pinpoint a not-too-broad-or-too-narrow topic, I suggest trying to brainstorm a topic that uses a comparison. Once you begin looking through the list of sample essays below, you'll notice that many use comparisons to formulate their main arguments.

I also used a comparison in my EE, contrasting Harold Pinter's Party Time with John Osborne's Look Back in Anger in order to show a transition in British theatre. Topics with comparisons of two to three plays, books, and so on tend to be the sweet spot. You can analyze each item and then compare them with one another after doing some in-depth analysis of each individually. The ways these items compare and contrast will end up forming the thesis of your essay!

When choosing a comparative topic, the key is that the comparison should be significant. I compared two plays to illustrate the transition in British theatre, but you could compare the ways different regional dialects affect people's job prospects or how different temperatures may or may not affect the mating patterns of lightning bugs. The point here is that comparisons not only help you limit your topic, but they also help you build your argument.

Comparisons are not the only way to get a grade-A EE, though. If after brainstorming, you pick a non-comparison-based topic and are still unsure whether your topic is too broad or narrow, spend about 30 minutes doing some basic research and see how much material is out there.

If there are more than 1,000 books, articles, or documentaries out there on that exact topic, it may be too broad. But if there are only two books that have any connection to your topic, it may be too narrow. If you're still unsure, ask your advisor—it's what they're there for! Speaking of advisors...

body-narrow-crack-stuck-cc0-pixabay

Don't get stuck with a narrow topic!

#3: Choose an Advisor Who Is Familiar With Your Topic

If you're not certain of who you would like to be your advisor, create a list of your top three choices. Next, write down the pros and cons of each possibility (I know this sounds tedious, but it really helps!).

For example, Mr. Green is my favorite teacher and we get along really well, but he teaches English. For my EE, I want to conduct an experiment that compares the efficiency of American electric cars with foreign electric cars.

I had Ms. White a year ago. She teaches physics and enjoyed having me in her class. Unlike Mr. Green, Ms. White could help me design my experiment.

Based on my topic and what I need from my advisor, Ms. White would be a better fit for me than would Mr. Green (even though I like him a lot).

The moral of my story is this: do not just ask your favorite teacher to be your advisor . They might be a hindrance to you if they teach another subject. For example, I would not recommend asking your biology teacher to guide you in writing an English literature-based EE.

There can, of course, be exceptions to this rule. If you have a teacher who's passionate and knowledgeable about your topic (as my English teacher was about my theatre topic), you could ask that instructor. Consider all your options before you do this. There was no theatre teacher at my high school, so I couldn't find a theatre-specific advisor, but I chose the next best thing.

Before you approach a teacher to serve as your advisor, check with your high school to see what requirements they have for this process. Some IB high schools require your IB Extended Essay advisor to sign an Agreement Form , for instance.

Make sure that you ask your IB coordinator whether there is any required paperwork to fill out. If your school needs a specific form signed, bring it with you when you ask your teacher to be your EE advisor.

#4: Pick an Advisor Who Will Push You to Be Your Best

Some teachers might just take on students because they have to and aren't very passionate about reading drafts, only giving you minimal feedback. Choose a teacher who will take the time to read several drafts of your essay and give you extensive notes. I would not have gotten my A without being pushed to make my Extended Essay draft better.

Ask a teacher that you have experience with through class or an extracurricular activity. Do not ask a teacher that you have absolutely no connection to. If a teacher already knows you, that means they already know your strengths and weaknesses, so they know what to look for, where you need to improve, and how to encourage your best work.

Also, don't forget that your supervisor's assessment is part of your overall EE score . If you're meeting with someone who pushes you to do better—and you actually take their advice—they'll have more impressive things to say about you than a supervisor who doesn't know you well and isn't heavily involved in your research process.

Be aware that the IB only allows advisors to make suggestions and give constructive criticism. Your teacher cannot actually help you write your EE. The IB recommends that the supervisor spends approximately two to three hours in total with the candidate discussing the EE.

#5: Make Sure Your Essay Has a Clear Structure and Flow

The IB likes structure. Your EE needs a clear introduction (which should be one to two double-spaced pages), research question/focus (i.e., what you're investigating), a body, and a conclusion (about one double-spaced page). An essay with unclear organization will be graded poorly.

The body of your EE should make up the bulk of the essay. It should be about eight to 18 pages long (again, depending on your topic). Your body can be split into multiple parts. For example, if you were doing a comparison, you might have one third of your body as Novel A Analysis, another third as Novel B Analysis, and the final third as your comparison of Novels A and B.

If you're conducting an experiment or analyzing data, such as in this EE , your EE body should have a clear structure that aligns with the scientific method ; you should state the research question, discuss your method, present the data, analyze the data, explain any uncertainties, and draw a conclusion and/or evaluate the success of the experiment.

#6: Start Writing Sooner Rather Than Later!

You will not be able to crank out a 4,000-word essay in just a week and get an A on it. You'll be reading many, many articles (and, depending on your topic, possibly books and plays as well!). As such, it's imperative that you start your research as soon as possible.

Each school has a slightly different deadline for the Extended Essay. Some schools want them as soon as November of your senior year; others will take them as late as February. Your school will tell you what your deadline is. If they haven't mentioned it by February of your junior year, ask your IB coordinator about it.

Some high schools will provide you with a timeline of when you need to come up with a topic, when you need to meet with your advisor, and when certain drafts are due. Not all schools do this. Ask your IB coordinator if you are unsure whether you are on a specific timeline.

Below is my recommended EE timeline. While it's earlier than most schools, it'll save you a ton of heartache (trust me, I remember how hard this process was!):

  • January/February of Junior Year: Come up with your final research topic (or at least your top three options).
  • February of Junior Year: Approach a teacher about being your EE advisor. If they decline, keep asking others until you find one. See my notes above on how to pick an EE advisor.
  • April/May of Junior Year: Submit an outline of your EE and a bibliography of potential research sources (I recommend at least seven to 10) to your EE advisor. Meet with your EE advisor to discuss your outline.
  • Summer Between Junior and Senior Year: Complete your first full draft over the summer between your junior and senior year. I know, I know—no one wants to work during the summer, but trust me—this will save you so much stress come fall when you are busy with college applications and other internal assessments for your IB classes. You will want to have this first full draft done because you will want to complete a couple of draft cycles as you likely won't be able to get everything you want to say into 4,000 articulate words on the first attempt. Try to get this first draft into the best possible shape so you don't have to work on too many revisions during the school year on top of your homework, college applications, and extracurriculars.
  • August/September of Senior Year: Turn in your first draft of your EE to your advisor and receive feedback. Work on incorporating their feedback into your essay. If they have a lot of suggestions for improvement, ask if they will read one more draft before the final draft.
  • September/October of Senior Year: Submit the second draft of your EE to your advisor (if necessary) and look at their feedback. Work on creating the best possible final draft.
  • November-February of Senior Year: Schedule your viva voce. Submit two copies of your final draft to your school to be sent off to the IB. You likely will not get your grade until after you graduate.

Remember that in the middle of these milestones, you'll need to schedule two other reflection sessions with your advisor . (Your teachers will actually take notes on these sessions on a form like this one , which then gets submitted to the IB.)

I recommend doing them when you get feedback on your drafts, but these meetings will ultimately be up to your supervisor. Just don't forget to do them!

body-bird-worm-cc0-pixabay

The early bird DOES get the worm!

How Is the IB Extended Essay Graded?

Extended Essays are graded by examiners appointed by the IB on a scale of 0 to 34 . You'll be graded on five criteria, each with its own set of points. You can learn more about how EE scoring works by reading the IB guide to extended essays .

  • Criterion A: Focus and Method (6 points maximum)
  • Criterion B: Knowledge and Understanding (6 points maximum)
  • Criterion C: Critical Thinking (12 points maximum)
  • Criterion D: Presentation (4 points maximum)
  • Criterion E: Engagement (6 points maximum)

How well you do on each of these criteria will determine the final letter grade you get for your EE. You must earn at least a D to be eligible to receive your IB Diploma.

Although each criterion has a point value, the IB explicitly states that graders are not converting point totals into grades; instead, they're using qualitative grade descriptors to determine the final grade of your Extended Essay . Grade descriptors are on pages 102-103 of this document .

Here's a rough estimate of how these different point values translate to letter grades based on previous scoring methods for the EE. This is just an estimate —you should read and understand the grade descriptors so you know exactly what the scorers are looking for.

Here is the breakdown of EE scores (from the May 2021 bulletin):

How Does the Extended Essay Grade Affect Your IB Diploma?

The Extended Essay grade is combined with your TOK (Theory of Knowledge) grade to determine how many points you get toward your IB Diploma.

To learn about Theory of Knowledge or how many points you need to receive an IB Diploma, read our complete guide to the IB program and our guide to the IB Diploma requirements .

This diagram shows how the two scores are combined to determine how many points you receive for your IB diploma (3 being the most, 0 being the least). In order to get your IB Diploma, you have to earn 24 points across both categories (the TOK and EE). The highest score anyone can earn is 45 points.

body-theory-of-knowledge

Let's say you get an A on your EE and a B on TOK. You will get 3 points toward your Diploma. As of 2014, a student who scores an E on either the extended essay or TOK essay will not be eligible to receive an IB Diploma .

Prior to the class of 2010, a Diploma candidate could receive a failing grade in either the Extended Essay or Theory of Knowledge and still be awarded a Diploma, but this is no longer true.

Figuring out how you're assessed can be a little tricky. Luckily, the IB breaks everything down here in this document . (The assessment information begins on page 219.)

40+ Sample Extended Essays for the IB Diploma Programme

In case you want a little more guidance on how to get an A on your EE, here are over 40 excellent (grade A) sample extended essays for your reading pleasure. Essays are grouped by IB subject.

  • Business Management 1
  • Chemistry 1
  • Chemistry 2
  • Chemistry 3
  • Chemistry 4
  • Chemistry 5
  • Chemistry 6
  • Chemistry 7
  • Computer Science 1
  • Economics 1
  • Design Technology 1
  • Design Technology 2
  • Environmental Systems and Societies 1
  • Geography 1
  • Geography 2
  • Geography 3
  • Geography 4
  • Geography 5
  • Geography 6
  • Literature and Performance 1
  • Mathematics 1
  • Mathematics 2
  • Mathematics 3
  • Mathematics 4
  • Mathematics 5
  • Philosophy 1
  • Philosophy 2
  • Philosophy 3
  • Philosophy 4
  • Philosophy 5
  • Psychology 1
  • Psychology 2
  • Psychology 3
  • Psychology 4
  • Psychology 5
  • Social and Cultural Anthropology 1
  • Social and Cultural Anthropology 2
  • Social and Cultural Anthropology 3
  • Sports, Exercise and Health Science 1
  • Sports, Exercise and Health Science 2
  • Visual Arts 1
  • Visual Arts 2
  • Visual Arts 3
  • Visual Arts 4
  • Visual Arts 5
  • World Religion 1
  • World Religion 2
  • World Religion 3

body-whats-next-stars

What's Next?

Trying to figure out what extracurriculars you should do? Learn more about participating in the Science Olympiad , starting a club , doing volunteer work , and joining Student Government .

Studying for the SAT? Check out our expert study guide to the SAT . Taking the SAT in a month or so? Learn how to cram effectively for this important test .

Not sure where you want to go to college? Read our guide to finding your target school . Also, determine your target SAT score or target ACT score .

Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points or your ACT score by 4 points? We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now:

Get eBook: 5 Tips for 160+ Points

As an SAT/ACT tutor, Dora has guided many students to test prep success. She loves watching students succeed and is committed to helping you get there. Dora received a full-tuition merit based scholarship to University of Southern California. She graduated magna cum laude and scored in the 99th percentile on the ACT. She is also passionate about acting, writing, and photography.

Student and Parent Forum

Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub.PrepScholar.com , allow you to interact with your peers and the PrepScholar staff. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process. Ask questions; get answers.

Join the Conversation

Ask a Question Below

Have any questions about this article or other topics? Ask below and we'll reply!

Improve With Our Famous Guides

  • For All Students

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 160+ SAT Points

How to Get a Perfect 1600, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 800 on Each SAT Section:

Score 800 on SAT Math

Score 800 on SAT Reading

Score 800 on SAT Writing

Series: How to Get to 600 on Each SAT Section:

Score 600 on SAT Math

Score 600 on SAT Reading

Score 600 on SAT Writing

Free Complete Official SAT Practice Tests

What SAT Target Score Should You Be Aiming For?

15 Strategies to Improve Your SAT Essay

The 5 Strategies You Must Be Using to Improve 4+ ACT Points

How to Get a Perfect 36 ACT, by a Perfect Scorer

Series: How to Get 36 on Each ACT Section:

36 on ACT English

36 on ACT Math

36 on ACT Reading

36 on ACT Science

Series: How to Get to 24 on Each ACT Section:

24 on ACT English

24 on ACT Math

24 on ACT Reading

24 on ACT Science

What ACT target score should you be aiming for?

ACT Vocabulary You Must Know

ACT Writing: 15 Tips to Raise Your Essay Score

How to Get Into Harvard and the Ivy League

How to Get a Perfect 4.0 GPA

How to Write an Amazing College Essay

What Exactly Are Colleges Looking For?

Is the ACT easier than the SAT? A Comprehensive Guide

Should you retake your SAT or ACT?

When should you take the SAT or ACT?

Stay Informed

word count for ib extended essay

Get the latest articles and test prep tips!

Looking for Graduate School Test Prep?

Check out our top-rated graduate blogs here:

GRE Online Prep Blog

GMAT Online Prep Blog

TOEFL Online Prep Blog

Holly R. "I am absolutely overjoyed and cannot thank you enough for helping me!”

Banner

Extended Essay: Advice (and Warnings) from the IB

  • Extended Essay- The Basics
  • Step 1. Choose a Subject
  • Step 2. Educate yourself!
  • Using Brainstorming and Mind Maps
  • Identify Keywords
  • Do Background Reading
  • Define Your Topic
  • Conduct Research in a Specific Discipline
  • Step 5. Draft a Research Question
  • Step 6. Create a Timeline
  • Find Articles
  • Find Primary Sources
  • Get Help from Experts
  • Search Engines, Repositories, & Directories
  • Databases and Websites by Subject Area
  • Create an Annotated Bibliography
  • Advice (and Warnings) from the IB
  • Chicago Citation Syle
  • MLA Works Cited & In-Text Citations
  • Step 9. Set Deadlines for Yourself
  • Step 10. Plan a structure for your essay
  • Evaluate & Select: the CRAAP Test
  • Conducting Secondary Research
  • Conducting Primary Research
  • Formal vs. Informal Writing
  • Presentation Requirements
  • Evaluating Your Work

Advice from the IB on Referencing and Citations

word count for ib extended essay

Documentation Checklist

Acknowledging the Work of Another Person

Referencing Online Materials

Caution on using footnotes and endnotes.

IB Publications on Academic Honesty

Use this checklist from IB to make sure you've done a complete job of referencing all the sources in your EE.

word count for ib extended essay

'Acknowledging the Work of Another Person' from IB Extended Essay Guide

Students must acknowledge all sources used in work submitted to IB for assessment.  

Diploma Programme students submit work for assessment in a variety of media that may include audio-visual material, text, graphs, images and/or data published in print or electronic sources.  If students use the work or ideas of another person, they must acknowledge the source using a standard style of referencing in a consistent manner.  A student's failure to acknowledge a source will be investigated by the IB as a potential breach of regulations that may result in a penalty imposed by the IB final award committee.

The IB does not proscribe which style(s) of referencing or in-text citation should be used by students; this is left to the discretion of appropriate faculty/staff in the student's school.  In practice, certain styles may prove most commonly used, but schools are free to choose a style that is appropriate for the subject concerned and the language in which students' work is written.

The following criteria must be applied:

  • Students are expected to use a standard style and use it consistently so that credit is given to all sources used, including sources that have been paraphrased or summarized.
  • When writing, students must clearly distinguish (in the body of the text) between their words and those of others by the use of quotation marks (or other method like indentation) followed by an appropriate citation that denotes an entry in the bibliography.
  • Students are not expected to show faultless expertise in referencing, but are expected to demonstrate that all sources have been acknowledged.
  • Students must be advised that any audio-visual material, text, graphs, images and/or data that is crucial to their work and that is not their own must also attribute the source.  Again, an appropriate style of referencing/citation must be used.
  • name of author
  • date of publication
  • title of source
  • page numbers as applicable
  • date of access (electronic sources)

Adapted from "Introduction; Academic honesty, Acknowledge the work or ideas of another person", from Extended Essay Guide, International Baccalaureate Organization, 2016.

References to online materials should include the title of the extract used as well as the website address, the date it was accessed and, if possible, the author.

In other words, all electronic sources must be date stamped by including the date the student accessed the resource (for example, accessed 12 March 2016). Caution should be exercised with information found on websites that do not give references or that cannot be cross-checked against other sources. The more important a particular point is to the essay, the more the quality of its source needs to be evaluated.

IB has a caution for students using footnotes and/or endnotes in their Extended Essays:

Shark warning sign - Britannica ImageQuest

Footnotes and endnotes may be used for referencing purposes and if this is the case will not be included in the word count of the essay.

In order to avoid confusion and unwittingly exceed the word limit, students are advised to avoid using footnotes or endnotes other than for referencing purposes unless it is appropriate.

As footnotes and endnotes are not an essential part of the extended essay students must take care to ensure that all information with direct relevance to the analysis, discussion and evaluation of their essay is contained in the main body of it.

An essay that attempts to evade the word limit by including important material in footnotes or endnotes will be compromised across the assessment criteria. Please note that footnotes and endnotes are added to the word count as they are encountered.

Extended Essay Guide, International Baccalaureate Organization, p. 86, 2016.

IB Publications

For information on academic honesty in the IB Diploma Programme, see these IB publications:

  • << Previous: Create an Annotated Bibliography
  • Next: Chicago Citation Syle >>
  • Last Updated: Apr 12, 2024 2:56 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.westsoundacademy.org/ee
  • Add anything here or just remove it...

Sign up for Newsletter

Signup for our newsletter to get notified about sales and new products. Add any text here or remove it.

Error: Contact form not found.

Filiz Led

Sepetinizde ürün bulunmuyor.

Ib Extended Essay Word Count Rules: Everything You Need to Know

Unraveling the mysteries of ib extended essay word count rules contract.

Writing an IB extended essay can be a daunting task, as students are required to delve deep into a topic of their choice and produce a comprehensive piece of research. One key of extended essay word count, often leaves puzzled rules guidelines.

As a former IB student myself, I understand the challenges and frustrations that can come with navigating the word count regulations. In blog post, aim provide thorough insightful of IB Extended Essay Word Count Rules Contract, clarity guidance current future students.

the Word Count Requirements

According to the official IB Extended Essay Guide, the word count for the extended essay must be between 3,000 and 4,000 words. This word limit includes the main body of the essay, as well as any quotations, footnotes, and in-text citations. The title page, abstract, table of contents, bibliography, and appendices are not included in the word count.

It is crucial for students to adhere to these word count regulations, as exceeding or falling short of the specified range can result in penalties and potential loss of marks. It essential students carefully plan structure essays ensure meet word count requirements.

Case Studies and Practical Examples

To provide a practical understanding of the word count rules, let`s consider a case study of two hypothetical extended essays:

In the first case study, the essay falls within the permissible word count range, demonstrating compliance with the regulations. However, in the second case study, the essay exceeds the upper limit of 4,000 words, potentially resulting in penalties for the student.

Strategies for Meeting the Word Count

As students to meet word count requirements, essential adopt strategies managing length essays. May include:

  • Conducting research selecting focused to ensure depth analysis within word limit.
  • Being and in language, avoiding repetition verbosity.
  • Carefully quotations citations within text contribute word count without padding.

By implementing these strategies, students can navigate the word count regulations while producing high-quality, substantive essays that fulfill the requirements of the extended essay assessment.

The word count rules for the IB extended essay play a significant role in shaping the structure and content of students` research projects. By gaining a clear understanding of these rules and employing effective strategies, students can confidently navigate the word count requirements while producing compelling and well-researched essays.

IB Extended Essay Word Count Rules Contract

In accordance with the rules and regulations set forth by the International Baccalaureate organization, this contract outlines the word count rules for the extended essay.

This contract is entered into on the date of submission of the extended essay.

Top 10 Legal Questions About IB Extended Essay Word Count Rules Contract

' src=

filizvolkan

Kullanıcı adı veya e-posta adresi  *

Parola  *

Beni hatırla Giriş Yap

Parolanızı mı unuttunuz?

Banner

Extended Essay (IB): Expressing your ideas

  • The Inquiry Process
  • EE Seminar 1
  • EE Seminar 2
  • IT Workshop 1
  • EE Investigation Days
  • EE Writing Days
  • Choosing a subject and topic
  • Developing a line of inquiry
  • Finding and selecting sources
  • Working with ideas
  • Expressing your ideas
  • Using ManageBac
  • Supervisor resources
  • Who can help?

Introduction

word count for ib extended essay

This is the stage you have been building towards - writing your essay. On this page you will find guidance on:

Am I ready to start writing my essay?

Referencing styles

Citing and referencing, academic writing.

  • Key IB presentation requirements

As well as resource boxes at the side containing:

  • Link to the Subject Specific Guides
  • IT guides for PC users and Mac users
  • Examples of sample EEs with mark schemes
  • Constructing your understanding grids for Group 4 (and some Group 3 and 5) essays and Non-Group 4 essays .

Am I ready?

Before you start writing, think:

  • Is my investigation largely complete? As you write you may find that you need a few additional resources or information to support your argument, but you should not start to write until you are largely sure where your argument is going.
  • Have I filled in a Research Organiser (see sidebar)? This will help you to organise your thoughts and make sure you understand the argument you intend to make and have the evidence to support it.
  • Do I understand the formal requirements of the EE (what sections I need, word limits, referencing and layout requirements)? It is significantly easier to set all this up correctly from the start than to try to correct it at the end.
  • Do I understand how to write in an appropriate academic style ?
  • Do I know how to import my sources from my Investigative Journal? Don't waste time putting all your citation data in again! Import all your sources as you set up your EE document. There are helpsheets in the Resources for PC / Mac users boxes to the right and more help in IT Workshop 2 .

You should use the Oakham APAv3 Academic Writing Template  -   click on the image below -  rather than a generic Word template to set up your essay. Further guidance will be given in EE Seminar 4.

word count for ib extended essay

The document below is a model of how to lay out an Extended Essay, with notes to explain how it meets the formal requirements.

word count for ib extended essay

Oakham School's 'house' referencing style is APA (version 6), which is an 'Author-date' style. Although the IB do not dictate which referencing style you should use, you are required to use a recognised style. We strongly recommend that you stick to APA as Library staff are unable to support you in citing and referencing accurately if you choose to use a different style. We do not support the use of footnote referencing styles.

The only deviation from this style is that the IB require you to add the "date accessed" for websites to show when you viewed the site (because information on websites can change). You can do this in Word by checking the "Show All Bibliography Fields" box when you add or edit a source and scrolling down to "Year/Month/Day Accessed"

word count for ib extended essay

For detailed information and guidance on how to use sources in your writing and how to cite and reference them accurately using the tools in Microsoft Word, consult the Citing and Referencing LibGuide . Note that this site includes IB specific guidance, such as how the IB require you to reference websites and interviews (which is slightly different to standard APA referencing) and what to do if you are using a source written in a language that is not the language of your essay.

Stages in an academic essay

undefined

Your thesis is the point you want to make. It emerges from your research and your task is to use the evidence you have found to establish it as the most reasonable response to that research.

In both approaches, you must state the research question in your introduction, and follow your Subject-specific guidelines carefully.

Sections required in your essay

word count for ib extended essay

Note: the rule changes for 2018 onwards state that an Abstract is no longer required. Given the strict word limit, examiners reports state that you SHOULD NOT INCLUDE AN ABSTRACT as it would now be included in the word limit and this reduces the number of words you have left to make your case.

Paragraph Structure

Paragraphs themselves have a structure - the most common you will have come across is likely to be PEEL. The letters often stand for slightly different things in different subjects, but the idea is largely the same - introduce your main idea for the paragraph ( Point ), justify it with Evidence and/or Examples , and Evaluate this evidence. Finally, Link back to the Research Question and/or Link forward to the next paragraph.

This is not the only way to write a paragraph and, with experience, you will soon find that your argument develops a flow of its own that does not require a formula - indeed, your essay would be very dull if every paragraph followed exactly the same structure. However, this structure can be a useful scaffold to get you started and make sure you don't miss anything important.

Paragraph structure

The structure of academic writing

word count for ib extended essay

Planning your essay

It is vital to plan your essay before you start writing. An essay plan provides an outline of your argument and how it develops.

Reread your EE Subject Guide . What MUST your essay include? Make a checklist to refer to throughout your essay.

  • Do you have to have a map or chart? Data? Primary and/or secondary sources?
  • Reread the assessment criteria, particularly Criterion D: Presentation . Are there any presentation requirements specific to your subject? Note that some subject guides say advise a section-subsection structure, some say it must be used and some say it is unusual in that subject area and a "continuous body of text" is normal. Make sure you know which is the case for your subject. Regardless of how whether or not you use subheadings for the main body of your essay (and in most subjects, you will), you should have a clear plan for the structure of your essay before you start writing, so...

What sections and subsections do you need?

Although this might change as you write your essay, you should not start writing until you have your overall structure. Then think about roughly how you are going to divide your word 4000 words between the different sections. 4000 words seems like a lot before you start writing, but it is much easier to write to the limit, section by section, than to try to cut your essay down once it is written.

What will the reader will expect to see and where?

Look back at your checklist and think about where in your essay you are planning to include the required information. Make sure the flow of your essay makes sense to a reader who may be a subject expert but knows little about your topic. Have you included background information? Details of experimental methods? Arguments and counter arguments?

Now get writing!

You've read all the guidance. You've made your plan. Now you have a blank screen in front of you and you just need to get started! Start with the section you think you will find easiest to write and work outwards from there, or follow the steps below to get started. Don't forget to write with the word limit in mind though.

undefined

What if you are writing lots of paragraphs but your essay just doesn't seem to be coming together?

1. Condense each paragraph into a short statement or bullet point. This is the skeleton structure of your essay.

2. Look at the order of the statements.

  • Is the order logical?
  • Does each point follow another in a sensible order?
  • Do you need to change the order?
  • Do you need to add paragraphs?
  • Do you need to remove paragraphs?

3. Add, subtract and rearrange the paragraphs until your structure makes sense.

4. Redraft using your new paragraph order.  

Image by OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay

Willard, D. (2003) My journey to and b eyond tenure in a secular university . Retrieved from: www.dwillard.org/articles/individual/my-journey-to-and-beyond-tenure-in-a-secular-university . Accessed: 9th May 2020

Oh no! It's too long!!

If you haven't managed to write to the word limit and are suddenly faced with cutting down an essay that is over the word limit, try these tips on concise writing from Purdue Online Writing Lab.

word count for ib extended essay

Use the menu on the left of this page from Purdue OWL to browse the four very practical pages on writing concisely and one on the Paramedic Method for reducing your word count.

Key presentation requirements for the EE

General requirements

Your essay MUST have:

  • "font, font size and spacing conducive to on-screen marking. [We recommend Arial 12pt, which was the previous IB recommendation.]
  • page numbering [In the Header or Footer]
  • no candidate, supervisor, or school name on the title page, page headers, appendices or acknowledgment pages
  • the file size must not be more than 10 MB. (Note that the RPPF is uploaded separately and is not part of the overall file size of the essay."

(IB EE Guide 2020, Presentation)

It is also suggested that:

  • You include a header containing your research question on every page to help you to maintain focus

You essay must have at most 4000 words. While there is no set penalty for exceeding this, examiners will stop reading at 4000 words, so may not, for example, read your conclusions and your mar is likely to suffer siginficantly. The following table summarises what is and is not included in the word count:

undefined

Note: The Guide states explicitly in several places that text in tables should be brief and tables should not be used to get around word limits. If the examiner feels you have put too much text into tables, then they will include it in your word count.

Illustrations (anything that isn't just text)

  • Must only be included if they relate directly to the text, are acknowledged where appropriate and help you to make your argument more effectively. It is not acceptable to include images just to make it look pretty!
  • Whether they are photographs, other images, graphs, tables, maps or charts, they must be clearly labelled with the minimum information required for the examiner to understand them. This labelling will not be included in the word count as long as it does not include any commentary .
  • We recommend that ll illustrations have brief captions with Figure/Table numbers to allow you to refer to them clearly in the text, and anything that is not entirely your own original work must be cited and referenced as you would for text.

Footnotes and endnotes

  • May be used for referencing (but we recommend you use APA, which is an in-text citation system and does not require footnotes. The Library will not provide any technical referencing support for any other system).
  • Otherwise the IB advises against using them to avoid confusion with word counts. The only exception to this is for quotations in languages other than the language of the essay. In this case you can provide a translation in the body of the essay with the quotation in the original language in the footnote. In this case it would not be included in the word count.

Since examiners will not read appendices, the IB suggests they should NOT be used, except in the following cases:

  • "an exemplar of a questionnaire or interview questions
  • an exemplar of permission letters
  • group 1, category 1 essays: copies of poems or short stories (of less than three pages)
  • group 1, category 3 essays: excerpts from newspapers, advertisements and transcripts of speeches
  • language acquisition, category 1 and 2: excerpts from newspapers, advertisements, transcripts of speeches, etc
  • language acquisition, category 3: excerpts or copies of poems or short stories (less than 3 pages)
  • an external mentor letter, where one has been used
  • raw data or statistical tables for experimental sciences (this should not include any analysis or conclusions)."

External sources and specimen materials

Examiners will not access any external resources (e.g. hyperlinks or DVDs), and you may not submit any specimen materials made during the EE (although you may include clearly labelled photographs of these in your EE).

Acknowledgements

The material in this section has been informed by:

  • The Academic Writing in English at Lund University platform for their overview of writing an academic essay
  • Daniel Kies, Department of English, College of DuPage, for his detailed descriptions of the analytical and argumentative approaches to writing an academic essay
  • The Harvard College Writing Center, Harvard University, for their Strategies for Essay Writing resource, especially Elizabeth Abrams for her guidelines for mapping an academic essay

EE Checklist

Use this checklist as a starting point for a discussion with your EE Supervisor to determine whether you are ready to submit your final draft to Managebac.

You should use it in conjunction with:

The example EE layout : https://oakham-rutland.libguides.com/ld.php?content_id=33268875

The essay outline document : https://oakham-rutland.libguides.com/ld.php?content_id=33268851

You should be able to answer “Yes” to all of the questions.

word count for ib extended essay

Links to other tabs

word count for ib extended essay

Don't forget to review your subject specific guide before you start writing!

word count for ib extended essay

If you need some guidance about the difference between a Title, Topic and Research Question, look here .

Citing and Referencing Guides

word count for ib extended essay

Guides for PC users

  • Citing and Referencing in Word 2016 for Windows
  • Managing Sources in Word 2016 for Windows
  • Creating a Table of Contents in Word 2016 for Windows

Guides for Mac users

  • Managing Sources in Word 2016 for Mac
  • Citing and Referencing in Word 2016 for Mac

Examples of EEs with mark schemes

  • Sample EEs These are sample essays, with mark sheets, on the IB Extended Essay website. Do not spend too long reading the essays - the most important use of these is to look at the mark schemes for essays in your subject to see what examiners are looking for, and what mistakes to avoid.

Sample EEs in German Language and Literature A (not provided on site above)

NOTE: These were all written before the 2018 rule changes so contain structural features such as abstracts, which should no longer be used. The mark scheme has also changed substantially, so be careful how you use these.

  • May 2015—Example A
  • May 2015—Example B
  • May 2015—Example C
  • May 2013—Example A
  • May 2013—Example B
  • May 2013—Example C

Constructing your understanding from your information G4

Before you start to write your essay you need to understand the argument you are trying to make clearly, and that you know what information you are required to include. This resource has been carefully designed using Group 4 mark schemes to make sure that you address all the main points required. It may also be useful if you are writing in Groups 3 or 5. Complete it in note form once you are close to completing your investigation to help you to structure your final essay.

While this is not an official IB document, so is not compulsory, it is very strongly recommended and it will almost certainly make it much quicker and easier to write your essay if you complete this first.

Group 4 Research Organiser

Constructing your understanding from your information (not G4)

Before you start to write your essay you need to understand the argument you are trying to make clearly, and the evidence you are using to support it. This resource has been designed to help you to organise your ideas. Complete it in note form once you are close to completing your investigation to help you to structure your final essay.

Research Organiser (not Group 4)

  • << Previous: Working with ideas
  • Next: Reflecting >>
  • Last Updated: Apr 26, 2024 2:14 PM
  • URL: https://oakham-rutland.libguides.com/ib-extended-essay

Smallbone Library homepage

Search the Library Catalogue

Access our Subscription Databases

Normal term-time Library opening hours: Mon-Fri: 08:30-21:15 Sat: 08:00-16:00 Sun: 14:00-18:00 (Summer Term only)

Quintessential Education. IGCSE IB Tuition Specialists

IB Study Resources

September 14, 2021

A Definitive Guide to the IB Extended Essay (EE)

The Extended Essay (EE) is an independent, self-directed academic research, presented in the form of a 4,000-word paper. One component of the International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) core, the extended essay is mandatory for all students. The final work is given a grade from E to A, and makes up part of each student’s final IB score. These are our thoughts on how to do well in the EE:

Step 1: Choosing a Extended Essay (EE) topic

Choosing a good topic for your extended essay can make a huge difference on your final score. Firstly, you should always choose a topic that you are interested in! The writing process becomes much more engaging, and will also be good content you can write in your personal statement for your university applications.

Always be creative and original when choosing your research topic. Think about how you can make your research question and the way you communicate your academic research unique. In addition, if you wish to explore a multidisciplinary field , you could consider writing a World Studies extended essay . This research is analysed through at least two disciplines, encouraging students to apply their knowledge to a problem with global significance. For example, you may want to consider the effects of an electric vehicle subsidy on climate change. This is an exciting opportunity and provides a good insight to an interdisciplinary university degree such as PPE.

Step 2: Framing your research question

Once you know your extended essay subject, your next step is to choose a question. Often, questions will be framed as “To what extent does…”. Exploring multiple perspectives, and critically analysing each of these, are key to success. Therefore, try and shape your question so that more than one point of view can be explored.

Similarly, make sure your question is specific ! Having a focused question will guide your research and show that you can explore one area in detail. For example, here are 2 examples of Economics extended essay questions:

  • To what extent do smartphone companies compete with each other?
  • To what extent do Apple and Samsung operate in a duopoly in the global smartphone market?

The second research question is more focused, allowing for greater in-depth research into which areas they are competing over. You can use secondary data from both companies’ annual reports, competitor websites, and undertake primary research (such as through an Economic survey or personal interview) – Having a research question that allows you to explore a specific area critically will definitely help you to score highly.

word count for ib extended essay

Step 3: Meeting your supervisor to establish specific targets

We recommend meeting with your supervisor as early as possible to check whether your research question is appropriate. If it is, this is a great opportunity to explore potential avenues of research. For example, a Physics extended essay on the path of a bowling bowl may look to incorporate several different features, such as force, weight, and air resistance into a model. Whichever subject area you choose, your supervisor is usually your first port of call for any questions you have.

During the meeting, it will be good to establish a timeline for your extended essay. Although this may only be rough, this will give you deadlines to work towards (much like you will need to do for university essays). Similarly, setting specific targets for your next meeting, such as writing an introduction or doing your survey, will also give you definitive targets to meet. Make sure at the end of this meeting you have clear goals to achieve and by your next meeting.

Furthermore, make sure that you are keeping a record of all of your meetings with your extended essay supervisor. 6 of the 36 marks for the EE are from your Reflections on Planning and Progress Form (RPPF) where you reflect on the meetings you have had with your supervisor. These should show that you are engaged with your topic, so discuss the ideas you have considered in response to setbacks whilst writing your extended essay and make sure to use personal pronouns (I, my) to convey your engagement. Detail any changes you made to your research method and demonstrate how you have taken a creative approach to your topic, as these will highlight what you have done to stand out.

Step 4: Starting your EE research

Following the meeting with your supervisor, it is time to begin researching your topic! This does not have to be too detailed to begin with, and we recommend aiming to research enough to write an introduction to your essay. This introduction should outline the main themes you will explore and your line of argument. To reiterate, your main argument may change as your essay develops, so do not worry if it is not perfect when you begin.

Some useful sources of information are your school library or Jstor. Your school librarian may be able to suggest some good books or articles to start reading, whilst using academic sources like Jstor or Google scholar gives you access to a wide range of academic material. When reading books or journal articles, you do not have to read them cover to cover! In fact, you should only read the sections that are relevant to your topic, and reading the introduction and conclusion will often tell you whether a journal article is relevant.

When reading, consistently keep in mind your essay title as this will help you to focus your reading on key sections of texts. For instance, highlight the key sections of the texts to review later. Alternatively, you could make notes in a separate word document; such as Googledocs; or with pen and paper. It is useful to keep everything you do in the same format, however, so you can easily collate it.

Step 5: Writing the essay’s first draft

The most difficult part with the EE is getting the first draft down. Many students struggle o to write the perfect introduction and methodology, and get stuck for weeks in the process. Your introduction and first draft do not have to be perfect but should form the base of your essay moving forward. It is often good to form a plan from your research that contains the key elements of each paragraph. Once you are confident with this and have filled it in with more research, you can turn this into a fully operational first draft.

We recommend breaking down the writing stage into several paragraphs, setting yourself mini-goals to achieve. This will help you to move along faster and make the seemingly daunting task of a 4,000-word essay a lot simpler. Similarly, you should use the research you have to support your ideas. Your research might consist of facts to back up your analysis or other writers’ opinions that agree with your own. Furthermore, you can also use this research to explore multiple points of view, coming to a conclusion as to which one is most appropriate. However, save yourself time whilst doing this by including links to the original article, rather than full references, as it is likely you may change the content of your essay and the references you use as you progress.

Make sure you save your extended essay frequently and to an accessible platform such Dropbox or Google Drive so that if your computer were to crash your progress will be stored!

Step 6: Reviewing your first draft

Your aim when meeting with your supervisor this time is to look over your first draft to see which parts are excellent, which can be explored further and which need to be rethought. This can be split into a number of meetings; for example, I looked at my introduction, then at the 4 sections of my main body, and finally at my conclusion. This reshaped the goals that I had moving forward and gave me specific subsections to work on.

Whilst editing your first draft, do not be afraid to delete, reword or move some parts that you have written, as this will help you shape your extended essay into the finished article. You can, if needed, even slightly alter your question. I changed my question at the start of April, with a June deadline for my essay. However, changing my essay question did not leave me with a whole new essay to write, as I was able to use most of what I had already written, adapting it to focus on the new question. Whatever changes you have to make, they are all moving you towards a complete final version, so stay positive!

Step 7: Refining your Extended Essay

After your meeting, review the changes you have to make to your methodology and research process. You should consider whether you have critically investigated the variables in your RQ and whether it is backed up by a solid methodology. For instance, are there any counter arguments you have not considered? Does your research process flow? Always draw links to each paragraph, so that your essay has a logical flow from its introduction to its argument, counter arguments, responses, and conclusion.

When researching areas in more detail, make use of what you have learnt from your current research. For instance, look at the suggested reading or references in books that you have read or look at articles from the same journal. Furthermore, stay up to date with the news in case you can include new research in your extended essay.

When editing, it is useful to save a new copy of your extended essay (for example, EE draft 2) so that you can track any changes that you make. Also, if anything were to happen to your new copy, you always have the previous copy and notes from the meeting to re-do any changes. We recommend doing this on Googledocs whether changes are saved real-time on the servers so you don’t lose precious work if your computer crashes.

Step 8: Final Notes

Once you are done with your initial drafts, ensure that you have professional presentation, consistent formatting, and proper citations. Make sure that you have included page numbers and a bibliography (if required). Additionally, make the layout justified, font and size, as well as double spaced as per IB requirements. You have to include a cover page with a title, your research question, word count and subject. You also have to meet your supervisor the final time to fill out your viva voce (oral) section of the RPPF before the final submission.

Step 9: Final Submission

When submitting your extended essay, ensure that your name, candidate number and your school’s name are not on the document. This will ensure that your EE is marked fairly without prejudice. Your EE is electronically stamped and the IB can track who it belongs to, as is your RPPF.

We wish you the best of luck with your extended essay and hope you enjoy the process. If you would like help with your extended essay, please take a look at our courses or contact us for more information. We also offer IB tuition for various subjects and University applications mentoring and are more than happy to tailor our classes to your needs and requirements!

Related Posts

The English IA: Tips for a successful presentation

The English IA: Tips for a successful presentation

How to prepare for the Singapore Medical School applications

How to prepare for the Singapore Medical School applications

Ace Your Biology IA (HL): A How-to Guide

Ace Your Biology IA (HL): A How-to Guide

How to Ace your Business Management Internal Assessment (HL)

How to Ace your Business Management Internal Assessment (HL)

Contact Info

545 Orchard Road #14-06/09 Singapore 238882

(+65) 61009338

QE_Singapore

Mondays to Fridays: 10am to 7pm

Quick Links

Join Our Mailing List

© 2024 Quintessential Education™

Are you seeking one-on-one college counseling and essay support? Limited spots are now available. Click here to learn more.

Guide to the IB Extended Essay in 2024

January 24, 2024

IB extended essay, topics, rubric

If you’re an International Baccalaureate student getting ready to write your IB Extended Essay, you might be experiencing some very understandable trepidation. But have no fear—we’re here to help you understand what’s required of you, how to plan ahead (IB extended essay topics), and how you’ll be graded (IB extended essay rubric). Keep reading for a good dose of preparation and confidence before you begin the journey. In this article, we’ll cover:

What is the IB Extended Essay?

The ib extended essay—required content, ib extended essay topics.

IB Extended Essay—Sample Essays

IB Extended Essay Tips

Ib extended essay rubric, ib extended essay—more resources.

The IB Extended Essay is a 4,000-word paper that asks you to immerse yourself in research and academic writing. A required part of the IB program, the Extended Essay is a chance to dig deep into a topic that fascinates you.

Although it’s no small task, the IB Extended Essay is an opportunity to gain practical research and writing skills that will come in handy again in college. As you write, you’ll learn how to:

  • Identify credible sources
  • Formulate a research question and limit your scope of research
  • Communicate ideas to an audience
  • Develop a well-supported argument

The IB Extended Essay is largely an independent, self-directed project, but don’t worry—the IB program doesn’t throw you into the deep end. You do get to select a mentor (usually a teacher at your school) to help guide you through the process. As you write, you’ll be required to meet with your mentor three times. As part of your final evaluation, your mentor will interview you in a final reflection section called a viva voce . During the viva voce, your mentor will check for plagiarism and malpractice, ask you to reflect on challenges and difficulties, and prompt you to discuss what you’ve learned through the research and writing process. Your mentor will then generate a report that factors into your final grade.

Your final essay must include the following:

  • Contents page
  • Introduction
  • Body of the essay
  • References and bibliography

For this essay, it will be up to you to generate a topic; the International Baccalaureate does not provide prompts. However, your essay will need to fit within one of six provided subject areas . You’ll choose from the following list of IB Extended Essay Topics:

  • Language and literature
  • Language acquisition
  • Individuals and societies
  • Mathematics

IB Extended Essay Topics (Continued)

At a glance, the subject areas might look limited, but the topics you can choose to write about are actually wide-ranging. The “Individuals and societies” category includes social science topics like economics, history, world religions, and philosophy. And, if you’re leaning toward “Science,” you can choose from classic subjects such as biology, chemistry, and physics, or related topics like environmental systems or health science, among others.

The IB also offers a special “World Studies” option for students interested in researching global issues. This subject would allow you to center your writing on global issues such as migration, global health, cultural exchange, or climate change.

Wondering what an outstanding IB Extended Essay looks like? The International Baccalaureate provides quite a few sample student essays online . Here are five essays that earned A grades.

Language and literature: An exploration of an aspect of the narrative voice in Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita

Environmental Systems and Societies: The economic impact of the 1995 reintroduction of grey wolves to Yellowstone National Park

Psychology: To what extent do social networking sites (SNS) usage lead to experience of anxiety in adolescents?

Music: Composition techniques in the 1st movement of Johannes Brahms’s Symphony No. 2, Op. 73

Business Management: Corporate Culture at Oracle

1) Pick something you’re passionate about

As you can see from the titles above, the IB Extended Essay is a great place to delve into a niche topic that fascinates you. Since you’ll be spending many months on this essay, you’ll want to pick a topic you genuinely enjoy spending time learning about. It’s also smart to choose something you’ve already learned about in your IB classes so that you have a strong foundation of knowledge to start with. In music class, do you love pondering why music makes us feel a certain way? Maybe an essay about music theory will keep your gears turning. Do you come alive trying to solve seemingly impossible problems in physics class? Now’s your chance to put those equations into action.

Since this essay is all about your academic interests, it’s also a good idea to pick a topic that’s relevant to what you plan to study in college. Selecting a relevant topic will provide you with significant exposure to the field and will also give you something meaningful to talk about in your college admissions essays.

2) Limit your scope

What’s the meaning of life? Why do wars happen? What is time? Some questions are just way too big to answer, and your IB Extended Essay is not a good place to tackle expansive, philosophical questions. Instead, think of this essay as a place to investigate one piece of a big question. If, let’s say, you’re generally interested in what helps women reach positions of leadership in business, this is a good place to examine how one or a few companies approach this issue. Or, if you’re interested in studying what inspires surrealist painters, you’ll want to pick one or a few painters to research, likely all from the same time period. For both these topics, you’d need a whole textbook to tackle the full question, but limiting your scope will make it much easier to write a clear and cohesive 4,000 words.

On the other hand, it’s possible to narrow your focus too much. It would be impossible, for example, to write 4,000 words about a single sentence in a novel. Make sure you talk about scope early and often with your mentor. Together, you can find the perfect Goldilocks scope for your project that’s not too big and not too small.

3) Choose a good mentor

Speaking of mentors, choosing wisely will help you enormously as you embark on your IB Extended Essay. You’ll want to make sure you choose someone with existing knowledge in your research topic. Your English teacher may be able to give you great writing advice, for example, but they won’t be able to guide your research and scope if you’re writing about marine animals or modern dance.

Before you approach a teacher, make sure you have at least one topic idea (or even a few ideas) in mind so that you can make sure they’ll be a good fit to supervise your project. When you meet with them, find out what their mentorship style is like. Make sure they’ll have time to read several drafts of your essays, meet with you a few times, and give you feedback. Some IB schools will require your IB Extended Essay mentor to sign an agreement form too, so make sure you find out what paperwork is required in advance.

4) Get organized, way organized

The IB Extended Essay is not something you can crank out the night before it’s due. The essay is meant to be a substantive, in-depth, thoughtful, and thoroughly researched analysis, and Rome simply isn’t built in a day. This might be the longest paper you’ve written to date, and this project might require more research than you’ve been asked to do before. Timelines vary by school, but you’ll likely spend between eight months and a year working on your IB Extended Essay. So, how will you pull it all off? For these 8-12 months, organization will be your guiding light. We recommend you:

  • Get started early. If your essay is due November of your senior year, start generating topic ideas during your junior year right after winter break.
  • Create a long-view schedule for yourself. What will you accomplish each month of your process?
  • Give yourself deadlines. Once you choose a mentor, suggest 2-3 draft deadline dates so that you will be held accountable throughout the writing process.
  • Find a note-taking system that works for you. You’ll be reading many articles and books and it’s hard to keep track of all your sources. Create a document or spreadsheet where you keep track of the sources you’ve found and check them off as you read. As you finish reading a text, type up important quotes and a few notes explaining how it connects to your topic and to your other texts.

5)Write a messy first draft

Writing never comes out perfect the first time, even for New York Times bestselling authors and the most experienced researchers. In your first draft, give yourself permission to get all your thoughts out, no matter how unstructured or rambling they are. Call this your brainstorming draft. When you’re ready to revisit it, see what patterns emerge, what common ideas you can group together, what beginning buds of ideas you can make bloom into full-fledged analysis.

6) Communicate for an audience

When you’re used to producing writing that only your teacher reads, it can be hard to remember to write for an audience. But at the end of the day, writing is communication , and the best writing is clear and thorough communication that anyone could pick up and read. For your IB Extended Essay, you’ll want to remember that many people will be reading your final essay, and not all of them will be experts in the niche topic you choose to study. Ask yourself: how can I explain my research to an audience who doesn’t already agree with my analysis?

To communicate to an audience, you’ll want to:

  • Provide lots of general background information on your topic.
  • Don’t assume your reader is familiar with your sources. Introduce them as if they’re guest speakers about to walk up to a podium and deliver a lecture.
  • After including quotes, facts, and figures, be sure to explain what those sources mean in your own words and how they connect to your bigger-picture argument.
  • Don’t assume your arguments are self-evident. In this essay, communicating for an audience means supplying ongoing interpretation and analysis, even if it feels like you’re explaining the obvious. Your reader isn’t on your research journey with you, so your points might not be so obvious to your reader.

Although your IB Extended Essay provides a report that factors into your grade, your essay will also be assessed by external examiners the IB. Per the IB Extended Essay Rubric , essays are graded on a scale from 0 to 34 based on 5 different criteria:

  • Criterion A: Focus and Method (6 points maximum)
  • Criterion B: Knowledge and Understanding (6 points maximum)
  • Criterion C: Critical Thinking (12 points maximum)
  • Criterion D: Presentation (4 points maximum)
  • Criterion E: Engagement (6 points maximum)

As you can see, Critical Thinking is the most significant rubric category. This means that the IB wants to see you arrive at your own unique analysis of your topic, drawing connections between sources and data, and making well-supported arguments. This means they want a lot of you: your ideas, your interpretations, your thoughts. Make sure you emphasize that in your essay, but of course don’t forget the other categories.

The score a student receives corresponds to a letter grade scale that is slightly different than what we’re accustomed to in the U.S. Here’s the letter grade to numerical score breakdown:

You must earn a D or higher to receive your IB Diploma. To learn more about the different criteria included in the IB Extended Essay Rubric, you can explore the IB’s full guide to the Extended Essay .

We hope you found our look at the IB extended essay rubric and IB extended essay topics to be helpful. Ready to dive into research? You may want to read our 10 Expert Tips for Improving Reading Comprehension before you hit the books.

And if you’re a high school student in the process of mapping out your pathway to college, take a look at a few other useful guides:

  • IB vs AP—Which Classes are Best for College Admission?
  • How to Earn College Credit in High School
  • High School Course Requirements for College Admission
  • SAT Score Calculator
  • ACT Score Calculator 
  • High School Success

' src=

Christina Wood

Christina Wood holds a BA in Literature & Writing from UC San Diego, an MFA in Creative Writing from Washington University in St. Louis, and is currently a Doctoral Candidate in English at the University of Georgia, where she teaches creative writing and first-year composition courses. Christina has published fiction and nonfiction in numerous publications, including The Paris Review , McSweeney’s , Granta , Virginia Quarterly Review , The Sewanee Review , Mississippi Review , and Puerto del Sol , among others. Her story “The Astronaut” won the 2018 Shirley Jackson Award for short fiction and received a “Distinguished Stories” mention in the 2019 Best American Short Stories anthology.

  • 2-Year Colleges
  • Application Strategies
  • Best Colleges by Major
  • Best Colleges by State
  • Big Picture
  • Career & Personality Assessment
  • College Essay
  • College Search/Knowledge
  • College Success
  • Costs & Financial Aid
  • Dental School Admissions
  • Extracurricular Activities
  • Graduate School Admissions
  • High Schools
  • Law School Admissions
  • Medical School Admissions
  • Navigating the Admissions Process
  • Online Learning
  • Private High School Spotlight
  • Summer Program Spotlight
  • Summer Programs
  • Test Prep Provider Spotlight

College Transitions Sidebar Block Image

“Innovative and invaluable…use this book as your college lifeline.”

— Lynn O'Shaughnessy

Nationally Recognized College Expert

College Planning in Your Inbox

Join our information-packed monthly newsletter.

I am a... Student Student Parent Counselor Educator Other First Name Last Name Email Address Zip Code Area of Interest Business Computer Science Engineering Fine/Performing Arts Humanities Mathematics STEM Pre-Med Psychology Social Studies/Sciences Submit

Banner

Extended Essay: Formatting your EE

Introduction.

  • Subject Guidance & Proposal Forms
  • 8 Simple Steps to writing an Academic Essay... and Outlines!
  • Finding a Topic
  • Academic Sources of Information
  • Researcher's Spaces
  • Reflections
  • IB Resources for Students
  • Citations and Referencing - IB REQUIREMENTS
  • In-Text Citations
  • Formatting your EE
  • Ms Sally's Presentations

PLEASE NOTE

All final submissions must be made in pdf format to these 4 places:, google classroom, emailed to your supervisor, formal presentation basics.

word count for ib extended essay

All essays must follow this format:

  • Standard Margins (1-inch or 2.5 cm margins)
  • 12-point, readable font (Arial is recommended)
  • Double-spaced
  • Page Numbers start on the Table of Contents 
  • No Candidate or School name  is to appear anywhere in the document
  • Title of the Essay
  • Research Question
  • Subject for which the Essay is registered
  • Category - If a Language A or B Essay
  • Theme & 2 Subjects utilized - If a World Studies Essay
  • Contents Page
  • annotated illustrations and tables
  • formulas and calculations
  • parenthetical or numbered
  • footnotes or endnotes
  • Bibliography
  • The RPPF Form
  • The Research and Writing Process: Word Counts
  • The Research and Writing Process: Footnotes and Endnotes

Table of Contents

  • Labelled "Table of Contents" in 12-point, readable font (Arial is recommended)
  • Headings and subheadings within the body of the essay may be included

References and Bibliography

  • Topic, purpose and focus of the research clearly identified and explained
  • Research Question bolded within the introduction and phrased as on the title page
  • Methodology of research and insight into the line of argument

Body of the Essay

The body of the essay must:

  • Examiners will not read appendices, endnotes or footnotes, so all essential elements to your argument must be included in the body of the essay
  • Include headings and sub-headings as appropriate to the subject 

Your conclusion must be:

  • A Summative conclusion based on the information presented in the body of the essay
  • A Conclusion linked directly to the research question
  • Notes of limitations and unresolved questions (as appropriate) can be included

Your References and Bibliography must follow this format:

  • Cross-referenced: each reference in the essay is ticked off in the bibliography to ensure all references are included and no extraneous references exist
  • All tables, charts, diagrams, illustrations etc. must be clearly labelled and referenced in the body of the essay
  • References are presented alphabetically 
  • Use hanging indents for all entries
  • Include Date Accessed or Retrieved for websites (as outlined on the IB Requirements page)
  • Remove all hyperlinks
  • The Research and Writing Process: Tables
  • The Research and Writing Process: Illustrations

Appendices should only be used if required by the subject discipline:

  • Appendices titled
  • Headings labeled
  • Included in the Table of Contents
  • Reliance on external resources such as DVDs, music, specimen materials etc. is not permitted
  • The Research and Writing Process: Reliance on External Materials
  • The Research and Writing Process: Specimen Materials
  • << Previous: In-Text Citations
  • Next: Ms Sally's Presentations >>
  • Last Updated: Apr 29, 2024 1:22 PM
  • URL: https://nist.libguides.com/ee/home

International Baccalaureate/Extended Essay Tips

  • 1.1 Recommendations
  • 1.2.1.1 Essay Competitions
  • 1.3.1 Citing Sources
  • 1.3.2 Organization
  • 1.3.3 IBO Official Guide

Introduction and Getting Started!

Start Working NOW!

The Extended Essay (EE) is one of the requirements of the IB Diploma Programme. It provides students with an opportunity to conduct independent research on a topic of interest to them. It is written on a freely-chosen topic as long as there is a subject teacher in school, as the candidate must have a subject supervisor.

Recommendations

The IBO recommends that candidates spend approximately 40 hours in total on their extended essays, and if you put it off until that last weekend, your work won't be nearly as good as it can be. Talk to your IB school supervisor, as it is his or her job to set internal school deadlines (i.e. choosing a topic, formulating an outline, rough draft, final draft, etc).

Getting Started

  • Firstly, find a topic you're actually interested in, or you'll never work on it.
  • Don't stress. After doing all your research 4,000 words is nothing (your first draft could be 6,000-8,000 words). While the Extended Essay has the potential to make you hate your own topic (as many academic assignments do), an interest in the topic can motivate you to pull through in the end.
  • Many students are appalled at the sheer number of words that this task requires. But by following the guidelines set out for you, you'll quickly realize how hard pressed you will be to contain your work to the limit.
  • Make sure that your focus is somewhat specific, or that you have a specific topic in mind (instead of just a general subject area).
  • Example : Your final essay title should be somewhat similar to the style used in the Internal Assessments for the 20th Century World Issues course - specific and focused with some form of cause and effect. Check the official Extended Essay guidelines for more on this - it offers sample essay titles (along with title choosing advice and essay titles to avoid) for each subject area.
  • If the above example does not apply to you, perhaps ask your IB Coordinator for examples from students past. Many of them keep a record of every essay, mainly to ensure there is no plagiarism.
  • Make sure you stay on top of the work.
  • Look over the guidelines and the explanations.

To get a diploma, you need to complete the TOK Essay and the Extended Essay. At best, you can achieve 3 bonus points towards your IB diploma, so don't ignore your schoolwork, as your courses are worth much more. The point matrix is outlined in the "Diploma Points Matrix for the Extended Essay and TOK" grid in the IBO form. You can still get your diploma if you get a "Mediocre" on one and an "Elementary" on another. NOTE: As of May 2010, an 'Elementary' on both TOK and Extended essay is an automatic fail, but you may still pass with an 'Elementary' on either one, just not both. An 'Elementary' on either is a so called 'failing condition' which requires a minimum 28 points rather than the usual 24 to obtain your diploma.

However, you can make a very good essay, provided you allot yourself enough time to write about something you are interested in. The IBO knows that you are between 16 and 18 years old and thus does not require a perfect essay or a groundbreaking new discovery. They just want to see that you can work on and complete a big project.

Picking a Topic

You'll want to write about a topic or subject you're fairly familiar with. For instance, if you've nailed the process of writing labs, do a science investigation. It'll be just like a big lab write-up, and writing the method, materials, qualitative/quantitative observations are all part of the word count, and take up a significant amount of words.

Essay Competitions

Find out if there are competitions or scholarship opportunities in which you can enter your essay. Why not kill two birds with one stone and head off to university with a scholarship? If you don't win, at least you'll get feedback, something the IBO neglects to give.

Writing a Good Extended Essay

Everyone wants to write a good Extended Essay, but just remember that it's really not as overwhelming as it sounds. Some candidates will find their first drafts are in the 6,000 to 8,000 range, while others will reach about 2800-3500. In fact, keep in mind that 4,000 words is the maximum word count and not where you must get to. While most essays have a word count in the 3,900 range, it is perfectly acceptable to submit an essay that is 3,500 words. While there is no actual minimum word count, you would probably want to write over 3,000 words, since a short essay might imply that the topic was not investigated thoroughly enough. However, some topics - mathematics among them - may require only 2,000 words to fully investigate them.

Citing Sources

Keep legible, consistent and accurate notes that include bibliographic information. There's nothing more annoying than browsing through a 1200 page book looking for where that key quotation came from. Cite your sources in a consistent manner (either in MLA or APA format, or some other recognized format). IBO is very strict with plagiarism, so remember that the text has to be your own and do not forget to make references. You will have to sign an IBO form certifying that your EE is your own, and has no unsourced material in it, before they will even read your essay. Failure to submit an Extended Essay will result in no diploma being awarded.

Use the internet to find information but do include books in your research especially if your essay is not on the Sciences. Be skeptical in your use of the internet. Anyone can post anything, so read with a critical eye. Generally, university and academic websites are good sources to refer to. News sources are generally reliable, but be sure to stay away from "gossip" media which often contorts the truth.

Keep in mind that a general guide line used in many schools is 5 sources minimum for the IA in History, so if you are doing a History paper aim to have as close to ten sources as possible if not more for the EE.

Organization

Once you have researched your topic, you should spend a lot of time structuring and organizing your essay. Make sure your essay has a clear introduction, research question/focus (i.e. what you will be investigating), body, and conclusion. A poorly organized or unclear essay will hurt the assessment of your essay. You should also spend some time making sure that your 300-word abstract is clear and succinct in summarizing your essay. An unclear abstract will make your essay difficult to understand and will also hurt the assessment of your essay.

Although this is stated in the "General Requirements" for the Extended Essay, I feel it is necessary to repeat: if you are doing a paper in a subject not offered at your school, be very careful , especially if doing your paper in World Religions. You might want to either reconsider your choice of topic, or make sure you have several people with good credibility in that topic reading your paper. If you don't, especially in World Religions, you could end up offending your reader, and I promise you, you do not want to do that.

You can do your extended essay on any topic for which an IB class exists - i.e. something like Islamic History, which only about 100 candidates a year write about. However, you cannot do your extended essay in Theory of Knowledge, most pilot subjects and school-based syllabus subjects (check with your IB coordinator). Bear in mind that getting a good score in your extended essay, combined with your score for your Theory of Knowledge essay, may reward you with up to 3 bonus points. So aim high!

IBO Official Guide

The IBO's official guide to writing the Extended Essay can be found here: http://xmltwo.ibo.org/publications/DP/Group0/d_0_eeyyy_gui_1012_1/html/production-app3.ibo.org/publication/258/part/1/chapter/1.html

The above site is quite useful in perusing tips and hints for writing the essay, in addition to viewing the IBO standards for the essay. Note that the above link is for consideration purposes only.

"three: The Ultimate Student's Guide to Acing the Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge" by Alexander Zouev - a book full of tips and time savers for IB EE.

word count for ib extended essay

  • Book:International Baccalaureate

Navigation menu

Extended Essay Guide: Criteria, Format, Sample EEs

  • Criteria, Format, Sample EEs
  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • DP Research Process
  • Databases & Academic Journals
  • Evaluate Sources
  • Academic Integrity
  • MLA Citation Format
  • CSE Citation Format (Science & Math)
  • Video Tutorials 2024

The Assessment Crtiteria in Detail!

  • Criterion A: Focus and method
  • Criterion B: Knowledge and understanding
  • Criterion C: Critical Thinking
  • Criterion D: Presentation
  • Criterion E: Engagement
  • EE_How to maximize marks for different subjects?

word count for ib extended essay

  • Criterion C: Critical thinking

Notes from the IB

RE: Research Question and Title of Extended Essay

Please note the statement below from the EE curriculum manager regarding the need to have both a title and a RQ for all subjects. Previous versions of the EE Guide indicated that the title and the RQ should be the same for History, Business Management and Mathematics. This is no longer the case.  All essays, regardless of the subject, need to have both a RQ and a title.

Hi Kathy, 

To answer your question, I am going to quote directly from a response John Royce provided, on this forum, in October in response to a very similar question: (it was a question about using Spanish sources - hence the mention of Spanish)

It is certainly  permissible to use sources which are not in the language of the essay, but translation into the target language is required , one cannot assume that the reader understands the original language.

It is usual to quote the original as well as presenting the translation.  [Do not put quotation marks around your translation, just around the original]

Umberto Eco argues ("in Mouse or rat?") that direct translation may lose meaning, paraphrase or use of different idioms may be required to get the ideas across. Paul Bellos ("Is that a fish in your ear?") makes a similar argument - direct translation may confound meaning... Direct translation may not be ideal - meaning and understanding are preferred - so, not to worry that your student with her good Spanish cannot present a direct translation.

What  must be made clear is that the translations are those of the student;  these are her understandings. Readers can make of that what they will - and if unsure, are presented with the original - they can seek another translation.  A note in the acknowledgements and/or in the introduction to the effect that all translations are those of the writer is ... essential.

In response to the question about the  Bibliography/Works cited, my preference would be to list the source in its original Thai version, but perhaps with the English in brackets, to help the examiner.

Your bibliography will have the entries in Thai characters first in the document. Any in-text citation to Thai sources will be in (Thai characters [English translation]).

Citation in Thai [English translation]

Works Cited Example:

วงษ์ปัญญา, ธนกร [Wongpunya, Thanakorn]. “โรงงานยาสูบรวยแค่ไหน และเอาเงินไปทำอะไรบ้าง.”  [How rich is the Thailand Tobacco Monopoly and where does the money go?] (candidate translation). The Standard, The Standard, 30 Aug. 2018, thestandard.co/thailand-tobacco-monopoly/.

Format of the Extended Essay

Required Formatting

The extended essay should be written in a clear, correct and formal academic style, appropriate to the subject from which the topic is drawn. Given that the extended essay is a formally written research paper, it should strive to maintain a professional, academic look. 

To help achieve this, the following formatting is  required:

  • 12-point, readable font (Calibri or Times New Roman);
  • double spacing throughout entire Essay;
  • page numbering - top right corner;
  • no candidate or school name or supervisor name on the title page or page headers.

Submitting the extended essay in the required format will help set the tone of the essay and will aid readability for on-screen assessment by examiners.

Required S tructure

The structure of the essay is very important. It helps students to organize the argument, making the best use of the evidence collected. 

There are six required elements of the final work to be submitted. More details about each element are given in the  “Presentation”  section. Please note that the order in which these elements are presented here is not necessarily the order in which they should be written. 

Six required elements of the extended essay:

  • Contents page
  • Introduction
  • Body of the essay
  • References and bibliography -- if MLA "Works Cited" if CSE "References"

1. Required Title Page  

The title page should include  only  the following information: 

  • the title of the essay
  • the research question
  • the subject the essay is registered in (if it is a language essay also state which category it falls into; if a world studies essay also state the theme and the two subjects utilized) 

The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays. 

word count for ib extended essay

2. Required Contents Page

A contents page must be provided at the beginning of the extended essay and all pages should be numbered. Please note that an index page is not required and if included will be treated as if it is not present.

3. Required Introduction

The introduction should tell the reader what to expect in the essay. The introduction should make clear to the reader the focus of the essay, the scope of the research, in particular an indication of the sources to be used, and an insight into the line of argument to be taken. 

While students should have a sense of the direction and key focus of their essay, it is sometimes advisable to finalize the introduction once the body of the essay is complete.

4. Required Body of the Essay  (research, analysis, discussion, and evaluation)

The main task is writing the body of the essay, which should be presented in the form of a reasoned argument. The form of this varies with the subject of the essay but as the argument develops it should be clear to the reader what relevant evidence has been discovered, where/how it has been discovered and how it supports the argument. In some subjects, for example, the sciences, sub-headings within the main body of the essay will help the reader to understand the argument (and will also help the student to keep on track). In structuring their extended essay, students must take into consideration the expected conventions of the subject in which their extended essay is registered. 

Once the main body of the essay is complete, it is possible to finalize the introduction (which tells the reader what to expect) and the conclusion (which says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved). 

Any information that is important to the argument  must not  be included in appendices or footnotes/endnotes. The examiner  will not  read notes or appendices, so an essay that is not complete in itself will be compromised across the assessment criteria.

5. Required Conclusion

The conclusion says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved. While students might draw conclusions throughout the essay based on their findings, it is important that there is a final, summative conclusion at the end. This conclusion(s) must relate to the research question posed.

6.  Required References & Bibliography

Students should use their chosen style of academic referencing as soon as they start writing. That way they are less likely to forget to include a citation. It is also easier than trying to add references at a later stage. For more information on this, refer to the guidelines in the IB document  Effective citing and referencing.

Writing the essay takes time but if students have used their Researcher's reflection space and reflection sessions in a meaningful way they should be well prepared to develop their arguments.

Extended Essay - Examples & Exemplars

  • Essays from May 2018 with IB marks and commentaries
  • Assessed Student Work & Commentary IB-provided. "Student sample extended essays, corresponding marks and comments from senior examiners are available for the following Diploma Programme disciplines. Please note that in light of not having authentic RPPFs to accompany these essays, they are marked against criteria A – D only, for a total of 28 possible marks. Following the first assessment session in 2018, exemplars will be refreshed with authentic sample material." more... less... Biology English Economics History Studies in language and literature Language acquisition Mathematics Psychology Visual arts World studies extended essay (WSEE)
  • Excellenet Extended Essays Concordian GoogleDoc
  • EngA1_Othello EE Othello 2018 From inThinking.net Click the link to see the score and evaluation.
  • Fifty (50) More Excellent Extended Essays DVD by International Baccalaureate Call Number: HS DVD 808.4 ISBN: 9781906345600 Publication Date: 2011 1 DVD-ROM (1:33 min.)

Past CIS Extended Essays

Available in the library behind the desk are file folders of past Extended Essays by Concordian students and IB EE Exemplars. Feel free to browse the papers which must be kept in the library.

word count for ib extended essay

  • << Previous: EE Home
  • Next: Annotated Bibliographies >>
  • Last Updated: Feb 27, 2024 8:42 AM
  • URL: https://concordian-thailand.libguides.com/ee

Banner

Extended Essay Resources: Paper Formatting

  • Research Video Tutorials
  • In-text Citations
  • Plagiarism VS. Documentation
  • Primary Sources
  • Subject Resources
  • Cite Your Sources This link opens in a new window
  • Evaluate Your Sources This link opens in a new window
  • Supervisor Resources
  • Note Taking Templates
  • Paper Formatting
  • October EE orientation presentation
  • Extended Essay calendar
  • Submit your topic selection

How to format the EE

The extended essay should be written in a clear, correct and formal academic style, appropriate to the subject from which the topic is drawn. Given that the extended essay is a formally written research paper, it should strive to maintain a professional, academic look.

To help achieve this, the following formatting is suggested.

  • Arial 12 or Times New Roman 12
  • Double-spaced
  • page numbering
  • no candidate, supervisor, or school name on the title page, page headers, appendices or acknowledgment pages
  • the file size must not be more than 10 MB. (Note that the RPPF is uploaded separately and is not part of the overall file size of the essay.)

What's on the Title Page?

The title page should include the:

  • title of the essay
  • research question
  • if it is a language essay also state which category it falls into;
  • if a world studies essay also state the theme and the two subjects utilized)
  • word count.

DO NOT include any personal information like your name, the name of the school, or your candidate number. The IB wants each EE to be anonymous and assessed without bias. 

Images and Illustrations

From the mla style guide at purdue, labels, captions, and source information.

Illustrations appear directly embedded in the document. Each illustration must include a label, a number, a caption and/or source information.

  • The illustration label and number should always appear in two places:  the document main text (e.g.  see fig. 1 ) and near the illustration itself ( Fig. 1 ).
  • Captions  provide titles or explanatory notes (e.g.,  Van Gogh’s The Starry Night)
  • Source information  documentation will always depend upon the medium of the source illustration. If you provide source information with all of your illustrations, you do not need to provide this information on the Works Cited page.
  • All visuals/illustrations that are not tables or musical score examples (e.g. maps, diagrams, charts, videos, podcasts, etc.) are labeled Figure or Fig.
  • Refer to the figure in-text and provide an Arabic numeral that corresponds to the figure. Do not capitalize figure or fig .
  • MLA does not specify alignment requirements for figures; thus, these images may be embedded as the reader sees fit. However, continue to follow basic MLA Style formatting (e.g. one-inch margins).
  • Below the figure, provide a label name and its corresponding arabic numeral (no bold or italics), followed by a period (e.g. Fig. 1.). Here, Figure and Fig .  are capitalized.
  • Beginning with the same line as the label and number, provide a title and/or caption as well as relevant source information in note form (see instructions and examples above). If you provide source information with your illustrations, you do not need to provide this information on the Works Cited page.
  • If full citation information is provided in the caption, use the same formatting as you would for your Works Cited page. However, names should be listed in  first name last name  format.

Figure Example

In-text reference:

Some readers found Harry’s final battle with Voldemort a disappointment, and recently, the podcast,  MuggleCast  debated the subject (see fig. 2).

Figure caption (below an embedded podcast file for a document to be viewed electronically):

Fig. 2. Harry Potter and Voldemort final battle debate from Andrew Sims et al.; “Show 166”;  MuggleCast ; MuggleNet.com, 19 Dec. 2008, www.mugglenet.com/2015/11/the-snape-debate-rowling-speaks-out.

Appendices are not an essential part of the extended essay and examiners will not read them, or use any information contained within them, in the assessment of the essay. Students must take care to ensure that all information with direct relevance to the analysis, discussion and evaluation of their essay is contained in the main body of it. Appendices should therefore be avoided except in the following instances:

  • an exemplar of a questionnaire or interview questions
  • an exemplar of permission letters
  • group 1, category 1 essays: copies of poems or short stories (of less than three pages)
  • group 1, category 3 essays: excerpts from newspapers, advertisements and transcripts of speeches
  • language acquisition, category 1 and 2: excerpts from newspapers, advertisements, transcripts of speeches, etc
  • language acquisition, category 3: excerpts or copies of poems or short stories (less than 3 pages)
  • an external mentor letter, where one has been used
  • raw data or statistical tables for experimental sciences (this should not include any analysis or conclusions).

Students should not continually refer to material presented in an appendix as this may disrupt the continuity of the essay and examiners are not required to refer to them.

The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays.

Please note:  Examiners are instructed not to read or assess any material in excess of the word limit. This means that essays containing more than 4,000 words will be compromised across all assessment criteria. 

Please refer to the following guidance on what content should be included in the word count.

Please refer to the document entitled  Assessment principles and practices—Quality assessments in a digital age  for further clarification of word count requirements.

A note for students writing in Chinese, Korean and Japanese:

Students writing their extended essay in Japanese, Korean or Chinese should use the following conversions.

  • Japanese: 1 word = approximately 2 Japanese characters (upper limit 8,000 characters)
  • Korean: 1 word = 1 Korean character (upper limit 4,000 characters)
  • Chinese: 1 word = approximately 1.2 Chinese characters (upper limit 4,800 characters)

When typing in Chinese, Korean or Japanese word processing software is likely to include the number of characters  and  punctuation in the word count. Students are asked to  not  include punctuation in the word count for assessed work. The word count should only take into account the number of characters typed.

A note about acknowledgments and dedications:

An acknowledgment/dedications page may be included in the EE if this is important to the student, but it must contain no “identifiers”, for example, people should not be detailed in any way that makes the student’s school identifiable. An acknowledgment/dedications page is not a formal requirement of the EE, so it does not contribute to either the word count or assessment.

Header and Footnotes

Students may wish to use the header function for their research question, so that it appears on each page. This may help retain focus.

Footnotes and endnotes

Footnotes and endnotes may be used for referencing purposes and if this is the case will not be included in the word count of the essay. If information is contained in a footnote or endnote and is not a reference, this  must  be included in the word count. In order to avoid confusion and unwittingly exceed the word limit, students are advised to avoid using footnotes or endnotes other than for referencing purposes unless it is appropriate.

One appropriate use of footnotes is for the placement of the original quotation (where the original quotation is in a language other than the language of registration). This use of footnotes would not need to be included in the word count.

As footnotes and endnotes are not an essential part of the extended essay students must take care to ensure that all information with direct relevance to the analysis, discussion and evaluation of their essay is contained in the main body of it.

An essay that attempts to evade the word limit by including important material in footnotes or endnotes will be compromised across the assessment criteria. Please note that footnotes and endnotes are added to the word count as they are encountered.

  • << Previous: Note Taking Templates
  • Next: October EE orientation presentation >>
  • Last Updated: May 6, 2024 11:20 AM
  • URL: https://aisgz.libguides.com/extendedessay

Banner

Extended Essay: Criteria D - Check your Formatting

  • Introduction to the EE
  • Step 1 - Choose a subject
  • World Studies
  • Step 3 - The Researchers Reflection Space
  • Identify Sources
  • Tools for Note Taking
  • Video Guides
  • Step 5 - Creating Research Questions
  • Step 6 - Outlines and Plans
  • Step 7 - Citing
  • Criteria E - 3 Reflections
  • Know Your Criteria
  • Criteria D - Check your Formatting
  • 4000 words final hand in

Why it is important

Criteria D is giveaway marks time - You get 4 marks for just formatting and citing properly. Do not lose any of these marks for simple errors.

No Abstract required

PLEASE NOTE

3 years ago the syllabus changed. You must not put an abstract in your Extended Essay. If you do you will lose many marks.

a) because it will show your lack of engagement

b) it will use up 300 words at the beginning of the essay. Therefore your conclusion will not be read.

Use only the latest criteria!!! DO NOT WRITE AN ABSTRACT

There are a number of checklists that you can use to ensure that you max out for Criteria D.

1) This is one that I recommend and is in a google doc format -    the checklist.

2) The one below (which you can download here as a pdf ) is taken from the excellent EE course companion by Kota Lekanides that is found in all of your AG classes.

word count for ib extended essay

There is also a fantastic check list in the book that you have in your AG classes. It is Simply called Extended Essay by Paul Hoang. 

word count for ib extended essay

What you need to do

Required Formatting

The extended essay should be written in a clear, correct and formal academic style, appropriate to the subject from which the topic is drawn. Given that the extended essay is a formally written research paper, it should strive to maintain a professional, academic look. 

To help achieve this, the following formatting is  required:

  • 12-point, readable font (Calibri or Times New Roman);
  • double spacing throughout entire Essay;
  • page numbering - top right corner;
  • no candidate or school name or supervisor name on the title page or page headers.

Required S tructure

The structure of the essay is very important. It helps students to organize the argument, making the best use of the evidence collected. 

There are six required elements of the final work to be submitted. More details about each element are given in the  “Presentation”  section. Please note that  the order in which these elements are presented here is not necessarily the order in which they should be written. 

Six required elements of the extended essay:

  • Contents page
  • Introduction
  • Body of the essay
  • References and bibliography -- if MLA "Works Cited" if CSE "References"

1. Required  Title Page  

The title page should include  only  the following information: 

  • the title of the essay
  • the research question
  • the subject the essay is registered in (if it is a language essay also state which category it falls into; if a world studies essay also state the theme and the two subjects utilized) 

The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays. 

Please note:  Examiners are instructed not to read or assess any material in excess of the word limit. This means that essays containing more than 4,000 words will be compromised across all assessment criteria. Given the holistic nature of the assessment criteria, students who write in excess of the word limit will self-penalize across all criteria. 

Note for Chinese/ Korean/ Japanese Essays -  Clarification of word counts in Chinese for EEs. When typing in Chinese, word-processing software is likely to include the number of characters along with punctuation. Teachers and students are asked not to include punctuation in the word count for assessed work. The word count should only take into account the number of characters typed. (IBO Feb 2023)

Students writing their extended essay in Japanese, Korean or Chinese should use the following conversions.

  • Japanese: 1 word = approximately 2 Japanese characters (upper limit 8,000 characters)
  • Korean: 1 word = 1 Korean character (upper limit 4,000 characters)
  • Chinese: 1 word = approximately 1.2 Chinese characters (upper limit 4,800 characters)

word count for ib extended essay

source: ibo.org

2. Required Contents Page

A contents page must be provided at the beginning of the extended essay and all pages should be numbered. Please note that an index page is not required and if included will be treated as if it is not present.

3. Required Introduction

The introduction should tell the reader what to expect in the essay. The introduction should make clear to the reader the focus of the essay, the scope of the research, in  particular  an indication of the sources to be used, and an insight into the line of argument to be taken. 

While students should have a sense of the direction and key focus of their essay, it is sometimes advisable to finalize the introduction once the body of the essay is complete.

4.  Required Body of the Essay  (research, analysis, discussion, and evaluation)

The main task is writing the body of the essay, which should be presented in the form of a reasoned argument. The form of this varies with the subject of the essay but as the argument develops it should be clear to the reader what relevant evidence has been discovered, where/how it has been discovered and how it supports the argument. In some subjects, for example, the sciences, sub-headings within the main body of the essay will help the reader to understand the argument (and will also help the student to keep on track). In structuring their extended essay, students must take into consideration the expected conventions of the subject in which their extended essay is registered. 

Once the main body of the essay is complete, it is possible to finalize the introduction (which tells the reader what to expect) and the conclusion (which says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved). 

Any information that is important to the argument  must not  be included in appendices or footnotes/endnotes. The examiner  will not  read notes or appendices, so an essay that is not complete in itself will be compromised across the assessment criteria.

5. Required Conclusion

The conclusion says what has been achieved, including notes of any limitations and any questions that have not been resolved. While students might draw conclusions throughout the essay based on their findings, it is important that there is a final, summative conclusion at the end. This conclusion(s) must relate to the research question posed.

6.  Required References & Bibliography

Students should use their chosen style of academic referencing as soon as they start writing. That way they are less likely to forget to include a citation. It is also easier than trying to add references at a later stage. For more information on this, refer to the guidelines in the IB document  Effective citing and referencing.

Writing the essay takes time but if students have used their Researcher's reflection space and reflection sessions in a meaningful way they should be well prepared to develop their arguments.

source: concordian-Thailand

  • << Previous: Know Your Criteria
  • Next: 4000 words final hand in >>
  • Last Updated: Mar 10, 2024 10:40 PM
  • URL: https://cis.libguides.com/extendedessay

ExtendedEssayWriters

Extended Essay Writers

extended essay blog

IB Extended Essay Word Count: How to Succeed and Exceed Expectations?

extended essay word count

Luke MacQuoid

The IB Extended Essay is the pinnacle of academic writing for students pursuing the IB Diploma Progeame. This research-based essay requires students to dive deep into a topic of their choice and present a well-developed argument. However, there is one essential aspect of the essay that students must master: meeting the IB EE word count requirement.

So, Extended essay word count is what I will focus on in this read.

How Many Words is the Extended Essay?

The IB Extended Essay word count requirement is 4000 words, including the abstract, main body, footnotes, and quotations. It is a vital aspect of the essay because it is a testament to a student’s research, analytical, and writing skills. 

As stated previously, the extended essay maximum word count of 4000 words is typically divided into several sections, each with a recommended number of words. 

The approximate word limit for each section of IB extended essay may vary depending on the subject area , research question, and approach taken by the student. However, the following is a general breakdown of the recommended word count for each section:

  • Title page and abstract – 300 words
  • Introduction – 300-500 words
  • Main body – 2,500-3,000 words
  • Conclusion – 200-400 words
  • References and bibliography – 100-300 words

It is important to note that the word count for each section is not set in stone, and students should use their own judgment to determine how much space each part of their essay requires. 

What counts towards your word count in IB extended essay is explained in the video above:

What is the Minimum Word Count for Extended essay?

Extended essay minimum word count is 3,500 words. This includes the main body of the essay but does not include the abstract, contents page, bibliography, or any appendices. 

However, it is important to note that meeting the minimum word count is not necessarily sufficient to produce a high-quality Extended Essay. Therefore, students should strive to meet the full 4,000-word requirement in order to fully develop their research and analysis and write a comprehensive essay .

The most critical aspect of the essay is to produce a well-researched, well-argued, and well-written piece that addresses the research question in a thoughtful and meaningful way.

What if I Fail IB Extended Essay Word Limit?

Crafting an IB Extended Essay is like building a house – every brick counts towards the final result. However, failing to meet the minimum word count requirement of 3,500 words can act like a wrecking ball to your efforts. It can lead to a heartbreaking disqualification, leaving your essay collecting dust on the shelf instead of being awarded a well-deserved grade .

On the other hand, exceeding the 4,000-word limit can have consequences as well. Like a gatekeeper standing at the word limit threshold, the examiner may stop reading your essay at 4,000 words and not consider any content that spills over the limit. This can be a crushing blow if critical information is tucked away in that portion, rendering it invisible in the grading process.

Therefore, it’s crucial to find a balance and use the right amount of words to paint a clear and concise picture of your research, analysis, and ideas. Remember, the goal of the Extended essay is not to write as many words as possible, but to demonstrate your research and writing skills and present a compelling argument. 

ib ee word limit

So, take care to plan your essay carefully, express your thoughts effectively, and adhere to the word count guidelines to ensure your essay is a strong and successful one.

How Can IB Students Meet the Extended Essay Word Count?

Students need to plan and organize their essay to meet the word count requirement. Therefore, starting early is essential to give oneself enough time to research, draft, and revise the essay. 

Creating an outline is another important step, ensuring that the essay covers all relevant aspects of the topic. 

Using concise and relevant writing is also crucial to keep the essay focused and on track. This will help students avoid using unnecessary jargon or repetitive phrases that can bloat the essay and cause it to exceed the word count limit. 

Lastly, peer review and editing are essential to help students identify areas that need improvement and ensure that the essay meets the word count.

Common Mistakes Leading to Failure

While meeting the word count is critical, students need to avoid common mistakes that can lead to falling short or exceeding the word limit. Repetitive writing is one of these mistakes that students make when they use the same phrases or expressions multiple times. 

Irrelevant information is another mistake to avoid because it does not add value to the essay and can cause it to exceed the word count. Strike a balance between depth and breadth of analysis and ensure that the essay provides enough detail to support your arguments without going off-topic .

The Extended Essay can be a daunting task for any IB student. With so many criteria to meet and a strict word count limit, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and lost in the process. But lucky you! ExtendedEssayWriters.com is here to guide you through and help you craft an essay that shines bright like a diamond.

Our team of writers is not only knowledgeable in the IB curriculum, but also passionate about helping students achieve their academic goals. We understand that every student is unique, and we work closely with you to tailor our services to fit your individual needs. So whether you need help brainstorming ideas, researching, or simply adhering to the word count guidelines, we’ve got you covered.

word count for ib extended essay

Need help with your IB EE?

You can also use our extended essay writers team’s services if you need assistance selecting a topic. Furthermore, we can also help you write your IB extended essay from scratch or edit your draft following the IB criteria.

We take pride in providing high-quality and well-researched extended essays that meet all the necessary criteria, while still showcasing your own unique style and voice. 

With our help from ExtendedcEssaycWriters, you can submit an essay that not only meets the word limit and criteria but also stands out from the rest. Let’s help you take the stress out of the Extended essay and make the journey a truly enjoyable and rewarding experience.

Now You Are Ready to Follow the IB EE Word Count

Hence, the IB Extended Essay word count requirement is an essential aspect of the essay that students must master. Effective planning and organization, using concise and relevant writing, and avoiding common mistakes are the keys to meeting the word limit requirement. 

By mastering the word count, students can produce an essay that demonstrates their research and analytical skills, making it a valuable contribution to their academic studies.

' src=

Luke MacQuoid has extensive experience teaching English as a foreign language in Japan, having worked with students of all ages for over 12 years. Currently, he is teaching at the tertiary level. Luke holds a BA from the University of Sussex and an MA in TESOL from Lancaster University, both located in England. As well to his work as an IB Examiner and Master Tutor, Luke also enjoys sharing his experiences and insights with others through writing articles for various websites, including extendedessaywriters.com blog

personal vs shared knowledge TOK

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

IB Writing Service Logo

How Long Is IB IA? Average IA Word Count

If you are studying for the International Baccalaureate (IB), understanding the scope and requirements of Internal Assessment (IA) is crucial. In my extensive experience with the IB, one of the first questions students often ask is: “How long is the IB IA?” This question isn’t just about numbers — it reflects anxiety and curiosity about effectively managing such an essential component of your IB studies.

What Does the IB Internal Assessment Entail?

The Internal Assessment is an essential component of the International Baccalaureate curriculum. It is crafted to evaluate students’ application of knowledge in scenarios that mimic real-world challenges across various subjects. According to general IB criteria, the IA enables students to engage deeply with their chosen subjects. It offers a practical framework that complements the theoretical aspects of the IB program.

As a vital element of the IB, the IA demands that students absorb and apply information creatively and critically. This assessment varies significantly from subject to subject, requiring tailored approaches that can include experiments in science, data analysis in mathematics, or textual analysis in languages. Each IA is an opportunity to showcase your unique analytical and research skills through a personalized investigation. It’s your chance to investigate a topic that fascinates you, developing a nuanced understanding that demonstrates your ability to synthesize and evaluate complex ideas.

In addition, IA encourages a hands-on approach to learning. This method helps bridge the gap between classroom study and the kind of independent work you expect in a university or professional environment. Completing an IA can be incredibly rewarding, allowing you to research potential career interests or academic pursuits in depth. It also plays a crucial role in developing essential skills such as problem-solving, project management, and critical thinking, preparing you for success in college and beyond.

Key Components of a Strong Internal Assessment

Writing a robust Internal Assessment involves meticulous planning and a deep understanding of the subject. Several essential components must be considered to ensure your IA meets the criteria and stands out.

Well-Formulated Research Question

The foundation of a strong IA lies in your research question. It must be clear, focused, and significantly feasible. The research question sets the direction of your entire project; it guides your research and underpins your analysis.

A well-chosen question will enable you to conduct targeted research and gather data that directly addresses the core of what you aim to investigate. It should challenge you to think critically and apply your subject knowledge creatively.

Methodology: The Blueprint of Your Investigation

Choosing the proper methodology is critical, as it should align perfectly with your research question. This component concerns your strategies for gathering, processing, and analyzing data. Your methodology must be rigorous and appropriate for your subject area, ensuring the data collected is valid and reliable.

Whether you’re conducting experiments, surveys, or textual analysis, the methods you choose should offer the most effective way of investigating your research question. Moreover, a clear and systematic methodology is essential for replicability, allowing others to follow in your footsteps or build upon your research.

Analysis: Interpreting Data

The final cornerstone of your IA is the analysis. This stage is where you transform raw data into insights and answers. Your analysis must go beyond mere data description; it should critically evaluate the information and draw insightful conclusions reflecting your study’s depth and breadth.

It involves discerning patterns, testing your hypothesis, and discussing anomalies. Your analysis’s strength lies in linking to your research question and demonstrating how the findings contribute to a broader understanding of the topic.

Reflection: The Oft-Overlooked Aspect

While not always emphasized, reflection is a crucial component of your IA. It involves evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of your investigation, reflecting on what you learned, and considering how the process could be improved. Reflection enhances your work’s authenticity and demonstrates your capacity for critical thinking and personal growth.

Presentation: The Final Polish

A well-organized, clearly formatted IA helps communicate your ideas more effectively. Paying attention to your presentation’s structure, clarity, and academic style can significantly affect how your work is perceived and graded.

IA Average word count

🎓✍️ Acing Your Internal Assessment Has Never Been Easier! ✍️🎓

Are you struggling with your Internal Assessment? Let our experts take care of it! We’ve successfully completed hundreds of IA projects across different IB courses, and we know the IB criterium inside out.

🌟 Our writers are all human and do not use CHAT-GPT, ensuring a unique and personalized touch to your project. Plus, our service is 100% confidential and risk-free, so you can trust us with your academic success.

Don’t miss out on this opportunity to secure the grade you deserve! Get started with our IB IA Writing Service​ today! 💡📚🔝

How Many Words Should Your IB IA Be?

Generally, the word limit for IAs typically ranges between 1,500 and 2,500 words. However, the key to effectively meeting this requirement lies in understanding that these limits are carefully tailored to suit the demands and depth of each subject. Now, let’s look at the word count for each type of IB IA:

  • Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) . Generally, the word count for science IAs is around 1,500 to 2,250 words. Emphasis on experimental work and the analysis and evaluation of data.
  • Mathematics . Around 1,000 to 1,500 words. More on calculations and the formulation and testing of hypotheses and less on extended writing.
  • History . Up to 2,200 words. Detailed analysis of historical events, significance evaluation, and source comparisons.
  • English and Other Language A . Around 1,200 to 1,500 words. Textual analysis, comparison of literary texts, and critical commentary.
  • Geography . Approximately 2,500 words. Fieldwork analysis, data collection interpretation, and evaluation of geographical questions.
  • Economics . Around 1,500 to 2,250 words. Economic theories application, data analysis, and real-world case study evaluation.
  • Psychology . Up to 2,200 words. Experimental study, data analysis, and theoretical evaluations.
  • Business Management . About 1,500 to 2,000 words. Business theory application to real-world examples, strategic analysis.
  • Visual Arts . The Comparative Study (part of the IA) is limited to 3,000 words maximum. It involves analyzing selected artworks and comparing and contrasting different artistic styles.
  • Music . Commentary of about 2,000 words. Investigation and analysis of musical links to cultural, social, and historical contexts.
  • Computer Science . Approximately 2,000 words. Problem analysis, solution design, and evaluation based on software development.
  • Environmental Systems and Societies . Typically around 2,250 words. Investigation of environmental systems and societies, including data analysis and evaluation.
  • Theatre Studies . Around 2,000 to 2,500 words. Detailed analysis of theatrical theories, practitioner influences, and personal reflections on performances.
  • Film Studies . The textual analysis essay should be no more than 1,750 words. Analysis of film elements, creative decisions, and contextual influences affecting the production.
  • World Religions . Approximately 1,500 to 2,000 words. In-depth study of religious beliefs, practices, and influences on culture and society.
  • Philosophy . Around 1,600 to 2,000 words. Philosophical argumentation, analysis of philosophical texts, and discussion of ethical considerations.
  • Anthropology . Up to 2,500 words. Ethnographic study, cultural analysis, and interpretations of human behaviors and societal structures.
  • Global Politics . About 2,000 words. Analysis of political issues, global interactions, and theoretical frameworks applied to case studies.
  • Sports, Exercise and Health Science . Typically around 2,200 words. Investigation of scientific principles, data analysis, and practical sports and health studies assessment.
  • Design Technology . Up to 2,200 words. Design project documentation, development processes, and evaluative analysis of product viability.

Exceeding the word limit can result in penalties, such as marks being deducted, which could impact your overall score significantly. Similarly, too brief submissions may not sufficiently investigate the research question, leading to lower marks for lacking depth or detail. Therefore, maintaining the balance within the prescribed word count is crucial for maximizing your IA score.

More Topics to Read:

  • IB Geography IA Topics: The Best Ideas
  • Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) IA Topics
  • Philosophy IA Topics and Research Tips
  • World Religions IA Topics: SL and HL Ideas
  • Design Technology IA Topics: SL and HL Topic Ideas
  • Sports, Exercise, and Health Science IA Topics
  • Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches IA Topics
  • IB Dance IA Topics: SL and HL Ideas
  • Film IA Topics: SL and HL Topic Ideas

Takeaways for Mastering Your IA Word Count

Mastering the word count in your IB Internal Assessment is more than just a numerical goal; it’s about crafting your arguments to fit effectively within a concise framework. In my experience as an expert IB writer, I’ve learned that it’s crucial to plan your IA meticulously from the start. Start with a clear outline, assigning word counts to each section based on its importance and the depth required. This approach not only ensures balance in your work but also helps you manage the distribution of words more effectively.

In my opinion, clarity and precision in your writing are essential. Strive to express your ideas succinctly, focusing on relevance and adherence to the topic. Throughout the drafting process, revising for brevity can significantly enhance the quality of your work. Make it a regular practice to cut unnecessary details and tighten your arguments, which helps you stay within the word limit while improving clarity.

According to general IB criteria, each subject has specific requirements, including what is included in the word count. It’s crucial to understand these details early on to plan accordingly. Adhering to these IB IA guidelines is vital, as straying from them can lead to penalties, including deductions for exceeding the word limit.

Time management plays a critical role in this process. Allocate adequate time for revisions and avoid last-minute changes that can lead to hastily made decisions or a bloated word count. As I know from my experience, feedback from your supervisor is invaluable. Use it wisely to refine your draft, focusing on areas that need expansion or condensation based on their advice.

Approach your IA with confidence and curiosity. Treat it as an opportunity to dig deep into a subject you are passionate about and present your findings in a well-structured document. Remember, a successful IA can significantly impact your final IB score, so take it seriously and give it the attention it deserves. Best of luck, and remember that our IB writers are always ready to help!

Valerie Green

Valerie Green

Valerie Green is a dedicated educator who spends her time helping high school and college students succeed. She writes articles and guides for various online education projects, providing students with the tools they need to excel in their studies. Friendly and approachable, she is committed to making a difference in the lives of students.

exteded essay word count

How Long Is IB EE? Minimum and Maximum Word Count

Balancing word count limits requires careful planning and consideration of every word you write. In this guide, I’ll share strategies and insights from years of mentoring IB students to help you master the art of word count management in your extended essay.

tok essay word count

TOK Essay Word Count. Min & Max

In this guide, we discuss the crucial parameters set by the International Baccalaureate for minimum and maximum word counts. Through the insights of an experienced IB writer, this article offers practical strategies for staying within these limits while improving the quality and depth of your essay.

IA Average word count

From my experience as IB tutor, a frequent question among students is, “How Long Is IB IA?” This question is crucial as the IA represents a significant component of the IB diploma, reflecting a student’s ability to apply classroom knowledge in a real-world context.

ib extended essay rubric

IB Extended Essay Rubric. Grading Criteria

Understanding the IB extended essay rubric is essential for success. The rubric provides a framework that grades students on several key criteria including the sharpness of their research question, the rigor of their methodology, the breadth and depth of their knowledge, the fluidity and clarity of their argumentation, and their personal engagement with the research topic.

IB TOK Essay Rubric and Grading criteria

IB TOK Essay Rubric. Grading Criteria

This article provides essential insights and strategies for understanding the assessment process and helping you write essays that meet and exceed the rigorous standards of the IB curriculum. Whether you’re striving for clarity of argument, effective integration of knowledge, or personal engagement, our tips will help you achieve a higher score.

ib ia rubric

IB Internal Assessment Rubric and Grading Criteria

The IB IA rubric is carefully structured to assess students’ understanding, skills and application of subject matter in a nuanced and comprehensive manner. Each subject rubric, whether for sciences such as Biology and Chemistry, humanities such as History and Psychology, or Mathematics, emphasizes a unique set of criteria tailored to assess specific competencies and skills.

word count for ib extended essay

© 2023  I Bstudenthelp.com. This website is owned and operated by Udeepi OU Harju maakond, Tallinn, Lasnamäe linnaosa, Sepapaja tn 6, 15551. Disclaimer : Services we provide are only to assist the buyer like a guideline to complete any kind of writing assignment. Privacy Policy Terms and Conditions Cookie Policy Revision Policy Refund Policy

  • Support Sites

Extended Essay Support Site

Presentation.

4 of the 34 marks for the Extended Essay are for Criterion D: Presentation. The IB does not provide a checklist to remind you to include page numbers, captions and correct citations. Instead Criterion D asks: 

  • To what extent does the structure of the essay lend itself to the topic, subject and argument?
  • To what extent is the layout correct?
  • To what extent do the structure and layout support the reading, understanding and evaluation of the essay?

The first bullet point is arguably the most difficult and is inextricably related to Criterion C: Critical thinking. However, there is no reason why you should lose marks for the second two bullet points on layout. Here is a checklist that you can use to determine if your essay is ready to submit:

EE checklist

Have you checked your word count (under 4000 words, after you have excluded words which are not counted towards the word count)?

Have you numbered tables and figures/illustrations, i.e. Fig.1, Table 1?

Does each table, figure or illustration have a caption or label?

For tables, illustrations and figures that are not based on your own work, have you included citations or full references?

Are tables, illustrations and figures mentioned in the text, using a numbered reference?

Do all in-text citations refer to a source in the bibliography or works cited section?

Is your list of works cited / references / bibliography in alphabetical order?

In your bibliography / works cited, are your sources formatted according to the requirements of your style guide (APA, Chicago, MLA)?

Are your pages numbered?

Does your table of contents include section headings and page numbers?

Are quotations clearly indicated by quotation marks or indented blocks?

Are appendices titled, referenced in the text and listed in the table of context?

Have you used a readable, conventional font? Have you double spaced your lines and used standard margins?

Does your title page include both your title and research question ? (Note: do not include your name, candidate number or school name or number on the title pages)

Do your introduction and conclusion answer the research question ? Does the answer to your research question follow logically from your arguments, evidence and findings?

Does the structure of your essay lend itself well to your topic, question and research?

How well does your essay structure lend itself to your argument? See the subject-specific interpretations of the assessment criteria in the EE Guide on the Programme Resource Centre under MyIB. There you can find advice on how to use headings and structures that are appropriate for your subject.

IMAGES

  1. IB Business Management Extended Essay: The Complete Guide

    word count for ib extended essay

  2. Criteria D

    word count for ib extended essay

  3. Word count help on Biology EE!

    word count for ib extended essay

  4. How Long is Extended Essay? Minimum and Maximum Word Count

    word count for ib extended essay

  5. How to Write an Extended Essay: A Step-by-Step Guide

    word count for ib extended essay

  6. Step-By-Step Guide On IB Extended Essay With 10 Tips

    word count for ib extended essay

VIDEO

  1. Coloring World: Fun & Educational Number Counting for Kids

  2. Trying to reach the word count on an Essay be like😂 #comedy #memes #shorts

  3. Trying to meet the word count in an essay #gaming #disney #kimpossible #childhoodmemories

  4. When you're trying to reach the word count on your essay

  5. WORD COUNTING 1 T0 15

  6. March 11, 2024 --More on Word Count and How to Figure this!

COMMENTS

  1. Extended essay

    The extended essay is an independent, self-directed piece of research, finishing with a 4,000-word paper. One component of the International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) core, the extended essay is mandatory for all students. Read about the extended essay in greater detail. You can also read about how the IB sets deadlines for ...

  2. The Complete IB Extended Essay Guide: Examples, Topics, and Ideas

    Conclusion. References and bibliography. Additionally, your research topic must fall into one of the six approved DP categories, or IB subject groups, which are as follows: Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature. Group 2: Language Acquisition. Group 3: Individuals and Societies. Group 4: Sciences.

  3. How Long is Extended Essay? Minimum and Maximum Word Count

    An IB Extended Essay should have a minimum of 1,500 words and a maximum of 4,000 words. It is important to stay within the specified word count, as going over the limit can lead to lower grades. When writing your extended essay, it is important to make sure that each paragraph is well structured and contains only relevant information.

  4. PDF Extended essay guide

    Formal presentation of the extended essay. The extended essay should be written in a clear, correct and formal academic style, appropriate to the subject from which the topic is drawn. The use of word processors is encouraged. The length of the extended essay. The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays.

  5. PDF A Student Guide To Writing the Extended Essay

    The word essay also describes a first or tentative effort. Your Extended Essay will not be your masterpiece. But if you take the process seriously, you will write something you can be proud of ... IF FOUND, Please return this guidebook to Ms. Day, the Extended Essay Coordinator, in the IB Magnet Office, Suite 200. 4 Table of Contents ...

  6. Extended Essay: Advice (and Warnings) from the IB

    An essay that attempts to evade the word limit by including important material in footnotes or endnotes will be compromised across the assessment criteria. Please note that footnotes and endnotes are added to the word count as they are encountered. Extended Essay Guide, International Baccalaureate Organization, p. 86, 2016.

  7. Ib Extended Essay Word Count Rules: Everything You Need to Know

    the Word Count Requirements. According to the official IB Extended Essay Guide, the word count for the extended essay must be between 3,000 and 4,000 words. This word limit includes the main body of the essay, as well as any quotations, footnotes, and in-text citations. The title page, abstract, table of contents, bibliography, and appendices ...

  8. Smallbone Library: Extended Essay (IB): Expressing your ideas

    Word count. You essay must have at most 4000 words. While there is no set penalty for exceeding this, examiners will stop reading at 4000 words, so may not, for example, read your conclusions and your mar is likely to suffer siginficantly. The following table summarises what is and is not included in the word count: (IB EE Guide 2020, Presentation)

  9. A Definitive Guide to the IB Extended Essay

    The Extended Essay (EE) is an independent, self-directed academic research, presented in the form of a 4,000-word paper. One component of the International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) core, the extended essay is mandatory for all students. The final work is given a grade from E to A, and makes up part of each student's

  10. PDF International Baccalaureate Extended Essay

    What is the Extended Essay? Comprised of various sections: •Title Page (with only Title, Subject, and Word Count) •Content Page •Introduction / Body / Conclusion •References / Works Cited •No abstract or external sources of information •Presented in the form of a formal research paper according to strict formatting requirements (MLA or other): 12 pt. font / double-spacing / page ...

  11. Guide to the IB Extended Essay in 2024

    Her story "The Astronaut" won the 2018 Shirley Jackson Award for short fiction and received a "Distinguished Stories" mention in the 2019 Best American Short Stories anthology. IB Extended Essay Guide - We look at the rubric, essay topics, and offer advice for penning a stellar composition in 2024.

  12. LibGuides: Extended Essay: Formatting your EE

    All essays must follow this format: Standard Margins (1-inch or 2.5 cm margins) 12-point, readable font (Arial is recommended) Double-spaced. Page Numbers start on the Table of Contents. No Candidate or School name is to appear anywhere in the document.

  13. International Baccalaureate/Extended Essay Tips

    Some candidates will find their first drafts are in the 6,000 to 8,000 range, while others will reach about 2800-3500. In fact, keep in mind that 4,000 words is the maximum word count and not where you must get to. While most essays have a word count in the 3,900 range, it is perfectly acceptable to submit an essay that is 3,500 words.

  14. Extended Essay Guide: Criteria, Format, Sample EEs

    The extended essay should be written in a clear, correct and formal academic style, appropriate to the subject from which the topic is drawn. ... word count . The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays. Please note: Examiners are instructed not to read or assess any material in excess of the word limit. This means that essays ...

  15. LibGuides: Extended Essay Resources: Paper Formatting

    Word count. The upper limit is 4,000 words for all extended essays. Please note: Examiners are instructed not to read or assess any material in excess of the word limit. This means that essays containing more than 4,000 words will be compromised across all assessment criteria.

  16. PDF International Baccalaureate Diploma Program Extended Essay Component

    The extended essay should include an introduction, body and conclusion with a limit of 4000 words. Papers in excess of 4000 words are subject to penalties and examiners are not required to read them. An important part of this process is the learning and personal reflection that students experience. Students must complete specific formal written ...

  17. LibGuides: Extended Essay: Criteria D

    The word count should only take into account the number of characters typed. (IBO Feb 2023) Students writing their extended essay in Japanese, Korean or Chinese should use the following conversions. Japanese: 1 word = approximately 2 Japanese characters (upper limit 8,000 characters) Korean: 1 word = 1 Korean character (upper limit 4,000 ...

  18. How Long is Extended Essay? Minimum and Maximum Word Count

    How Many Words is the Extended Essay? The IB Extended Essay word count requirement is 4000 words, including the abstract, main body, footnotes, and quotations. It is a vital aspect of the essay because it is a testament to a student's research, analytical, and writing skills. As stated previously, the extended essay maximum word count of 4000 ...

  19. IB IA Word Count Guide: Essentials for Students

    Generally, the word count for science IAs is around 1,500 to 2,250 words. Emphasis on experimental work and the analysis and evaluation of data. Mathematics. Around 1,000 to 1,500 words. More on calculations and the formulation and testing of hypotheses and less on extended writing. History.

  20. Extended essay: Presentation

    4 of the 34 marks for the Extended Essay are for Criterion D: Presentation. The IB does not provide a checklist to remind you to include page numbers, captions and correct citations. Instead Criterion D asks: ... Have you checked your word count (under 4000 words, after you have excluded words which are not counted towards the word count)? ...