A Christmas Carol

By charles dickens, a christmas carol summary and analysis of stave four.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come solemnly approaches Scrooge in its black garment. It responds to Scrooge's questions with silence and motions for him to follow. They instantly appear in the city and listen in on some businessmen who casually and jokingly discuss someone's death. Scrooge wonders why the Ghost is showing him these conversations and what bearing they have on his future self. However, he does not see himself among the crowds.

Scrooge and the Ghost travel through a poor, run-down part of town. In a shop, several people divvy up some possessions they have plundered from a man who has recently died. Scrooge tells the Ghost that he sees his life might turn out like the dead man's. The scene changes and Scrooge is at the plundered bed of the corpse. Scrooge cannot bring himself to raise the veil of the dead man and see his face. Scrooge asks the Ghost to show him someone who has been emotionally affected by the man's death.

They are transported to the house of a young couple, who rejoices since their merciless creditor has died and they are not ruined from debt. Scrooge asks the host to show him some tenderness connected with a death. In the Cratchit home, Bob mourns for Tiny Tim , who has recently died. He tells the family about the kindness of Scrooge's nephew, Fred , and soon feels better when he discusses Tiny Tim's lasting memory.

Scrooge asks the Ghost who the dead man they saw was, but the Ghost only brings him to Scrooge's office. However, someone new has taken over the office. The Ghost points Scrooge toward a graveyard and to a specific grave. Before Scrooge looks at it, he asks the Ghost if these are the shadows of things that "Will" be or "May" be. Scrooge believes they are the shadows of what "May" be, but the Ghost says nothing. Scrooge sees his own name on the tombstone, and realizes he was the dead man from before. Scrooge vows to honor Christmas in his heart and live by the lessons of the past, present, and future, such that he may alter his life. The Ghost shrinks and collapses into a bedpost.

Dickens continues his development of the theme of free will over determinism. Scrooge understands that the future he is shown is alterable and that he can change his fate. Again, this idea celebrates the potential for redemption in anyone and urges people to change their ill ways right now as opposed to later.

Dickens also focuses on the ways a person has influence beyond his or her lifetime. What cheers up Bob after Tiny Tim's death is that his son's memory will live on and remind them of the good in the world. Conversely, the only joy Scrooge's life will provide for others after it is over is through their acquisition of his material goods or release from debt, not through his memory.

Scrooge finally has the redemptive epiphany he has been gradually learning throughout his travels in the past, present, and future. However, an epiphany, by definition, is a sudden revelation. How can we call Scrooge's adventure, which supposedly stretches over three days, an epiphany? As we will see in Stave Five, all of the ghostly visits took place over just one night. Just as Scrooge learns to assimilate the past, present, and future into his life, the three different temporal ghosts have come to Scrooge in one time frame, perhaps even all at once. For Dickens, then, the epiphany is a sudden revelation that encompasses all time.

The two other definitions of epiphany have associations with A Christmas Carol . Epiphany, on January 6, is the festival commemorating the coming of the Magi as the first manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles. Epiphany also means an appearance or manifestation especially of a divine being, and the ghosts certainly fit into this category.

In addition, the silent Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come looks much like the Grim Reaper and has similarly divine powers in his final judgment of human lives. Those who lead good lives like Tiny Tim will go to heaven and be commemorated on earth, while those who lead bad lives like Scrooge will go to hell and be scorned on earth.

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A Christmas Carol Questions and Answers

The Question and Answer section for A Christmas Carol is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

What is the author's likely purpose for the figurative language used in paragraph 6? Cite at least two pieces of evidence from the paragraph in your response.

I can't be sure if your paragraph 6 matches mine. There are literally hundreds of publications of this story. If you quote the first line of the paragraph, I can find it.

Why does Scrooge hate Christmas so much?

Scrooge is alone and his hate on for Christmas is, at least in part, a defence mechanism. Scrooge became isolated as he accumulated his wealth: his rejection of friends and family for the sake of wealth becomes a theme in the story. Scrooge sees...

What kind of character designation would Scrooge be?

Ebenezer Scrooge would be your classic dynamic character.

Study Guide for A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol study guide contains a biography of Charles Dickens, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

  • About A Christmas Carol
  • A Christmas Carol Summary
  • A Christmas Carol Video
  • Character List

Essays for A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol literature essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of A Christmas Carol.

  • Have a Capitalist Christmas: The Critique of Christmas Time in "A Christmas Carol"
  • Movement Within the Episodes
  • Ghost of an Idea
  • A Secular Christmas: Examining Religion in Dickens' A Christmas Carol
  • Perceiving the Need for Social Change in "A Christmas Carol"

Lesson Plan for A Christmas Carol

  • About the Author
  • Study Objectives
  • Common Core Standards
  • Introduction to A Christmas Carol
  • Relationship to Other Books
  • Bringing in Technology
  • Notes to the Teacher
  • Related Links
  • A Christmas Carol Bibliography

E-Text of A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol E-Text contains the full text of A Christmas Carol

  • Stave I: Marley's Ghost
  • Stave II: The First Of The Three Spirits
  • Stave III: The Second Of The Three Spirits
  • Stave IV: The Last Of The Spirits

Wikipedia Entries for A Christmas Carol

  • Introduction

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

Characters - Eduqas The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

Three ghosts take Scrooge through Christmases past, present and future. Characters Bob Cratchit, his son Tiny Tim, and Scrooge’s nephew Fred, all influence Scrooge in his journey of transformation.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in A Christmas Carol

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

The final Ghost is frightening and eerie. It doesn't say a word to Scrooge, but glides along and points out scenes to him.

The spirit first shows Scrooge a funeral scene, with businessmen wondering about the money that the dead man has left. The Ghost then takes him through dark alleyways to a scene of three people picking through the belongings of the deceased. Scrooge recognises that his own death could be met this way.

Next the Ghost takes him to the Cratchit household where Scrooge is upset to realise that Tiny Tim has died.

Finally the Ghost shows him a tombstone engraved with the name: Ebenezer Scrooge. Clutching at the spirit's robes, Scrooge pledges to change his ways if he can avoid this solitary death. The Ghost disappears and leaves Scrooge clutching at his bed curtains.

Learn more about the three ghosts in this podcast

Listen to the full series on BBC Sounds.

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More guides on this topic.

  • Plot summary - Eduqas
  • Themes - Eduqas
  • Form, structure and language - Eduqas
  • Sample exam question - Eduqas

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More on A Christmas Carol

Introduction see all, summary see all, themes see all.

  • Compassion and Forgiveness
  • Transformation
  • Philosophical Viewpoints: Rationality
  • Memory and the Past
  • Guilt and Blame

Characters See All

  • Ebenezer Scrooge
  • Bob Cratchit
  • Tiny Tim Cratchit
  • Ghost of Christmas Past
  • Ghost of Christmas Present

Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

  • Jacob Marley

Analysis See All

  • What's Up With the Title?
  • What's Up With the Ending?
  • Tough-o-Meter
  • Writing Style
  • Marley's Chains
  • Scrooge's Gravestone
  • Scrooge's Bed
  • Narrator Point of View
  • Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis
  • Plot Analysis
  • Three-Act Plot Analysis

Quotes See All

  • For Teachers

The Phaaantom of Christmastime Is Here

However eerie and unpleasant Scrooge's midnight adventures have been, they are all fun and games until the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows up. This thing isn't even called a ghost any more—Dickens changes the terminology and starts referring to this super menacing cloaked figure as a "phantom."

The text doesn't really explain this word change, but we're guessing it has something to do with the fact that the other two Christmas ghosts were a lot more human in their behavior than this mutely pointing dude. (Also, Dickens might just have a thing about silent figures pointing fingers at the guilty. Check out the death of lawyer Tulkinghorn in Bleak House . It happens right under a painting of a guy pointing down at the corpse .)

The phantom's exit is a little more predictable than that of the other two ghosts. Sure, it's stressful when the thing disappears without telling Scrooge whether he'll get a do-over, but, hey, at least it's not birthing claw-footed babies in front him. It's the little things. Here is how the good-bye goes down:

"Are these the shadows of the things that Will be, or are they shadows of things that May be, only? […] Why show me this, if I am past all hope! […] Assure me that I yet may change these shadows you have shown me, by an altered life!" […]

In his agony, [Scrooge] caught the spectral hand. It sought to free itself, but he was strong in his entreaty, and detained it. The Spirit, stronger yet, repulsed him.

Holding up his hands in a last prayer to have his fate reversed, he saw an alteration in the Phantom's hood and dress. It shrunk, collapsed, and dwindled down into a bedpost. (4.151-166)

Scrooge has gone from fighting the ghosts off to trying desperately to hold onto them and not go back to his own reality. That's a pretty startling change, no? Again, is this a sign that he really has undergone some fundamental shift in his ability to empathize with others?

It was a little more marked during his good-bye with the Ghost of Christmas Present, when instead of losing it at the sight of the ghost-babies, Scrooge is instead worried about whether the ghost is okay.

But here, there is a clear difference as well—Scrooge is making an appeal to the phantom's sense of mercy and asking it to just have some pity on him and tell him the deal. Rather than attacking it, like he did with the Ghost of Christmas Past, Scrooge tries to find the emotional humanity in a startlingly inhuman figure.

This seems like a pretty big departure, and a mirror of what has happened to Scrooge himself. He has rediscovered his own humanity under all that cold.

Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in A Christmas Carol Study Group

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A Christmas Carol

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The Ghosts of Christmas Yet to Come, ranked by freakiness

From Mickey Mouse to Muppets to Scrooged, Spirited, and the great classics

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You probably all know the story of Charles Dickens’ endlessly adapted 1843 holiday story A Christmas Carol , even if you’ve never read it. Tight-fisted, mean old miser Ebenezer Scrooge falls asleep on Christmas Eve and is visited by three spirits: the Ghost of Christmas Past, a man in a sleeping cap; the Ghost of Christmas Present, a rotund, jolly fellow; and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, a harrowing, silent specter of death. These three ghosts convince our miserly man to change his ways, but the third one does the heavy lifting, showing Scrooge how soon he’ll be dead and buried, while nobody mourns his passing.

In the text, Dickens describes the ghost as “shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand.” This leaves a lot of leeway for adaptations to interpret, and A Christmas Carol is one of the most-adapted works of fiction of all time.

So in the holiday spirit, I decided to watch every film version and evaluate them on one single criteria: How scary do they make the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come? Don your sleeping cap and come with us on a journey into holiday horror.

60. A Sesame Street Christmas Carol (2006)

A robot “ghost” that looks like an egg with a christmas wreath on it floats over grouch in Sesame Street Christmas Carol

If you were going into this one expecting to be spooked, I don’t know what to tell you. Oscar the Grouch as Scrooge contends with a CGI floating robot with googly eyes as the Ghost of Christmas Future. We get it, you don’t want to terrify the preschoolers, but there’s a reason it’s lowest on the list.

59. A Christmas Carol (1954)

A rave in a black and white image from A Christmas Carol (1954)

Fredric March stars as Scrooge in this, the first color televised version of the tale. Unfortunately, the only surviving version is a black and white kinescope. In a strange choice, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come doesn’t appear in human form at all. Instead, a myna bird caws Scrooge to the graveyard, where he finds not only his grave, but also Tiny Tim’s.

58. Christmas Cupid (2010)

Typical smug bastard dressed as santa in Christmas Cupid (2010)

Christina Milian is the Scrooge figure in this ABC Family holiday comedy, and the three ghosts are her ex-boyfriends. Depending on your relationship history, this might seem scarier than it is. The third ghost is her boss, who she is also dating, dressed up like Santa Claus. He tells her that in the terrible future to come, they get married, then divorced. Bummer. Fortunately, as part of amending her wicked ways after the ghostly visitation, she dumps him.

57. Ghosts of Girlfriends Past (2009)

A woman in a sparkly dress floats over the snowcovered woods in Ghosts of Girlfriends Past (2009)

It’s a stretch, but this Matthew McConaughey rom-com is based on the Dickens story, so it counts. The “Ghost of Girlfriends Future” that shows McConaughey’s womanizer protagonist Connor Mead the error of his ways is played by stunning Russian model Olga Maliouk, dressed in white rather than the traditional black cloak.

56. Rich Little’s Christmas Carol (1978)

scrooge in his old timely nightgown sitting on a desk next to Christmas Future, a man in a trenchcoat

It’s almost impossible to explain how popular comedic impersonator Rich Little was in the 1970s, but “HBO gave him a Christmas special in which he played every single role of A Christmas Carol as a different celebrity character” might do it. Scrooge is Rich Little as W.C. Fields, and the Ghost of Christmas Future is Little playing Peter Sellers as the Pink Panther movies’ Inspector Clouseau. So not scary, but extremely weird.

55. The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol (2011)

A smurfy finger points out from a dark cloak at another smurf in The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol (2011)

The real revelation here is that Grouchy Smurf (the Scrooge of the story) acts like a dick all the time because Papa Smurf gives him a hat every year for Christmas. The ghost is Hefty Smurf. Not scary unless you have a phobia of gym bros.

54. My Dad Is Scrooge (2014)

A dog stands on the carpet in My Dad Is Scrooge (2014)

This is probably the only Christmas Carol where Scrooge gets headbutted by a llama. Our miser here is a farmer named EB, who is taught the magic of the season by a trio of talking animals. The third one is a dog that hypnotizes EB . This thing is so cheap and weird that when the animals talk, it’s sometimes just their lips moving over a still photograph. The dog doesn’t even dress up!

53. A Christmas Carol: The Musical (2004)

A woman in white shredded robes does a luring hand gesture in A Christmas Carol: The Musical (2004)

This is a tough watch for numerous reasons, especially if you’re not a fan of Broadway musicals. Kelsey Grammer plays Scrooge, and he’s confronted by a white-clad Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come played by Geraldine Chaplin (Charlie Chaplin’s daughter, most recently seen in Netflix’s The Crown ). The costuming is pretty dire — she looks like she’s covered in damp toilet paper.

52. Chasing Christmas (2005)

A dorky guy with wavy hair and a red ascot stands next to a lit christmas tree in Chasing Christmas (2005)

Tom Arnold has tremendous divorced energy as the Scrooge figure in this mediocre comedy, where the Ghost of Christmas Past goes AWOL and leads him and the Ghost of Christmas Present through a series of scenes. Scrooge and the second spirit eventually make out, and there are a lot of cartoon sound effects. Yet to Come only shows up at the movie’s climax, and is just a sleazy-looking Euro guy in an ascot.

51. Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas (2006)

Taz emerges from the Christmas Future robes to scare Daffy Duck while the two stand in the snowy forest in Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas (2006)

Here, the ghost is the Tasmanian Devil. He starts out the scene in the typical black shroud, but doffs it a minute or so later to engage in the usual Warner Bros. schtick.

50. Carry on Christmas (1969)

A stereotypical afro sunglasses hippie wears a necklace of flowers in a black void

The long-running British slapstick film series tackled Dickens for a Christmas special at the end of the swinging ’60s, but the Ghost of Christmas Future is just actor Bernard Bresslaw playing an incredibly broad hippie impersonation. Oh, and Frankenstein and Dracula are also in this, for unexplained reasons.

49. It’s Christmas, Carol! (2012)

Carrie Fisher in black holds a black umbrella to cover a brunette woman from the rain in  It’s Christmas, Carol! (2012)

Carrie Fisher plays all three ghosts (and the Marley role to boot) in this Hallmark Channel take on A Christmas Carol set in the modern age. Emmanuelle Vaugier is the Scrooge figure, transformed into a hard-charging CEO with no time for Christmas. Not scary.

48. A Christmas Carol (2015)

A woman in a black veil stands behind a tree in A Christmas Carol (2015)

This extremely cheap-looking Canadian musical production of the story was a labor of love (director Anthony D.P. Mann also plays Scrooge), for what that’s worth. The Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come talks and sings in this rendition. She’s just a lady with a white face in a big black hat. The whole thing has a community theater vibe.

47. Brer Rabbit’s Christmas Carol (1992)

A jack o lantern head hides under a white blanket in Brer Rabbit’s Christmas Carol (1992)

The early ’90s were such a dire time for animation. This made-for-TV special — not produced by Disney, and with no connection to Disney’s Song of the South — is an ordeal to watch, and all the ghosts are just Brer Rabbit messing with Brer Fox through the use of household props and woodland actors. So the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come here is just a sheet on a mop with a jack-o’-lantern on top.

46. An American Christmas Carol (1979)

Henry Winkler in old age makeup playing Scrooge next to Dorian Harewood as Christmas Future

Henry Winkler — the Fonz himself — dons old-age makeup to portray Benedict Slade in this adaptation moved to Depression-era New England. The spirit who shows him the misery that awaits him after death is played with soulfulness by Dorian Harewood — the fill-in voice of Shredder from the Ninja Turtles cartoons!

45. A Christmas Carol (1969)

A 2D animated Ghost of Christmas Future points his bony finger in a graveyard in A Christmas Carol (1969)

From a series of Australian animated adaptations called Famous Classic Tales , this is a pretty standard take on the story, complete with a third ghost that could pass for an unimaginative Scooby-Doo villain.

44. A Christmas Carol (2000)

A bald man guides a red headed kid through a cemetery in A Christmas Carol (2000)

This odd British TV adaptation moves the action to the present day, with Ross Kemp playing Scrooge as a council-estate loan shark despised by his clients and community. The third spirit that visits him on Christmas Eve is an eerily silent young boy who shows him the bad end that awaits, and in the film’s coda, we learn that the kid was his yet-to-be-born child. In theory this could be scary, but it’s executed so clumsily that it’s more laughable than chilling.

43. Skinflint: A Country Christmas Carol (1979)

A cloaked man wearing a skeleton mask meets scrooge in Skinflint: A Country Christmas Carol (1979)

David Bond plays the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in this honky-tonk musical adaptation of the Dickens story, with Gremlins ’ Hoyt Axton in the Scrooge role. This was only aired once, during the late-’70s peak of Grand Ole Opry country music. Bond eschews the hood in favor of what looks like dollar-store Dracula makeup and some deeply weird hand gestures.

42. A Christmas Carol (1910)

A whispy ghost shows scrooge his gravestone

The oldest surviving film version of Dickens’ tale (except for the 1906 one, which didn’t have the three ghosts) is a 13-minute silent speedrun of the whole tale. The ghosts aren’t terribly scary, and as far as I can tell, the gimmick for the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is “big lady.”

41. A Flintstones Christmas Carol (1994)

A hooded ghost shows Fred Flinstone Scrooge his deathbed

This 70-minute animated take, featuring the usual Flintstones characters, depicts the ghost as a pretty generic hooded featureless figure. The one notable thing about this movie is that it actually shows Fred Flintstone’s corpse — or at least his massive, pale-white big toe sticking out from under a sheet.

40. The Stingiest Man in Town (1978)

A dimly lit ghost

A low-effort Rankin-Bass animated musical version of the classic story, with a hooded figure pointing a bony white arm at Scrooge’s tombstone. Perfectly competent, but nothing to write home about.

39. A Carol Christmas (2003)

A prison guard stands behind Tori Spelling

This Hallmark movie had some serious stunt casting — Gary Coleman as the Ghost of Christmas Past! William Shatner as the Ghost of Christmas Present! Storied actor James Cromwell is the third and final ghost, and his expressive face does a lot to sell it, even though he’s just a mute limo driver. The bit where he closes Carol (Tori Spelling) into her coffin is a little freaky.

38. Old Scrooge (1913)

A transluscent ghost freaks out scrooge

Ghosts in these early silent adaptations were always very tall. In this silent version of the tale, our future ghost is just a lanky fellow wrapped in some bedsheets. Marley is actually significantly scarier.

37. A Christmas Carol (1982)

A creepy hooded guy in The Stingiest Man in Town (1978)

I think this animated Australian version of the story is the baseline “solid C” for scariness. It’s not imaginative at all — if you’ve read this far, you’ve probably guessed that the ghost here is a big figure in a black cloak — but the rendering is fine, and the music really sells the scene. Perfectly decent but nothing to renounce your miserly ways over.

36. Scrooge & Marley (2012)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

Chicago drag legend Jojo Baby plays the third ghost in this campy gay take on the tale, with Scrooge recast as a penny-pinching club owner visited by his deceased partner. Mr. Baby does a fine job, wrapped up in a mummy-like sheath of black fabric that casts a very glam silhouette.

35. Ebbie (1995)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

A Lifetime original movie starring Susan Lucci as the first female Scrooge? Look for scares somewhere else, pal. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is played by busy Bill Croft, most notable for playing prison guards or convicts in shows like Airwolf and Viper . He’s just a quiet but imposing guy in a hat and a black trenchcoat.

34. A Christmas Carol (1997)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

DIC was the go-to studio for affordable animation through much of the ’80s and ’90s, and this holiday special was as average as possible. Tim Curry plays Scrooge, and the adaptation gives him a bulldog named Debit because all cartoons must have a cute animal character. The ghost here is a glowing cloaked specter, nothing fancy or special, but it’s well designed.

33. A Diva’s Christmas Carol (2000)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

Vanessa Williams plays “Ebony Scrooge” in this perplexing made-for-VH1 holiday movie, which also stars Duran Duran’s John Taylor and Chilli from TLC. The stunt casting could have gone any number of ways for the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, but for some reason, it’s a haunted television set showing an episode of Behind the Music where everybody talks about how much they hate Scrooge now that she’s dead. Then it sucks her in, Poltergeist -style. Extremely weird.

32. A Christmas Carol (1994)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

Cheaply made animated special with the artwork done in Japan in a vaguely anime style. Our final ghost is a hooded figure wearing a rope as a belt. The whole enterprise is pretty artless and uninspired.

31. 2nd Chance for Christmas (2019)

Vivica A Fox looks shocked at an offscreen blonde

Direct-to-DVD (and streaming) cornball starring Brittany Underwood as a spoiled pop star in the Scrooge role. Vivica A. Fox is mostly wasted as the third ghost, credited as “Death” — she enters the scene in cloak and bones, inspiring Underwood to ask whether she “died at Comic-Con.” But she plays through the flick just as her normal, fine self.

30. Mickey’s Christmas Carol (1983)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

Disney animated projects are occasionally pretty scary — even the Mickey Mouse stories . But the Ghost here is just frequent Mickey nemesis Peg-Leg Pete, wearing a brown shroud and puffing a stogie. It’s a testament to how good the framing and animation is that he still feels threatening. The addition of a cigar does explain the billows of smoke around the spirit.

29. An All Dogs Christmas Carol (1998)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

The last film in the All Dogs Go to Heaven series has a convoluted plot about evil bulldog Carface scheming to hypnotize pets to steal Christmas presents. The good dogs dress up as the three spirits to change his ways, and the Ghost of Christmas Future starts off as an imposing hooded figure before whipping his cloak off to do a bizarre riff on Jim Carrey in The Mask . He does take Carface to literal hell, which is a little intense.

28. A Christmas Carol (1977)

A shadowy figure meets Scrooge in a graveyard covered in fog

Yet another BBC adaptation of the tale, with a perfectly acceptable shroud-clad spirit. He loses a few points because he doesn’t really seem to know what to do with his hands, leaving them hanging awkwardly while Scrooge monologues. But the massive hanging hood and creepy silence are both on point.

27. Una Meravigliosa Notte (1953)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

I don’t speak Italian, so it’s difficult to evaluate how well the ghost comes off in this adaptation, which stars Paolo Stoppa as greedy Antonio Trabbi, visited by a trio of spirits who show him the error of his ways. This is the second film on this list where the ghost has no physical form, instead manifesting as an echoing voice-over. The cinematography does a lot to sell it, as Stoppa seems genuinely deranged and unsettled by the all-knowing voice in his head.

26. Ms. Scrooge (1997)

ghost of christmas yet to come theme

Cicely Tyson plays the Scrooge role in this gender-swapped version of the tale, in which the Ghost of Christmas Future warns her that the IRS will take all her money after she dies. He’s played by actor Julian Richings, who has a memorable face, but spends his whole part of the movie standing around expressionless in a suit. It’s just weird enough to be truly creepy.

25. A Christmas Carol (1938)

Scrooge barely sees the ghost of christmas yet to come hiding in a bush

One of the more famous adaptations, this one is solid, but the ghost is just a guy in a black cloak. When he walks, he sometimes sticks both of his arms out in front of him like Frankenstein’s monster. Every once in a while, you can see his weird skinny hand.

24. John Grin’s Christmas (1986)

A bald Black man lifts up his robe to reveal himself to Scrooge

This all-Black TV adaptation of the story has Robert Guillaume as the Scrooge figure John Grin, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is played by Trinidadian dancer/actor Geoffrey Holder, probably best known as Baron Samedi in Live and Let Die . The costuming isn’t anything to write home about, but Holder’s expressive face and wild mannerisms definitely deliver.

23. Tales From Dickens: A Christmas Carol (1959)

A robed ghost points offscreen in a cemetery to direct a scrooge with long white hair

Early television programming didn’t have much to offer in terms of special effects, so the Ghost in this Basil Rathbone-starring adaptation is a black cloak walking around in some studio fog. Some nice stiff-armed pointing and a commitment to stillness and silence makes it one of the better of its type.

22. Scrooge (1951)

A hand raises in front of Scrooge who kneels on the ground

Alastair Sim is one of cinema’s most famous Scrooges, and he puts his whole back into cowering in fear of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. It’s another shrouded figure, but its introduction is pretty good — a pale white hand held in the foreground of a shot for more than a minute as Scrooge freaks out. The best thing about this one is his implacability: None of Scrooge’s pleas move him in the slightest.

21. A Christmas Carol (1914)

A ghost appears next to a stone wall as Scrooge looks down at his feet

Another silent flim, this one running a little over 20 minutes. The ghost is a big guy in a black hood and cloak, played by the awesomely named and completely stone-faced H. Ashton Tonge. Charles Rock is an overacting machine as Scrooge, chewing scenery like it was a Christmas goose.

20. A Christmas Carol: Scrooge’s Ghostly Tale (2006)

A walrus ghost

This direct-to-video CGI animated film casts anthropomorphic animals in the lead roles. You will never in a million years guess what kind of animal the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is, so I’ll just spoil it for you: It’s a walrus with one broken tusk, crackling with some sort of eldritch electricity. It’s so inexplicable that it wraps around to being scary.

19. Scrooge (1922)

A transparent ghosts freaks out Scrooge in the graveyard

This is, chronologically, the first film that depicts the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come with its face fully shrouded, and it’s effective, even though the ghost is barely on screen for a minute in this silent short.

18. Ebenezer (1998)

A cloaked figure with long white hair walks on an old timely western street

Jack Palance as Ebenezer Scrooge in a version of the tale set in the Old West? Incredible, and the legendary actor goes wild as a card-cheating swindler who hates Christmas. The ghost here is a shrouded figure with some wisps of gray hair coming out from the cloak, and at the end of his scene, he reveals his face as Scrooge’s dead partner, Jacob Marlowe.

17. Mister Magoo’s Christmas Carol (1962)

The Ghost of CHristmas Future leads mr magoo blindly into the graveyard

The hapless blind codger has been cast as Ebenezer Scrooge in a theatrical adaptation of the Dickens story, possibly for insurance-fraud reasons. The third spirit is the stereotypical silent hooded shadowy figure, but animated in the classic UPA style, so it looks pretty cool and imposing. The original songs written for the movie and sung by Magoo kind of undercut the drama, though.

16. Scrooge (1935)

a shadowy hand points at something

The first feature-length Christmas Carol film with sound takes a pretty interesting approach with our third ghost, portraying him as an amorphous shadow that sometimes enfolds Scrooge, and at other times appears as a pointing finger cast on the snowy ground. Not super scary, but cool.

15. A Christmas Carol (1923)

A ghost appears in a burst of little lights in front of Scrooge

Another shadowy cloaked figure in this silent adaptation, but Russell Thorndike’s Scrooge sells the hell out of it well enough to bump it up a few spots.

14. A Christmas Carol (2012)

A bald bearded scrooge meets the ghost

This relatively obscure adaptation directed by Jason Figgis does some odd things with the source material, deliberately removing some scenes to make the narrative bleaker. It’s pretty low-budget and obviously shot on video with the actors in different rooms, overlaid with cheap digital effects, but it manages to work OK. The ghost has a red cloak and some gross zombie makeup on his outstretched hand, earning points for being different.

13. A Christmas Carol (2018)

A younger Scrooge looks up in the darkness of night

The introduction of the final spirit in this Scotland-set version is straight out of a horror movie, all ominous whooshing noises and creaking violins. But in a departure from the norm, we never actually see it. Instead, it speaks in one-word pronouncements in a gravelly voice as Scrooge reacts to it. Points for originality and solid sound design, but the actor playing Scrooge doesn’t sell it as well as he could.

12. Spirited (2022)

A cloaked ghost points his skeleton hand in a moonlit graveyeard

Will Ferrell and Ryan Reynolds mug it up in this comedy holiday musical made for Apple TV. It’s got good production values, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, played by former Raptors power forward Loren Woods (but voiced by Tracy Morgan), makes the most of its few minutes on screen.

11. A Christmas Carol (1984)

A window illuminates the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

George C. Scott stars as Scrooge in one of the all-time best versions of the story, and the ghost is really solid — tattered, shadowy, silent, and imposing. Nothing particularly innovative about this rendition, but expertly executed.

10. Christmas Carol: The Movie (2001)

A skeleton’s visage melts into the Crachit family before a fully illuminated Scrooge

In general, this animated version of the story is pretty low-quality, even though the celebrity voice cast includes Kate Winslet and Nicolas Cage. But the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is handled pretty marvelously. Its depiction eschews realism: It’s drawn with sloppy brushstrokes outlining a cadaverous figure. It’s one of the few animated versions that really takes advantage of the medium, even if it’s just for a short time.

9. The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992)

A cloaked figure holds his hands at the graveyard gates as Scrooge approaches in The Muppet Christmas Carol

Michael Caine in a world full of Muppets is disconcerting enough, but this one takes a turn for the eerie when Scrooge runs into the third spirit — a huge figure clad in black robes, with an infinite, featureless void where its face should be. Not a lot of time on screen, but a really strong design.

8. Scrooge (1970)

A full-on skeleton Yet to Come ghost pokes Scrooge

For the first part of the ghost’s appearance in this musical (with Albert Finney as Scrooge), he’s the usual black-cloaked figure. But when Scrooge realizes he’s looking at his own grave, the Ghost reveals a skeletal face and hands that are simultaneously corny and disconcerting.

7. A Christmas Carol (2019)

Jason Flemyng playing a ghost of christmas yet to come with his mouth sewen shut and a top hat

Guy Pearce starred as Scrooge in this series, one of the darkest adaptations of Dickens ever. There’s even a sexual-abuse subplot to Scrooge’s childhood, along with several other adult themes. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is well played by British actor Jason Flemyng, who appears as a pallid man in a black suit and top hat with his mouth crudely sewn shut.

6. A Christmas Carol (2020)

A shadow monster grabs Scrooge

This ambitious dance film features celebrity voices and professional dancers. It’s one of the more visually compelling takes on the story, with some dynamic sets and beautiful motion. Both Bob Cratchit and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come are played by dancer Brekke Fagerlund Karl, who is magnificently threatening with his spare movements.

5. A Christmas Carol (1971)

graves pop up all around scrooge

Legendary animator Richard Williams won an Oscar for this brilliant adaptation, which is just tremendous from start to finish. The ghost is a hooded figure, as per normal, but the incredible fluidity of the drawings here gives it an uncanny hyperrealism. Coupled with some unsettling camera movement, the design gives us a very high placer.

4. A Christmas Carol (1999)

A ghost of christmas yet to come with a brown robe and jawa eyes

The Patrick Stewart-led Christmas Carol was the first Scrooge story to use digital special effects. Our Ghost here is played by British actor Tim Potter, but we don’t really see him. Instead, it’s a baleful black shroud with two unsettling amber eyes buried within. Sometimes the primitive VFX of this period could be really effective, and this is a great example.

3. A Christmas Carol (2009)

a growing dark shadow ghost

I’m not the biggest fan of Robert Zemeckis’ motion-capture animated films, as they always veer a little too far into the uncanny valley for comfort. But you can’t deny that the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in his holiday effort is effective. CGI lets the spirit be a creature of pure shadow, changing size at will for some truly impressive effects.

2. Scrooged (1988)

a bunch of dead melty face spirits trapped in the skeletal chest of the ghost in Scrooged

Bill Murray meeting the hulking Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in the elevator is one of many great scenes in this classic ’80s dram-com. Then the ghost opens the front of his cloak to reveal tormented souls trapped in his ribcage, and forces Bill Murray to experience his own cremation. A great fusion of the traditional and the contemporary, and it’s definitely scary!

1. A Carol for Another Christmas (1964)

Robert Shaw in a cloak in A Carol for Another Christmas

Leave it to Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling to max out the scare factor. This adaptation stars Sterling Hayden as industrialist Daniel Grudge, who is visited by three ghosts attempting to argue him out of his isolationist policies. The third ghost is played by Robert Shaw, who isn’t that scary on his own — until you realize that the “future” he’s showing Grudge is a world ravaged by nuclear armageddon and senseless, murderous violence. Shadowy figures and impending death are typically scary enough to turn a Scrooge around, but the threat of global thermonuclear war? That’s enough to save a whole lifetime of Christmases.

IMAGES

  1. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

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  2. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come scene (Scrooge A Christmas Carol 2022

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  3. Ghost of Christmas yet to come A Christmas Carol

    ghost of christmas yet to come theme

  4. Muppet Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    ghost of christmas yet to come theme

  5. The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come by JamesBousema on @DeviantArt

    ghost of christmas yet to come theme

  6. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, Christmas Carol National Tour. photo by

    ghost of christmas yet to come theme

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COMMENTS

  1. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Character Analysis in A Christmas

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Previous Next The third and final ghost strikes fear into Scrooge's heart. Unlike the first two spirits, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is a silent figure clad in a hooded black robe, almost indistinguishable from the surrounding darkness, and is as mysterious and unknowable as the future itself.

  2. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    Background Dickens portrait by Margaret Gillies (1843), painted during the period when he was writing A Christmas Carol.

  3. A Christmas Carol Stave 4 Summary & Analysis

    Quotes Characters Symbols Lit Devices Quizzes Theme Viz Teachers and parents! Our Teacher Edition on A Christmas Carol makes teaching easy. Everything you need for every book you read. "Sooo much more helpful than SparkNotes. The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive." Get LitCharts A +

  4. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Character Analysis

    Theme Viz Teachers and parents! Our Teacher Edition on A Christmas Carol makes teaching easy. Everything you need for every book you read. "Sooo much more helpful than SparkNotes. The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive." Get LitCharts A + Previous The Ghost of Christmas Past

  5. A Christmas Carol Stave 4 Summary

    Scrooge meets the terrifying Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. Scrooge says to him, I fear you more than any spectre I have seen. However, despite his terror of this spirit, Scrooge has...

  6. A Christmas Carol Stave Four Summary and Analysis

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come solemnly approaches Scrooge in its black garment. It responds to Scrooge's questions with silence and motions for him to follow. They instantly appear in the city and listen in on some businessmen who casually and jokingly discuss someone's death.

  7. Characters

    Silent Dark Ominous The final Ghost is frightening and eerie. It doesn't say a word to Scrooge, but glides along and points out scenes to him. The spirit first shows Scrooge a funeral scene, with...

  8. A Christmas Carol: Mini Essays

    A Christmas Carol is an allegory in that it features events and characters with a clear, fixed symbolic meaning. In the novella, Scrooge represents all the values that are opposed to the idea of Christmas—greed, selfishness, and a lack of goodwill toward one's fellow man. The Ghost of Christmas Past, with his glowing head symbolizing the mind ...

  9. Charles Dickens

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come conveyed him, as before -- though at a different time, he thought: indeed, there seemed no order in these latter visions, save that they were in the Future ...

  10. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in A Christmas Carol

    The Spirit, stronger yet, repulsed him. Holding up his hands in a last prayer to have his fate reversed, he saw an alteration in the Phantom's hood and dress. It shrunk, collapsed, and dwindled down into a bedpost. (4.151-166) Scrooge has gone from fighting the ghosts off to trying desperately to hold onto them and not go back to his own reality.

  11. A Christmas Carol Themes and Analysis

    The Ghost of Christmas Future . The ghost of Christmas future symbolizes death and the mistakes that are sure to haunt him after his death. Without the ghost of Christmas future, Scrooge would've been unlikely to change. The Ghost of Christmas Past. The ghost of Christmas yet to come is a symbol of the effect that memories have on someone as ...

  12. How does the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come assist in Scrooge's

    The Ghost of Christmas Past reminds Scrooge of the happiness he used to know, while the Ghost of Christmas Present shows him alternatives to the joyless way he is celebrating his own...

  13. Why is the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come the most frightening in A

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is the most frightening, because ignorance really can be a bliss when we don't know exactly what we've deserved in our life. Scrooge gets a chance to see...

  14. Symbols in A Christmas Carol

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come: The final spirit, silent and clothed in black, symbolizes the uncertainty and fear of the future. The presence is mysterious and without identifiable features, showing that the future is not yet set. Scrooge's Gravestone: Shown to him by the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, the gravestone symbolizes Scrooge ...

  15. A Christmas Carol Stave 5 Summary & Analysis

    The church bells start chiming. Scrooge runs to the window and sees a beautifully clear, cold day. He shouts out to a young boy on the street what day it is. The boy replies that it is Christmas Day. Scrooge is ecstatic not to have missed it. He asks the boy to go to the nearby shop with the huge prize turkey in the window and to buy it, and offers him half a crown if he comes back quickly.

  16. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come: Key Quotations and Analysis

    Welcome to the fifteenth video in my "'A Christmas Carol' GCSE English Literature Revision" series! In this video, I focus on the depiction of the Ghost of C...

  17. PDF AQA English Literature GCSE A Christmas Carol: Character Profile

    Scrooge moves away from his defiant attitude with the Ghost of Christmas Past. His relationship with the Ghost of Christmas Present takes on an entirely different dynamic , highlighting that he has started to change. When the Spirit first appears, he tells Scrooge to come into th e room. Dickens writes that

  18. The Ghosts of Christmas Yet to Come, ranked by freakiness

    Tight-fisted, mean old miser Ebenezer Scrooge falls asleep on Christmas Eve and is visited by three spirits: the Ghost of Christmas Past, a man in a sleeping cap; the Ghost of Christmas...

  19. PDF A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Stave IV. "The Last of the Spirits". The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently approached. When it came, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery. It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its ...