Undergraduate Programs

Master of Engineering Programs

  • Distance Learning - Master of Engineering in Aerospace Engineering
  • Distance Learning - Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering

Graduate Programs

  • Academic Leadership
  • Staff Directory
  • Advisory Council
  • MAE Inclusivity Statement
  • Collaborative Facilities Across Campus
  • Reuleaux Collection
  • Sibley School Labs
  • Sibley 150 - Celebrating 150 Years of Mechanical Engineering at Cornell
  • MAE Newsletter
  • Giving Opportunities
  • Recruit Students
  • Academic Support
  • Experience and Employment for Students
  • Graduate Services and Activities
  • Jobs at MAE
  • Mental Health Resources
  • Undergraduate Services and Activities

Celebrating 150 years of Mechanical Engineering at Cornell

Our footprint, slide rules, sundials and comedy: bill nye hails scientific solutions.

“Science Guy” Bill Nye ’77 recalled the state of mechanical engineering when he was a student, and looked ahead to the field’s future at “Sibley 150,” a celebration of 150 years of mechanical... Read more about Slide rules, sundials and comedy: Bill Nye hails scientific solutions

Bill Nye standing on a stage, gesturing with his hands near his head. The image is a screenshot from a YouTube video condensing highlights of the Sibley 150 celebration that took place on the Cornell campus on April 25, 2024.

Video Spotlight: Celebrating 150 years of mechanical engineering at Cornell with Sibley 150

The Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering celebrated 150 years of mechanical engineering at Cornell on April 25, 2024, reflecting on the school’s distinguished past and looking forward... Read more about Video Spotlight: Celebrating 150 years of mechanical engineering at Cornell with Sibley 150

Mechanical Engineering Major

Master of Science Program

Ph.D. Degree

collage that reads "Sibley  150"

Sibley School celebrates 150 years of mechanical engineering at Cornell

The Sibley School kicks off its #Sibley150 celebration with a video that looks to the past and the future. Read more

Three-part image with a close-up of Mason Peck on the left, a red square in the middle with the words Space Flight Mechanics, and a close-up of Elaine Petro on the right

MAE Professors launch Spaceflight Mechanics podcast

Elaine Petro and Mason Peck didn’t want to start a podcast—they simply wanted to start a kind-of seminar series. It would feature experts on all aspects of spaceflight technology talking about what... Read more

Gregory Falco

Breaking things to make them stronger

Gregory Falco graduated from Cornell with a B.S. in hotel administration in 2010. It is not likely at the time that Falco would have predicted he would be starting as an assistant professor of... Read more

Kris Young in mission control on Crew-5 launch

Q&A with MAE Alumni Kris Young of SpaceX

Kris Young ’06, M.Eng. ’07 was a program manager of the Cornell University Satellite (CUSat) program in 2006-07 as he earned his M.Eng. degree in aerospace engineering. His first job after college was... Read more

Bill Nye standing on a stage, gesturing with his hands near his head. The image is a screenshot from a YouTube video condensing highlights of the Sibley 150 celebration that took place on the Cornell campus on April 25, 2024.

The Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering celebrated 150 years of mechanical engineering at Cornell on April 25, 2024, reflecting on the school’s distinguished past and looking forward... Read more

MAE Research Areas

mechanical engineering research cornell

Advanced Manufacturing and Materials

mechanical engineering research cornell

Biomechanics and Mechanobiology

mechanical engineering research cornell

Bioengineering and Healthcare

Windmills at sunset

Energy and the Environment

mechanical engineering research cornell

Robotics and Autonomy

mechanical engineering research cornell

Space Science and Engineering

/images/cornell/logo35pt_cornell_white.svg" alt="mechanical engineering research cornell"> Cornell University --> Graduate School

Mechanical engineering m.s. (ithaca), field of study.

Mechanical Engineering

Program Description

The Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offers a terminal M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering . This field of study is one of ninety-four major fields of study comprising The Graduate School at Cornell University. Graduate fields cross traditional college and department boundaries and afford a graduate student maximum flexibility in designing a program represented by faculty from virtually any discipline on campus. One of the top ten Mechanical Engineering departments in the U.S., our department hosts 40 faculty members with diverse research interests. Cornell, located in the beautiful New York Finger Lakes region, is home to a diverse student community with a large international student population.

Our Master of Science (M.S.) program in Mechanical Engineering provides classroom training and experience with research methodology at one of the premier research universities in the world. Our graduates find that their Cornell training and the resulting M.S. degree prepares them to succeed in industry, government, and academia. Please note there is no financial support available to students in this program—it is self-paid by the student.

The two-year M.S. program combines academic rigor with a strong research component. Working with faculty advisors, M.S. student tailor their studies to their particular interests and backgrounds, incorporating core topics in mechanical engineering as well as specialized courses. 

Our M.S. students undertake a substantive body of research in the research group of a Field faculty member. They document their research in a master's thesis, which they defend in a formal examination by a faculty committee. Research projects are chosen in consultation with the supervising faculty member and enable students to benefit from Cornell's powerful combination of an unusually collaborative and interdisciplinary culture and outstanding research facilities. Mechanical Engineering has vibrant research programs in many research areas. 

  M.S. Program details: 

  • Duration: 4 terms
  • S. Thesis required. The collective academic expectations of committee is that an M.S. Thesis should be publishable as independent research or be a significant secondary author contribution to a publication with postdoc/grad student/PI as first author. 

Course requirements:

  • 48 total credits
  • 20 credits of research (MAE 8900)
  • complete MAE 7999, the departmental colloquium, twice
  • exclusive of MAE 8900 and MAE 7999, students must complete 15 credits at 5000 level or above; 6 credits of which must be at 6000 level or above.

You do not choose a master's thesis advisor before applying. Applications, reviewed by a committee of the faculty, are selected for admission based on a combination of factors: academic performance, letters of recommendation, research experience, and research interests that are a good fit with the research interests of our faculty. Matriculated students are afforded the opportunity to interact with a number of faculty in seeking a good student-advisor match. 

The M.S. program results in a "terminal" master's degree; it is not related to the Ph.D. program and is not a pathway into the Ph.D. program in Mechanical Engineering. This program is not recommended for students wishing to pursue at PhD at Cornell.  Financial aid in the form of research assistantships and teaching assistantships are not provided for the M.S. degree program.

Contact Information

107 Upson Hall Cornell University Ithaca, NY  14853

Concentrations by Subject

  • biomedical mechanics
  • dynamics and control
  • energy and sustainability
  • fluid dynamics
  • micro- and nanoscale engineering
  • solid mechanics and materials
  • thermal science

Visit the Graduate School's Tuition Rates page.

Application Requirements and Deadlines

Fall, December 1; no spring admissions

Requirements Summary:

Applicants should hold a bachelor's degree in engineering or the physical sciences. Admission is offered only for the fall semester, except in unusual cases. A field brochure is available on request from the graduate field office.

  • all  Graduate School Requirements , including the  English Language Proficiency Requirement for all applicant
  • three recommendations
  • Ph.D. --email questions regarding the Ph.D. application to [email protected] or see the MAE Ph.D . home page 
  • Resume or C.V.

Learning Outcomes

Learn advanced research skills

  • Synthesize existing knowledge, identifying and accessing appropriate resources and other sources of relevant information and critically analyzing and evaluating one’s own findings and those of others
  • Apply existing research methodologies, techniques, and technical skills

Demonstrate commitment to advancing the values of scholarship

  • Keep abreast of current advances within one’s field and related areas
  • Show commitment to personal professional development through engagement in professional societies and other knowledge transfer modes

Demonstrate professional skills

  • Adhere to ethical standards in the discipline
  • Communicate in a style appropriate to the discipline
  • Listen, give, and receive feedback effectively

Narrow Your Search

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Cornell University Office of Undergraduate Research

  • Research Opportunities
  • Summer Opportunities

Summer research opportunity programs are designed to introduce undergraduates to leading scholars at the nation’s top research institutions.

Participating undergraduates are engaged in graduate level research with faculty guidance over an eight- to- ten-week period in the summer. Funding is often provided. Applications are typically due in early January.

Cornell Programs

  • Cornell Cooperative Extension Summer Internships
  • Cornell Agri-Tech Summer Research Scholars Program
  • College of Arts and Sciences Nexus Scholars Program
  • Bowers CIS Undergraduate Research Experience (BURE)
  • Cornell Center for Materials Research
  • College of Engineering Student Grant Program
  • Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source
  • Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-based Sciences and Education (CLASSE)
  • Cornell NanoScale Science & Technology Facility Research Experience for Undergraduates (CNF REU) Program
  • Food Science Summer Scholars Program
  • Molecular Biology and Genetics will consider Leadership Alliance applicants.
  • Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Summer Research Program
  • Mathematics REU
  • Microbial Friends and Foes
  • Molecular Biology and Genetics Research Experience for Undergraduates
  • National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center Summer Student Program
  • Nexus Scholars Program in Arts & Sciences
  • Plant Genome Research Summer Internship
  • Platform for the Accelerated Realization, Analysis, and Discovery of Interface Materials Research Experience for Undergraduates (PARADIM REU) Program
  • REU Program in Astrophysics and Planetary Science
  • Shoals Marine Lab in Maine
  • Information on Summer Internships with aerospace companies in New York State
  • Summer Mathematics Institute

National and International Programs

  • American Economic Association Summer Program (Pre-graduate study and research)
  • Amgen Scholars Program
  • REU Programs in Engineering
  • Graduate Horizons (A four day intensive course for Native American, Native Alaskan and Native Hawaiian students)
  • Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers (for prospective grad students interested in humanities, social sciences, and education)
  • Leadership Alliance Summer Research Early Identification Program (includes programs funded by the Mellon-Mays Foundation for students in the humanites)
  • Pathways to Science (Use this website to search for programs in STEM, including undergraduate summer research opportunities as well as graduate fellowships and post-doctoral positions)
  • Ralph Bunche Institute
  • Summer Internships through Space Grant for prospective grad students in government and political science

Additional Resources

  • The Cornell Graduate School lists summer research opportunities for undergraduates
  • The Office of Undergraduate Biology lists summer research opportunities on their website
  • The National Science Foundation lists summer research opportunities for undergraduates
  • Experience.cornell.edu helps Cornell students find research opportunities
  • Cross-Institutional Initiatives
  • Weill Medical Opportunities

Cornell Engineering: A Virtual Visit

Learn More About Cornell Engineering

Cornell Engineering

Undergraduate Degree Program for the Sibley School Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Do your interests lie in the areas of aircraft and space vehicles, diesel engines, the mechanics and control of musculoskeletal systems, or solar and other renewable energy conversion devices? If you understand the essential need for discovering and applying new knowledge and developing new tools for the practice of engineering, then the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering at Cornell may be right for you.

Two Major Streams of Mechanical Engineering:

  • Mechanical systems (structural analysis, dynamics, and control), and Materials Processing are concerned with the design, analysis, testing, and manufacture of machinery, vehicles, devices, and systems. Particular areas of concentration are mechanical systems, vehicle engineering, biomechanics, and materials processing and precision engineering. Other topics covered are computer aided design, vibrations and control systems, and dynamics.
  • Fluids, energy, and heat-transfer systems are concerned with the experimental and theoretical aspects of fluid flow and heat transfer; the sciences of thermodynamics and combustion; and the analysis and design of related systems. Specific areas of concentration include fluids/aerospace engineering; thermal systems engineering; and vehicle engineering.

The undergraduate major program is a coordinated sequence of general courses you begin in your second year. You are then well equipped to take upper-level electives in aerospace engineering, biomechanics, energy and the environment, engineering materials, mechanical systems and design, thermo-fluids engineering, or vehicle engineering. You may also participate in an independent project either within a student project team or in conjunction with a faculty member.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) faculty members are experts in aerospace, biomechanical, and thermal systems engineering, as well as fluid mechanics, mechanics of materials, and robotics. They contribute their wealth of knowledge and expertise to students who can choose from a variety of exciting research and design projects, such as:

  • designing robotics for planetary exploration, disaster relief, and environmental monitoring
  • designing and building a Baja car (an off-road race car), an unmanned vehicle capable of long-duration flight, or a race car
  • designing a miniature mechanism with flapping wings (a miniornithopter)
  • designing a system for effective growth of artificial cartilage tissue
  • designing a walking robot that can set a new world distance record
  • designing software for multi-material 3D printing
  • designing, building, launching, and operating a highly maneuverable, 50K nanosatellite
  • exploring new machine learning algorithms to control a robot constructed of struts and cables
  • designing a wind farm layout using two-year wind data and redesigning wind turbine blades
  • developing artificial intelligence in computer-aided design
  • modeling the impact of clean diesel technologies on air quality
  • studying how vibrating bodies in the wind may yield a source of energy
  • developing methods to determine the strength of musculoskeletal tissues
  • investigating aircraft wing tip vortex wakes
  • designing evolutionary computation to model and forecast earthquakes
  • designing a system to track the dispersion of particulates emitted by vehicles
  • designing and wind-tunnel testing a body for a race car

Master of Engineering Degree Program

The Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) degree program in mechanical engineering, aerospace engineering, or engineering mechanics is a one-year professional course of study that allows students to develop a high level of competence in engineering science, current technology, and engineering design. It is interdisciplinary in nature and allows flexibility in tailoring a program to fit individual needs and interests. Typical M.Eng. graduates enter the work force with greater opportunities and at significantly higher salaries than those entering with a B.S. degree, and many are offered earlier chances of advancement. Although the majority of M.Eng. students start the program immediately following the completion of their B.S. degrees, some are industrial employees who have enrolled through their companies’ continuing education programs.

Toyota Material Handling, Cornell Engineering Announce Partnership on Innovative Forklift Learning Studio

Toyota Material Handling (TMH) and Cornell University’s College of Engineering have announced a unique partnership dedicated to the development of an innovative learning studio that incorporates Toyota equipment to elevate immersive engineering education to an entirely new level.

Some Areas of Faculty Research

  • civil engineering materials
  • contaminant transport, behavior and treatment
  • engineering management
  • geotechnical engineering
  • remote sensing
  • structural engineering
  • structural mechanics
  • transportation engineering and planning
  • transportation systems

Mechanical Engineering by the Numbers

Number of Mechanical Engineering undergraduate students: 337

Starting salaries of B.S. Mechanical Engineering graduates (for 2021):

  • Median salary: $78,000
  • High salary: $120,000

Post-graduate plans for mechanical engineers at the time of graduation (2021):

  • Employed 32% 32%
  • Attending Graduate School 63% 63%
  • Seeking Employment 4% 4%
  • Seeking Acceptance to Graduate School 1% 1%
  • Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Nelly Andarawis-Puri

Nelly Andarawis-Puri

C. Thomas Avedisian

C. Thomas Avedisian

Rebecca J. Barthelmie

Rebecca J. Barthelmie

Gregory Bewley

Gregory Bewley

Lawrence Bonassar

Lawrence Bonassar

Nilolaos Bouklas

Nilolaos Bouklas

Mark Campbell

Mark Campbell

Olivier Desjardins

Olivier Desjardins

David Erickson

David Erickson

Mahdi Esmaily Moghadam

Mahdi Esmaily Moghadam

Silvia Ferrari

Silvia Ferrari

Benjamin M. Finio

Benjamin M. Finio

Elizabeth M. Fisher

Elizabeth M. Fisher

Keith Green

Keith Green

Maha Haji

Mostafa Hassani

Christopher J. Hernandez

Christopher J. Hernandez

Guy Hoffman

Guy Hoffman

Herbert Hui

Herbert Hui

Brian Kirby

Brian Kirby

Hadas Kress-Gazit

Hadas Kress-Gazit

James Lloyd

James Lloyd

Michel Yves Louge

Michel Yves Louge

Douglas MacMartin

Douglas MacMartin

Matthew Miller

Matthew Miller

Atieh Moridi

Atieh Moridi

Mason Peck

Perrine Pepiot

Elaine Petro

Elaine Petro

Richard H. Rand

Richard H. Rand

Hadas Ritz

Timothy Sands

Dmitry Savransky

Dmitry Savransky

Robert F. Shepherd

Robert F. Shepherd

Meredith Silberstein

Meredith Silberstein

Sadaf Sobhani

Sadaf Sobhani

Zhiting Tian

Zhiting Tian

Marjolein van der Meulen

Marjolein van der Meulen

Andrew van Paridon

Andrew van Paridon

Jane Wang

Chas Williamson

Jingjie Yeo

Jingjie Yeo

Alan Zehnder

Alan Zehnder

K. Max Zhang

K. Max Zhang

mechanical engineering research cornell

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)

Connect with us

Accelerate your career and earning potential with a professional graduate degree from Cornell. The M.Eng. is designed to prepare students for the professional arena through two- and three-semester experiences that offer: (1) world-class coursework in advanced engineering methods, (2) opportunities to synthesize and apply that knowledge through real-world project experiences, and (3) professional development activities that connect students with each other, with alumni, and with potential employers.

All M.Eng. degree programs share these five Learning Outcomes:

  • Mastery and Application of Core Disciplinary Knowledge
  • Problem Formulation and Organization, and Planning of the Solution Process
  • Collaborative Problem Solving and Issue Resolution
  • Communication of Knowledge, Ideas, and Decision Justification
  • Self-Directed Learning and Professional Development

We offer 14 M.Eng. programs on our Ithaca campus. Online, part-time programs are also available!

  • Aerospace Engineering ↪ Distance Learning Option
  • Biological and Environmental Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Engineering Management ↪ Distance Learning Option
  • Engineering Physics
  • Geological Sciences
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering ↪ Distance Learning Option
  • Operations Research and Information Engineering
  • Systems Engineering ↪ Distance Learning Option
  • Industrial Partnership Program

Cornell M.Eng. Experience

Video transcription

The Cornell M.Eng. experience immerses students in an environment where they are surrounded by excellence and trained to have an impact in industry. The one-year, 30 credit professional degree is embedded with practical experience, professional development, and project-based coursework.

M.Eng. students work together

M.Eng. graduates employed within six months of graduation

expected boost in starting salary over undergraduate degrees

average U.S. salary reported by M.Eng. graduates

Top 3 reasons students choose Cornell M.Eng.:

  • Enhanced career opportunities
  • Specialization options

According to employers, Cornell M.Eng. graduates are:

  • Promoted faster
  • Skillful in applying new knowledge to their jobs

Dedicated career support is available to all M.Eng. Students.

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Top m.eng. employers:.

  • American Express
  • BAE Systems
  • Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Capital One
  • Epic Systems
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab
  • JPMorgan Chase
  • Lockheed Martin
  • Morgan Stanley
  • National One
  • Northrop Grumman
  • Sandia National Labs

M.Eng. Program Support Office

Yong Joo, Jennifer Micale, Jennifer Mimno, and Gibran el-Sulayman

Senior Associate Dean of the Master of Engineering Programs

Jennifer Micale

M.Eng. Career Services Manager

Jennifer Mimno

M.Eng. Accreditation and Recruitment Coordinator

Gibran el-Sulayman

M.Eng. Programs Assistant

M.Eng. Students

Staff smile together in front of Duffield Hall

Kathryn Caggiano

Associate Dean of the Master of Engineering Programs

Director, M.Eng. Programs Support Services Office

Director for M.Eng. Programs Admissions and Recruitment

Heidi Morton

M.Eng. Career Coordinator

students in professional attire

M.Eng. Career Resources

  • Job/Internship & Interviewing Resources
  • M.Eng. Alumni Career Connections
  • M.Eng. Events & Programming
  • On-Campus Recruiting and Using Handshake
  • U.S. Job Search for International Students

student choosing their major

Advising for M.Eng. Students

students at eHub

Entrepreneurship Options for M.Eng. Students

  • Entrepreneurship Projects for M.Eng.

people working on a computer

Registrar Forms

  • Affiliation Form Contacts

students talking outside Duffield

Paying for Your Degree

  • Knight Scholarship Program

mechanical engineering research cornell

Cornell Engineering Undergraduate / Master of Engineering Projects Website

[email protected]

Connect With Us

Sign up for mailing list

Admissions for M.Eng. Students

M.Eng. Student Ambassadors

M.Eng. Ambassadors are available to answer non-application questions about why they chose Cornell, what classes they are taking, their M.Eng. project, their job search process, how they like Cornell and Ithaca, and related non-application questions. Admissions-related questions (such as acceptance criteria, application, etc.) should be directed to the appropriate staff of each M.Eng. program. Student Ambassadors are only available for email correspondence between September 1 and May 20 each year.

M.Eng. Student Ambassador Contact Form

Additional Resources

Cornell Engineering Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) Student Resources (PDF)

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Latest news & events, cross-campus collaboration unlocks health systems m.eng. pathway.

The Department of Population Health Sciences at Weill Cornell Medicine and the Systems Engineering program in Cornell Engineering have teamed up to create a Health Systems Engineering pathway in the... Read more about Cross-campus collaboration unlocks health systems M.Eng. pathway

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Ph.D. student Lainie Eisner was drawn to Cornell specifically for its relationship with Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Read more about Investigating degenerative tendon disease and repair

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Cornell Engineering Magazine

The winter 2023 issue highlights interesting aspects of our vibrant on-campus student experience. Read more

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Celebrating 140 Years of Women at Cornell Engineering

  • MAE 1112 - Practical Computing for Engineering (crosslisted)
  • MAE 1130 - Introduction to Computer-Aided Manufacture
  • MAE 1170 - Introduction to Mechanical Engineering (crosslisted)
  • MAE 1510 - Modeling and Simulation of Real-World Scientific Problems (crosslisted)
  • MAE 1900 - Freshman and Nontechnical Projects in Mechanical Engineering
  • MAE 2210 - Thermodynamics (crosslisted)
  • MAE 2250 - Mechanical Synthesis
  • MAE 2270 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship for Engineers (crosslisted)
  • MAE 3050 - Introduction to Aeronautics
  • MAE 3120 - Mechanical Properties of Materials, Processing, and Design (crosslisted)
  • MAE 3130 - Atomic and Molecular Structure of Matter (crosslisted)
  • MAE 3230 - Introductory Fluid Mechanics
  • MAE 3240 - Heat Transfer
  • MAE 3260 - System Dynamics
  • MAE 3270 - Mechanics of Engineering Materials
  • MAE 3280 - Experimental and Applied Mechanics of Structures
  • MAE 3780 - Mechatronics
  • MAE 3783 - Mechatronics
  • MAE 4020 - [Wind Power]
  • MAE 4021 - [Wind Power]
  • MAE 4060 - Introduction to Spaceflight Mechanics
  • MAE 4120 - [Community Wind Energy Research] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4121 - [Community Wind Energy Research]
  • MAE 4130 - Mechanics of Composite Structures
  • MAE 4131 - Mechanics of Composite Structures
  • MAE 4150 - GPS: Theory and Design (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4180 - [Autonomous Mobile Robots] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4230 - Intermediate Fluid Dynamics
  • MAE 4231 - Intermediate Fluid Dynamics
  • MAE 4250 - FSAE Automotive Design Project
  • MAE 4272 - Fluids/Heat Transfer Laboratory
  • MAE 4291 - Supervised Senior Design Experience
  • MAE 4300 - Professional Practice in Mechanical Engineering
  • MAE 4320 - [Integrated Micro Sensors and Actuators: Bridging the Physical and Digital Worlds] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4340 - Innovative Product Design via Digital Manufacturing
  • MAE 4341 - Innovative Product Design via Digital Manufacturing
  • MAE 4530 - Computer-Aided Engineering: Applications to Biological Processes (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4560 - [Bioastronautics and Human Performance]
  • MAE 4580 - Introduction to Nuclear Science and Engineering (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4590 - Introduction to Controlled Fusion: Principles and Technology (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4610 - Entrepreneurship for Engineers (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4640 - Orthopaedic Tissue Mechanics (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4641 - Orthopaedic Tissue Mechanics
  • MAE 4650 - Biofluid Mechanics
  • MAE 4651 - Biofluid Mechanics
  • MAE 4660 - Biomedical Engineering Analysis of Metabolic and Structural Systems (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4700 - Finite Element Analysis for Mechanical and Aerospace Design
  • MAE 4701 - Finite Element Analysis for Mechanical and Aerospace Design
  • MAE 4730 - Intermediate Dynamics and Vibrations
  • MAE 4750 - [Robotic Manipulation] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4758 - [Robot Learning] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 4780 - Feedback Control Systems
  • MAE 4860 - Automotive Engineering
  • MAE 4861 - Automotive Engineering
  • MAE 4900 - Individual and Group Projects in Mechanical Engineering
  • MAE 4980 - Teaching Experience in Mechanical Engineering
  • MAE 5010 - Future Energy Systems
  • MAE 5020 - [Wind Power]
  • MAE 5070 - [Dynamics of Flight Vehicles]
  • MAE 5130 - Mechanical Properties of Thin Films (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5150 - GPS: Theory and Design
  • MAE 5180 - [Autonomous Mobile Robots]
  • MAE 5200 - Dimensional Tolerancing in Mechanical Design
  • MAE 5210 - Dimensional Tolerancing in Mechanical Design
  • MAE 5230 - Intermediate Fluid Dynamics with CFD
  • MAE 5340 - Innovative Product Design via Digital Manufacturing
  • MAE 5430 - Combustion Processes
  • MAE 5459 - Energy Seminar I (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5469 - Energy Seminar II (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5560 - [Bioastronautics and Human Performance]
  • MAE 5640 - Orthopaedic Tissue Mechanics
  • MAE 5650 - Biofluid Mechanics
  • MAE 5700 - Finite Element Analysis for Mechanical and Aerospace Design
  • MAE 5710 - Applied Dynamics: Robotics, Vehicles, Machines and Biomechanics
  • MAE 5730 - Intermediate Dynamics and Vibrations
  • MAE 5750 - [Robotic Manipulation] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5780 - Feedback Control Systems
  • MAE 5860 - Automotive Engineering
  • MAE 5910 - Model Based Systems Engineering (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5920 - Systems Analysis Behavior and Optimization (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5930 - Systems Engineering and Six Sigma for the Design and Operation of Reliable Systems (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5949 - Enterprise Engineering Colloquium (crosslisted)
  • MAE 5950 - Theory and Practice of Systems Architecture (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6010 - Foundations of Fluid Mechanics I (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6020 - [Foundations of Fluid Mechanics II]
  • MAE 6060 - Spacecraft Attitude Dynamics, Estimation, and Control
  • MAE 6110 - Foundations of Solid Mechanics I
  • MAE 6120 - Foundations of Solid Mechanics II
  • MAE 6140 - [State Variable Modeling]
  • MAE 6230 - Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • MAE 6240 - Physics of Micro and Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6270 - Experimental Methods in Fluid Dynamics (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6310 - Turbulence and Turbulent Flows
  • MAE 6330 - [Multiphase Flow Dynamics]
  • MAE 6430 - [Computational Combustion]
  • MAE 6480 - [Air Quality and Atmospheric Chemistry] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6510 - Advanced Heat Transfer
  • MAE 6560 - [Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion]
  • MAE 6620 - [Biomedical Technologies for Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Mobile and Global Health]
  • MAE 6640 - [Mechanics of Bone] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6650 - [Principles of Tissue Engineering] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6670 - Soft Tissue Biomechanics II: Viscoelasticity and Phasic Theory
  • MAE 6680 - Cancer for Engineers and Physicists (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6690 - [Biofluid Mechanics and Physiological Transport] (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6700 - [Advanced Dynamics]
  • MAE 6710 - Human-Robot Interaction: Algorithms and Experiments
  • MAE 6730 - Introduction to Robotic Mobile Manipulation (crosslisted)
  • MAE 6760 - [Model-Based Estimation]
  • MAE 6770 - Formal Methods for Robotics
  • MAE 6780 - Multivariable Control Theory
  • MAE 6790 - Intelligent Sensor Planning and Control
  • MAE 6850 - [Hamiltonian Dynamics]
  • MAE 6900 - Special Investigations in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  • MAE 6910 - M.Eng. Independent Study
  • MAE 6949 - Seminar for First-Year MAE Ph.D. Students
  • MAE 6950 - Special Topics
  • MAE 6969 - [Seminar in GPS and GNSS]
  • MAE 7110 - [Micromechanical Modeling and Diffraction Experiments for Crystalline Solids]
  • MAE 7840 - [Bayesian Scientific Computing]
  • MAE 7150 - [Atomistic Modeling of Materials]
  • MAE 7340 - [Analysis of Turbulent Flows]
  • MAE 7910 - Mechanical and Aerospace Research Conference
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Exploring frontiers of mechanical engineering

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From cutting-edge robotics, design, and bioengineering to sustainable energy solutions, ocean engineering, nanotechnology, and innovative materials science, MechE students and their advisors are doing incredibly innovative work. The graduate students highlighted here represent a snapshot of the great work in progress this spring across the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and demonstrate the ways the future of this field is as limitless as the imaginations of its practitioners.

Democratizing design through AI

Lyle Regenwetter Hometown: Champaign, Illinois Advisor: Assistant Professor Faez Ahmed Interests: Food, climbing, skiing, soccer, tennis, cooking

Lyle Regenwetter finds excitement in the prospect of generative AI to "democratize" design and enable inexperienced designers to tackle complex design problems. His research explores new training methods through which generative AI models can be taught to implicitly obey design constraints and synthesize higher-performing designs. Knowing that prospective designers often have an intimate knowledge of the needs of users, but may otherwise lack the technical training to create solutions, Regenwetter also develops human-AI collaborative tools that allow AI models to interact and support designers in popular CAD software and real design problems. 

Solving a whale of a problem 

Loïcka Baille Hometown: L’Escale, France Advisor: Daniel Zitterbart Interests: Being outdoors — scuba diving, spelunking, or climbing. Sailing on the Charles River, martial arts classes, and playing volleyball

Loïcka Baille’s research focuses on developing remote sensing technologies to study and protect marine life. Her main project revolves around improving onboard whale detection technology to prevent vessel strikes, with a special focus on protecting North Atlantic right whales. Baille is also involved in an ongoing study of Emperor penguins. Her team visits Antarctica annually to tag penguins and gather data to enhance their understanding of penguin population dynamics and draw conclusions regarding the overall health of the ecosystem.

Water, water anywhere

Carlos Díaz-Marín Hometown: San José, Costa Rica Advisor: Professor Gang Chen | Former Advisor: Professor Evelyn Wang Interests: New England hiking, biking, and dancing

Carlos Díaz-Marín designs and synthesizes inexpensive salt-polymer materials that can capture large amounts of humidity from the air. He aims to change the way we generate potable water from the air, even in arid conditions. In addition to water generation, these salt-polymer materials can also be used as thermal batteries, capable of storing and reusing heat. Beyond the scientific applications, Díaz-Marín is excited to continue doing research that can have big social impacts, and that finds and explains new physical phenomena. As a LatinX person, Díaz-Marín is also driven to help increase diversity in STEM.

Scalable fabrication of nano-architected materials

Somayajulu Dhulipala Hometown: Hyderabad, India Advisor: Assistant Professor Carlos Portela Interests: Space exploration, taekwondo, meditation.

Somayajulu Dhulipala works on developing lightweight materials with tunable mechanical properties. He is currently working on methods for the scalable fabrication of nano-architected materials and predicting their mechanical properties. The ability to fine-tune the mechanical properties of specific materials brings versatility and adaptability, making these materials suitable for a wide range of applications across multiple industries. While the research applications are quite diverse, Dhulipala is passionate about making space habitable for humanity, a crucial step toward becoming a spacefaring civilization.

Ingestible health-care devices

Jimmy McRae Hometown: Woburn, Massachusetts Advisor: Associate Professor Giovani Traverso Interests: Anything basketball-related: playing, watching, going to games, organizing hometown tournaments 

Jimmy McRae aims to drastically improve diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities through noninvasive health-care technologies. His research focuses on leveraging materials, mechanics, embedded systems, and microfabrication to develop novel ingestible electronic and mechatronic devices. This ranges from ingestible electroceutical capsules that modulate hunger-regulating hormones to devices capable of continuous ultralong monitoring and remotely triggerable actuations from within the stomach. The principles that guide McRae’s work to develop devices that function in extreme environments can be applied far beyond the gastrointestinal tract, with applications for outer space, the ocean, and more.

Freestyle BMX meets machine learning

Eva Nates Hometown: Narberth, Pennsylvania  Advisor: Professor Peko Hosoi Interests: Rowing, running, biking, hiking, baking

Eva Nates is working with the Australian Cycling Team to create a tool to classify Bicycle Motocross Freestyle (BMX FS) tricks. She uses a singular value decomposition method to conduct a principal component analysis of the time-dependent point-tracking data of an athlete and their bike during a run to classify each trick. The 2024 Olympic team hopes to incorporate this tool in their training workflow, and Nates worked alongside the team at their facilities on the Gold Coast of Australia during MIT’s Independent Activities Period in January.

Augmenting Astronauts with Wearable Limbs 

Erik Ballesteros Hometown: Spring, Texas Advisor: Professor Harry Asada Interests: Cosplay, Star Wars, Lego bricks

Erik Ballesteros’s research seeks to support astronauts who are conducting planetary extravehicular activities through the use of supernumerary robotic limbs (SuperLimbs). His work is tailored toward design and control manifestation to assist astronauts with post-fall recovery, human-leader/robot-follower quadruped locomotion, and coordinated manipulation between the SuperLimbs and the astronaut to perform tasks like excavation and sample handling.

This article appeared in the Spring 2024 edition of the Department of Mechanical Engineering's magazine,  MechE Connects . 

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Spring 2024 ECE M.Eng. poster session winners

The ECE M.Eng. Poster Session was held in the Duffield Atrium on Tuesday, May 7, 2024. Over 70 posters were evaluated by a combination of ECE faculty members and ECE Ph.D. students. The judges selected winners in seven individual categories, as well as overall Best in Show.

Category: AI / Pattern Recognition (Computer Vision, Machine Learning, Robotics)

Poster Title: Design of a Large-Scale Robotic Swarm

M.Eng. Student: Eshita Sangani

Category: Bio-Signals (Neural, controls, Imaging, Bioinformatics)

Poster Title: Machine Learning for Predicting Properties of Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Vehicles

M.Eng. Students: Yiduo Wang and Qingyuan Xie

Category: Communications (Information Theory, Network Coding, Digital Communications)

Poster Title: Threading and Networking Developments for the Raspberry Pi Pico W

M.Eng. Students: Harris Miller and Liam Kain

Category: Computer Systems (OS, Embedded, Networks, Architecture, Database)

Poster Title: Hardware Acceleration of Computer Vision Algorithms using Field Programmable Gate Arrays

M.Eng. Student: Dengyu Tu

Category: Electronic Devices + Materials (Analog, Digital, Optics, MEMS, Circuits)

Poster Title: High Speed Photodetector Design and testing for MOTEs

M.Eng. Student: Wilson Huang

Category: Large Scale Systems (Power Systems, Energy)

Poster Title: Methodology to Select Optimal System Voltage for Electric Forklifts

M.Eng. Student: Asna Altaf

Category: Signal and Information Processing

Poster Title: Open-source Handheld pH Sensor with Mobile App

M.Eng. Students: Yuzhong Zheng and Yapeng Teng

Category: Best in Show

Poster Title: Using Error-Correcting Codes to Simulate Channels

M.Eng. Student: Rochelle Barsz 

Research Poster from Harris Miller and Liam Kain

Winning research posters

Over 70 students from the Masters in Engineering (M.Eng.) program within Cornell Electrical and Computer Engineering presented their research during the annual Spring M.Eng. poster session. 

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Cross-campus collaboration unlocks health systems M.Eng. pathway

By diane tessaglia-hymes.

For students interested in becoming leaders who are capable of solving complex engineering problems in health-focused industries, a new degree pathway has opened up through a  collaboration between Weill Cornell Medicine and Cornell’s Ithaca campus.

The Department of Population Health Sciences at Weill Cornell Medicine and the Systems Engineering program in Cornell Engineering have teamed up to create a Health Systems Engineering pathway in the existing Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) program offered by Systems Engineering.

“When I heard about this concept for the first time, I knew it was a winner,” said Emmanuel Giannelis, the director of Cornell’s Engineering Innovations in Medicine initiative, which launched in 2022 to accelerate connections between the two campuses. “It is amazing how quickly the team has turned this concept into a reality, which indicates that we’re doing something together that meets a real need.”

Cornell Engineering’s M.Eng. programs can typically be completed in as few as two semesters and provide students with a professional degree that can be leveraged to increase their professional opportunities and growth. The Systems Engineering program equips engineers with the broad expertise and perspective necessary to address interconnected problems with solutions that are sustainable, responsible and achievable. It has provided distance learning programs, often an ideal option for working professionals, for more than 16 years.

The new Health Systems Engineering pathway is offered either on the Ithaca campus or through distance learning. To earn their degree, students complete interdisciplinary Systems Engineering core courses as well as selected pre-approved electives, such as Healthcare Data Management and Analysis, Clinical Natural Language Processing, or AI for Healthcare Systems Engineering.

“As world leaders in medicine and systems engineering, as well as in professional education and research, this partnership feels like a natural step to meet societal needs,” said Jyotishman Pathak, the Frances and John L. Loeb Professor of Medical Informatics at Weill Cornell Medicine. “The health systems engineering field – in which the needs of multiple stakeholders are balanced against emerging new technology and evolving societal impacts – is one in which graduates of this program can have a huge impact.”

All students in the pathway also take part in a healthcare-focused project developed around real-world challenges with real-world stakeholders.

"Our intention through this collaboration is to make the work our students do while they are enrolled in the program — and are prepared to do after graduation — as impactful as possible,” said Clifford Whitcomb, professor of practice in Systems Engineering. “Our transdisciplinary educational program will provide students with three key elements: a deep understanding of health systems, a strong quantitative engineering foundation, and hands-on clinical experience.”

Prospective students and future health industry leaders can already apply to this cross-campus, interdisciplinary program. The Health Systems Engineering M. Eng. pathway is accepting applications for the fall 2024 semester until May 31, and for the 2025 spring semester until Dec. 1, 2024.

“Collaborations with systems engineering students and faculty have introduced systems principles to the analysis of the complex healthcare landscape,” said Yiye Zhang, associate professor of population health sciences at Weill Cornell Medicine. “The synergy between systems engineering and health informatics will allow new perspectives for understanding current challenges and facilitating innovations.”

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George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

Gregory Sawicki, Aaron Young

Woodruff School Faculty Awarded $2.6 Million NIH Research Project Grant

May 10, 2024 By Chloe Arrington

Faculty from the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, including Associate Professors Gregory Sawicki and Aaron Young , have been awarded a five-year, $2.6 million Research Project Grant (R01) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

“We are grateful to our NIH sponsor for this award to improve treatment of post-stroke individuals using advanced robotic solutions,” said Young.

The R01 will support a project focused on using optimization and artificial intelligence to personalize exoskeleton assistance for individuals with symptoms resulting from stroke. Sawicki and Young will collaborate with researchers from the Emory Rehabilitation Hospital including Associate Professor Trisha Kesar .

“As a stroke researcher, I am eagerly looking forward to making progress on this project, and paving the way for leading-edge technologies and technology-driven treatment strategies that maximize functional independence and quality of life of people with neuro-pathologies," said Kesar.

The intervention for study participants will include a training therapy program that will use biofeedback to increase the efficiency of exosuits for wearers.   

Kinsey Herrin , senior research scientist in the Woodruff School, explained the extended benefits of the study, including being able to increase safety for stroke patients who are moving outdoors. “One aspect of this project is testing our technologies on stroke survivors as they're walking outside. Being outside is a small thing that many of us take for granted, but a devastating loss for many following a stroke.”  

Sawicki is also looking forward to the project. "This new project is truly a tour de force that leverages a highly talented interdisciplinary team of engineers, clinical scientists, and prosthetics/orthotics experts who all bring key elements needed to build assistive technology that can work in real-world scenarios."

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Room-Temperature Superconductor Discovery Is Retracted

It was the second paper led by Ranga P. Dias, a researcher at the University of Rochester, that the journal Nature has retracted.

Ranga Dias stands with his arms folded in front of a blackboard, which is covered in various diagrams and formulas written in colored chalk. He wears a blue sweater over a collared shirt.

By Kenneth Chang

Nature, one of the most prestigious journals in scientific publishing, on Tuesday retracted a high-profile paper it had published in March that claimed the discovery of a superconductor that worked at everyday temperatures.

It was the second superconductor paper involving Ranga P. Dias, a professor of mechanical engineering and physics at the University of Rochester in New York State, to be retracted by the journal in just over a year. It joined an unrelated paper retracted by another journal in which Dr. Dias was a key author.

Dr. Dias and his colleagues’ research is the latest in a long list of claims of room-temperature superconductors that have failed to pan out. But the retraction raised uncomfortable questions for Nature about why the journal’s editors publicized the research after they had already scrutinized and retracted an earlier paper from the same group.

A spokesman for Dr. Dias said that the scientist denied allegations of research misconduct. “Professor Dias intends to resubmit the scientific paper to a journal with a more independent editorial process,” the representative said.

First discovered in 1911, superconductors can seem almost magical — they conduct electricity without resistance. However, no known materials are superconductors in everyday conditions. Most require ultracold temperatures, and recent advances toward superconductors that function at higher temperatures require crushing pressures.

A superconductor that works at everyday temperatures and pressures could find use in M.R.I. scanners, novel electronic devices and levitating trains.

Superconductors unexpectedly became a viral topic on social networks over the summer when a different group of scientists, in South Korea, also claimed to have discovered a room-temperature superconductor, named LK-99. Within a couple of weeks, the excitement died away after other scientists were unable to confirm the superconductivity observations and came up with plausible alternative explanations.

Even though it was published in a high-profile journal, Dr. Dias’s claim of a room-temperature superconductor did not set off euphoria like LK-99 did because many scientists in the field already regarded his work with doubt.

In the Nature paper published in March, Dr. Dias and his colleagues reported that they had discovered a material — lutetium hydride with some nitrogen added — that was able to superconduct electricity at temperatures of up to 70 degrees Fahrenheit. It still required pressure of 145,000 pounds per square inch, which is not difficult to apply in a laboratory. The material took on a red hue when squeezed, leading Dr. Dias to nickname it “reddmatter” after a substance in a “Star Trek” movie .

Less than three years earlier, Nature published a paper from Dr. Dias and many of the same scientists. It described a different material that they said was also a superconductor although only at crushing pressures of nearly 40 million pounds per square inch. But other researchers questioned some of the data in the paper. After an investigation, Nature agreed, retracting the paper in September 2022 over the objections of the authors.

In August of this year, the journal Physical Review Letters retracted a 2021 paper by Dr. Dias that described intriguing electrical properties, although not superconductivity, in another chemical compound, manganese sulfide.

James Hamlin, a professor of physics at the University of Florida, told Physical Review Letters’ editors that the curves in one of the paper’s figures describing electrical resistance in manganese sulfide looked similar to graphs in Dr. Dias’s doctoral thesis that described the behavior of a different material.

Outside experts enlisted by the journal agreed that the data looked suspiciously similar, and the paper was retracted . Unlike the earlier Nature retraction, all nine of Dr. Dias’s co-authors agreed to the retraction. Dr. Dias was the lone holdout and maintained that the paper accurately portrayed the research findings.

In May, Dr. Hamlin and Brad J. Ramshaw, a professor of physics at Cornell University, sent editors at Nature their concerns about the lutetium hydride data in the March paper.

After the retraction by Physical Review Letters, most of the authors of the lutetium hydride paper concluded that the research from their paper was flawed too.

In a letter dated Sept. 8, eight of the 11 authors asked for the Nature paper to be retracted .

“Dr. Dias has not acted in good faith in regard to the preparation and submission of the manuscript,” they told the Nature editors.

The writers of the letter included five recent graduate students who worked in Dr. Dias’s lab, as well as Ashkan Salamat, a professor of physics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who collaborated with Dr. Dias on the two earlier retracted papers. Dr. Dias and Dr. Salamat founded Unearthly Materials, a company that was meant to turn the superconducting discoveries into commercial products.

Dr. Salamat, who was the company’s president and chief executive, is no longer an employee there. He did not respond to a request for comment on the retraction.

In the retraction notice published on Tuesday, Nature said that the eight authors who wrote the letter in September expressed the view that “the published paper does not accurately reflect the provenance of the investigated materials, the experimental measurements undertaken and the data-processing protocols applied.”

The issues, those authors said, “undermine the integrity of the published paper.”

Dr. Dias and two other authors, former students of his, “have not stated whether they agree or disagree with this retraction,” the notice said. A Nature spokeswoman said they did not respond to the proposed retraction.

“This has been a deeply frustrating situation,” Karl Ziemelis, the chief editor for applied and physical sciences at Nature, said in a statement.

Mr. Ziemelis defended the journal’s handling of the paper. “Indeed, as is so often the case, the highly qualified expert reviewers we selected raised a number of questions about the original submission, which were largely resolved in later revisions,” he said. “This is how peer review works.”

He added, “What the peer-review process cannot detect is whether the paper as written accurately reflects the research as it was undertaken.”

For Dr. Ramshaw, the retraction provided validation. “When you are looking into someone else’s work, you always wonder whether you are just seeing things or overinterpreting,” he said.

The disappointments of LK-99 and Dr. Dias’s claims may not deter other scientists from investigating possible superconductors. Two decades ago, a scientist at Bell Labs, J. Hendrik Schön, published a series of striking findings, including novel superconductors. Investigations showed that he had made up most of his data.

That did not stymie later major superconductor discoveries. In 2014, a group led by Mikhail Eremets, of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Germany, showed that hydrogen-containing compounds are superconductors at surprisingly warm temperatures when squeezed under ultrahigh pressures. Those findings are still broadly accepted.

Russell J. Hemley, a professor of physics and chemistry at the University of Illinois Chicago who followed up Dr. Eremets’s work with experiments that found another material that was also a superconductor at ultrahigh pressure conditions, continues to believe Dr. Dias’s lutetium hydride findings. In June, Dr. Hemley and his collaborators reported that they had also measured the apparent vanishing of electrical resistance in a sample that Dr. Dias had provided, and on Tuesday, Dr. Hemley said he remained confident that the findings would be reproduced by other scientists.

After the Physical Review Letters retraction, the University of Rochester confirmed that it had started a “comprehensive investigation” by experts not affiliated with the school. A university spokeswoman said that it had no plans to make the findings of the investigation public.

The University of Rochester has removed YouTube videos it produced in March that featured university officials lauding Dr. Dias’s research as a breakthrough.

Kenneth Chang has been at The Times since 2000, writing about physics, geology, chemistry, and the planets. Before becoming a science writer, he was a graduate student whose research involved the control of chaos. More about Kenneth Chang

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  2. Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    The Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering celebrated 150 years of mechanical engineering at Cornell on April 25, 2024, reflecting on the school's distinguished past and looking forward... Read more. MAE Research Areas Advanced Manufacturing and Materials. Biomechanics and Mechanobiology. Bioengineering and Healthcare. Energy ...

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    MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering grad students are undertaking a broad range of innovative research projects. Top row, l-r: Lyle Regenwetter, Loïcka Baille, Carlos Díaz-Marín. Bottom row, l-r: Somayajulu Dhulipala, Jimmy McRae, Eva Nates, and Erik Ballesteros. From cutting-edge robotics, design, and bioengineering to sustainable ...

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    Winning research posters Over 70 students from the Masters in Engineering (M.Eng.) program within Cornell Electrical and Computer Engineering presented their research during the annual Spring M.Eng. poster session. Other Articles of Interest. News. Students revive classic microchip fabrication with open-source tools.

  14. Cross-campus collaboration unlocks health systems M ...

    The Health Systems Engineering M. Eng. pathway is accepting applications for the fall 2024 semester until May 31, and for the 2025 spring semester until Dec. 1, 2024. "Collaborations with systems engineering students and faculty have introduced systems principles to the analysis of the complex healthcare landscape," said Yiye Zhang ...

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    Assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering Laurent Burlion has been focusing his research interests on non-linear control systems, safe control of UAVs, spacecraft attitude control, and flight control and protection since he joined the Rutgers University School of Engineering faculty in 2019.

  18. Sustainability

    As an industrial waste, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag is an ideal substitute for natural rubble and sand. However, its potential instability of volume restricts the application of the BOF slag in engineering. This study aims at investigating the volume stability and mechanical properties of BOF slag and its application as an aggregate in cement-stabilized macadam. As part of this research ...

  19. Research to Focus on Experimentation of Spacecraft Propulsion Systems

    Steven Berg joined the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering as an assistant professor in September 2023. His academic, research, and industry experience includes serving as a lecturer at North Carolina State University, postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Missouri University of Science and Technology, as well as service as the CEO of ...

  20. Postdoctoral Research Associate

    Hiring Department: Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Location: Chicago, IL USA Requisition ID: 1023836 Posting Close Date: About The University Of Illinois Chicago UIC is among the nation's ...

  21. George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

    May 10, 2024 By Chloe Arrington. Faculty from the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, including Associate Professors Gregory Sawicki and Aaron Young, have been awarded a five-year, $2.6 million Research Project Grant (R01) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). "We are grateful to our NIH sponsor for this award to improve treatment of post-stroke individuals using ...

  22. Room-Temperature Superconductor Discovery Is Retracted

    It was the second superconductor paper involving Ranga P. Dias, a professor of mechanical engineering and physics at the University of Rochester in New York State, to be retracted by the journal ...