About the Journal

Focus and scope.

Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR) is an international peer-reviewed and open access journal, which is devoted to the rapid publication of high-quality original articles, reviews, case reports, short communication and letters on all aspects of experimental and clinical oncology. The covered topics include, but are not limited to: cellular research and bio-markers, identification of bio-targets and agents with novel mechanisms of action, preventative and integrated treatments for cancer patients, radiation and surgery, palliative care, patient adherence, quality of life, satisfaction, and anticancer medicine.

Peer Review Process

All the manuscripts submitted to the Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR)  will need to go through the following procedure:

  • The manuscripts will be pre-screened by the in-house editors to ensure adherence to the journal policies.
  • If a manuscript is deemed suitable for publication in the journal, the Editorial Office will proceed to arrange the manuscript for peer review. The reviewers will be selected from the Editorial Board or other external scholars or researchers. A double-blind peer review procedure is applied to all manuscripts of relevant article types.
  • A review report including the Editorial Decision (Accept, Minor Revision, Major Revision or Reject) made on the advice of the Editor-in-Chief will be prepared and sent to the authors following the peer review process.
  • The author is required to address the comments and inquiries in the review report if the Editorial Decision is Minor Revision or Major Revision. In general, the authors should revise and resubmit the paper within 7 days and 14 days upon receipt of the review report if the Editorial Decision is Minor Revision and Major Revision, respectively.
  • Same procedure is applied to the revised paper.

Authors may appeal for a rejected submission. All appeal requests must be made in writing to [email protected] with detailed reasons for the appeal, and point by point responses to the review comments. Decisions on the appeals are final.

The peer-review process is completed once the paper is accepted for publication. The paper will then be arranged for article production which encompasses copy-editing, typesetting and proofreading prior to online publication.

Note: The authors may suggest up to four reviewers from the academic background. The field of the subject matter as described in the submission should match with the research field of the suggested reviewers. The list of the suggested reviewers and their details such as full name, affiliation, email address, etc. should be included in the cover letter which should be submitted during the manuscript submission stage. However, whether or not the suggested reviewers should be recruited to review the manuscript is at the editorial office’s discretion, and the editorial office has the authority to select new reviewers.

Open Access Policy

Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR) provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

Publishing Ethics

Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR) requests all members involved in the journal publishing process to adhere to the Core Practices on publication ethics as stipulated by  Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE)  in compliance with the information and guidelines on handling publishing ethics allegations as described in the  Publishing Ethics Resource Kit (PERK) .

The journal editors take all possible misconduct seriously. The Editors, authors or readers can forward their concerns to the journal if they find out that the description in a submitted article may constitute an academic fraud, research misconduct or publication malpractice. The concerns or complaints on the possible allegations submitted to the journal will be dealt with promptly and appropriately according to the procedure set out in the COPE flowchart on complaints and in PERK. The complainant may direct all inquiries and correspondence to the Publisher at [email protected].

Editorial Policies

Authors should read the  Author Guidelines  before making a submission, and make sure that the manuscripts were written in accordance to the style and specifications of the journal’s policy.

All manuscripts submitted to Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR)  are subject to rigorous peer review. Prior to peer review process, the manuscripts will be screened for acceptable English language, novelty and relevance to the Focus and Scope of the journal.

Any manuscripts submitted to Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR)  will be treated as confidential materials. The manuscripts will not be disclosed to anyone except individuals such as editorial staff, reviewers and editors who participate in the initial screening, peer review, processing and preparation of the manuscript for publication (if accepted).

Acknowledgments

The Acknowledgments section in a paper serves to indicate the individuals, agencies and/or institutions whose contributions merit acknowledgment, rather than authorship. The roles that merit acknowledgment include the acquisition of funding, general supervision of a research group or general administrative support, writing assistance such as technical editing and language editing, as well as proofreading.

The authors should also acknowledge technical assistance involved in the experiments and field trips, as well as assistance in non-technical form such as intellectual discussions.

The authors are also required to declare what financial support they obtained to perform their research. Thus, the authors should acknowledge the funders and mention the roles of the funders in the research as well as the research grant information, e.g. the grant number, in this section. 

Conflict of Interest

The authors are required to provide the authorization of no conflict with any financial body or funding agency that might influence the results or interpretation of their manuscripts. All authors, members, reviewers and editors must disclose any association that poses a conflict of interest in connection with the manuscript.

A manuscript would not be accepted if it has been published or is currently under consideration for publication in any other journals. The authors are required to notify the editorial team if the findings and data in their submissions have been presented in conferences.

Author Proofreading

The Editorial Office will send a galley proof to the authors for proofreading at least one week after a manuscript has been accepted. The authors are responsible to read and check the entire proof, and inform the Editorial Office if some mistakes need to be corrected. In general, only minor mistakes will appear in the galley proof, such as typographical errors, layout issue, etc. Significant changes that can affect the scientific integrity and interpretation of findings in the accepted manuscript can be made during the proofreading stage.

Corrections and Additions to Published Papers

The authors are not allowed to make corrections, including addition and deletion of contents in papers after they have already been published.

A corrigendum or an addendum is published at the sole discretion of the editors.

Advertising Policy

All advertisements are subject to approval by the Bio-Byword Scientific Publishing. The advertisements must comply with the relevant regulations in the country where the advertisements appear. Contact the Editorial Office ([email protected]) for more information.

Data Processing Policy

The authors are required to clearly state in the figure legend and in the Methodology section or its equivalent, if alterations (e.g. brightness, contrast, color balance) have been applied to the images.

The Editorial Office reserves the right to request the original data, e.g. raw data and images, from the authors if inappropriate manipulation of data is suspected after paper publication. The suspected paper will be retracted in accordance with the standard guidelines if the claim of data manipulation is proven to be true.

Article Processing Charge

The authors are required to pay the Article Processing Charge (APC) for publishing with Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR) to cover the cost incurred in processing the manuscripts in order to ensure the contents are freely available and to maintain publishing quality. The manuscript processing includes peer review, copy-editing, typesetting, publishing, content depositing and archiving processes. An invoice of APC will be issued after a paper has been accepted, where authors are advised to pay the APC within one week to avoid delay in publication.

The APC for processing each article is AUD 600. 

Copyright and License

The authors shall retain the copyright of their work but allow the Publisher to publish, copy, distribute, and convey the work.

License  

Proceedings of Anticancer Research publishes accepted manuscripts under  Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0) . Authors who submit their papers for publication in  CAS Medicine  agree to have the CC BY 4.0 license applied to their work, and that anyone is allowed to reuse the article or part thereof free of charge for any purpose, including commercial use. As long as the author and original source is properly cited, anyone may copy, redistribute, reuse and transform the content. 

Reuse of article content

Anyone is free to reuse  Proceedings of Anticancer Research article content licensed under CC BY 4.0 provided that proper attribution is given through citation of the original source.

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Publication Fees and Reprints

To defray publication costs and to support other AACR programs, the corresponding author of an accepted manuscript will be invoiced based on the journal’s publication fees as detailed herein. Authors are required to confirm at the time of submission that they agree to pay the article publication fees in the event that their manuscript is accepted for publication. Please note that, with the exception of articles published under an open access license in the AACR hybrid journals, only manuscripts from 25+ countries are subject to the full price. All other manuscripts will receive a country-specific discount based on the location of the primary affiliation of the corresponding author; see Publication Fee Discounts below for details of this and other discounts.

Standard AACR Publication Fees

For articles published under a copyright transfer agreement, the AACR journals charge a fixed base publication fee determined by the journal, as well as a standard handling fee for each display item (figure or table) as detailed in the table below.

Open Access Fees

Authors who wish to publish under an open access license may do so by paying a single flat article processing charge (APC) as noted in the table below. The amount of the APC is determined based on the journal and the type of open access license. The Creative Commons license options for open access publication are as follows:

  • CC BY-NC-ND—This license permits free access and redistribution and noncommercial use with proper attribution.
  • CC BY—This license permits free access, redistribution, commercial use, and derivative works with proper attribution.
  • Cancer Discovery
  • Publication Fees (Copyright Transfer only)
  • Base Publication Fee * : $5000 #
  • Display Item Fee * : $250 per item
  • APCs (Open Access only)
  • CC BY-NC-ND: $10000
  • CC BY: $11000
  • Blood Cancer Discovery
  • Base Publication Fee * : $2500 #, **
  • CC BY-NC-ND: $7000
  • CC BY: $8000
  • Cancer Research
  • Base Publication Fee * : $2700 #
  • Clinical Cancer Research
  • Cancer Immunology Research
  • Molecular Cancer Research
  • Base Publication Fee * : $1900
  • CC BY-NC-ND: $6000
  • CC BY: $7000
  • Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
  • Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
  • Base Publication Fee * : $600 #
  • CC BY-NC-ND: $4000
  • CC BY: $5000
  • Cancer Prevention Research
  • Cancer Research Communications
  • Base Publication Fee * : NA
  • Display Item Fee * :NA
  • CC BY-NC-ND: NA
  • CC BY: $2550 **,***

Certain invited article types solicited directly by an editor will be published under standard copyright transfer and the associated publication fees waived. If an invited author requests open access publication, the APC will not be waived. APCs may be discounted for commentary-style content at the AACR’s discretion.

Publication Fee Discounts

The AACR provides authors with a variety of discounts to the standard publication fees, which allows them to reduce, and in some cases eliminate, the cost of publication. Most discounts are automatically applied on behalf of the author. Descriptions of these discounts, and who qualifies for them, are described below.

AACR Membership Discount

If the corresponding, first, or last author is in the Active AACR membership Category , a 10% discount on the total charges, excluding any open access fee, is applied. In order to obtain the discount, the corresponding author should ensure that the full membership information for the relevant member is entered into the manuscript submission system, SmartSubmit.

If the manuscript has a qualifying AACR member author who is in the Population Sciences , Cancer Immunology , or Cancer Prevention AACR Working Group, and the manuscript does not qualify for the AACR Editor Discount below, an additional 5% discount will be applied to manuscripts accepted at Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention , Cancer Immunology Research , or Cancer Prevention Research respectively. To obtain the increased discount, the author must supply the journal with the appropriate discount code. The necessary code may be found on the working group webpages.

AACR Editor Discount

A manuscript with a qualifying Editor from an AACR journal listed as an author will receive a discount of 25% on the total charges, excluding any open access fee. Such manuscripts are also eligible for the AACR member discount detailed above.

AACR Grantee Discount

A manuscript describing work supported by an AACR grant will receive a discount of 25% on the total charges, excluding any open access fee. Such manuscripts are also eligible for the AACR member discount detailed above.

Country-Specific Discounts

The AACR understands that researchers in many countries have considerably fewer resources than others to support the payment of publication costs. To address these financial realities, the AACR journals provide three levels of pricing discount (25%, 50% or 100%) based on the location of the primary affiliation of the corresponding author listed in the author byline of the accepted manuscript. These country-specific discounts will not be provided to support publication of manuscripts describing work principally conducted for a commercial organization. This discount is applied to the total charges, excluding any open access fee; but it is applied to the APC at Cancer Research Communications as described below. An author receiving this discount may also benefit from the AACR membership discount detailed above. The lists below delineate the countries for which country-specific discounts are or are not provided. If a country is not listed, it may be assumed to fall in the 100% discount category. Country classification is based on R&D funding per capita and cancer funding measured by total active grant-based funding and average grant size. Classifications are subject to change early each year.

Full Price Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong SAR (China), Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States

25% Discount Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Hungary, Lithuania, Macao SAR (China), Malta, Slovakia

50% Discount Andorra, Bahrain, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Gibraltar, Greenland, Isle of Man, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Monaco, Puerto Rico, San Marino, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Thailand

100% Discount Afghanistan, Aland Islands, Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Angola, Anguilla, Antarctica, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bouvet Island, Brazil, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Colombia, Comoros, Congo (Brazzaville), Congo (Kinshasa), Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Falkland Islands (Malvinas), Faroe Islands, Fiji, French Guiana, French Polynesia, French Southern Territories, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Guatemala, Guernsey, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Heard and Mcdonald Islands, Holy See (Vatican City State), Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jamaica, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Korea (North), Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao PDR, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands Antilles, New Caledonia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue , Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestinian Territory, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Pitcairn, Réunion, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Saint Vincent and Grenadines, Saint-Barthélemy, Saint-Martin (French part), Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic (Syria), Tajikistan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, Uruguay, US Minor Outlying Islands, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic), Viet Nam, Virgin Islands (US), Wallis and Futuna Islands, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Under exceptional circumstances, authors who would not qualify for a country-specific discount, or who would qualify for the lower 25% or 50% discount, may apply to the Publisher at the time of submission for an additional discount on the standard publication fees. All such applications must be countersigned by an appropriate institutional official stating that insufficient funds are available for the payment of the publication fees.

Manuscript Turnaround Guarantee Discount

The AACR journals work very hard to provide fast and fair decisions after peer review. In the unlikely event that their peer review does not meet a minimum standard of timeliness, authors may take advantage of our Manuscript Turnaround Guarantee and receive a full refund of the total charges, excluding any open access fee.

Cancer Research Communications Fees

Cancer Research Communications is an online-only, exclusively open access journal. As such, unlike the other AACR journals noted above it has a flat article publication charge (APC). During the current launch phase, Cancer Research Communications has a special introductory APC of $2,550.

If the corresponding, first, or last author is in the Active AACR membership category , the APC is $2,200. To obtain the discount, the corresponding author must ensure that the full membership information for the relevant member is entered into the manuscript submission system, SmartSubmit.

If the manuscript has a qualifying Editor from an AACR journal listed as an author, the APC is $1,500.

Cancer Research Communications manuscripts are eligible for the country-specific discounts described above. No other discounts are available.

Any article processing charges (publication, display item, and open access fees) are being processed through RightsLink ® , an online billing platform tailored for the AACR by the Copyright Clearance Center. If a manuscript is accepted and there are article processing charges associated with the manuscript, RightsLink ® provides authors with a simple way to manage and pay charges online via an email prompt shortly after acceptance.

Authors have the opportunity to order up to 100 reprints of their articles when they receive their article proofs for approval prior to publication. A link will be provided to the Sheridan Electronic Order Center where reprint fees are detailed and payment can be made. Authors who have questions about fees should contact the AACR Publications Department at [email protected] .

Anyone who would like to purchase bulk reprints of an article but who is not a listed author can find information about this at Third Party Permission and Reprints .

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  • v.117; 2022

Article-processing charges as a barrier for science in low-to-medium income regions

Marcio l rodrigues.

1 Fundação Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Instituto Carlos Chagas, Curitiba, PR, Brasil

2 Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil

Wilson Savino

3 Fundação Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Laboratório de Pesquisas sobre o Timo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil

4 Fundação Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz/Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Neuroimunomodulação, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil

5 Fundação Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rede FAPERJ de Pesquisa em Neuroinflamação, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil

Samuel Goldenberg

MLR, WS and SG conceived the manuscript’s rationale, debated the related literature, and wrote the manuscript. The authors declare no conflict of interest.

It is widely accepted that science is universal by nature. However, to make science universal, access to research findings is imperative. The open access model of publication of academic articles was established and consolidated during the last two decades. However, most of the open access journals apply article-processing charges (APCs), which can cost more than USD 10,000.00. In regions where support for research is scarce, these funds are usually not available. Similar problems occur in countries with weak economies and, consequently, unfavorable currency conversion rates. This situation reveals a barrier to the alleged universality of science and the access to research findings. In this manuscript, the barriers faced by authors and institutions from low-to-middle income regions to cover APCs and make their science freely available are discussed and illustrated with recent numbers.

Article processing charges (APCs) correspond to a fee paid by the authors of academic articles, their research funders, or institutions during the publication process. 1 APCs are directly connected to the private open-access model of publication, where an article that is considered suitable for publication is made available online and free to read for anyone with an internet connection. Usually, the article is made available under a Creative Commons CC-BY license, a tool that allows for anyone to reuse, share, or build upon the work. 2 APCs are used by private open access journals to pass up the subscription costs that libraries and readers habitually had paid to have access to academic articles. Therefore, APCs allowed the transfer of journal production costs (article production, editorial management, peer review systems, dissemination of papers on online platforms or journal websites) from readers to authors. 1 Charging APCs allows publishers of different nature (academic, corporate, non-profit, and scientific societies, among others) to meet their income needs and publishing costs. This model differs from the traditional system of page charges, which were (and are still) used to cover administrative costs in addition to the cost of print publication. However, page charges do not make the articles freely available as they are in the open access/APCs model. 1

Publish or perish - and pay

The process of publication 3 and its connection with APCs can be simplified as follows. Authors of scholarly studies first fight to obtain research funding from public and/or private sources to develop their research, then they make their results available for voluntary editorial management and peer review by the scientific journals. When these results are considered scientifically sound and allegedly arise from procedures of high ethical standards, they can be published by the scientific journal where they were initially submitted. In the open-access model, the authors (or their institutions or funders) pay APCs to make these results accessible to any reader. The journals, on the other edge, normally conduct the whole editorial process of peer review based on highly qualified - but voluntary - work. 4 It is important noting that several if not most editorial companies that charge for APCs have a low manuscript editing cost in view of engaged staff, and printing costs. The reviewers, probably the most important players in this process of manuscript submission, receive no financial retribution for their work. This last point is, in fact, a paradox since despite their work as reviewers, scientists are in general fully charged when they decide to publish in that given journal.

Not all journals are open access and consequently do not charge APCs. Therefore, the reasons by which authors decide to pay APCs are multiple. 1 For instance, open access can increase the readership of the article, and increased access can lead to higher citation rates, a well-known index of success in the scientific career. 5 In addition, the more a given paper is read by different sectors, the more likely it will be useful for the benefit of the people. Furthermore, paying APCs is commonly a demand from funding agencies. Several funders in Europe in the US require open access publication as a condition to connect public funding to the dissemination of science. Overall, APCs represent a major paradox in the dissemination of science, since the authors, their institutions, or funders must pay to make their research freely available.

The discussion on the currently practiced open access models necessarily includes the so-called Plan S, a set of requirements drafted in 2018 by 11 national funding agencies across Europe collectively called cOAlition S. 6 The group’s aims were virtuous: their initiative was dedicated to making scientific research publicly available, ending the reign of paywalls, and promoting a transition to a fully open-access publishing model in science. Plan S mandates that newly published studies are made open access without a waiting period, and that funders must cover grantees’ APCs. 7

There are important concerns on the consequences of Plan S implementation. For instance, it was proposed that Plan S is simply promoting a move from a reader-pays to an author-pays system. 7 Other outcomes of the Plan S mandate are also a reason of concern. 8 As well portraited by Alejandra Manjarrez, APCs among journals with higher impact factors faced an explosion in the last decade. 7 At journals in the upper 50% of Scopus classification, APCs increased more than 80%. Journals’ APCs similarly ranked in the Journal Citation Reports increased more than 130%. 9 This information is compatible with the findings by Khoo, who demonstrated that ACPs paid by European institutions between 2005 and 2018 grew significantly higher than the 2005 fee indexed according to inflation in the United States and Europe. 10

How much does it cost to make science available?

In a recent essay, the problems faced by authors from low-to-medium income regions to publish open access articles were proficiently discussed. 11 It is clear for us, authors included in such a situation, that covering the costs for publishing open access is indeed a major barrier to making our science accessible. This is an issue faced by scientists from dozens of low-to-medium income countries. For instance, APCs are purportedly a major obstacle for the progress of African science. 12 Among several others, the Brazilian model of research funding efficiently illustrates - with numbers - how hard is to cover the costs of equipment and consumables and still pay for APCs. A discussion of this model and the difficulties faced by authors working under these conditions follows below. This rationale is mostly based on Brazil, but it reflects the difficulties of several other countries under similar conditions.

Under the currently practiced models, it is important to highlight that the fee structure of Plan S is unrealistic in countries like Brazil. As well discussed by Kowaltowski and Oliveira, APCs in Brazil are not supported by supplementary funds, but by subtraction from grant totals. 13 That means that the authors must opt between consumables and APCs, which is undeniably prejudicial for science. Plan S includes “to establishing fair and reasonable prices for publishing services, including equitable waiver policies, that reflect the publishing costs”, 6 but the regular practices of paying APCs reveals that completely variable criteria are used by different publishers to grant waivers for authors from low-to-middle income countries. In fact, plan S also states that upper-middle-income countries will be excluded from the waiver policies, 6 which likely consists of a rigid and outdated classification that will negatively impact authors from those countries. Remarkably, the problem of Brazilian scientists being denied in their requests for waivers and discounts efficiently illustrates this situation. 14 Therefore, authors from countries deemed “too rich” for fee waivers will have subscription journals as the only publishing option, as recently discussed. 15

The National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) is a public foundation linked to the Ministry of Science, Technology, and Innovation to support Brazilian research. CNPq launched in 2021 the “Universal” call, its most traditional program for funding research in all areas. 16 This call received 8,877 proposals and approximately 15% of them were supported. It was divided into proposals from senior and emerging groups. Proposals from senior groups were limited to a maximum of approximately USD 50,000 (today’s values used for the conversion from Brazilian Reais to US dollars) for 36 months. To ask for USD 50,000, the team had to necessarily include 9 researchers holding a Ph. degree. That gives total financial support of less than USD 6,000 per investigator in the team, or something close to USD 2,000 per scientist each year. Particularly in experimental sciences, this funding is very, very far below the minimum.

A median cost of APCs equal to USD 2,600 was recently estimated. 11 However, APCs can cost more than USD 10,000. 17 It is noteworthy mentioning that the funding models discussed herein for the Brazilian system and others are not supposed to cover only APCs, but everything else. In summary, it is virtually impossible to cover APCs under these conditions, although it means exclusion from publishing open access papers. The problem is not new. Six years ago, we raised this discussion when 1 USD corresponded to 3.5 Brazilian Reais. 18 After a huge financial crisis and controversial governmental decisions that are directly affecting Brazilian science, 19 today’s conversion rate indicates that 1 USD corresponds to more than 5 Brazilian Reais, but the prices remain the same in the northern hemisphere currencies (American Dollars, Euros, Swiss francs, British Pounds, etc). Of note, currency conversion is only part of the problem since the values of APCs have been constantly increasing in high-reputation journals over the years. 7 , 9 , 10 It was recently demonstrated that is economically viable for major publishers to waive APCs for authors from low-to-medium income regions; 20 now it is time for concrete actions.

Suggestions on how to mitigate the problem are hard to elaborate. Above all, publishing in journals associated to scientific societies has been consistently proposed as an important action, 13 since these publishers are usually non-profit and take science itself above publication costs. The authors, in fact, play an important role in this process. As stated in Plan S, and in accordance with the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), it is fundamental to value “the intrinsic merit of the work and not consider the publication channel, its impact factor (or other journal metrics), or the publisher”. 6 According to this principle, where to publish is less important than what to publish. To make this principle realistic, the authors are the most important players at the initial stage of the publication process: avoiding journals that charge inexplicably high APCs would be mandatory, independently on impact factors or similar metrics. However, funding agencies and the academy in general play fundamental roles in this process too, since they tend to give more appreciation to journal records than the findings described there. A major change in the evaluation process is required to stimulate authors to choose where to publish independently on the common sense imposed by the high impact journals. 21 Of note, evaluation committees (both for grants and hiring scientists) are composed by scientists, who are ultimately authors.

In conclusion

To be inclusive, the APC system must change, and this is urgent. If not, scientists from low-to-medium income regions will not have their science known by the scientific community and the people in general. This situation strikingly contrasts with the widely accepted concept that science is universal by nature, 22 and enhances the already existence of inequalities in science, negatively impacting the scientific-derived benefits for the people(s).

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

To the Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz editorial board for their openness to publish a non-biological topic that is essential for science. The authors also acknowledge the highly qualified reviews provided by the journal. MLR is on leave from a position of Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

Financial support: MLR, WS and SG received no specific funding for this work. They are recipients of scientific productivity fellowships from the CNPq, Brazil.

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anticancer research article processing charge

  • Published: 01 August 2003

Breast Cancer Research : the move to introduce article-processing charges

  • Cornelia Schnelle 1 ,
  • Emma Scott 2 &
  • Bruce AJ Ponder 3  

Breast Cancer Research volume  5 , Article number:  218 ( 2003 ) Cite this article

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When Breast Cancer Research was launched in 1999, we took the innovative decision to make all research articles open access. Open access means research published in Breast Cancer Research is universally and freely available via the Internet and the authors or copyright owners grant any third party the right to use, reproduce and disseminate the article. The benefits of open access for the research community are enormous but the consequence is that the journal does not receive any subscription income for its research content. To cover the running costs, Breast Cancer Research will be introducing article-processing charges for all research articles from August 2003.

Why open access?

Breast Cancer Research is part of BioMed Central, a publisher who has chosen the open-access model because it believes that the results of scientific research should be publicly available. Open access makes it easy for readers to find and make use of research literature in their field of interest, and it gives authors and their works increased visibility, readership, and impact [ 1 – 4 ].

We believe that the open-access model will be more sustainable than the traditional subscription model, under which journal prices have been rising faster than inflation and faster than library budgets for three decades [ 5 , 6 ]. Between 1970 and 1995, the average subscription price of a science, technology or medical journal increased by 471% [ 4 ]. Consequently, subscriptions by academic institutions as well as by individual academics have decreased sharply, which means that researchers have access only to a small percentage of all research in their field [ 7 ].

What do the article-processing charges pay for?

As an open-access journal, Breast Cancer Research does not differ from traditional journals in its commitment to peer review or its way of conducting it. We take seriously the journal's "gate-keeping function" [ 1 ] to control and certify research quality. Article-processing charges will cover the cost of our high-quality peer review, copy-editing and publication, and ensure permanent world-wide, barrier-free, open access to the full text of research articles published in Breast Cancer Research .

Why charge the authors?

The certification and dissemination of scientific work is an integral part of the scientific process. It is in the interest of scientific authors and their institutions that their research results be certified, seen, cited and used to inform further research. As they obtain the reward for the publication, it is becoming logical that they should be the ones to cover the costs for peer review and publication. This is already being acknowledged by funding agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health (USA), the National Health Service (UK), and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, who take into account the cost of publication when allocating their grants [ 8 ].

What does it cost?

Analyses show that the overall costs of providing open access to peer-reviewed research are far lower than the costs of traditional forms of dissemination. Estimates vary between US $300 and US $1800 per open-access article [ 7 , 9 ], compared to an average of US $4000 per article published in a traditional subscription journal [ 9 ].

Breast Cancer Research has decided to charge US $500 for each accepted research manuscript submitted after 31 July 2003, which we anticipate will cover our costs. Discounts of US $50 will be available if authors submit their manuscript formatted with EndNote 5/6 or Reference Manager 10 [ 8 ]. Special discounts will also be available for punctual referees, and waiver requests from authors from developing countries or low-funded institutions will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

An automatic waiver will be granted if the submitting author's institution is a BioMed Central member. More than 100 institutions have already chosen to join BioMed Central's Institutional Membership Program [ 10 ]. It enables institutions to support open access in scholarly publishing, and will help ensure the most widespread dissemination of the research published by their scientists.

Who else is using article-processing charges?

Breast Cancer Research is not the only journal introducing article-processing charges. Two new journals by the Public Library of Science [ 11 ] will also be funded this way and several existing journals are considering similar models [ 12 ]. Other journals are experimenting with mixed models. For example, several entomology journals give their authors the choice between paying a processing charge, thus ensuring open access to their articles, or not paying and thereby restricting access to subscribers [ 13 ].

Other forms of charging for processing articles may develop in time. Breast Cancer Research is following the example of a large number of journals also published by BioMed Central, a publisher with a 4 years' track record of open-access publishing who started introducing article-processing charges in January 2002, believing that open access to peer-reviewed research is the publishing model of the future.

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Publishing, perishing, peer review: could new kinds of electronic publishing rescue academia from its long-running "journals crisis"?. The Economist. 1998

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Cornelia Schnelle

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Editor-in-Chief, Breast Cancer Research, and Head of the Cancer Research UK Department of Oncology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK

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The Scholarly Kitchen

What’s Hot and Cooking In Scholarly Publishing

The American Chemical Society Offers a New Twist on the Article Processing Charge: An Interview with Sarah Tegen

  • Business Models
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On 21 September, the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) announced  a new twist on the article processing charge (APC) model of funding open-access publishing. Their new program involves what they call an article development charge (ADC), which is designed to “provide authors a new option to satisfy funder requirements for zero-embargo green open access.” Sarah Tegen, PhD, Chief Publishing Officer of ACS Publications, agreed to respond to a few questions about this new program.

American Chemical Society logo

ACS believes that “more than 90%” of the authors it publishes “have a simple and funded pathway to publish gold OA (OA) in ACS journals.” I’m curious about how you arrived at that statistic – was it via an author survey? Can you tell us more about how you gathered that data?  

ACS has invested significantly in technology and processes to determine an author’s institutional affiliation and funder identity. We cross match this information to our database of ACS-negotiated read and publish agreements and funder access requirements. Nearly three-quarters (73%) of authors who are subject to an OA mandate have a funded solution through an institutional read and publish agreement , and one-fifth (21%) through OA funding support.   

How exactly does payment of the ADC work? At what point in the process is the charge imposed?  

Funders who require researchers to immediately post the accepted manuscript usually recommend that standard language (often referred to as rights retention strategy or RRS) is included either in the manuscript or cover letter. If this documentation is included with the manuscript when it is submitted to an ACS journal, our team will reach out to the author and provide four clear paths to OA, with the zero-embargo green OA process as an option. Payment of the ADC will be requested once the submitted manuscript is sent for external peer review and will be due prior to the completion of the peer review.   

Will the author have the option of withdrawing at this point, if s/he doesn’t have funds to cover the ADC? Or does the author commit to the ADC payment before the manuscript is sent out for review?

We expect a very small number of authors to elect the ADC — in the range of about 200 per year out of 200,000 annual manuscript submissions.  If an author cannot pay the ADC, they can continue on their publishing journey, but they will need to wait to post their accepted manuscript for 12 months.

Is the ADC the same amount as the APC paid by funded authors? If not, how is the difference calculated?  

The ADC is a flat fee of $2,500 for our hybrid journals, and it covers the costs associated with the many publishing services provided from submission to final editorial decision. This includes organizing, maintaining, and investing in the high-quality scholarly peer review process and multiple other services provided by an expansive global network of editors and reviewers. These costs are significant, comprising more than 50% of the overall cost of publishing the final version of record. 

Unlike an article publishing charge (APC), the ADC does not cover expenses related to final production, digital distribution, discovery, and hosting of the version of record or maintaining post-publication updates. For those authors who later decide to publish fully OA, the amount of the ADC will be deducted from the cost of the gold APC. Authors will not pay more than the APC required for gold OA. ADC waivers or discounts will be automatically applied to papers from corresponding authors from all countries that currently receive special country pricing for APCs.  

Is ACS’s APC also a flat fee, or does it vary by journal? (And if the latter, what is the range of APC prices?)

The APC for our hybrid journals is $4,500, with discounts for ACS members and authors from countries that currently receive special country pricing.

To ask what is such an obvious question that it might be stupid: how does an unfunded author (who therefore presumably can’t afford an APC) benefit from being charged an ADC instead?  

Assisting authors to get published is our North Star, and we’re introducing this ADC option to help authors navigate shifting funder mandates. Funders, institutions, and publishers agree there is a real cost to scholarly publishing, and choosing an OA option is entirely voluntary. The ADC ensures the long-term integrity and quality of content published in ACS journals. We also provide cost-free pathways to publish for all authors.  

Through the read and publish agreements we have with thousands of institutions worldwide, we have shielded authors from the costs of meeting funder requirements for gold OA. These enable authors to post the final version of record to repositories immediately after publication. ACS Publications already allows those authors who cannot publish via the gold OA route to post the accepted manuscript to a repository 12 months after publication at no cost. Authors may also choose to publish through subscription access journals at no cost to them.

For authors not covered by a read and publish agreement or another pathway, our zero-embargo green OA pathway will provide an additional option to immediately share the accepted manuscript while offsetting the costs incurred to ensure the quality, value, and integrity of the research during the publishing process.

Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson

Rick Anderson is University Librarian at Brigham Young University. He has worked previously as a bibliographer for YBP, Inc., as Head Acquisitions Librarian for the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, as Director of Resource Acquisition at the University of Nevada, Reno, and as Associate Dean for Collections & Scholarly Communication at the University of Utah.

23 Thoughts on "The American Chemical Society Offers a New Twist on the Article Processing Charge: An Interview with Sarah Tegen"

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I am rather curious. How many additional costs have publishers had to incur as a result of the implementation of Open Access (OA)? Have OA costs to authors been passed on in the form of higher Article Processing Charge (APCs)? Or has the APC reached a point of resistance? I only ask because it seems to me, that publishers are scrambling to maintain margins. And, that the only way to sustain margins is to publish more articles and/or to add services no one knew they needed! Lastly, in eight paragraphs we have used OA and APC 40 times! Are we talking only to ourselves? By the way, if one googles APC the first entries all refer to Armored Personnel Carriers.

  • By Harvey M Kane
  • Oct 2, 2023, 9:41 AM

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The definition of APC is provided implicitly in the post title, and explicitly in the first paragraph.

As for failing to define “OA,” fair enough — but at this point, there’s a vanishingly small likelihood that any Scholarly Kitchen (TSK) reader doesn’t know what OA refers to.

  • By Rick Anderson
  • Oct 2, 2023, 11:04 AM

' src=

This is a cynical corporate twist to the already unequitable and unsustainable APC system, charging authors to publish green OA (!) without embargo. It basically uses the research funders’ requirements against the researchers and monetises these requirements (e.g. by Plan S). Access to publicly funded research results should be open and immediate by default and instead of imposing a flat fee APC/ADC, costs should be made transparent so that authors know exactly how much they’re paying for what.

  • By Daniela Hahn
  • Oct 2, 2023, 10:02 AM

' src=

Thank you for asking the last question! I find the response “choosing an OA option is entirely voluntary” to be noticeably at odds with one ACS’s main rationale for starting the ADC in the first place – that funders are requiring researchers to publish Open Access. To argue that Open Access is voluntary is a fallacy – funders and institutions around the world mandate OA in their policies. I suppose technically authors have a “choice” not to accept funding from organizations requiring OA…but surely we can see the fundamental flaw in logic here.

  • By B. Anderson
  • Oct 2, 2023, 3:09 PM

' src=

I still do not understand the difference between what an author gets with APDs vs APCs. With APDs I believe they can post their published article in their institutional repository. Can nonsubscribers read the article that way? How are APDs fulfilling Plan S to make the article OA to all? What are the four clear paths to OA? Are they 1) pay nothing and post after 1 year embargo, 2) pay $2,500 in APDs and post now, 3) pay $4,500 in APCs and ? What would motivate an author to pay APCs if they’ve paid APDs and the article has been posted? Please simplify the difference. Thanks.

  • By Jill Powell
  • Oct 2, 2023, 5:15 PM

' src=

One question not asked here is why the decision was made to charge the ADC before, rather than after acceptance.

At surface level, it perhaps seems a straightforward proposition – authors are asked to pay a price for pre-acceptance publishing services only, which they will receive regardless of whether their article is accepted or not. And if accepted, they will be provided with the product of those services only, which they can then share.

But I’m having a hard time squaring the circle for at least two reasons:

1) Articles for which an ADC is paid still incur post-acceptance costs, as they will still receive ‘final production, digital distribution, discovery, and hosting of the version of record or maintaining post-publication updates’. Is the expectation that these costs are covered by remaining subscription / per article sales income and thus represent the value-add of producing a publisher version – compared to the existence of an immediately shared AAM with a CC-BY license?

2) If the APC-price of $4500 is supposed to represent all costs incurred (+ surplus received!) of one published article, and the ADC is calculated to represent the 50% pre-acceptance costs of that $4500, it would make sense for the ADC, like the APC, to be paid after acceptance, as the costs for publication services for eventually non-accepted articles are included in that cost calculation already. If an ADC is asked of articles before peer review, I would expect it to be lower, depending on the acceptance rate of articles sent to peer review, as in that case the pre-publication costs (which remain the same) are recouped from a larger number of articles. As an example, in the current setup, with a hypothethical acceptance rate after peer review of 50%, ADC would generate $5000 per accepted article, more than the current APC.

It can probably be argued that these are calculations at scale that do not apply when only a very small proportion of submissions is expected to chose the ADC route. But in that case, that’s perhaps also a self-fulfilling prophecy – with the ADC model being more of a deterrent than an enticement for authors?

  • By Bianca Kramer
  • Oct 2, 2023, 5:35 PM

' src=

I appreciate your—and everyone’s—comments and questions. You’re absolutely right that the scale here is key. Introducing the article development charge is a way for ACS Publications to sustainably meet the requirements of this small number of authors who need to publish green OA without a read and publish agreement between their institution and ACS. The introduction of this additional option is more of an attempt to evolve than to grow.

The cost and value of our publishing services between manuscript submission and final acceptance are a significant slice of the pie that’s traditionally been covered by subscriptions. The investments required to continue to earn the trust of the scientific publishing community extend beyond what we illustrate as stages in the publishing process.

I encourage people with more questions to visit our webpage ( https://acsopenscience.org/researchers/zero-green-oa ) and to explore our various OA publishing options ( https://acsopenscience.org/researchers/zero-green-oa/oa-pathways/ ).

  • By Sarah Tegen
  • Oct 4, 2023, 1:51 PM

' src=

I am trying to wrap my mind around what sounds like an attempt to turn Green OA into a form of Gold. If I understand correctly the ADC is charged before an author(s) assign any rights to ACS. In effect, this is a submission fee charged to authors at institutions without an ACS read and publish deal. Requests from authors to pay this fee will most likely wind up with the library, placing pressure to negotiate a read and publish agreement. Not very friendly, but possibly effective. (I am also dubious that 73% of authors are covered by a RAP–at least domestically–as the ACS site only lists 19 such agreements in the US.) Finally, I wonder how the ADC will fly for authors at institutions with OA mandates/policies that reserve author’s rights to place a post-print in an institutional repository. I expect pushback from those saying you cannot charge them for something they retain the rights to do.

  • By Daniel Dollar
  • Oct 2, 2023, 9:31 PM

' src=

I think its 73% of authors who are currently subject to an OA mandate … not 73% of authors.

  • By Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe
  • Oct 2, 2023, 11:56 PM

Thanks, Lisa, for the clarification. I get what you are saying. There are a number of excellent questions and critiques in the comments. My hope is ACS will review them carefully. I still perceive this fee as part of a negotiating strategy by ACS, and a rights question that challenges Green OA.

Thanks, Rick for this post, and Sarah responding to the questions.

  • Oct 3, 2023, 8:27 AM

' src=

On the numbers quoted above (200 papers @ $2500) this will generate about $500K, which seems like a lot until you consider that ACS “Information Services” (which seems to be the euphemism for publishing) brought in $667 million in 2022, which basically powered their $65.2 million “change in net assets” (non-profit way of saying profit) that year.

So this will add .07% to their revenue, minus whatever it costs to administer it. It does feel like a deterrent rather than a solution to a real problem.

https://www.acs.org/about/aboutacs/financial.html

  • By David Groenewegen
  • Oct 3, 2023, 2:11 AM

' src=

Note that Information Services at ACS includes traditional scholarly journals publishing at ACS Publications and the significantly larger (in revenue) CAS group. Also note that ACS themselves defined this as an edge use case of authors with funder requirements not covered by TA’s.

  • By Brandon Nordin
  • Oct 8, 2023, 11:39 PM

' src=

I think the reason most of the commenters above seem puzzled is because they are assuming that the publisher is operating in good faith.

  • By Richard James
  • Oct 3, 2023, 9:51 AM

' src=

It seems to me like you’re assuming publishers are the big bad oil barons who are destroying the planet because they’ll all be dead before it all implodes…but that role is actually filled by academics who expect others to build and maintain infrastructure for free…

If you were to take the long view, allowing people to publicly post peer-reviewed articles for free will actually make the entire peer review and publishing system implode. If everything is free, why bother with a publisher at all? (OH WAIT, that’s what preprints are all about!) Which leads to publishers ceasing to exist…which leads to research losing all integrity standards.

  • By An Dickson
  • Oct 27, 2023, 12:53 PM

I have been involved in STEM publishing for some 30 years and ACS is a most honorable organization.

  • Oct 3, 2023, 4:19 PM

' src=

But “The APC for our hybrid journals is $4,500” seems hugely excessive. There seems to have been slippage into the $4ks APC recently for Elsevier and other big publishers too, right across into the poorly-funded humanities and social sciences. I would encourage authors to review whether this is really “value for money” when scholar-led journals can produce and curate high quality articles and figures using a few hours of volunteer or paid labor, and they charge nothing, or far less. In my field, there are fortunately abundant places to publish with no APCs, scholar-led and with no to almost-no commercial interest. My big R1 university outside North America will cover some APCs, but ethically, they are too high for me when when so many colleagues cannot afford them and have no read&publish deals to draw on.

  • Oct 13, 2023, 6:48 PM

It is not a slippage but only a reflection of costs and projected costs of growth. It costs money to stay ahead of the game, ie – new computers, maintenance and cost of personal, etc. The problem with business (publishing is a business profit or not) is that it costs more and more to stay in the game. For instance, new equipment and vendor increases not to mention R&D. The problem with OA is that someone has to pay for open! I would guess that within two years programs will be needed to cope with AI – it is the old MAD comics spy vs spy – and cost to publish will exceed $5,000. In short, there is no free lunch!

  • Oct 14, 2023, 12:28 PM

' src=

One of the big differences with OA is that under a subscription model you can still monetize older content — if it remains behind subscription access restrictions, you’re still able to sell it and bring in revenue to pay for its upkeep (and upgrades with new PIDs, new technologies, etc.). Because OA models are largely transactional, the publisher earns from the article once, upon publication, and thereafter it becomes a cost center, being dragged behind the program in perpetuity, costing money but never bringing any more in. There’s an interesting argument for journals to stop hosting older OA papers and push those costs onto repositories like PubMed Central.

  • By David Crotty
  • Oct 14, 2023, 12:42 PM

The unintended consequences of OA are many. It has become a monster that has to be constantly fed. The model was not carefully considered and the ecosystem is now being challenged. In a social Darwinian sense, only the cleaver and strong will survive. As a result, there will be fewer players in the ecosystem and an oligopoly is being created.

  • Oct 14, 2023, 12:59 PM

' src=

I didn’t see anything about what happens to the ADC for submissions rejected after peer review? Refunded to the authors? Forfeited to ACS?

  • By Chris Mebane
  • Oct 14, 2023, 11:57 AM

I thought it was fairly clear that (like eLife’s charges), this fee is paid for the process, regardless of the outcome.

  • Oct 14, 2023, 12:39 PM

That seems the only way it could work. But unlike eLife’s full dissemination model, ACS will still have binary accept/reject decisions. One outcome will likely be that authors will be more discriminating in submissions. For example, I’ve submitted a manuscript to ES&T knowing that it was on the fringe of their scope and if rejected, no loss besides some weeks and reformatting. If I have to bet the ADC upfront, I would be a lot more careful and take more time with presubmission review and polishing. In other words, journals with ADCs will likely see better quality submissions that are more central to their scope.

  • Oct 15, 2023, 10:55 AM

Yes, but to be fair, if it only applies to 200 out of 200,000 submissions, it’s not going to make much of a dent.

To me, the intention here is to make the RRS route the least attractive route to authors. 12-month embargo Green OA is essentially free, Gold OA requires a payment, but only if the paper is accepted and published, while immediate Green OA via RRS requires a payment and entails a risk that the paper will not be accepted and published and the payment will essentially be for naught. https://www.ce-strategy.com/the-brief/out-of-reach/#3

  • Oct 15, 2023, 11:58 AM

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International Institute of Anticancer Research

Founded in 1995.

  • Anticancer Research
  • Cancer Genomics & Proteomics
  • Cancer Diagnosis & Prognosis
  • Conferences

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PRINT ISSN: 0258-851X ONLINE ISSN: 1791-7549

In Vivo is an international journal designed to bring together original high quality works and reviews on experimental and clinical biomedical research within the frames of human physiology, pathology and disease management. IN VIVO was established in 1987 by J.G. Delinasios . In this site you may find information concerning the editorial board, editorial policy, submission of manuscripts, contents of previous volumes and a current list of accepted manuscripts.

All articles on SARS-Cov-2 and Covid-19 Disease can now be accessed here

The IN VIVO Special Issue on SARS-Cov-2 and Covid-19 Disease is available OPEN ACCESS at Highwire

Original articles and reviews on SARS-Cov-2 and Covid-19 Disease are welcome to be submitted to IN VIVO for peer-review and rapid publication upon acceptance

Impact factor (2021): 2.406

INDEXED IN PMC

Total cites: 5,776

Archive of All Online Issues (January 2004 – Present)

ANTICANCER RESEARCH USA, Inc. 111 Bay Avenue, Highlands, NJ 07732, USA. e-mail: [email protected]

Information – Editorial & Production Office: Managing Editor: G. J. Delinasios , International Institute of Anticancer Research, 1st km Kapandritiou- Kalamou Rd., P.O.Box 22, Kapandriti, Attiki 19014, Greece. Tel & Fax : +30-22950-52945, +30-22950-53389 e-mail: [email protected]

IMPORTANT NOTE: You may submit your article only through our online submission system

Submit your manuscript, privacy overview.

IMAGES

  1. A,B) Schematic illustration of the design and anticancer mechanism of

    anticancer research article processing charge

  2. Schematic representation of anticancer activity studies (MTT assay

    anticancer research article processing charge

  3. (PDF) Drug Utilization Review and Cost Analysis of Anticancer Drugs

    anticancer research article processing charge

  4. Mechanisms of anticancer activity for AuNPs are diagrammatically

    anticancer research article processing charge

  5. What are the various submission charges for Anticancer Research

    anticancer research article processing charge

  6. Anticancer activity mechanism of NCPs

    anticancer research article processing charge

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  4. Article Processing Charges (APC)

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COMMENTS

  1. Instructions for Authors 2023

    All articles of Anticancer Research in HighWire become open access two years after their publication. ... Submitted original manuscripts exceeding 4 printed pages will be subject to excess page charges. The 4 printed pages correspond approximately to twelve (12) document pages (~250 words per double-spaced typed page in Arial 12), including ...

  2. Cancers

    All articles published in Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694) are published in full open access . An article processing charge (APC) of CHF 2900 (Swiss Francs) applies to papers accepted after peer review. This article processing charge is to cover the costs of peer review, copyediting, typesetting, long-term archiving, and journal management.

  3. About the Journal

    Article Processing Charge. The authors are required to pay the Article Processing Charge (APC) for publishing with Proceedings of Anticancer Research (PAR) to cover the cost incurred in processing the manuscripts in order to ensure the contents are freely available and to maintain publishing quality. The manuscript processing includes peer ...

  4. Publishing options

    Authors submitting primary research articles to Nature Cancer have the option of publishing their research using either: 1 ... The Article Processing Charge (APC) is the amount authors are charged ...

  5. Publication Fees and Reprints

    Cancer Research Communications Fees. Cancer Research Communications is an online-only, exclusively open access journal. As such, unlike the other AACR journals noted above it has a flat article publication charge (APC). During the current launch phase, Cancer Research Communications has a special introductory APC of $2,550.

  6. Molecules

    Anticancer Research: Towards an Understanding of Cancer and Discovery of New Therapeutic Agents Print Special Issue Flyer; Special Issue Editors ... The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English.

  7. Processing Charges

    To publish manuscripts in this Independent peer reviewed journal, authors are required to pay article processing charges (APC) of $1099 that covers the range of publishing services we provide. This includes, free accessing of published data to the authors, providing online tools for editors for manuscript evaluation, liaison with abstracting and indexing services, production of articles, and ...

  8. Article Processing Charges (APC) : Nature Support

    Modified on: Tue, 18 Apr, 2023 at 2:11 AM. Authors are asked to pay an Article Processing Charge (APC) in order for their article to be published Open Access under a Creative Commons license. This covers the costs involved in every stage of the publication process, from administrating peer-review to copy editing and hosting the final article on ...

  9. Article-processing charges as a barrier for science in low-to-medium

    Article processing charges (APCs) correspond to a fee paid by the authors of academic articles, their research funders, or institutions during the publication process. 1 APCs are directly connected to the private open-access model of publication, where an article that is considered suitable for publication is made available online and free to read for anyone with an internet connection.

  10. What are the various submission charges for Anticancer Research

    As it mentions in the Manuscripts section on their Instructions for Authors 2021 page, "Submitted manuscripts exceeding 4 printed pages will be subject to excess page charges.". As they have elaborated soon after that, "The 4 printed pages correspond approximately to twelve (12) document pages (~250 words per double-spaced typed page in ...

  11. Article Processing Charges

    All articles published in npj Breast Cancer are made freely and permanently available online immediately upon publication, without subscription charges or registration barriers. Further ...

  12. Breast Cancer Research : the move to introduce article-processing charges

    As an open-access journal, Breast Cancer Research does not differ from traditional journals in its commitment to peer review or its way of conducting it. We take seriously the journal's "gate-keeping function" [] to control and certify research quality.Article-processing charges will cover the cost of our high-quality peer review, copy-editing and publication, and ensure permanent world-wide ...

  13. MDPI

    Discounts and waivers. MDPI is committed to supporting the transition of all research to fully open access, therefore we regularly offer APC waivers or discounts. On average, we waive approximately 25% - 27% of our content every year. Of the total APCs in a journal, we waive and offer discounts ranging from 15% in our most established journals ...

  14. Instructions for Authors 2023

    Our open access articles are distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY-NC-ND) 4.0 international license. Upon acceptance, Authors will be asked to pay an online publication fee of USD 950.00 for articles up to 8 online pages (including figures and tables).

  15. Anticancer Research

    Anticancer Research is an international journal designed to rapidly publish original papers and reviews on experimental and clinical cancer research. Anticancer Research was established in 1981 by J.G. Delinasios. In this site you may find information concerning the editorial board, editorial policy, subscriptions, submission of manuscripts ...

  16. The American Chemical Society Offers a New Twist on the Article

    On 21 September, the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) announced a new twist on the article processing charge (APC) model of funding open-access publishing. Their new program involves what they call an article development charge (ADC), which is designed to "provide authors a new option to satisfy funder requirements for zero-embargo green open access."

  17. Article processing charge

    An article processing charge ( APC ), also known as a publication fee, is a fee which is sometimes charged to authors. Most commonly, it is involved in making an academic work available as open access (OA), in either a full OA journal or in a hybrid journal. [1] [2] [3] This fee may be paid by the author, the author's institution, or their ...

  18. Anticancer Drugs: Recent Strategies to Improve Stability Profile ...

    In past decades, anticancer research has led to remarkable results despite many of the approved drugs still being characterized by high systemic toxicity mainly due to the lack of tumor selectivity and present pharmacokinetic drawbacks, including low water solubility, that negatively affect the drug circulation time and bioavailability. The stability studies, performed in mild conditions ...

  19. Article Processing Charges (APC) : Springer Nature Support

    Modified on: Tue, 18 Apr, 2023 at 2:11 AM. Authors are asked to pay an Article Processing Charge (APC) in order for their article to be published Open Access under a Creative Commons license. This covers the costs involved in every stage of the publication process, from administrating peer-review to copy editing and hosting the final article on ...

  20. In Vivo

    PRINT ISSN: 0258-851X. ONLINE ISSN: 1791-7549. In Vivo is an international journal designed to bring together original high quality works and reviews on experimental and clinical biomedical research within the frames of human physiology, pathology and disease management. IN VIVO was established in 1987 by J.G. Delinasios.

  21. Anti-Cancer Drugs

    See all reviews. Based on the Journal Feedback System, the avarage publication fees of Anti-Cancer Drugs are around 24.0 USD. To publish in Anti-Cancer Drugs with Open Access Lincense, authors are required to pay an overall article publishing charges (APC) : $ 24.0 USD.

  22. Advances in Anticancer Drugs and Pharmacotherapy of Cancer

    Special Issue Information. Dear Colleagues, The pharmacotherapy of cancer has experienced some encouraging novel developments. A new armamentarium of anticancer drugs and their delivery have led to improvements not only in efficacy and safety profiles but also the quality of life both pre and post treatment.

  23. Article Processing Charges

    The journal Research is an Open Access journal supported by article processing charges (APCs). There are no submission charges. APC rate. Research and Review Articles are partially subsidized by CAST, allowing authors to pay the below reduced rates: Research Articles: $1800 USD Review Articles: $1800 USD. The rates for additional article types are: