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"Honest to God,'' the man tells the woman, "I never thought to see you in such a state. You must miss him dreadfully.'' Between ordinary people, ordinary words. Between a commoner and a queen, sheer effrontery. How can this bearded man, a Scotsman who oversees Queen Victoria's palace at Balmoral, have the gall to look her in the eye and address her with such familiarity? The atmosphere in court is instantly tense and chilling. But the man, John Brown, has caught the queen's attention and cut through the miasma of two years' mourning for her beloved consort, Prince Albert. The little woman--a plump pudding dressed all in black--looks up sharply, and a certain light glints in her eyes. Before long she is taking Brown's advice that she must ride out daily, for the exercise and the fresh air.

"Mrs. Brown'' is a love story about two strong-willed people who find exhilaration in testing each other. It is not about sexual love, or even romantic love, really, but about that kind of love based on challenge and fascination. The film opens in 1864, when Queen Victoria ( Judi Dench ), consumed by mourning, has already been all but invisible to her subjects for two years. Her court coddles and curtseys to her, and that's what she expects: A nod or a glance from her can subdue an adviser.

Her household thinks perhaps riding might help her break out of her deep gloom. Import John Brown ( Billy Connolly ), a Scotsman in a kilt, arrives with one of the queen's horses and is promptly ignored. Not to be trifled with, he stands at attention in her courtyard, next to the horse. The next day he is there again. Proper behavior would have him waiting, docile and invisible, in the stables. "The queen will ride out if and when she chooses,'' Victoria informs him.

"And I intend to be there when she is ready,'' Brown informs Victoria.

Nobody in her life had spoken to her in this way, except perhaps for the beloved Prince Albert. A charge forms in the air between the queen and her servant. Victoria is a complex and observant woman, who knows exactly what he is doing and is thrilled by it: Queens perhaps grow tired of being fawned upon. Soon Brown and the queen are out riding, and soon the color has returned to her cheeks, and soon Brown is offering advice on how she should manage her affairs, and soon the household and the nation are whispering that this beastly man Brown is the power behind the throne.

"Mrs. Brown,'' they called her behind her back. Her son the Prince of Wales (David Westhead) is enraged to find that at Brown's order, the smoking room is to be closed at midnight ("Mr. Brown needs his rest,'' the queen serenely explains). Brown takes her riding in the country and they call at a humble cottage, and the queen is offered Scotch whisky. The national newspapers raise their eyebrows. Finally the prime minister, Benjamin Disraeli ( Antony Sher ), pays a visit to see for himself what is happening in the royal household.

Judi Dench has long been one of the reigning stars of the London stage. She often plays strong-willed, intelligent women. She has never been much interested in the movies, although she did play "M'' in a Bond film. This is her first starring role. She is wonderful in it, building the entire character on the rock of utter self-possession, and then showing that character possessed by another. Entrenched behind her desk, dressed in mourning, coils of braids framing her implacable face, she presents such a formidable facade that it is curiously erotic when Brown melts through it.

Billy Connolly is also little-known in films; he is a stand-up comic, I learn, although here he has the reserve and self-confidence that most stand-up comics lack almost by definition. There is a manliness to him, a robust defiance of the rules. He also drinks too much, and although he seems for a long time able to hold it, one of the movie's subtle themes is that the better he gets to know the queen the less sure he is of how he should proceed.

Would there be, could there be, physical sex between them? Almost certainly not. But they both tacitly recognize that they might enjoy it. The queen is not an attractive woman, but she is powerful, and power is thrilling; in one key scene Brown swims naked in the highlands, intoxicated by his closeness to the throne. Victoria is like a movie nun--like Deborah Kerr in "Black Narcissus''--in being all the more intriguing because she's forbidden.

"Mrs. Brown'' was written by Jeremy Brock and directed by John Madden , whose first film, the torturous "Ethan Frome," gave little promise of his confidence here. The movie is insidious in its methods, asking us to see what is happening beneath the guarded surfaces. The behavior of a queen and her servant is so minutely dictated by rules and customs that they may look much the same when breaking them as when following them. So much depends on the eyes.

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert was the film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, he won the Pulitzer Prize for distinguished criticism.

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Mrs. Brown movie poster

Mrs. Brown (1997)

Rated PG Mature Themes, Brief Nudity

103 minutes

Antony Sher as Disraeli

Billy Connolly as John Brown

Geoffrey Palmer as Henry Ponsonby

Judi Dench as Queen Victoria

Directed by

  • John Madden
  • Jeremy Brock

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Tender royal period drama about friendship and loyalty.

Mrs. Brown Poster Image

A Lot or a Little?

What you will—and won't—find in this movie.

The value of friendship, trust, and loyalty underp

John Brown's character combines strength and confi

A character is attacked by two others -- kicking a

Some nudity when two characters run down the beach

A few uses of "God" and "hell." Language also incl

Occasional drinking of whiskey, including drinking

Parents need to know that Mrs. Brown is a poignant historical drama based on a true story that focuses on the value of friendship, issues over morality, and the role of the monarchy. Overall the movie has a gentle mood, although there are occasional brief moments of peril -- a character is attacked and left…

Positive Messages

The value of friendship, trust, and loyalty underpins the story. The movie also deals with bereavement and how friendship can help overcome grief.

Positive Role Models

John Brown's character combines strength and confidence with a gentle, caring nature. However, he is quick-tempered and at one point gets drunk and behaves aggressively. Queen Victoria is powerful and stubborn but her vulnerability and her dependence on John makes her more relatable.

Violence & Scariness

A character is attacked by two others -- kicking and punching not fully shown, but they are left with a bloody face. In subsequent scenes the character is cut and bruised. Characters hunt for deer with shotguns, but no animal is seen shot or hurt. A gunman attempts an assassination but is apprehended.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Violence & Scariness in your kid's entertainment guide.

Sex, Romance & Nudity

Some nudity when two characters run down the beach naked -- filmed from behind. They are then seen swimming in the sea naked, with glimpses just below the waist showing pubic hair.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Sex, Romance & Nudity in your kid's entertainment guide.

A few uses of "God" and "hell." Language also includes "horses--t," "arse," and "balls."

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Language in your kid's entertainment guide.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Occasional drinking of whiskey, including drinking from a hip flask and downing a full glass. One character is seen drunk and unruly.

Did you know you can flag iffy content? Adjust limits for Drinking, Drugs & Smoking in your kid's entertainment guide.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Mrs. Brown is a poignant historical drama based on a true story that focuses on the value of friendship, issues over morality, and the role of the monarchy. Overall the movie has a gentle mood, although there are occasional brief moments of peril -- a character is attacked and left bruised and battered, and there is a foiled assassination attempt. There is brief nudity when two characters go swimming in the sea and there is some profanity including "God," "hell," "horses--t," and "arse." Spanning the years between 1863 and 1883 the movie depicts the friendship that developed between Queen Victoria ( Judi Dench ) and her servant John Brown ( Billy Connolly ) and the subsequent uproar it caused. While there is very little adult content, younger kids may find it difficult to follow some of the dialogue, particularly that which takes place among the politicians. However, the fundamental story of an intense friendship that bridges a social divide is simple and moving. To stay in the loop on more movies like this, you can sign up for weekly Family Movie Night emails .

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What's the Story?

In MRS. BROWN, Queen Victoria ( Judi Dench ) is in mourning for her husband Prince Albert and remains withdrawn from public life. The royal household calls upon Albert's former servant John Brown ( Billy Connolly ) to attend to her. Brown, a straight-talking Scot who treats the Queen with candor, encourages her to go riding in order to lift her spirits. As their friendship deepens, rumors begin to circulate about their relationship. The pair try to rise above the controversy, but the Prime Minister, Benjamin Disraeli ( Antony Sher ) sees an opportunity to transform the Queen's flagging public image.

Is It Any Good?

Brilliant performances from the two lead actors -- Dench and Connolly -- as well as a witty, intelligent script make this a thoroughly enjoyable and thought-provoking movie. The development of the relationship between Queen Victoria and John Brown is a fascinating study of two worlds colliding and of the strength of platonic (or so we are led to believe) love.

The quiet chemistry between Dench and Connolly is compelling while the historical settings and true story factor will leave you enlightened but intrigued to know more -- at the time there was speculation over a sexual relationship between the Queen and Brown, and even a secret marriage, hence the title Mrs. Brown . There is also much to inspire discussion over the role of the monarchy and associated privacy rights -- both then and now.

Talk to Your Kids About ...

Families can talk about the relationship between Queen Victoria and John Brown in Mrs. Brown . Rumors about their relationship were printed in the media at the time. How does this compare to today? Has the media changed?

Queen Victoria remained in mourning for her late husband, Prince Albert, for 40 years. Discuss how grief can affect people differently.

Do you think kings and queens have a duty to be in the public eye? How much should the public be told about the private lives of the monarchy? Do you think the monarchy still plays an important role in society? How has it changed since Victorian times?

John Brown was among Queen Victoria's most loyal servants. What does loyalty mean? How important is it to be loyal? What other character strengths are displayed in their friendship?

Movie Details

  • In theaters : July 18, 1997
  • On DVD or streaming : April 22, 1998
  • Cast : Judi Dench , Billy Connolly , Geoffrey Palmer
  • Director : John Madden
  • Inclusion Information : Female actors
  • Studio : Buena Vista International
  • Genre : Drama
  • Topics : History
  • Run time : 101 minutes
  • MPAA rating : PG
  • MPAA explanation : a beating, language and brief nudity
  • Last updated : December 30, 2023

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Billy and Connolly and Judi Dench in Mrs Brown

Mrs Brown: a right royal romance

Mrs Brown (1997) Director: John Madden Entertainment grade: B History grade: B+

Queen Victoria was widowed in 1861. Four years after Prince Albert's death, she became attached to her gillie , John Brown.

Judi Dench and Billy Connolly in Mrs Brown

John Brown (Billy Connolly) joins Victoria's staff at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, then moves with her to Balmoral in Scotland. The film invents some Upstairs Downstairs drama, but sticks approximately to the facts. The only conspicuous error is that the Balmoral sets are far too tasteful. Balmoral, like Osborne, was bought and decorated by Victoria and Albert as a couple, and its interiors were famously hideous . All the wood was painted dark ginger, fake thistles abounded, and anything that stayed still long enough was covered in violently clashing tartans – including curtains, carpets, furniture, linoleum and small children. According to historian Sarah Bradford , prime minister Lord Rosebery remarked that he "thought the drawing room at Osborne was the ugliest room in the world until he saw the drawing room at Balmoral".

Still from Mrs Brown 2

Brown calls Victoria "woman" rather than "ma'am", sneaks her drams of whisky, drags her out to ride in freezing temperatures, and takes her to visit her subjects on the estate. Naturally, she loves this. After commissioning memorials to Prince Albert and sulking, the real Queen Victoria's favourite pastime was being grovelled to by thankful peasants. It's also true, as shown in the film, she refused to relax her rules against smoking in royal palaces, even when begged by her son the Prince of Wales. Biographer Lytton Strachey wrote that "bishops and ambassadors, invited to Windsor, might be reduced, in the privacy of their bedrooms, to lie full-length upon the floor and smoke up the chimney".

Republicanism

Judi Dench in Mrs Brown

Victoria's isolation at Balmoral – and her attachment to Brown – feed a wave of republicanism in the nation at large. The film has this right, but Victoria was not the sole cause. Republicanism had its roots in the Chartist movement , and was stoked by the financial crisis of 1866. The naming of the Prince of Wales in a divorce case was also a factor. Still, it's true that Victoria's relationship with Brown was widely disliked and ridiculed. An anonymous 1871 pamphlet (written, it later emerged, by George Trevelyan ) was titled "What does she do with it?" This was an examination of the Civil List , but the title was meant – and understood – as a double entendre alluding to what Victoria got up to with Brown.

Judi Dench in Mrs Brown

The movie is cautious about exactly what Victoria got up to with Brown, showing merely a tender scene of them holding hands on his deathbed. Victorian gossips were less reserved. A European newspaper reported that she secretly married him and had his child (this was in 1869, when she was 50). The writer Wilfrid Scawen Blunt, who shared a mistress with the Prince of Wales, said of Brown's relationship with Victoria that there was "no doubt of his being allowed every conjugal privilege". Even Victoria's own daughters began to refer to Brown as "Mama's lover" – though the Earl of Derby, who recorded this, politely assumed they were joking.

Still from Mrs Brown

Prime minister Benjamin Disraeli (played by Antony Sher) decides "to winkle the old gal out of mourning" and tells the queen to return to public life, mainly to create a bit of dramatic tension in the movie's final act. In reality, Victoria was never shamed out of her admiration for Brown. After he died, she developed an attachment to another servant: her Hindustani teacher Abdul Karim . Edward VII destroyed as much as he could find of the evidence of both of these relationships after his mother's death. Victoria insisted on being buried with Brown's photograph, a lock of his hair and his mother's wedding ring – fuelling rumours of a secret marriage. These effects were discreetly hidden by her undertakers with a posy of flowers and some white tissue paper.

It's not often that a movie plays down – rather than up – a suggestion of historical romance, but that's exactly what Mrs Brown does. By doing so, it stays mostly on the right side of Victoria's biographers. There's no chance of these film-makers being sent to the tower.

  • Reel history
  • Billy Connolly
  • Drama films
  • Queen Victoria

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Centering on a lesser-known chapter in the lengthy reign of Queen Victoria, "Mrs. Brown" is a sensitive, richly detailed drama about the extraordinarily complex and intimate friendship that she developed with her loyal servant John Brown, a relationship that scandalized the entire country and even threatened the stability of the crown. Two superlative performances, by legendary stage actress Judi Dench (in her first leading screen role) and Billy Connolly, elevate this costumer way above the level of a well-mounted "Masterpiece Theater" production. Though a bit static and lacking the exuberance of "The Madness of King George" (with which it shares some concerns), Miramax should expect positive response from educated viewers, who are likely to be absorbed by this tightly focused, emotionally rewarding film. "Mrs. Brown" is part political intrigue, part family drama --- and above all a passionate, if platonic, love story between two individuals who could not have been more different. As in Alan Bennett's "The Madness of King George," scripter Jeremy Brock aims at humanizing a mythic monarch by illuminating her personal life, or offstage personality, as it were. The appeal of these tales rests on audiences' curiosity about life behind the closed doors of public celebrities.

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Emanuel Levy

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The story begins in 1864, three years after Queen Victoria (Dench) has lost her beloved husband and mentor, Albert, and plunged into a deep and dizzying depression, which results in a complete disappearance from public view. Despite unceasing efforts by some of her children, her loyal staff and her worshipful public, no one seems to be able to lift the spirits of the disconsolate queen, who’s soon labeled “The Widow of Windsor.”

Into this gloomy milieu enters Scottish servant Brown (Connolly), the Royal Family’s loyal hunting guide and horse caretaker, who devotes his life to one goal: cheering his queen and protecting her, both physically and emotionally, from any potential harm. Down-to-earth and with no regard for protocol, Brown causes immediate upheaval in the court.

Charmingly nonchalant and single-mindedly committed to his task, Brown is the only person who doesn’t treat the queen with kid gloves. Indeed, Brown’s insolence seems to be working a magical spell on the queen, who, for the first time in years, begins to react emotionally. Spurred by Brown’s insistence, she begins to smile and resumes her rides, and spends long days walking with Brown and confiding in him.

Despite the impossible barriers of class, politics and rigid norms, Victoria and Brown are attracted to each other as individuals needing intimacy, affection and loyalty. But as soon as the queen recommences the pleasures of “being alive” (as someone says), rumors of an affair begin to scandalize British society and a crisis in the monarchy seems inevitable.

Brown is contrasted with Prime Minister Disraeli (Anthony Sher), a shrewd, charismatic politician who understands that it’s the servant who holds the key to the queen’s return to public life, an act that will once and for all terminate all rumors of an unseemly affair. For this very reason, Brown is also resented by Sir Henry Ponsonby (Geoffrey Palmer), the queen’s private secretary, and her children, particularly Bertie (David Westhead), Prince of Wales.

Director John Madden handles his chores far more impressively than he did in his last assignments (“Ethan Frome,” “Golden Gate”), employing an unobtrusive style that serves the drama effectively and allows his gifted thesps to develop highly modulated characterizations.

Mostly working onstage and occasionally appearing in movies (recently as M in “Goldeneye”), Dench brings her commanding stature and superb elocution to the multi-nuanced role of a strong but vulnerable woman. As written and performed, Dench’s Victoria deviates from previous stage and screen portrayals that have shown the queen to be arrogant, rigid and unfeeling.

As a character, Brown lacks the overtly heroic dimensions of Rob Roy or the William Wallace of “Braveheart,” two mythic Scottish figures celebrated in recent American movies, but Connolly (better known as a comedian) acquits himself marvelously, stressing the irreverent willfulness of a servant who sacrificed his entire life in Her Majesty’s service, a man who faced a major personal dilemma when pressured to give Victoria back to the nation at the cost of his own heart.

Though there are a number of outdoor scenes and production values are handsome, ultimately it’s the narrow focus and chamber nature of the material that lends the movie its resonance and emotional power.

British --- Color

  • Production: A Miramax release of an Ecosse Film production. Produced by Sarah Curtis. Executive producers, Douglas Rae, Andrea Calderwood. Executive producers, Nigel Warren-Green (Irish Screen), Rebecca Eaton (WGBH). Directed by John Madden. Screenplay, Jeremy Brock
  • Crew: Camera (color), Richard Greatrex; editor, Robin Sales; music, Stephen Warbeck; production design, Martin Childs; art direction, Charlotte Watts; costume design, Deirdre Clancy; sound (Dolby), Alistair Crocker; associate producer, Paul Sarony; assistant director, Deborah Saban; casting, Michelle Guish. Reviewed at the Ticketmaster screening room, L.A., May 1, 1997. Running time: 103 min.
  • With: Queen Victoria ..... Judi Dench John Brown ..... Billy Connolly Henry Ponsonby ..... Geoffrey Palmer Disraeli ..... Anthony Sher Archie Brown ..... Gerald Butler Doctor Jenner ..... Richard Pasco Prince of Wales ..... David Westhead

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Mrs. Brown Review

Mrs. Brown

05 Sep 1997

103 minutes

It's becoming increasingly apparent that the stand-up microphone is a surprisingly useful tool with which to prise open a backdoor into the movies. A big screen Eddie Izzard was in The Avengers, while Lee Evans starred in The Fifth Element. And now Billy Connolly tackles a leading role as Queen Vic's horse-wrangling Highlander in a film that's a good deal more gutsy and compelling than you'd think.

Period cossies, historical story and earthy British production do not always make for scintillating entertainment. But this is a different matter altogether. It's more than two years since Prince Albert popped off, but Dench's starchy monarch is still in the depths of depression and unmoved by public obligations. In the desperate hope that a breath of fresh air may dispel her gloom and thereby quell republican ambition, John Brown (Connolly) is summoned from Balmoral with the Queen's nag.

What follows, however, is the last thing her staid Private Secretary (Palmer) had in mind, as the Scot develops a close and exclusive relationship with HRH, and clamours for Royal abolition are replaced by rumours of a scandalous affair. Which the film sees fit to neither confirm nor deny, and in striking this delicate balance, makes its impact.

Leading a host of strong, mature performances - other notables being Palmer and Anthony Sher's oily Disraeli - Connolly's brusque, straight-talking, stern loyalty and beardy compassion gradually wears down tangible walls of grief around Dench's incredibly convincing Victoria, and before you know it, you're caught up in a difficult but touching friendship, and enjoying a history lesson more than you ever thought possible.

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Mrs. Brown (United Kingdom, 1997)

Mrs. Brown is a love story much in the same vein as Carrington in that it deals with platonic affection that runs deeper and truer than that of the motion picture staple romantic variety. These days, it seems that whenever we see a male/female friendship on screen, it's just a setup for the inevitable moment when the two realize that they're fated to be lovers. Not so with Mrs. Brown , one of the most emotionally sensitive and intelligent love stories of the year. It shows, amongst other things, that it's possible to love completely and with unflagging devotion without sex ever becoming an issue.

Queen Victoria was born on May 24, 1819 and died nearly eighty-two years later, in the first month of 1901. Her reign as England's monarch, which began in 1837, lasted more than six decades and left such an indelible impression upon the country that, upon hearing of her death, author Henry James wrote, "We all feel a bit motherless today." Mrs. Brown , which is based on actual events and uses historical figures, transpires during one of the darkest periods of Victoria's reign -- a four year segment from 1864 to 1868 (with a brief epilogue in 1883). Still mourning the death of her beloved husband, Prince Albert, who died over two years earlier, the Queen (Judi Dench) is in virtual seclusion at Windsor. She sees no one outside of her servants and her immediate family, rarely goes out, and has no taste for politics. In the words of her loyal secretary, Henry Posonby (Geoffrey Palmer), they are all "prisoners of the queen's grief," which he describes variously as "ferocious introspection" and "unfettered morbidity." So, in an attempt to revive Victoria, Posonby summons John Brown (Billy Connolly), the highlander who runs the queen's Scottish retreat of Balmoral, to Windsor. It's Posonby's hope that Brown will "appeal to the queen's sentimental belief that all highlanders are good for the health."

Brown arrives and proves to be a breath of fresh air. Before he enters Windsor, the castle is a place of icy silence and solitude. Director John Madden so effectively conveys this atmosphere that we become keenly aware of such things as a ticking clock and a cleared throat. Brown's attitude of speaking what he thinks, regardless of the consequences, horrifies the servants and family. But, after initially being annoyed, Victoria warms to his methods, and it isn't long before the two develop a unshakable friendship. They become so close, in fact, that wags begin calling the Queen "Mrs. Brown." The Prince of Wales, wary of Brown's growing influence over his mother, seeks to have the highlander sent back to Scotland. And the Prime Minister, Disraeli, wonders whether Brown is more likely to be a valuable ally or a dangerous enemy.

Like 1995's The Madness of King George , Mrs. Brown mixes the political machinations of various MPs with the growing fissure between the monarch and the Prince of Wales. However, while George may have been mad, Victoria is merely eccentric. Nevertheless, her extended period of mourning, during which she has been out of the public's sight, has created a great deal of uncertainty among her subjects, and Parliament is beginning to discuss the possibility of disestablishing the monarchy -- a prospect that horrifies Disraeli and Prince Edward.

Brown and Victoria's relationship develops and deepens slowly and naturally, and credit must be given to both of the lead actors, Judi Dench ("M" from Goldeneye and Tomorrow Never Dies ) and Billy Connolly (Howard Hessman's replacement in the TV series Head of the Class ), for their extraordinary performances. Both actors immerse themselves in their roles, playing Brown and the Queen without a hint of artifice, and the chemistry between them is palpable. Theirs is a wonderfully real relationship that is reminiscent of the one between Lytton Strachey and the title character of Carrington . (Ironically, Strachey is most famous for his 1921 biography of Queen Victoria.)

Perhaps the best thing of all about Mrs. Brown is that it doesn't offer any hokey, Hollywood-type moments. The picture remains true to itself throughout, affirming that film maker John Madden ( Ethan Frome ) has a keen insight into the human psyche. Mrs. Brown is a fascinating character study, a wonderful love story, and a brilliant period piece ( Masterpiece Theater and the BBC, both renowned for their costume dramas, are listed as co-producers). In a summer that is sure to be glutted with formulaic action thrillers and flat romantic comedies, Mrs. Brown will delight and touch any viewer who seeks it out.

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You never find out whether the lovers in this 1997 movie really are lovers; like most of the people in the film, you have to keep guessing. The tale begins with Queen Victoria (Judi Dench) in mourning for her husband, Albert. She is reassured, and then comforted, by John Brown (Billy Connolly), who had worked for Prince Albert. Over time, her private secretary (Geoffrey Palmer) and her Prime Minister, Disraeli (Antony Sher), become alarmed by the growing intimacy between monarch and manservant, and by the damage that it is inflicting on the royal reputation. The director, John Madden, could have set this up as a minor tragedy, but he has the wit, especially in the first half, to play it cool and droll, and he is helped no end by finely gauged performances. Dench is stern but not wholly invulnerable; Connolly offers a portrait of devotion so fierce that it verges on the mad; and Sher is a riot—he has the air of a man who finds the whole affair vastly entertaining. And he’s right.

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Release details.

  • Duration: 104 mins

Cast and crew

  • Director: John Madden
  • Screenwriter: Jeremy Brock
  • Billy Connolly
  • Antony Sher
  • Geoffrey Palmer
  • Richard Pasco
  • David Westhead
  • Gerard Butler

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Mrs Brown

Where to watch

1997 Directed by John Madden

Loyalty without question. Friendship without equal.

When Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert dies, she finds solace in her trusted servant, Mr. John Brown. But their relationship also brings scandal and turmoil to the monarchy.

Judi Dench Billy Connolly Geoffrey Palmer Antony Sher Gerard Butler Richard Pasco David Westhead Georgie Glen Sara Stewart Finty Williams Oliver Ford Davies Delia Lindsay Bridget McConnell Claire Nicolson Hattie Ladbury Oliver Kent Alex Menzies Simon McKerrell Jimmy Chisholm Elaine Collins Jason Morell Cherith Mellor James Vaughan Brendan O'Hea Catherine O'Donnell Rupert Farley Rebecca Charles George Hall Robin Marchal Show All… Theo Fraser Steele

Director Director

John Madden

Assistant Director Asst. Director

Deborah Saban

Producer Producer

Sarah Curtis

Executive Producers Exec. Producers

Andrea Calderwood Douglas Rae Rebecca Eaton Nigel Warren-Green

Writer Writer

Jeremy Brock

Casting Casting

Michelle Guish

Editor Editor

Robin Sales

Cinematography Cinematography

Richard Greatrex

Camera Operator Camera Operator

Alastair Rae

Lighting Lighting

Tony Haslam

Production Design Production Design

Martin Childs

Art Direction Art Direction

Charlotte Dirickx

Special Effects Special Effects

Tony Harding

Title Design Title Design

Penny Madden

Composer Composer

Stephen Warbeck

Sound Sound

John Downer

Costume Design Costume Design

Deirdre Clancy

Makeup Makeup

Veronica McAleer Lisa Westcott

Hairstyling Hairstyling

Lisa Westcott Beverley Binda

Miramax BBC Scotland GBH

Ireland UK USA

Releases by Date

18 jul 1997, 05 sep 1997, 14 nov 1998, 08 jan 1999, releases by country, south korea.

  • Theatrical 12
  • Theatrical PG

105 mins   More at IMDb TMDb Report this page

Popular reviews

Josh Gillam

Review by Josh Gillam ★★

In mourning and shut away from the world, a recently widowed Queen Victoria (Judi Dench) forms a bond with Scottish servant John Brown (Billy Connolly) that causes consternation among those around her.

Mrs Brown is an oddly unengaging film, one I went into expecting to find interesting and yet never quite got drawn into; this doesn’t ever really get beyond its starchy period drama trappings, the characters never coming off the written page into vivid people in their own right. It’s is all about Queen Victoria’s period of mourning after the death of her beloved husband Prince Albert, but while meant to be sympathetic the character just came across incredibly selfish in a way that put me off fairly early…

Jackson

Review by Jackson ★★★★ 1

/The Victims of Helen Hunt’s Oscar Win Part II/

Dame Judi Dench in Mrs. Brown undeniably controls everything about this film. It’s a beautiful story of love persevering with two people who tangle each other for a relationship. The kind of love that’s fueled by human struggle, and not the kind of love story that would be forced romantically, it’s just two people finding each other. Judi Dench compiles a real love to this character. For such a recognizable face as Dench has she always has that ability to hide it behind such strong figures. And Mrs. Brown was her baby, she cradled this elegance of a written character and raised her with such power. The entire film is a rousing achievement for Dench who was an abundance of emotion as well as the surroundings of Dench.

🔙 Afterglow/In & Out 🔜The Wings of the Dove 

Ben Empey

Review by Ben Empey ★★★

Judi Dench is a cat now.

Adam Hursey

Review by Adam Hursey ★★★½ 1

Not part of Junesploitation, but rather my attempt to find a movie to watch with my wife. She famously (at least in my house) will only watch British films or films based on a true story, or, even better, the overlapping section of that Venn diagram.

Of course, we get about 30 minutes into it and she says she’s seen it before. But we finished it. It was fine. It annoyed me that Judi Dench was much older than the real Victoria was at the age portrayed here. Dench is great of course, but a good 15 years too old for the part. And I could never really get past it.

Johnny Pomatto

Review by Johnny Pomatto ★★★★ 2

When Judi Dench recently criticized the Netflix series "The Crown" and suggested that episode be prefaced with a disclaimer warning the audience that what they were about to watch wasn't entirely based on fact, my first thought was "Did MRS. BROWN or 'Shakespeare in Love' need such a disclaimer, or are audiences intelligent enough to understand the concept of dramatic license?" Like most biographical films, MRS. BROWN surely enhances some elements of the story to make it more cinematic or provide a satisfying dramatic arc, but hey, that's what movies do, Judi. I shouldn't throw shade because this film is far better than any episode of "The Crown" I ever watched. I know we're in a moment in time when…

Noel Penaflor

Review by Noel Penaflor ★★★½

The eagerly awaited sequel to Jackie Brown replaces Pam Grier with an old white woman and Robert Forster with Billy Connelly and they go back in time and wear old times costumes and Downton Abbey this bitch.

Apparently this was the film debut of Gerard Butler, paving the way for some of the worst movies of the then-new century.

Thanks John Madden.

Maddy

Review by Maddy ★★★½

Only Judi Dench can make me interested in the geriatric love story of people such as Queen Victoria

santasatan

Review by santasatan ★

If I had a nickel for every terrible period drama I've seen that starred Judi Dench as Queen Victoria about the Queen having an implied affair with a man while her son disapproves of it, I would have two nickels. Which isn't a lot but it's weird that it happened twice.

Richard

Review by Richard ★★★

Surprisingly coy. I wasn’t expecting anything too steamy, but there is barely a nudge or a wink to suggest the rumours might be true that the relationship between Queen Victoria and her servant John Brown was anything other than platonic, which I would have thought is the main reason for telling this story—a little ambiguity would have gone a long way. Judi Dench is obviously great as the grief-wracked, depressed Queen, but she, like Billy Connolly, is 20 years too old for the role, which really changes the dynamic. This is the frumpy, sexless matriarch of the popular imagination, not a woman who had the last of her nine children barely six years before the film starts.

Few stand-up comics…

Varghese

Review by Varghese ★★★★

If anyone deserved to win The Best Actress Oscar it should have been Dame Judi Dench! It's a performance in one can easily sense the anger and repressed sexual urges eager to burst out. Billy Connolly is equally brilliant as the loyal servant.This film needs more recognition than Shakespeare in Love!

Luke Thorne

Review by Luke Thorne ★★★★

John Madden’s Oscar-nominated dramatisation of the unusual love story between Queen Victoria and Highlander John Brown. Starring Judi Dench, Billy Connolly, Geoffrey Palmer and Gerard Butler.

After the demise of her adored husband, Prince Albert, Queen Victoria (Judi Dench) extracts from community life, so the court employs a previous retainer of the prince, John Brown (Billy Connolly), to support her improve from her sorrow.

John’s unconventional ways and contempt for etiquette draw the queen out of her crust, and the impetuous Scot becomes her only friend. However, their mounting friendship causes controversy, as disgraceful reports start socialising about the meticulous nature of their connection.

Judi Dench gives a terrific performance in her role as Queen Victoria, the woman initially finding…

ZitaShort

Review by ZitaShort ★★ 4

This film begins with the assumption that we all think the Queen of England should be able to treat the people around her like trash simply because she was born into the right family and we should respect her even though she is not fulfilling the responsibilities of her job. She is a mean, silly old lady in this film and yet this film exists to put her up on a pedestal and never turns into the biting satire about the stupidity of the British class system that I wanted it to be. It features a lazy Judi Dench performance which asks her to do little more than delivers lines in that imperious voice of hers and she is not…

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Mrs. Brown

  • When Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert dies, she finds solace in her trusted servant, Mr. John Brown, but their relationship also brings scandal and turmoil.
  • Queen Victoria (Dame Judi Dench) is deeply depressed after the death of her husband, disappearing from public. Her servant Mr. John Brown (Sir Billy Connolly), who adores her, through caress and admiration brings her back to life, but that relationship creates scandalous situation and is likely to lead to monarchy crisis.
  • While on an extended stay at Balmoral Castle and still in mourning over the death of her beloved Prince Albert, Queen Victoria (Dame Judi Dench) meets Mr. John Brown (Sir Billy Connolly), a member of her household staff who thinks the time has come for her to start living a normal life. He soon gains the Queen's favor and friendship, and his authority and status in the household are soon on the rise. This creates concerns amongst the Queen's many advisers who see their own influence diminishing and the Queen's reputation being tarnished. As a result, they move to ensure Mr. Brown's future influence in the household is kept in check. — garykmcd

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Mrs. Brown (1997)

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Brief Synopsis

Cast & crew, john madden, gerard butler, billy connolly, geoffrey palmer, antony sher, photos & videos, technical specs.

Set in 1864, the Court and Government are in turmoil. Queen Victoria remains stricken with grief over Prince Albert's death and refuses to carry out any public duties. Her popularity with the British people is waning and there are calls to abolish the Monarchy. As a last resort Sir Henry Ponsonby, the Queen's Private Secretary, summons John Brown, her loyal Scottish Attendant, down from Balmoral to walk the Queen's pony. Brown's arrival at Court is the beginning of extraordinary relationship. Rumours of an affair begin to scandalize polite society and a crisis in the Monarchy seems inevitable.

movie review mrs brown

Oliver Ford Davies

Simon mckerrell, delia lindsay, sara stewart, rebecca charles, richard pasco, catherine o'donnell, rupert farley, hattie ladburty, george hall, cherith mellor, elaine collins, jason morell, patrick hannaway, theo steele, john ramsay, brendan o'hea, jimmy chisholm, bridget mcconnel, claire nicolson, david westhead, alex menzies, robin marchal, james vaughn, georgie glen, oliver kent, finty williams, kim armitage, stephen barker, frances bennett, hilary benson, robert bernstein, beverly binda, david bourke, paul bradburn, andy bradford, veronica brebner, jeremy brock, robert brown, simon brown, roland caine, andrea calderwood, francesca castellano, martin childs, deirdre clancy, alistair crocker, sarah curtis, paul decsarnatony, helen dolan, john downer, gill ducker, mick duffield, rebecca eaton, mitchell edwards, owen dudley edwards, pat garrett, richard greatrex, lynne greenshields, michelle guish, tony harding, tony haslam, paul hedges, kenny hutchinson, ian jackson, debbie kaye, vincent keane, margaret knights, olivia lloyd, phil lonergan, tony lucken, suzanne lynch, penny madden, alexandra mcintosh, sarah morton, alistair rae, douglas rae, lorraine richards, seon rogers, george rosie, deborah saban, jonathan sales, robin sales, paul sarony, rupert scrivener, deborah smith, shellie smith, richard stanley, jamie summers, david christopher taylor, mark tillie, claire tovey, stephen warbeck, nigel warren-green, stuart watson, charlotte watts, lisa westcott, david williams, susanna wyatt.

movie review mrs brown

Award Nominations

Best actress, best makeup.

Mrs. Brown

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 1997 award for Best Actress (Judi Dench) from the Chicago Film Critics Association.

Winner of the biennial British Academy of Film and Television Arts' 1996-1997 BAFTA Scotland Awards for best actress (Judi Dench).

Released in United States Summer July 18, 1997

Limited Release in United States July 25, 1997

Expanded Release in United States August 8, 1997

Released in United States on Video April 21, 1998

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States August 1997

Released in United States 1998

Shown at Filmfest Hamburg (Britain Swings) September 25 - October 2, 1997.

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Closing Night) May 15 - June 8, 1997.

Shown at Wellington Film Festival in New Zealand July 16 - August 2, 1997.

Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival August 10-24, 1997.

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 26 - March 6, 1998.

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at Filmfest Hamburg (Britain Swings) September 25 - October 2, 1997.)

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (Closing Night) May 15 - June 8, 1997.)

Released in United States August 1997 (Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival August 10-24, 1997.)

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 26 - March 6, 1998.)

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at Wellington Film Festival in New Zealand July 16 - August 2, 1997.)

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"Service Above Self"

movie review mrs brown

What You Need To Know:

(B, L,V, A) Biblical worldview of a royal servant who valued service above self; 3 obscenities & 2 profanities; man pummeled by assailants; and, alcohol use

More Detail:

In 1838, at the age of 19, Victoria was crowned Queen of England, beginning a reign of 63 years, the longest of any British monarch. Less than two years later, she would marry her cousin Prince Albert, a union that would prove to be far more harmonious than the typical royal marriage. Because most of their nine children married into other royal houses of Europe, nearly all crowned heads of Europe in the 20th century were their descendants.

Alas, in 1861, Albert died of typhoid fever, and the Queen was devastated. Her inconsolable grief drove her to spend years of seclusion on the Isle of Wight, and on Balmoral Castle in Scotland. Those in her service were literally held hostage to her grief. A contemporary adage said: “If the Queen ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.” Meanwhile, in London, Parliament began to debate whether the monarchy should be dissolved.

Enter John Brown, a plain-spoken, Scot servant, who had been a favorite of Albert’s, who is now summoned in a desperate effort by the Queen’s family to penetrate her depression. Brown sizes up the situation quickly, and to the horror of Victoria’s entourage of sycophants, bluntly insists that she get some fresh air. Both Queen and Brown prove to be equally hard-headed, and, after repeatedly crossing verbal swords, Brown persuades her to ride horseback, with him serving as guard and guide.

This fascinating clash of personalities and the deep friendship which subsequently develops is the substance of MRS. BROWN, a first-rate production from the makers of MASTERPIECE THEATRE. This is indeed a masterpiece. The title, MRS. BROWN, is a reference to the contemporary slur which began to circulate among those who began to resent the growing influence of the Scotsman on his Queen. For Brown was as willing to confront other members of the Queen’s family and her servants when he thought they were not acting in her best interest, as he was to confront the Queen herself. His was not a genteel manner, and his almost fanatical insistence on tighter security for his monarch (which he personally oversaw) won him few friends among the royal household. However, neither their objections, nor rumors that the relationship between sovereign and servant was becoming physically intimate would quench the Queen’s favor.

With Oscar-caliber performances by Judi Dench as Victoria and Billy Connolly as Brown MRS. BROWN scrupulously avoids adding a sleaze to this story. In fact, while Brown’s weakness for alcohol is honestly portrayed, this film highlights a virtue which is rarely seen in contemporary movies: a devotion to duty and service which transcends personal interest and rank. Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli (expertly played by Antony Sher) queries Brown carefully at one point and cannot believe that he does not bring personal ambition to his role as the Queen’s confidant. Even a marked reversal of status cannot diminish Brown’s faithfulness. At one point, he is allowed to take charge of the Queen’s servants, and he does so with such abandon that people thought his new responsibilities were going to his head. Years later after Victoria makes a resounding re-entry into public life, he is reduced to serving primarily as a royal guard dog. Yet his fidelity, even in this far less exalted role, is shown to be unflinching.

Unfortunately, in the thick of a summer of cinema bursting with the customary lineup of action adventure thrillers with space aliens, muscular super-heroes, crashes, and gunfire, MRS. BROWN is likely to be lost in the shuffle, relegated to specialty theaters in major cities. Those who cannot find this outstanding drama at their local multiplex should look for the video later this year. With uncommon intelligence, and value, MRS. BROWN richly requites the cost of a movie admission ticket. This is a fascinating history lesson for mature teenagers and adults, and a moving portrait of a man who truly honored service above self .

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Mrs. Brown You've Got a Lovely Daughter

1968, Musical/Comedy, 1h 50m

Where to watch Mrs. Brown You've Got a Lovely Daughter

Rent Mrs. Brown You've Got a Lovely Daughter on Apple TV, Prime Video, or buy it on Apple TV, Prime Video.

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Mrs. brown you've got a lovely daughter   photos.

Herman (Peter Noone) lives in Manchester, England, with a greyhound named Mrs. Brown. He's sure the dog is a surefire money-winner, and so the Hermits, his band, pack up and head for swinging London, with designs on making their fortune at a big greyhound race. Along the way, they meet hobos, millionaires and fashion models. They also end up in a punch-up and find work playing shows. But music is just something on the side, because Mrs. Brown is their ticket to the easy life.

Genre: Musical, Comedy

Original Language: English

Director: Saul Swimmer

Release Date (Streaming): Jan 5, 2017

Runtime: 1h 50m

Production Co: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Cast & Crew

Peter Noone

Keith Hopwood

Derek Leckenby

Barry Whitwam

Stanley Holloway

Lance Percival

Marjorie Rhodes

Mona Washbourne

Sheila White

Sarah Caldwell

Saul Swimmer

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32 facts about the movie mrs. brown.

Dorine Paul

Written by Dorine Paul

Modified & Updated: 05 Mar 2024

Sherman Smith

Reviewed by Sherman Smith

32-facts-about-the-movie-mrs-brown

Welcome movie buffs! If you’re a fan of historical dramas and captivating performances, then sit back and get ready to dive into the fascinating world of the movie “Mrs. Brown”. Released in 1997, this critically acclaimed film takes us back to the 19th century and tells the intriguing story of Queen Victoria’s close friendship with her Scottish servant, John Brown.

In this article, we’ll take a deep dive into 32 fascinating facts about the movie “Mrs. Brown”, from its stellar cast and director to the historical accuracy and memorable scenes. Whether you’ve seen the film and want to discover some behind-the-scenes tidbits or you’re curious to learn more before giving it a watch, this article is your go-to guide for all things “Mrs. Brown”. So grab your popcorn, settle in, and let’s explore the fascinating world of this remarkable movie !

Key Takeaways:

  • “Mrs. Brown” is a captivating historical drama that explores Queen Victoria’s grief, the power of love, and the resilience of friendship, all set against the backdrop of the Victorian era.
  • The film beautifully portrays the complexities of loyalty, the transformation of Queen Victoria, and the unlikely yet powerful friendship between a monarch and her servant, leaving a lasting emotional impact on viewers.

Mrs. Brown is a 1997 historical drama film

Released in 1997, Mrs. Brown is a captivating historical drama that delves into the life of Queen Victoria and her close relationship with her servant, John Brown.

The film is directed by John Madden

Renowned director John Madden brings this captivating story to life with his skilled storytelling and attention to detail.

Judi Dench portrays Queen Victoria

Judi Dench delivers a powerful and memorable performance as Queen Victoria, showcasing her versatility and talent as an actress.

Billy Connolly plays the role of John Brown

Billy Connolly captures the essence of John Brown, Queen Victoria’s trusted servant and confidante, with his superb acting skills.

The film is based on historical events

Mrs. Brown takes inspiration from the real-life relationship between Queen Victoria and John Brown , grounding the story in historical accuracy.

It explores the Queen’s grief and loneliness

The movie delves into Queen Victoria’s deep sense of loss after the death of her husband, Prince Albert, and how John Brown’s presence helps alleviate her grief and loneliness.

The film received critical acclaim

Mrs. Brown was highly praised by critics for its stellar performances, captivating story, and impeccable production design.

It won several awards

The film garnered numerous awards and nominations, including an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress (Judi Dench).

Mrs. Brown showcases the complexities of power

The movie explores the intricacies of power dynamics between Queen Victoria, a figurehead of the British Empire, and her loyal servant, John Brown.

It highlights the importance of friendship

Mrs. Brown emphasizes the significance of friendship and companionship, showcasing how a deep bond can develop even in unconventional circumstances.

The movie is set in the late 1800s

Transporting viewers to the late 19th century, Mrs. Brown immerses audiences in the Victorian era with its stunning costumes and period details.

It provides a glimpse into royal life

The film offers a fascinating glimpse into the private and public lives of the British monarchy during Queen Victoria’s reign.

Mrs. Brown explores themes of duty and responsibility

Examining Queen Victoria’s sense of duty towards her country and her struggle to balance personal desires with her responsibilities as a monarch.

It has a compelling soundtrack

The film features a beautiful and evocative musical score that enhances the emotional depth of the story.

Mrs. Brown showcases the power of love

The movie portrays the transformative power of love and how it can provide solace and healing in the midst of personal and political turmoil.

The film explores the boundaries of tradition

Mrs. Brown challenges societal norms and traditions by depicting the unconventional relationship between Queen Victoria and her servant.

It has breathtaking cinematography

The stunning cinematography captures the beauty of the Scottish Highlands, where Queen Victoria and John Brown often retreat to find solace.

Mrs. Brown delves into the complexities of grief

The movie tackles the complexities of grief, depicting Queen Victoria’s struggle to come to terms with the loss of her beloved husband.

It portrays historical figures in a human light

Mrs. Brown humanizes historical figures, showing their vulnerabilities, flaws, and the personal challenges they face.

The movie is a blend of drama and historical accuracy

Mrs. Brown strikes a perfect balance between compelling drama and historical accuracy, creating a captivating viewing experience.

It showcases the resilience of Queen Victoria

The film highlights Queen Victoria’s strength and resilience as she navigates the challenges of grief, power, and societal expectations.

Mrs. Brown immerses viewers in Victorian culture

The film meticulously recreates the atmosphere and cultural nuances of the Victorian era, providing a rich and immersive experience.

It depicts Queen Victoria’s contentious relationship with her family

Mrs. Brown delves into the strained relationship between Queen Victoria and her own family, highlighting the personal and political tensions.

The movie explores themes of identity and self-discovery

Mrs. Brown delves into the search for identity and self-discovery, as Queen Victoria finds solace and a sense of purpose in her relationship with John Brown.

It sheds light on the role of women in Victorian society

The film sheds light on the limitations and expectations placed on women during the Victorian era, contrasting with Queen Victoria’s position of power.

Mrs. Brown showcases the beauty of the Scottish landscape

The captivating Scottish landscape serves as a backdrop for the film, adding to its visual appeal and enhancing the storytelling.

It explores the sacrifices made for love

Mrs. Brown delves into the sacrifices both Queen Victoria and John Brown make for their deep and profound love for each other.

The movie portrays the complexities of loyalty

Mrs. Brown examines the complexities of loyalty, as both Queen Victoria and John Brown grapple with their personal and professional allegiances.

It is a tale of unconventional friendship

Mrs. Brown portrays the unlikely friendship between a monarch and her servant, showcasing the power of connection and understanding.

The film showcases the transformation of Queen Victoria

Mrs. Brown depicts Queen Victoria’s transformation from a grieving widow to a resolute leader, guided by her experiences and her relationship with John Brown.

It explores themes of social class and hierarchy

Mrs. Brown delves into the complex dynamics of social class and hierarchy, highlighting the tensions and challenges faced by individuals from different backgrounds.

The movie leaves a lasting emotional impact

Mrs. Brown is a film that resonates with viewers long after the credits roll, leaving a lasting emotional impact due to its powerful storytelling and stellar performances.

In conclusion, “Mrs. Brown” is a remarkable movie that offers a captivating glimpse into the life of Queen Victoria and her unconventional friendship with servant John Brown. The film beautifully portrays the complexities of their relationship and the impact Brown had on the widowed queen. With outstanding performances by Judi Dench and Billy Connolly, “Mrs. Brown” brings history to life and creates a poignant and memorable cinematic experience. From its impressive screenplay to its stunning cinematography, this film showcases the talent and brilliance of the cast and crew. Whether you are a history buff or simply enjoy compelling storytelling, “Mrs. Brown” is a must-watch film that will leave a lasting impression.

Q: Is “Mrs. Brown” based on a true story?

A: Yes, “Mrs. Brown” is based on the true story of Queen Victoria and her relationship with her beloved servant, John Brown.

Q: Who stars in “Mrs. Brown?”

A: The film stars Judi Dench as Queen Victoria and Billy Connolly as John Brown.

Q: When was “Mrs. Brown” released?

A: “Mrs. Brown” was released in 1997.

Q: Has “Mrs. Brown” won any awards?

A: Yes, the film received critical acclaim and was nominated for several awards, including two Academy Awards.

Q: What is the running time of “Mrs. Brown”?

A: The film has a running time of approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes.

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COMMENTS

  1. Mrs. Brown movie review & film summary (1997)

    The atmosphere in court is instantly tense and chilling. But the man, John Brown, has caught the queen's attention and cut through the miasma of two years' mourning for her beloved consort, Prince Albert. The little woman--a plump pudding dressed all in black--looks up sharply, and a certain light glints in her eyes.

  2. Her Majesty, Mrs. Brown

    After the death of her beloved husband, Prince Albert, Queen Victoria (Judi Dench) withdraws from public life, so the court appoints a former servant of the prince, John Brown (Billy Connolly), to ...

  3. Mrs. Brown Movie Review

    Parents need to know that Mrs. Brown is a poignant historical drama based on a true story that focuses on the value of friendship, issues over morality, and the role of the monarchy. Overall the movie has a gentle mood, although there are occasional brief moments of peril -- a character is attacked and left bruised and battered, and there is a foiled assassination attempt.

  4. Mrs Brown: a right royal romance

    Thu 1 Dec 2011 07.53 EST. 17. Mrs Brown (1997) Director: John Madden. Entertainment grade: B. History grade: B+. Queen Victoria was widowed in 1861. Four years after Prince Albert's death, she ...

  5. Mrs. Brown (1997)

    8/10. Top notch all the way. blanche-2 31 March 2009. Dame Judi Dench is "Mrs. Brown" - that is, Queen Victoria, and Billy Connolly is John Brown in this 1997 film, based on fact, of Queen Victoria's relationship with a Scottsman, John Brown, who becomes her servant. The excellent script is by Jeremy Brock and the director is John Maddon, who ...

  6. Mrs. Brown (1997)

    Mrs. Brown: Directed by John Madden. With Judi Dench, Billy Connolly, Geoffrey Palmer, Antony Sher. When Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert dies, she finds solace in her trusted servant, Mr. John Brown, but their relationship also brings scandal and turmoil.

  7. Mrs. Brown

    Mrs. Brown Centering on a lesser-known chapter in the lengthy reign of Queen Victoria, "Mrs. Brown" is a sensitive, richly detailed drama about the extraordinarily complex and intimate friendship ...

  8. Her Majesty, Mrs. Brown

    TOP CRITIC. Centering on a lesser-known chapter in the reign of Queen Victoria, this richly detailed drama about her intimate relationship with her servant that scandalized the country is ...

  9. BBC

    Mrs Brown (1997) Reviewed by William Mager. Updated 27 August 2003. "Mrs Brown" is a rather stately and mannered period drama that depends strongly on the interplay between its two charismatic ...

  10. Mrs. Brown Review

    Mrs. Brown Review. Queen Victoria (Dench) is deeply depressed after the death of her husband. Her servant Brown (Connolly) adores her, and through caress and admiration brings her back to life ...

  11. Mrs. Brown

    Mrs. Brown (United Kingdom, 1997) A movie review by James Berardinelli. Mrs. Brown is a love story much in the same vein as Carrington in that it deals with platonic affection that runs deeper and truer than that of the motion picture staple romantic variety. These days, it seems that whenever we see a male/female friendship on screen, it's ...

  12. Mrs Brown

    Mrs. Brown. You never find out whether the lovers in this 1997 movie really are lovers; like most of the people in the film, you have to keep guessing. The tale begins with Queen Victoria (Judi ...

  13. Mrs Brown 1997, directed by John Madden

    Madden's film owes its existence to the success of The Madness of King George, a period vehicle for a superb but cinematically under-appreciated actor. For Farmer George, substitute Widow Victoria ...

  14. Mrs Brown

    Mrs Brown (also released in cinemas as Her Majesty, Mrs Brown) is a 1997 British drama film starring Judi Dench, Billy Connolly, Geoffrey Palmer, Antony Sher, and Gerard Butler in his film debut. It was written by Jeremy Brock and directed by John Madden.The film was produced by the BBC and Ecosse Films with the intention of being shown on BBC One and on WGBH's Masterpiece Theatre.

  15. ‎Mrs Brown (1997) directed by John Madden • Reviews, film + cast

    Dame Judi Dench in Mrs. Brown undeniably controls everything about this film. It's a beautiful story of love persevering with two people who tangle each other for a relationship. ... Review by Ben Empey ★★★ Judi Dench is a cat now. Review by Adam Hursey ★★★½ 1. Not part of Junesploitation, but rather my attempt to find a movie to ...

  16. Her Majesty, Mrs. Brown

    1997. PG. Buena Vista Home Entertainment. 1 h 41 m. Summary Queen Victoria (Dench) was the world's most powerful woman. Rugged Scotsman John Brown (Connolly) was a lowly servant who looked after her horses. Yet when circumstances brought them together, the result was a passionate friendship that scandalized a nation. (Buena Vista Entertainment)

  17. Mrs. Brown (1997)

    Summaries. When Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert dies, she finds solace in her trusted servant, Mr. John Brown, but their relationship also brings scandal and turmoil. Queen Victoria (Dame Judi Dench) is deeply depressed after the death of her husband, disappearing from public. Her servant Mr. John Brown (Sir Billy Connolly), who adores ...

  18. Mrs. Brown (1997)

    Mrs. Brown (1997) -- (Movie Clip) The Queen Will Ride Out Bereaved Queen Victoria (Judi Dench) observes as secretary Ponsonby (Geoffrey Palmer) ... commanding stature and superb elocution to the multi-nuanced role of a strong but vulnerable woman," said the Variety review. "Though there are a number of outdoor scenes and production values are ...

  19. Mrs Brown

    Released 5 September 1997. I'm Her Majesty's Highland servant! Indoors and out. There's no stoppin' me now. A love affair which broke all the rules: the passionate relationship between Queen ...

  20. MRS. BROWN

    With Oscar-caliber performances, MRS. BROWN scrupulously avoids adding sleaze to this story. In fact, while Brown's weakness for alcohol is honestly portrayed, this film highlights a virtue rarely seen in contemporary movies: a devotion to duty and service which transcends personal interest. With uncommon intelligence, and value, MRS.

  21. Mrs Brown (1997)

    Visit the movie page for 'Mrs Brown' on Moviefone. Discover the movie's synopsis, cast details and release date. Watch trailers, exclusive interviews, and movie review. Your guide to this ...

  22. Mrs. Brown You've Got a Lovely Daughter

    Movie Info. Herman (Peter Noone) lives in Manchester, England, with a greyhound named Mrs. Brown. He's sure the dog is a surefire money-winner, and so the Hermits, his band, pack up and head for ...

  23. 32 Facts about the movie Mrs. Brown

    Key Takeaways: "Mrs. Brown" is a captivating historical drama that explores Queen Victoria's grief, the power of love, and the resilience of friendship, all set against the backdrop of the Victorian era. The film beautifully portrays the complexities of loyalty, the transformation of Queen Victoria, and the unlikely yet powerful ...