Keeping Insects

Keeping Insects

Caring for a praying mantis, butterflies, stick insects and beetles, ghost mantis.

The Ghost mantis, also known as Phyllocrania paradoxa , is a species that has a beautiful leaf-like body. It’s color is usually dark brown, but can also be sand, light brown or even green. The natural habitat of the Ghost mantis is Madagascar and continental Africa. To learn more about keeping this mantis as a pet, continue reading this caresheet below.

ghost mantis temperature

Appearance of the Ghost Mantis

The Ghost mantis Phyllocrania paradoxa mimics withered leaves by its dark body covered in leaf-like decorations. On its head it has a striking asymmetrical cone or crest that helps to distort its body outline to look more like a leaf. In this way it is camouflaged among the fallen leaves in its natural habitat; the forest of Madagascar and Africa. They can remain unseen by predator such as insect-eating birds while waiting for its own prey. The most common color for this praying mantis species is dark brown, but sometimes you can find light brown, reddish brown or even green specimens. The color of the skin is determined by the environment, a more humid environment provides a greener individual, but some are more predispositioned to change color than others.

Phyllocrania paradoxa is about 5 cm long when adult, with little difference in bodysize between the sexes. The males weight much less than the females. The males are thinner with long wings that reach past the abdomen. The females are bigger and bulkier than the males. They also have a wider prothorax and their wings extend to just the end of the abdomen, not further. The antennae of the adult male are much longer than those of the female. The difference between the sexes can also be seen when still in the older nymph stadia, because males have a more indented extension on the head. The males body has also more jaggedy edges than the female.

The males develop a bit faster than the females and will need 6 molts instead of 7. When born their instar is named L1, so the males will be adult at L7 and the females at L8. When adult both sexes will have wings, before they are adult they are wingless.

ghost mantis temperature

Behavior of the Ghost mantis

The Ghost mantis is a quiet kind of praying mantis. It is a typical sit-and-wait predator. Relying on her camouflage it waits patiently until an unsuspecting prey comes along. Once she sees her prey, she will attack very fast. Before the prey realizes it, he is already firmly stuck between the claws of this predator. P. paradoxa will rarely actively chase its prey, it will rather wait for an opportune moment to strike. It is specialized in flying prey and prefers to eat flies.

Sometimes this kind of praying mantis is a little scared and easily intimidated by its prey. Especially the adult males can run away from large prey instead of attacking. Also large tweezers or the hand of the owner can make this mantis refuse its prey. When this happens during feeding, just wait fifteen minutes and try again.

Because they are less agressive and prefer to eat flies, ghost mantises will not be as likely to eat each other. So unlike other mantis species ghost mantises can be housed together in one enclosure. See below for more details about this.

Newborn ghost mantises look like black ants and behave in the same way. They run around a lot. When they change skin for the first time they are no longer black, but brown, will look like leaves and will not move as much anymore. Adult males can be easily scared and can fake being dead if disturbed.

ghost mantis temperature

Food for a Ghost Mantis

In nature, Phyllocrania paradoxa mainly eats flying prey such as flies. Therefore it should be prefered to feed flies instead of crickets to Ghost mantids. But this species of mantis also feeds well on crickets, small grasshoppers and other insects. The size of its prey should be approximately the size of the head of the mantis. This species is not as strong as some other species, making it less fit to catch very large prey items. An adult female can eat adult crickets without a problem, but I prefer to feed them smaller grasshoppers or flies. Newborn ghost mantises will eat fruit flies, either the smaller or the bigger variety.

ghost mantis temperature

Environmental conditions for this mantis species

The ideal temperature for the Ghost mantis is around 26 °C, but a temperature between 20 °C and 30 °C is also okay. The temperatures can be allowed to drop at night, but should at least be 18 °C. You can read here more about heating the enclosure. This species prefers a relatively high air humidity. The RV (relative humidity) should be approximately 60 to 90%. This can be achieved by spraying with water about 5 times a week for the average enclosure.

The enclosure of this species of mantis should be at least 3 times the length of the animal in high, and at least 2x the length of the animal in width. For an adult this means is at least 15 cm in height and 10 cm in width. A nice size for a terrarium would be 20 x 20 x 30 cm, so there is space for lots of fake plants and perches. If you have a bigger terrarium you could also house multiple ghost mantises together, see below for more information on that.

Dead leaves in beautiful autumn colors as decorations in the terrarium fit the looks of this mantis perfectly. Sometimes they can hardly be spotted because of its perfect camouflage! If you want to try get green ghost mantises instead of brown ones, you could decorate the enclosure with more green plants and keep the enclosure more humid.

ghost mantis temperature

Group housing of Ghost Mantises

phyllocraniaparadoxa-female

The special “feature” of this species of mantis is that multiple ghost mantises can be kept in one enclosure without cannibalism. Other mantis species will attack and eat each other, even it there is plenty of food. The Ghost mantis is often quiet and non-aggressive, also to other Ghost mantids, so it will tolerate it’s own kind.

Of course the mantis does need plenty of space and enough prey items such as flies, because when food is running low these mantids will also turn on each other. The individuals also need to be of the same size, you cannot combine animals that differ too much in instar. Keeping a large group of Ghost mantids in a big enclosure can be a beautiful sight. Keep in mind: the risk of cannibalism is very small, but the risk still exists.

Breeding Phyllocrania paradoxa

phyllocraniaparadoxa-male

This species can be made to breed by most insect enthousiasts because it’s not a very difficult species to keep. You need to focus on good environmental conditions, then they will sort out the rest.

First you need to find a male and a female of around the same age. It’s easy to spot the differences in males and females, especially as they get older. The females of this species are slightly larger and broader than the males. Already in the older nymph instars you can see this difference. The sex difference can also be spotted when looking at the antennae; the base of the antennae of the male is wider and antennae are also longer in lenght. From around L4 (fourth instar) a keen eye can distinqish the sexes easily.

Approximately 2 to 4 weeks after the last molt, a mating attempt should be made. Make sure that the female is well fed before introducing the male. When you group house these mantids, you don’t need to do anything to ensure mating. The mantids will mate when the time is right, and usually you will not even see this happening because it is happens at night. Mating can take several hours and it only very rarely happens that the male will be cannabalized by the female.

The ootheca are long and sand colored and have between 20 and 60 eggs in them. They should be kept the same as the adult mantises. They hatch in around 6 to 8 weeks depending on the temperature. If the nymphs hatch but can’t escape the egg sack then you are keeping them too dry. Increase the air humidity for any next ootheca.

Ghost mantis development and growth

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Ghost Mantis: Care Guide, Pictures, Lifespan & More

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The Ghost Mantis is a small species of Mantis from Africa. It has the unique appearance of a dried and weathered leaf. It’s smaller than the Praying Mantis, and you can usually find them in dry areas with plenty of bushes, shrubs, and trees that will accent its natural camouflage. Keep reading while we look at this interesting species to learn more facts about them to see if they would make a good pet in your home.

  • Quick Facts about Ghost Mantis
  • Ghost Mantis Overview

The Ghost Mantis is smaller than the Praying Mantis and tends to play dead when threatened, maximizing its camouflage. It molts seven times in its life, and you can actively determine sex after the fourth because females are much more massive despite being the same length. It’s fairly easy to care for, and you can keep a large number of them in a small space as long as there is room for them to move and climb.

  • How Much Does A Ghost Mantis Cost?

You should expect to pay between $15 and $30 for your Ghost Mantis depending on where you buy it. It’s easy to find them in a pet store, but these will usually be the more expensive ones. Online stores are often less costly, but then you will need to worry about shipping and how they will survive the trip.

Besides the cost of the Ghost Mantis, you will need to purchase a place to house them. You can use an inexpensive netting enclosure or an aquarium, depending on your needs. Aquariums will cost more but will protect your Ghost Mantis better.

  • Typical Behavior & Temperament

The Ghost Mantis is quite calm and moves very slowly. It’s a communal species that enjoys living in larger colonies, and you can house many of them together with few incidents. When confronted with an enemy, it will typically remain motionless, pretending to be a dead leaf.

Appearance & Varieties

The Ghost Mantis has a leaf-like projection on its head, and there are leaf-like lobes on the legs. The abdomen has a jagged extension on each side that help completes the appearance of a dead leafy branch. Temperature, humidity, and the amount of UV light the Ghost Mantis receives will affect its color, ranging from an almost yellow light brown to a dark brown, and shades of green are also common. The males can even show black and grey colors, especially when they reach sexual maturity.

Your Ghost Mantis will molt seven times in its life.

  • L1 – L2 will occur once the Mantis has reached about two weeks old.
  • L2 – L3 will occur only a few days later.
  • L3 – L4 will usually occur less than three weeks later.
  • L4 – L5 will usually occur in about one month.
  • L5 – L6 will usually occur about five weeks after the last molt.
  • L6 – L7 can take longer than two months.

After the fourth molt, the female will have much larger leaf appendages than the male, who will have a slender appearance and be a capable flier.

How to Take Care of a Ghost Mantis

  • Habitat, Tank Conditions & Setup

Your Ghost Mantis is relatively easy to care for and will only require a small area with some real or artificial plants that it can climb on. Many owners prefer artificial plants because if the Mantis places the oothecae, a type of egg sack, it will have a stronger foundation without the fear of the plant rotting or dying.

For a single or a pair of Ghost Mantises, a one-gallon aquarium should be sufficient, and you can put a dozen or more in a ten-gallon tank. You can also use netting if there are no other pets around to create any size environment, and the Mantis won’t work too hard to escape.

Ghost Mantises prefer the temperature to stay between 60 and 80 degrees with a humidity between 40% and 70%, so they will do well without the need for heaters or humidifiers in most American homes.

  • Do Ghost Mantis Get Along with Other Pets?

The Ghost Mantis can live in a large colony without danger of turning to cannibalism, even though they are carnivorous. However, mixing other species will likely cause infighting, and we don’t recommend trying it., especially since the Ghost Mantis is smaller than many others, like the Praying Mantis .

  • What to Feed Your Ghost Mantis

The Ghost Mantis typically eats fruit flies, but as they age, their diet can contain various insects, including crickets, bottleflies, moths, roaches, and more. Crickets are the most popular for a captive Mantis colony because they are easy to find in most pet stores and are relatively inexpensive. You can even breed your own.

  • Keeping Your Ghost Mantis Healthy

Your Ghost Mantis lives between 4 and 8 months, with the female outliving the male by several weeks. They are quite tolerant of temperature and humidity, so as long as you keep it within the guidelines listed above, your pets should see all seven molts, and it will remain healthy.

The Ghost Mantis is a prolific species that can begin mating two weeks after adulthood. Place the males in a warming tank with high humidity for several days while ensuring the female is well fed. After a few days, place one or two females in at night, and by morning they should be locked with a male. They can remain locked for up to eight hours. The female will begin laying oothecae shortly after. Oothecae will take about six to ten weeks to begin hatching, and you can expect 20 – 60 nymphs. The female can lay 12 or more oothecae in a lifetime, and they are typically less than a quarter-inch in diameter with a small thread-like extension on one end. Providing cooler temperatures for the female will cause her to lay a longer ootheca instead of several smaller ones

  • Are Ghost Mantis Suitable for You?

The Ghost Mantis is a wonderful pet for anyone who enjoys an exotic pet . It can live in a small area and doesn’t have any special temperature or humidity needs, so it’s easy to raise in almost any home in America. They eat very little, so the cost of feeding is minimal, and they breed quickly. If you have at least one male and female, you will likely be raising Ghost Mantis for the foreseeable future. They look amazing, and anyone that visits your home will want to see them.

We hope you have enjoyed reading over this guide, and it has helped answer your questions. If we have convinced you to get a few of these for your home, please share this guide to the Ghost Mantis on Facebook and Twitter.

Featured Image Credit: Anthony King Nature, Shutterstock

Ed Malaker is a veteran writer who has contributed to a wide range of blogs that cover tools, pets, guitars, fitness, and computer programming. When he’s not writing, Ed is usually performing DIY projects around the house or working in the garden. He’s also a musician and spends a lot of time helping people fix their guitars and composing music for independent films.

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Ghost Mantis Care, Information, & Pictures

Ghost mantis Phyllocrania paradoxa

The Ghost Mantis is an exciting and stunning species of Phyllocrania paradoxa. The Ghost Mantis originates in Eastern and Western Africa, sometimes in the south, and Madagascar. Ghost Mantis live in dry areas, in bushes, shrubs, and trees. It is one of the smaller species of Mantis.

  • Species: Phyllocrania paradoxa
  • Diet: Small insects
  • Hydration: Misting
  • Habitat: Glass or screen enclosure
  • Temperature: Friendly
  • Lifespan: Approximately 8 months
  • Care Level: Easy
  • Compatibility: Can raise males and females together if well fed

What Is A Ghost Mantis?

So, what exactly is a Ghost Mantis? The Ghost Mantis is small and only grows to about two inches long. In the mantis world, this species is considered to be one of the smallest.

Although many of the Mantis are dark brown, some have colors that range from light sandy brown to a lovely green. It’s been suggested that the color change may be caused when molting because of the response to the amount of humidity. Less moisture tends to produce more brown mantids, while more moisture produces more green Mantis.

Housing for Ghost Mantis

When choosing housing for the Ghost Mantis, the insect needs to be in an enclosure three times as tall as the mantis is in length. But because they are so small, finding a suitable cage usually isn’t a problem. Below are suggestions of what is needed for housing a Ghost Mantis:

Ventilation

Whatever type of enclosure is used, it has to have adequate ventilation. The cage will need, too, material of some kind that will let the mantis hang upside during molting season. Plus, there needs to be a space at the top which is empty that is two times larger than the mantis.

The cages can be made from mesh or from glass. But if you keep the mantis in either of those types of enclosures, a screen or mesh top can be used. Then the mantis can hang upside down with ease.

This species of mantis can be housed in groups of male and female, unlike other mantis species. Cannibalism isn’t a high occurrence for the Ghost Mantis, although it is still a possibility. If there isn’t enough food, the mantis will eat each other. Places to perch are also a necessity.

The cage’s size, as mentioned above, is to be three times taller than the mantis is in length. This is important for the molting process to be completed successfully. Plus, the cage has to have a lid that the mantis can’t escape because they are good at flying and climbing.

If a large colony is going to be kept together, then a larger cage will be needed. This is because if there isn’t enough room to give each mantis personal space, then cannibalism can become an issue.

One of the other main concerns is to be able to keep the cage clean. Hygiene is the key to keeping the mantis healthy and happy. So, choose a container that is easy to keep up with the maintenance.

What is put inside the cage is as important as what cage is chosen. There are two main concerns when planning the décor for a Ghost Mantis. Perches that are suitable for the insect’s needs are the first consideration.

The number of mantis in the caged environment will affect how many perches are needed. Each mantis should be able to have its own personal perch. The best and easiest perches are just twigs and branches. Immerse them into boiling water, scrub with a detergent that is safe for reptiles, so no pathogens are introduced into the habitant.

The perches need to be positioned so that they touch the ground. This will let the mantis get off the ground if it falls or come down to the ground if it’s hunting. There should be enough space under the twig for the insect to molt with success.

The other concern when planning the décor is what to use on the bottom of the enclosure. Coconut fiber is one substrate that is suitable for adults, and only a small depth is needed. It helps to moderate the humidity, smells good, and looks unique. For young mantis, a simple kitchen towel can be used.

Ghost Mantis Care

The care of the Ghost Mantis isn’t a complicated process because their needs are relatively simple.

Heat Source

Since Ghost Mantis are from the heat of Africa, they will require to have a heat source in their enclosure. For larger specimens of this insect, the whole cage can be heated. 77 degrees-80 degrees Fahrenheit is usually the recommended temperature and is provided by using a heat mat.

If there are young mantids, place all the young into one large cage that is heated. This keeps them all together, and they have an easier time not competing for food with the larger mantids.

With a reptile heat mat, the temperature can be adjusted manually as needed. With a heat mat, it keeps the cage at an even warm temperature and doesn’t harm or disturb the Ghost Mantis’ sleep cycle. It helps keeps the appetite, metabolism, and activity level on point.

Keep in mind that warmer temperatures will shorten the mantis’s life cycle because the heat speeds up the metabolism. Cooler temperatures, on the other hand, will lengthen the life span and slow down metabolism. But extremes of either one of those temperatures can kill the mantis.

Hydration Source

Mantis usually don’t obtain their water from a water source such as a water dish. Plus, there is the danger of them falling in and drowning. Most of the time, the mantis absorb water from their prey. Or they will drink droplets of moisture from the leaves of plants.

So, a lot of the time, using a water bowl is discarded, and misting is used instead. The use of a household spray bottle with lukewarm water should be done about 2-3 times per week. The mist should be a gentle one and not a strong mist.

The misting water can be left to evaporate between the mistings to increase the humidity but not make the cage soggy. The humidity should be in the range of 60-90% for ultimate comfort. Don’t use water from the faucet, but distilled or spring water only.

Plus, mantis don’t enjoy being sprayed with water directly on them. So, try to spray the area around where the mantis is hanging or sitting. If the mantis is sprayed by accident, it’s not a problem. The mantis just doesn’t like it.

Ghost mantis

When it’s feeding time, the Ghost Mantis will eat anything that it can catch and overpower. Because of its small size, the diet of this insect is mostly tiny invertebrates.

When in the wild, the Ghost Mantis will feast mostly on flies and other flying insects. The preferred food to feed the mantis is flies and fruit flies, but it will also eat small grasshoppers, crickets, and other smaller insects.

Prey food should never be bigger than the head of the mantis because their arms don’t have the strength to catch larger insects. Ghost Mantises spend most of their time hanging upside down from the lid of their enclosures or tree branches. This is why prey insects that are on the ground aren’t always and only good food source.

When in the wild, Ghost Mantis are generalists and will attack and eat almost anything within range. It has raptorial claws that will reach out and grasp its victim tightly before devouring it.

The Ghost Mantis uses camouflage techniques to disguise itself from prey and from its predators.

The Body Camouflage

The camouflage of the Ghost Mantis is beyond impressive. Each of the walking legs and abdomen has projections jutting out that look like dead leaves. The thorax is flattened into a leaf-like shape as well.

The back of the insect has thin veins in a lace effect and mottled like the pigmentation of a leaf fold. The insect’s head is the most unique aspect of its whole body.

Because the eyes are the same exact color as the rest of its exoskeleton, the eyes appear almost invisible. Above the eyes is a long crest that resembles a dead, dried, and withered leaf. But it’s just not the physical camouflage that is the whole package.

Behavioral Camouflage

The Ghost Mantis displays camouflage that’s behavioral as well. It will tuck its forelegs up against its body, so the shape is unusual and confusing to predators. On top of that, it will gently rock back and forth like a leaf being blown in a breeze.

Ghost Mantis doesn’t have much in the way of hunting skills. They don’t move much and spend a lot of their time hanging upside on branches and leaves, waiting for lunch to walk by. They hunt by hiding and staying still.

Insects that crawl are the mantis most common prey because of some difficulty capturing prey that flies. A mantis can remain still and in one spot for hours, ready to pounce on anything that comes near. If the mantis feels threatened, it will try to escape or try to fool the predator into thinking the mantis is a leaf.

If those ruses fail, then the mantis plays dead by folding its legs into its body and falling to the ground. Since most predators eat live prey, thinking the Ghost Mantis is dead causes the predator to look elsewhere for its meal.

The Ghost Mantis will also flatten itself against the twig or branch it’s sitting on if feeling threatened. When it does this, the camouflage makes it look like a dead leaf attached to the branch or twig.

ghost mantis

Frequent molting is common with Ghost Mantis. When the mantis are babies, they will molt every 2-3 weeks. Each time between molting will increase as the insect becomes older. Because of this species’ slower growth rate, the last molt before becoming an adult may take up to two months.

Before the Ghost Mantis begins to molt, it will stop eating. So don’t be alarmed if the mantis refuses food. It’s starting to become ready to shed its skin. When the mantis is molting, it’s imperative not to disturb it.

When the molting process begins, the mantis will choose a spot and hang upside down. It may spasm or shake violently, but this is normal behavior. It will slowly worm out of the old skin and then hang and let itself dry. Sometimes a limb may be lost during this process, but if the mantis is young, the limb will grow back.

Breeding Ghost Mantis

To be able to breed Ghost Mantis, the need to be able to tell the male from the female is essential.

Male vs. Female

The males are recognized easily from the females. Both the male and the female Ghost Mantis are about the same size, which is about two inches long.

However, the male has a little bit longer wing case, which is partially transparent and slimmer. The female has six abdominal segments while the male has eight. The colors of these mantes can range from brownish green to appearing almost black.

Plus, the males have long feathery antennae and wings, which are olive in color and almost transparent. The males are excellent flyers and are much thinner than the females.

The female’s wings extend to the end of its abdomen, and they have a prothorax, which is more expansive. After the 6 th molt, the female’s crown is as broad as the head. It’s also smoother than the crown of the male.

The female Ghost Mantis becomes an adult after it molts seven times. Then the female will need another two weeks until she can mate. Male Ghost Mantis become mature after it molts six times, so they would be sexually mature about one week before the last molt.

The Breeding Process

The actual breeding is relatively simple as long as the females are well fed. Two weeks after the last molt, the insects should be ready for breeding. The male and females can be placed together unless they are already living in a group.

Be sure to feed the female so she’s distracted and won’t throw him off. Most of the time, the male will sit on top of the female after the initial introduction and mate selection. The Ghost Mantis enclosure needs to be large enough for the male to escape from the female and hide after the mating process.

The male may sit there for a couple of hours without doing anything before making his first attempt. After he holds on for a while, the male bends his abdomen and connects with her abdomen. Then mating will start, and the mating process can take a few days until the male gets enough nerve to do his part.

When the mating is successful, the female, after a few weeks, will start to stick clutches of eggs on the twigs, branches, and enclosure walls. The humidity and temperature should stay the same, being careful the humidity doesn’t rise too much.

The Ootheca

The clutch of eggs is called an ootheca and can have up to 50 eggs, but there are usually 10-40 eggs. There can be about 6 ootheca about 2 inches long. The ootheca is constructed from a protein containing secretion, which is applied to wherever the eggs are located.

The female makes spiral shaped movements with her abdomen, and more of the foamy secretion is released. The egg-laying process begins with one egg being laid after the other within the ootheca.

The secretion looks like a long thread when it’s pulled out and then hardens into a cocoon. The cocoon is firm and sponge-like, with the thinnest wall on the surface where the nymphs will hatch. The appearance looks like a large pore seam.

At a temperature of about 77 degrees Fahrenheit, the nymphs hatch around at four weeks. They will need to be misted 5-7 times a week. The nymphs can be fed fruit flies about a day or two after hatching.

Nymphs can be housed in the same cage since they aren’t cannibalistic. They will eat copiously until they are filled up. When the Ghost Mantis nymphs hatch, they look like baby ants. This disguise is so the nymphs don’t get eaten by predators.

Spiders and other large insects would love to eat a Ghost Mantis nymph but typically won’t because of this disguise. The nymphs look like black ants, which predators find too aggressive and not tasty to even bother with, so the nymphs are safe. After the second molt, the nymphs will look more like their parents.

Raising Ghost Mantis can be an exciting and rewarding experience. From the first day, they are put into their environment, watching these insects is an adventure. If they breed, then the process from mating, laying of eggs, and then hatching can provide a feeling of accomplishment.

One of the differences between Ghost Mantis from other mantis is that they can live in groups with a rare cannibalism rate. The key is to keep the mantis well-fed, happy, and content in the environment provided for them.

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Ghost Mantis Caresheet

The Ghost Mantis ( Phyllocrania paradoxa ) should be kept in an enclosure that is at least 3 times as tall as the mantis is long, and at least 2 times as wide as the mantis is long.  Luckily, Ghosts are a fairly small species, so it is easy to find a suitable enclosure! Adult ghost mantises are around 2 inches long, with little difference between the sexes. The cage must have adequate ventilation, and some kind of material on the ceiling of the enclosure which will allow the mantis to hang upside down during molting, as well as an empty space at the top which is at least 2 times the size of the mantis.  They can be kept in glass or mesh cages.  However, if you chose to keep them in enclosures with glass or clear plastic sides, a mesh or screen top from which they can easily hang upside down is necessary.

These mantises can be housed in groups, as the risk of cannibalism for this particular species of mantis is very low. However, as with any other species of mantis, it is still possible. They will turn on each other if there is not enough food, and the tank should include plenty of sticks and plants (fake or real) to give them plenty of space to spread out, and places to perch.

Temperature & Humidity

Ghost mantises can tolerate a fair range when it comes to temperature and humidity.  They should do well being kept anywhere between 65°F and 80°F. Ideally, humidity should stay in the range of 50% to 70% relative humidity (RH).

The enclosure should be given a light misting at least once a day so they can drink. When kept in mesh cages, we mist their enclosures twice a day.  Most mantises do not like getting sprayed directly, so it is best to try and spray around the mantis, but if you get them a little wet by accident, it is usually no big deal.  Use spring water, distilled water, or water filtered by reverse osmosis (RO), but do not use plain tap water.

Ghost mantises prefer flying insects throughout their entire lifecycle.

  • L1 and L2 nymphs:  Should be fed D. melanogaster fruit flies.
  • L3 and L4 nymphs:  Should be fed D. hydei fruit flies.
  • L5 nymph to adult:  Should be fed house flies and blue bottle flies.

These mantises will never actively chase prey insects, rather they will remain completely still, disguised as part of the environment, and will only strike when the unsuspecting insect walks by and is within grabbing distance of the mantis. This is why ground-dwelling prey insects are not good candidates for the ghost mantis. Ghost mantises usually prefer to hang upside down in tree branches, or from the top of their enclosures, and rarely will they be seen on the ground of an enclosure. They are also prone to being easily intimidated by prey insects, especially if they perceive the insect as being too big for them to properly catch and eat. Prey items should be no bigger than the mantises head, as their arms are not strong enough to properly catch very large pray insects.

For additional information about the Ghost mantis, including breeding and ootheca care please reference the links below:

Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania Paradoxa) Caresheet – Keeping Insects

Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa) Caresheet –  Mantid Forum

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Ghost mantis care sheet.

Ghost mantises ( Phyllocrania paradoxa ) are 2” long, diurnal, carnivorous invertebrates found throughout sub saharan Africa and Madagascar. They occupy forest habitats.

The ghost mantis has a particularly unique appearance designed for maximum camouflage. Their body has the coloring and texture of dead leaf matter, including a noteworthy crest on top of its head. Coloring varies from dark brown to greenish.

The ghost mantis is an intermediate-level pet mantis. Total lifespan for this species is 7-12 months, with females living longer, particularly at lower temperatures.

Minimum terrarium size for ghost mantises

The widely-accepted minimum formula for housing praying mantises is:

  • Length = 2x mantis length
  • Width = 2x mantis length
  • Height = 3x mantis length

Height is particularly important, as mantises need vertical space in order to molt (shed their exoskeleton) and grow properly.

Using the above formula, the enclosure for an adult-sized ghost mantis should be at least 4”L x 4”W x 6”H and made of glass, plastic, or mesh. Larger is preferable. Ghost mantis nymphs can be raised in a 32oz deli cup with a ventilated top until they’re large enough to move to their adult home.

Ghost mantises are one of the few mantids that can be housed in groups without undue risk of cannibalism. To maximize the likelihood of everyone getting along, increase the size of the enclosure proportionate to each additional individual, and each mantis should be roughly the same size.

Do ghost mantises need special lighting?

If your mantis’ enclosure is placed in a room that receives ~12 hours/day of bright natural or artificial light, then additionally lighting equipment is unnecessary. However, if your mantis is being kept in a dark room or you wish to put live plants in the enclosure, then you will need additional lighting equipment such as a small white fluorescent or LED grow light around 6500K.

Do not put mantis enclosures near windows, as the sunlight can cause the terrarium to overheat!

Best temperature for ghost mantises

If you are raising a young ghost mantis in a 32oz deli cup or Kritter Keeper, then it’s best to keep them at an ambient temperature around 78°F.

If you are keeping a ghost mantis in an adult-sized glass or mesh enclosure, it’s best practice to provide a temperature gradient via heat lamp that will allow it to choose the temperature it wants to be at. The Zoo Med Nano Dome Lamp Fixture and 25w Zoo Med Nano Basking Spot bulb is a good combination to start with. Average air temperature should be between 70-80°F, and basking temperature between 82-86°F, which you can monitor with a digital thermometer placed in the middle of the enclosure.

Mantises tend to hang upside-down from the top of their enclosure, so if you put the lamp directly on top of the mesh, there’s a good chance that your pet will get burned! Instead, suspend the lamp from a lamp stand .

The heat lamp should be turned off at night. Nighttime temps should be no lower than 68°F.

Best humidity levels for ghost mantises

Providing the right amount of humidity is very important for making sure that your praying mantis is able to molt properly and stays generally healthy. Too high and too low will both cause problems. For the ghost mantis, their comfort zone is between 60-90% on average.

Lightly mist your mantis’ enclosure twice per day with a spray bottle to both increase the humidity and provide drinking water. Mesh enclosures will need misting more often than glass or plastic ones.

Keep track of the humidity in your mantis’ enclosure with a digital hygrometer .

Best substrate for ghost mantises

Your ghost mantis terrarium should have at least 1-2” of substrate on the bottom to help maintain the humidity. Here are some moisture-friendly materials you can use:

  • Zoo Med Creatures Eco Soil
  • Zoo Med Creature Soil
  • Zoo Med ReptiBark
  • Eco Earth Plantation Soil
  • Exo Terra Forest Bark

This substrate will need to be replaced weekly and the enclosure thoroughly rinsed out with hot water to maintain good hygiene.

Alternatively, you can use a bioactive-ready soil substrate with springtails, isopods, beneficial bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi, and live plants to create a bioactive setup. This can be a little complicated to balance, and requires additional research to create. However, the big benefit with bioactive is that it helps keep the enclosure clean by naturally breaking down waste.

How to decorate a ghost mantis terrarium

In order to reduce stress, prolong your mantis’ lifespan, and encourage natural behaviors, your ghost mantis needs both objects to climb and hide behind in its enclosure. Here are some ideas of things you can use:

  • live plants
  • artificial foliage

Use hot glue to attach climbing objects to the sides and bottom of the enclosure at different angles for variety. Hanging upside-down all the time may cause physical disfigurement in young mantids.

However you arrange your enclosure, make sure to leave enough open space at the top for twice your mantis’ height to use during molting.

What to feed to a ghost mantis

Praying mantises are carnivores , which means that they eat other insects and small animals in order to get the nutrition that they need. Offer prey every other day, as much as your mantis will eat in one session. Although you can let your mantis hunt its prey by simply tossing the bugs into the enclosure, it’s best to offer food via tweezers so you know for sure that your pet is eating. (Not all ghost mantises are okay with accepting food from tweezers, however.)

Feeders should be live and no more than 1/2 your mantis’ length. Offer a variety of different bugs so your mantis can benefit from more balanced nutrition. Here are some options:

  • D. melanogaster fruit flies
  • D. hydei fruit flies
  • Black soldier flies
  • Blue/green bottle flies
  • Red runners

Ghost mantises are particularly fond of flying insects and feeders that like to climb up to their level. Due to disease-related concerns, it’s best to avoid feeding crickets to your praying mantis.

Before offering prey to your mantis, make sure the prey has been well fed and hydrated for at least the last 24 hours. This helps maximize your mantis’ lifespan by making sure it’s getting quality nutrition from each of its meals. Here are some good formulas for gutloading feeder insects:

  • Repashy Bug Burger
  • Repashy Superfly
  • Repashy Superhorn

How to handle your ghost mantis

As a general rule, invertebrates are “look-but-don’t-touch” pets: fun to watch, but not to be handled regularly. This holds true for the ghost mantis. Instead, enjoy trying to find its camouflaged form among the décor of its enclosure!

Never handle or otherwise disturb your mantis within ~3 days after a molt, as they’re very soft after molting, and get injured easily during this time. Note that molting (shedding) occurs every 2-3 weeks for juveniles and 3-4 weeks for subadults, and it’s normal for mantises to refuse food for 1-2 days before a molt.

*This care sheet contains only very basic information. Although it’s a good introduction, please further your research with high-quality sources. The more you know, the better you will be able to care for your pet!

"Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa)" by Frupus is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

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Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa) Care Sheet

The Ghost Mantis ( Phyllocrania paradoxa ) is a stunning species, broadly distributed across Africa and Madagascar. The name itself means “leaf head”, and it’s hardly difficult to see why.

These cryptic praying mantids do an amazing job of avoiding predators by resembling plants.

Not only is there an unusual leaf-like projection on the top of the mantids head, but the legs also possess leaf-shaped structures. In nature, these mantids will sit motionless for hours on end, just waiting for a suitable insect to walk just a little too close.

Interestingly, studies of Ghost Mantids in the wild suggest that when disturbed by a potential predator this species tends to simply flatten itself against the branch it is sitting in, so provide even better levels of camouflage.

Ghost Mantis as Pets

The Ghost Mantis is a surprisingly small species, when you compare it with many of the other popular pet mantids (such as the Dead Leaf Mantis) with adult females growing to just 4-5cm in body length.

The males can be even smaller that this, though are easily told part by the number of abdominal segments. While females have 6 visible sections, males have 8, so it is possible to sex this species from quite a young age.

There are a number of factors which have made Ghost Mantids popular as pets.

Besides their unusual morphology, Phyllocrania paradoxa is also encountered in a range of different colour forms.

While most are dark brown, specimens may range between a light sandy brown through to a beautiful green colour. It has been suggested that individual specimens may change colour when they moult (as has been seen in a range of other mantis species), most likely in response to humidity.

A moister environment tends to produce a higher proportion of green mantids, while brown specimens tend to be derived from drier conditions.

The other aspect of keeping Ghost Mantids in captivity is that they can be kept in communities when well fed. While almost all the most popular mantis species should be kept alone for fear of cannibalism, it seems that when suitably fed and caged the Ghost Mantis can be kept in groups.

This, combined with their relatively small size and unusual shape, means that Ghost Mantids can make one of the very best display insects around, where a number of specimens can be housed in a single modestly-sized cage.

Cages for Ghost Mantis

Ghost mantids can be slightly more difficult to care for than other popular mantids due to their smaller size. Particular care must be taken with youngsters, lest they manage to squeeze through small gaps in their cage, or become trapped.

For adults, however, the care is reasonably simple. As with other mantids, it is recommended that the cage used should be at least three times as tall as your mantis is long, and at least twice as long.

For single specimens I like to use a small Exo Terra or ReptiZoo, which provides plenty of space and allows you to create an environment which is both visually-appealing and highly practical. In such a cage one can add pieces of bark , artificial plants and more to give a very naturalistic appearance.

REPTIZOO Glass Terrarium Tank 8'x8'x12', Front Opening Door Full View Visually Appealing Mini Reptile or Amphibians Habitat

  • Front opening door with locking latch for easy cleaning or feeding your reptile
  • Compact design mini tank with escape-proof door locks to prevent escape
  • The full screen top ventilation allows UVB and infrared penetration

For communal living, where more than one mantis is kept together, I use a larger Exo Terraor ReptiZoo.

REPTIZOO Small Glass Tank 8 Gallon, Top Opening Terrarium 12' x 12' x 12' Leopard Gecko Tarantula Young Lizard Hermit Crab Frog Insects Breeding Tank

  • 【Small Glass Tank 8 Gallon】Features with full view glass, this small Patent Design 8 gallon glass tank is convenient for feeding and having fun with your reptile or small animal pets.
  • 【Compact Design & Top Feeding】Compact and flat-packed design reptile tank with top opening to prevent escape and easy feeding. With a transparent PVC tray in the bottom for holding water and substrate
  • 【Thin Wire Net】The full screen top ventilation with thinner mesh wire allows more UVA UVB and infrared heat penetration.

Note that while my preference is always for Exo Terras or ReptiZoos personally, as I think they look great and include all manner of practical elements (closeable holes for electrical cables, lockable doors, excellent ventilation) one can use almost any glass or plastic container as long as it meets the following criteria:

Suitable ventilation – No pet insect should be kept in muggy, stagnant air. Doing so can encourage bacteria and fungi to grow, which can be a major factor in how long your Ghost Mantis lives. Whether this ventilation takes the form of a metal grill, mesh or holes, it is important that air-flow should be allowed.

Appropriate size/dimensions – We have discussed the size above, but the specific dimensions are also important. Be sure to select a cage that is many times as tall as your mantis is long, in order to facilitate the moulting process.

Tight-fitting lid – Mantids are adept at climbing, and adults can be surprisingly good at flying. Combined with their small size, it is essential to make sure that whatever cage you select cannot be escaped from.

Easy to clean – Lastly, hygiene in all captive animals is key. The cage you choose should therefore make cleaning and routine maintenance as easy as possible. Some of the very narrow yet tall cages used – such as sweet jars – can make cleaning rather more difficult.

Sourcing the right vivarium is only part of the battle. Next, you need to fit it out appropriately.

Here there are two core elements to consider.

The first of these is one (or more) suitable perches for your Ghost Mantis to rest on. The more of these mantids you keep together, the more different perches you should provide. In this way, your mantids will all be able to have their own personal space rather than vying for the best spot on a single perch.

The easiest perches are simply twigs and branches, which can been immersed in boiling water before use, and scrubbed with a reptile-safe detergent, in order to avoid introducing any pathogens into the tank.

These perches should be carefully positioned in such a way that they:

  • Touch the ground, allowing your mantis to come down to hunt if required, or get back up off the ground if it falls
  • Provide sufficient space beneath for your mantis to be able to moult successfully

The second element is a suitable substrate. While many keepers – including myself – use kitchen towel or suchlike for young mantis, a substrate such as coconut fibre works well for adults. This looks beautiful, smells fresh and helps to moderate the humidity in the cage.

Josh's Frogs Coco Cradle (10 liters)

  • ECO-FRIENDLY ORGANIC and 100% BIODEGRADABLE unlike some reptile substrates that are contributing to deforestation and then go to the landfill
  • INCREASES HUMIDITY for animals that need moderate to high humidity
  • ABSORBENT composition allows it to soak up messes and odors, leaving a cleaner habitat for your pet

As mantids don’t burrow, only a small depth is required, especially if you are opting to heat your mantis cage from beneath.

Heating & Temperature

Hailing from Africa, the Ghost Mantis understandably require artificial heating in all but the hottest months of the year. For young mantids, the easiest solution is normally to heat one large enclosure (such as a wooden vivarium) and to then place all the baby mantids within this.

For larger specimens, the cage as a whole can be heated. Temperatures of around 25’C are generally recommended, and is best provided through the use of a heat mat .

Tikaton Reptile Heat Pad - Adjustable Temperature Under Tank Heater for 10-20gal/30-40gal Tank, Terrarium Heat Mat for Turtle/Snake/Lizard/Frog/Spider/Plant Box

  • UPGRADED DESIGN: Temperature can be adjusted manually. POWERFUL FUNCTION: Helps reptile for daily activity, appetite and metabolism. It can keep reptile tank warm without any harm to your pets and also won't disturb animals sleep pattern.
  • Durable material: made of high quality PVC material, its soft surface can be flexible and folded. The heat mat is easy to clean, convenient to use and low energy.
  • ENERGY-SAVING: This heater uses a solid state nichrome heating element Which only use 8 watts of electricity and costs only pennies a day to operate. HIGH EFFICIENCY: High-quality heating wire heating, stable performance and long service life.

This can be placed under the tank, or attached to the side, though you should monitor the temperature within on a regular basis. A temperature which is too far away from this ideal can encourage mantids to stop eating, to cause problems with moulting or to even cause heat exhaustion.

Personally I use digital thermometers , with neat little probes on the end of a wire. The wire can easily be fed into my Exo Terras (thanks to the closeable holes provided just for this purpose), allowing me to consult the LCD display at any time to check on temperature and humidity.

Water & Humidity

Praying mantis seldom drink from a water dish, and an open body of water like this can lead to drowning. Mantids, after all, are not known for their swimming abilities.

That’s not to say that Ghost Mantids don’t drink. While they may absorb a reasonable amount of water from their prey, it is not unusual to find them gently lapping at droplets of rain or dew that they find on plants.

In light of this, most praying mantis keepers dispense with a water bowl entirely, and instead rely on regular misting of the tank. Possibly the easiest way to accomplish this is through the use of a houseplant spray gun. Using lukewarm water (not cold water straight from the tap) the tank should be gently misted 2-3 times a week.

Between those mistings, the water can slowly be left to evaporate, increasing the humidity in the cage and avoiding a consistently “soggy” cage. Humidity in the vivarium can be measured using a low-cost hygrometer, and should ideally remain the region of 60-90%.

Feeding Phyllocrania paradoxa

Ghost Mantis will eat almost anything that can overpower. While other mantis may take small reptiles (and some can even catch and eat birds) the diminutive size of this species means they feed almost exclusively on invertebrates.

Many praying mantis are fed consistently on a diet of crickets, with the occasional “treat” such as mealworms or baby locusts. Feeding Ghost Mantis, however, can be a little more challenging.

The reason for this is that many keepers report that younger P.paradoxa rarely venture down to the floor of the cage. As crickets rarely climb, this can result in a cage containing plenty of food, none of which is being eaten by your pet.

There are a number of potential solutions here, but possibly the most effective are to feed these mantids on feeder insects which either climb well (such as locusts of an appropriate size) or fly.

Fruit flies can make ideal prey items for baby Ghost Mantis, while larger flies can become an integral part of the adults diet.

Ghost mantis care can be quite simple once you get everything set up correctly. This praying mantis care sheet discusses everything from selecting the right cage or vivarium, through to heating, set-up and even feeding too.

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The Enigmatic Ghost Mantis: Phyllocrania paradoxa – Care Guide

Prepare to be enchanted by the captivating world of the Ghost Mantis , scientifically known as Phyllocrania paradoxa . This mysterious mantis species belongs to the Phyllocrania genus, a master of disguise and a true testament to the wonders of nature’s camouflage.

The Ghost Mantis: Phyllocrania paradoxa

  • A Nymph's Journey and Behavior

Lighting and Temperature

Humidity and substrate, terrarium size and setup, enrichment and decorations, feeding and companions, male and female copulation-readiness, the dance of copulation, ooth building and hatching, breeding and nurturing conditions, nurturing newborn nymphs.

Phyllocrania paradoxa

Hey there, I’m Mateusz, the face behind mantistopia.com. A few months back, I turned my lifelong dream into reality by bringing these fascinating mantises into my world. What started as a personal fascination has now become a full-blown passion that I want to share with fellow enthusiasts like you.

If you found this article interesting, don’t hesitate to share it on social media!

May interest you, are praying mantis endangered is it illegal to kill them, tiny titans: how much can a praying mantis lift, can praying mantis eat fruit, rest or roam the fascinating question: do praying mantis sleep.

As we delve into the fascinating world of praying mantis, we find ourselves pondering a curious question: do praying mantis sleep? If so, how do praying mantis sleep? Like many…

Why Do Praying Mantis Sway? 6 Reasons Behind Mantis Dance

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Mantis Universe

Giant Mantis Care Sheet (Phyllocrania paradoxa)

Care instructions, ghost mantis, introduction:.

The Ghost manta is one of i favorite, stand by praying manticore species! Why? Because I think they are and absolute best choices for new mantis keepers. They are the of the easiest of this strange species to keep, instead not i still look exceptionally exotic and unique. They do not require highly specialized humidity with temperature care like some of the other excursion species.

Of Ghost mantas has an latin name by: Phyllocrania paradoxa. They are a medium sized tiny that originally come from August. His leaf like body and features help them camouflage perfectly in their characteristic surroundings away drys, weathered leaves. They can be light brown, dark brown, almost black, tan, dark green, illuminate green, etc. Ghost Prayer - Phyllocrania paradoxa | Keeping Insects

Ghost mantis. Phyllocrania paradoxa

Ghost speaking. Phyllocrania paradoxa

L2-L4: Feed Hydei fruit decken.

Request 2-3 fruit flies every other day. Increase such needed and in they grow. You will be ably to tell if your feminine needs more- watch how fast they catch and eat when you addieren them in. PRO TIP: Also keep an eye turn their little abdomen area- when this looks flat, inherent laufzeit to feed and when it looks more plump and comprehensive they are well fed. Learn Spook Mantis care essentials with our guide at DubiaRoaches.com. Learn habitat, diet, temperature, and dampness tips for a healthy fondle praying.

There are dual styles of flightless fruit flies that are spent for alimentation mantids. 

Drosophila hydei - narrow bleak flightless fruit fly 

Drosophila melanogaster - wonderful tiny brown apterous fruit fly

Wee ship L2 Ghost mantids (L2= you have molted two times) and they are eating Hydei fruit flies, so that is what EGO endorse to continue feeding. Hydei capacity be purchased usually at any local reptile or aquarium store (they are former to including feed freckles and fish). Do NOT buy melanogaster with my Ghost mantis nymphs, as these will be manner furthermore small for themselves. Housing The Mind Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa) should be kept in an enclosure is is at least 3 times as tall as the mantis are long, and at least 2 times as wide as the mantis is long.  Luckily, Ghosts are a fairly low species, so it is easy to find one suitable enclosure! Adult spook maned are around 2 inches lo

Or, online at:

www.JoshsFrogs.com - get the “Producing Unable Drosophila Hydei Fruit Race Culture” for $8.99

Rainbow Mealworms

Please make securely you have this on hand before owner Ghost mantis arrives to you.

There is a trick to getting an fruits flies von their container into the mantis container! Consequence fly will come out of their vat FAST once the lid the opened! Tap the fruit fly container down the a hard surface (table, counter, etc.) BEFORE you open their covering. :) This makes everything an piece flies fall to the bottom so you may more time to open the lid without tons coming go. Open mantis container, tap fruit flies into mantis container and will close lid quickly! 

When your mantis molts one few get times, it will subsist time to raise the size of their food. We take NAY recommend crickets. These will truer be the passing of your mantis (IMHO), so please NEVER feed they cry. Instead, they can eat houseflies, blue bottle flies, or scarlet runner roaches than they grow. Are you looking to buy an ghost red? If so, you will want up prepare plus raise herself with how until care for a ghost mantis! This care sheet goes over everything from raw instructions, enclosures, temperature humidity requirements and more!

L5- Grownup: Feed Houseflies, Red Runner Roaches or Blue Bottle Flies

Houseflies:

You will buy these already as the natural pupae case. They will come is a small container and you will need to put they in a larger deli cup WITH ventilation. Without a ventilated container, the pupal will mold. Abandon at spaces temperature and they will hatch out. them should be left out at room temperature. Once they hatch to can place them in the refrigerator to "calm them down" so they don't fly away or then you can grab a few to put into your mantis hood.

SpiderPharm

Small/Medium Color Runner Crazy:

Happy Few Guys

Blue Bottle Flies:

Those food informationsquelle above are not like readily accessible feeders so we highly recommend ordering them in advance.

NEVER EVERWHERE FEED PROPERS! We do not support crickets as feeders for mantas due to the highest bacteria load that krickets carry in my gut- usually from you enclosures.

Misting/Water

Lightly mist to inside walls and bottom of your manty case anyone day with bottled SPRING water (please NOT TAP!) in a print bottles. Sometimes they will drink the water droplets on the side, sometimes they won’t furthermore sometimes they will drink the mist off yours head conversely raptors- dieser is very cute!. Misting will keep the humidity inside the container up. (This will also support with molting). AGAIN, no tap water.

Dieser are of spray bottles which ME use:

WATER!! DO NOT USE TAP IRRIGATE! Your my needs to be lightly spattered every day with bottled spring water only. I use Arrowhead Spring water.

Generally, your mantis enclosure shoud will during least twice the broader also three ages as tall as one mantid, but not much larger than that. If the enclosure is too large, i will have adenine hard time finding inherent prey. If the enclosure is too small, they will not have enough room to molt successfully. How to Pick Care of a Praying Mantis (with Pictures) - wikiHow

There are hundreds in ideas/options away there. With a faster Google find, you will see examples of strong simple fix ups, similar to the container your mantis came in, to extremely extravagant enclosures complete with greenery, timed misters, sticks, leafing and more! 

I prefer until use modified plastic deli cups. I like toward edge out the back of and deli cup and hot glue mesh fabric out it to increase ventilation. I use tulle, organza, or fine mesh. EGO and like to cut a rectangle out from the side of the container, about this bottom, and cover this with web way. This gives aforementioned container a way for air to come in the bottom and out the top and vice versa. (Photo below). Exotic manty like ventilation or bearing water, therefore kindly keep this in mind once choosing or modifying your envelopment.

ghost mantis temperature

Modifies deli cup where IODIN have cut out a section on the size concerning the cups and hot laminated organza fabric out it forward extra ventialtion

These are also impressive, full mesh enclosures is I  love and recommend : 

For nymphs and smaller species:

RESTCLOUD Minis Dally Habitation, Insect Fabric Cage, Bug Terrarium Pop Up 7.5" x 11" Tall

For higher breed:

RESTCLOUD Insect real Butterfly Habitat Cage Terrarium Pop-up 12 X 12 X 12 Inches

Everyone wants to get these all glass or plexi terrariums and while they belong pretty to look at, they do not truly meet a praying mantis' most essential requirements: Praying Mantis Kit - Everything you need to raise prayers mantises

1. ventilation and 2. gripping surfaces.

So if you must use a glass or plexi enclosure (and again, I do not recommend) I would greatly recommend which you modify the top mesh with an additional fabric (tulle, organza otherwise a refined mesh), as the metal mesh usually used for these types of casings are not good for the tarsal (end of the legs/raptors, what they use to grip) and can not allow them a strong grip to hangs upside bottom and molt. With large arts this is a HUGELY concern. The larger an species the bigger which challenge it is for them to molt successfully press not fall during molting due to their influence while hanging upside down. Falling during molting is a common point with mantes, so making my grip exterior such it will hang upside down von is extremely important. The Ghost Mantisk, Phyllocrania paradoxa, is a beautifully camouflaged mantis species this is relatively easy the care for. Read all about keeping one for a pet here.

In addition to adding some finer netting fabric over the top by sexy glueing for who inside, you will including want to add some mesh to one flanks (left, right additionally back) to give the mantis more gripping surface and the competence at get to the top of the enclosure on hang upside down. Glass or Plexi enclosures are too slick for mantids to climb up, hence EGO constantly recommend covering the sides with some gripping tissue. Essentially you are trying to convert your shell to to more enjoy this neat: ghost mantis care conduct

RESTCLOUD Mini Dally Habitat, Insect Mesh Fence, Bug Terrarium Pop Up 7.5" efface 11" Tall

with more mesh gripping surfaces on the sides.

But again, I really only recommend full woven boxes like the solitaries linked above.

Here are important things to remember when it comes to creating an mantas enclosure: 

This are the most important! Mantids need VENTILATION, so be VERY aware of the amount of airflow this can pass through your enclosure. Tiny holes alone will not sufficient, which is how IODIN recommend the modified deli cup container described above that has ampere full mesh top and apertures all over the our, OR the mesh enclosure linked above on Amazing.

The next equally important thing is so mantids need something into “grip” or hang on to- specifically at the top of and boxes. ONE lot regarding manta keepers will and add sticks or even hot glue mesh screen, organza or mesh type to the inside sides/walls of their enclosure to ensure they hold enough griff. You want see your mantis mount out most out that time wherever there is grip for them- usually on this pinnacle. When you upgrade to a tall container, be sure to provide net for them to handle set to on the top and sides. You can application tulle, fine mesh, organza (this is what MYSELF use), or non-slip rug gripper. Those a extremely important. I see a lot of window enclosures out there for mantis with NO grip added to which side, simply for top and this is a wide no-no. Extra glass courtyards provide little ventilation. Mantids need to be able to easily grab and climb up who home on their enclosure, as well as hang away the top. With you use the mesh container from Amazon linked aforementioned, you don't need to worry about gripping surface because the entire thing remains performed are mesh- this mantises love and belongs easy up grip in in. Ghost Mantis: Care Guide, Pictures, Lifespan & More | Pet Keen

Mantises also must humidity, so even when your enclosure will have ample ventilation, it also needs some humidity. So, there is an balance to aim for! But in easily misting them daily, you will provide enough humidity. The Ghost Manticore is smaller than of average Prayer Manty and plays dead whenever threatened, maximizing its liner. Read on finding out more about this interesting insect

Decoration advice! Mantises especially love sticks, flowers and leaves! If you use any decoration in your cabin, I tell purchasing from a pet store or online so you know they have been cleaned and are meant to be used on pet. I do NOT endorse using plants/leaves from nature- pick, dirt, bacteria, etc sack harm you mantis, so I truly don’t recommend this.

EGO often make these two items from Amazon:

Magbeauty Artificial Ivy Paper Fake Vines - 12 Strands Fake Ivy Wall Plants Green Vine Ornamental Vines

6Pcs 75cm Lifelike Dry Willow Branches Bendable Iron Pipes Artificial Floral Flower Stub Stem

5. The bottom of thy enclosure can be as simplified as a paper towel (that is what I use!), or coco fiber substrate by Tierpark Med (Petco) the huge too. Just be sure to keep it lightly moist. MYSELF honestly feel so paper towels are the easiest. ghost mantis nymph L2

TEMPERATURE & HUMIDITY

I’m going to talk about “ideal” and “realistic” here. Mantids are most feel at 80-90 degree temps for think about locus i are originally off, usually hot, humid and tropical places. Some mantis keepers possess a dedicated room for his mantids, so they canned easily keep their room that warmer. However, my mantids are in my spaces and that are a smaller hots available me and also hard to keep is warm in the winter months. Your Ghost has become kept thriving in more on adenine range of 74-79 qualifications during the day, and about 70-74 degrees at night.  I think anywhere from mid 70- average 80’s will be fine. Here in Southern California we have mild temperatures, consequently I don’t really worry about it that way but extra part to of national should consider what to keep ideal temps for his enclosures. I have tiny hygrometers on my mantis shelf ensure helps in tell ich the temperature and humidity. You can obtain them cheap on Shrew in an 4 pack. Ghost Mantis Care Sheet (Phyllocrania paradoxa) — Mantis Universe

This your which an ME like:

Relative air humidity for Ghost is 75-85%. MYSELF have found a quick mist each day will help keep this level.

UPON ARRIVAL

Please make definite you will have Hydei fruit fly species on handheld when your mantis arrives. Give your Wraith a light spray of bottled sprinkle with a sprayer bottle as soon as it arrives and offer 3-4 result flies. Then place in a quiet area of your home and just let he rest and destress from travel/shipping. Ghosts are hardy mantids, but yours is still little so I recommend to be more conservative when it first arrives and did handle it for a couple years. Just the misting of water and some fruit flies and rent information simple chill out for a few days. After that, you can handle it a little and take it outbound to love it.

Additional Questions?

Please feel free to contact me with any additional frequent! I am present to help you! Most importantly HAVE FUN with autochthonous new fondle! These are beautiful little creatures that are a lot of fun!

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The Enchanting Orchid Mantis: Species Information, Care Tips, furthermore Rear Insights

ghost mantis temperature

Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania Paradoxa): Care, Pictures & Facts

The Ghost Mantis ( Phyllocrania Paradoxa ) is an enigmatic mantis species native to the African continent and Madagascar.

This species is quite popular in the insect-keeping hobby. It usually displays dark brown colors from greenish to light brown depending on the environment and humidity.

It’s known for being one of the few species that can sustain communal life and for feeding naturally from most common pests, making it ideal for keeping inside greenhouses.

If you are planning to expand your mantids collection or are looking to get into the hobby, here is everything you need to know about the beautiful Ghost Mantis!

ghost mantis temperature

Ghost Mantis Care Sheet

Ghost mantis overview.

ghost mantis temperature

The Phyllocrania paradoxa , commonly known as the Ghost Mantis, is found in an extensive area of the African continent and its surrounding islands such as Angola, Cameroon, Ghana, Zimbabwe, and many others. However, it’s most frequently found in Madagascar.

It’s considered Macropterous since it has long wings used for flying; it also feeds mostly from small flying insects by stalking them from a branch, so the wings aren’t used for hunting, but more for getting around.

It’s also considered a leaf mantis since its appearance resembles a leaf. The Ghost Mantis can live comfortably in captivity, as long as you provide them with the right environment.

Appearance & Variations

The Ghost Mantis displays dark colors that match the gloomy environment; typically, dark brown to almost black colors can fluctuate depending on the surroundings and humidity, but the colors can sometimes turn greenish-grey.

ghost mantis temperature

Its colors are adapted at an early age while molting, so it’s easy to lead its color development by changing its tank set up to achieve the desired tones.

Its razor-like fore legs are ideal for grabbing and retaining prey, and it has leaf-like adornments on all other limbs. It has a lengthened head with a flat and asymmetric surface that is capable of rotating up to 180º, ideal for turning into a more leaf-like form for camouflage.

The Ghost Mantis also has long wings that cover the abdomen with “creases” over the wings that are shadings of pigment. 

The ghost mantis exhibits sexual dimorphism. As they mature, females get bulkier and males thinner, with longer and slender antennas and wings that go past de abdomen.

They are good flyers, though females tend not to fly very far since they are heavier, their antennea are more compact, and their wings are shorter.

In addition, females have a six-segment abdomen, while males have eight segments. However, while females are slightly larger, the difference in size is usually not big enough to be a good criterion for telling males and females apart.

The Ghost Mantis’ market price goes from $24 to $50, depending on gender and maturity state. Nymphs of L2 to L3 go for as little as $24, while L4 to L5 nymphs are between $28 and $30 each.

Adult males go for around $35 to $40, while adult females get around $45 to $50 in some cases.

It’s pretty common to buy them in bulk since they’re fit for communal life; deals are usually for four to ten specimens at the same time on some websites with a price of $20 each.

Behavior and Temperament

Though it has an eccentric name, the Ghost Mantis exhibits a calm demeanor, even with other members of the same species.

They keep their distance and rarely recur to feeding on one another, which is a rarity among mantids, making them suitable for communal life.

They camouflage themselves as dried-up leafs turning over their own body to be more accurate in evading predators’ gaze while waiting for prey.

They usually don’t pursue their food but instead, wait for the right moment to ambush and catch it. If threatened, they can enter an almost dead pose to divert attention, but males mostly tend to fly away at the first chance they get.

Considering their mild temperament and behavior, the GM is ideal for all newcomers who are trying to get their first mantis.

Caring for a Ghost Mantis

ghost mantis temperature

Temperature and Humidity

The GM can live comfortably with temperatures around 68 °F to 86 °F, but 79 °F is the ideal measure. It needs high humidity to resemble its natural habitat, so a humidity level between 60% and 90% is best for them. To achieve this, you must spray the enclosure frequently and ensure adequate ventilation.

The GM uses around one to two inches of substrate in most cases to keep them happy. High humidity is of utmost importance for their survival, so topsoil and peat moss are the standard choices to keep in the substrate mix.

Organic soil is another good option if you’re up to keeping a bioactive enclosure because they feel most at home with plenty of vegetation.

The GM’s enclosure should have at least three times the specimen’s length in height and twice its length width.

However, most hobbyists will get larger tanks of around five to ten gallons to house several specimens in the same place.

As long as your mantids are well-fed, they won’t turn into cannibalism. Also, ensure the tank has adequate ventilation, or else you risk mold formation and diseases.

For decoration, plenty of dried-up leaves and branches are desirable to give them a place to climb and disappear.

If you’re looking to create a bioactive enclosure, a couple of plants will help keep humidity levels and make them feel comfortable; be aware though that you’ll likely have trouble finding your Ghost Mantises due to their excellent camouflage. 

The GM needs high humidity levels to survive, so spraying the enclosure about five times per week is advisable.

Depending on the temperature, it can be done even twice a day. Distilled water has been the best choice for the job, but any chemical-free water is suitable.

This species normally gets its hydration while feeding on its prey, but sometimes it uses drops from the enclosure. As such, a water bowl is not really necessary as long as you keep the humidity up. Of course, if you want to be on the safe side you can equip their enclosure with a small bottle cap filled with water.

Diet & Feeding

The Ghost Mantis diet is fairly easy, using flies as the focus of their diet. L1 nymphs can be well fed with small fruit flies. L2 and L3 nymphs can start with small fruit flies and then step up to big ones. L4 and L5 nymphs love green bottle flies, while L6 to L8 vary between green bottle flies and blue bottle flies.

Adult Ghost Mantises can eat blue bottle flies for the rest of their lives without complaint, even though they can eat other insects like moths and small grasshoppers as well.

As long as you feed them well, they’re going to stay healthy. The GM’s approach to hunting is peaceful, seldom pursuing its prey actively.

The Ghost Mantis is quite weak compared to other mantids species. Therefore, it’s important that you keep their prey relatively small. If the prey is small enough, they won’t have any issues feeding themselves.

You can use the abdomen’s plumpness and flatness to discern if they require any nutritional rectifications, so you’ll know if they’re being overfed or underfed and be able to adapt their diet accordingly.

Throughout its life, the Ghost Mantis will molt several times. You’ll know that they’re about to molt because they will hang motionless upside down. When you see this, it’s important that you do not disturb them as molting is a stressful time for them.

Furthermore, it’s important to note that right before a molt the insect will refuse to eat. This is normal behavior and nothing to worry about. In addition, you should refrain from feeding your mantis for about 24 hours after a molt to give their exoskeleton time to harden. Refrain from handling them for at least 48 hours, since they’re quite fragile right after a molt.

Communal Living

The Ghost Mantis is one of the few mantids that is capable of communal living. What this means is that you can have more than one of these insects in a single enclosure without them resorting to cannibalism.

If you plan on housing them communally, here’s a video with good information about setting things up.

When housing them communally it is very important that you always provide them with enough food and a large enough enclosure with space for all of them. If they do not have enough food and space it’s very likely that they will resort to cannibalism.

Furthermore, it’s important that the specimens you house together are at the same instar. What this means is that you should never house L1 nymphs with L2, L3, or higher instar specimens. The size difference will be very large, which makes cannibalism more likely.

In addition, males are typically more docile than females, so if you plan on communal housing it’s best to use males for this purpose.

However, even though cannibalism is unlikely in this species, it’s still something you need to take into account. The risk of this happening always exists, even with the docile Ghost Mantis.

Health & Lifespan

The Ghost Mantis typically lives for about 8 months in captivity. To keep them strong and healthy it’s important that you provide them with good food and a proper enclosure. As long as you follow the guidelines provided above, your mantis should have everything it needs to thrive and live a happy life.

To prevent illness, it’s also important that you feed them only captive-bred insects. Wild-caught insects can have parasites that can transfer to your mantis, which is obviously something we want to avoid.

In addition, to prevent the growth of mold and bacteria it’s important that their enclosure is well ventilated and that you remove uneaten food in a timely matter.

Lastly, be careful when handling them. They’re fragile insects!

Fun Facts about the Ghost Mantis

  • These species are weaker compared to other mantids, so they don’t fare well against other insects over twice their size.
  • The Ghost Mantis changes colors with every molting having several opportunities to adapt to their current environment at different stages of the year. A popular trend with keepers is changing decoration so they can achieve several tones between stages in the same enclosure.
  • It exhibits an asymmetric head that can rotate 180° and leaf-like protrusions; it revolves its own body to mimic a dried-up leaf almost perfectly.
  • This is one of the few mantis species that will rarely practice cannibalism. This rare miracle makes it suitable for communal life as long as all specimens are well fed and have enough space in the enclosure

Final words: Is the Ghost Mantis right for you?

The Ghost Mantis is an elegant species, extremely calm, beautiful, and fit for beginners. Having a group of these mantids in the same habitat offers an incredible view; you won’t ever get bored while keeping them with you.

While these insects are very suitable for beginners, they have a lot to offer to more experienced keepers as well. Not only do they have very interesting behavior, but they’re also extremely beautiful to look at.

Nevertheless, if after reading about them you decide that this species is not for you, you might be interested in checking out the Carolina or Chinese mantis instead!

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Phyllocrania Paradoxa – Ghost Mantis – CARE SHEET

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  • Scientific Name : Phyllocrania Paradoxa
  • Native in : Tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and Madagascar
  • Average Size as an Adult : males 1.8 in – 2.2 in (approx. 4.5 cm – 5.5 cm); females 2 in – 2.5 in (approx. 5 cm – 6.5 cm)
  • Diet : Carnivorous, flying insects such as flies
  • Lifespan : Males 1 year; females 1.5 years
  • Temperature : 75° F – 90° F (approx. 24° C – 32° C)
  • Humidity : 50% – 60/70%
  • Overall difficulty rating : Easy – Medium

The Phyllocrania Paradoxa is commonly referred to as “Ghost Mantis” due to its’ impressive camouflaging skills. It is a praying mantis species that can be found almost everywhere south of the Sahara in Africa and in Madagascar. It thrives in tropical and subtropical regions and it is not too picky on humidity and temperature. The Phyllocrania Paradoxa is a medium-sized mantis that is relatively easy to keep, compared to other praying mantis species. What’s special about this species is its appearance. The Phyllocrania Paradoxa mimics dead and dried-up leaves and the camouflage skills are simply astonishing and very impressive. Depending on the environment it will adapt the colors to become almost invisible.

The males have the ability to fly after the last molt.

Just like all praying mantis species, the Phyllocrania Paradoxa is carnivorous and waits motionless for its prey to come close enough to get caught. Depending on the size of the praying mantis, it can be fed with fruit flies (Drosophila Melanogaster) in L1 and L2, and bigger fruit flies (Drosophila Hydei) in L2 and L3. Larger praying mantis can also be fed with larger flies such as houseflies, crickets, or smaller cockroaches.

You can find a full list of possible prey in this article.

The Phyllocrania Paradoxa is known to be less aggressive towards conspecifics than other praying mantis species, but cannibalism can never be fully excluded. This species is often kept in groups of around 5 individuals as adults. Younger individuals (L1 – L4) can be kept in bigger groups.

If you plan to use twigs or branches from outdoors instead of a pet shop, you should put the wood in the oven for 15 minutes at 212° F (approx. 100° C) or microwave them for 20 seconds to kill off any potential parasites. It’s safer to go with wood from pet stores to make sure that no pesticides or parasites are introduced to the container.

Cage for L1 / L2

When the Phyllocrania Paradoxa nymphs are still very young (L1, L2) they can be kept in plastic jars. The plastic jar should have a hole in the lid with a mesh material glued in so that the praying mantis can dangle from the ceiling. It also allows the air to circulate and to prevent mold. The interior of the plastic jar can be equipped with wood wool or small twigs and leaves to allow the praying mantis to climb around in the container.

It is important that the praying mantis have enough space (at least 2 – 3 times the lengths of the body) beneath them when they dangle from the ceiling. Otherwise, they might be in trouble when they molt and hit any kind of decoration or the floor.

The floor can be covered with some kitchen paper cloth which needs to be exchanged every few days to keep the container clean and free of any molt.

Cage for L3 / L4

Once the praying mantis gets bigger (L3, L4) they should move into a slightly bigger container with more opportunities to climb on twigs and branches. The size should be at least 7 in x 7 in x 7 in (approx. 18cm x 18cm x 18cm).

Don’t put too much decoration into the cage to give your praying mantis enough space to molt without hitting any wood.

Cage for L5 and bigger

Once the Phyllocrania Paradoxa reaches L5, it should move into an enclosure of at least 7.9 in x 7.9 in x 7.9 in (approx. 20 cm x 20 cm x 20 cm) for individuals or 11.8 in x 11.8 in x 17.7 in (approx. 30 cm x 30 cm x 45 cm) for a group of 3 to 4 adults. As mentioned earlier, this species is one of the very few that can be kept in groups due to a lower aggression level than other praying mantis species, but cannibalism is always possible even for this species.

The floor can be covered with soil, sand, kitchen paper, or bark. Praying mantis very rarely walk on the ground, therefor the only purpose of the floor cover is to look pretty and to hold the humidity.

You can use bark or mesh materials on the walls as well to allow the mantis to move along the walls.

Twigs and branches can be used inside the container, as well as artificial plants.

ghost mantis temperature

Temperature

The Phyllocrania Paradoxa can be kept at a temperature between 75° F and 90° F (approx. 24° C – 32° C) during the day and the temperature may drop down to 68° F (approx. 20° C) at night. This species does forgive small mistakes and is rather hardy.

To maintain a consistent temperature, you can use a heat lamp on top or on the side of the container, or a heating mat under a part of the cage. Both options work perfectly and will allow the Phyllocrania Paradoxa to live a happy healthy life.

The Phyllocrania Paradoxa lives in tropical and subtropical areas and is used to medium-high humidity. 50% – 70% is a good humidity level for this species. It can be achieved by spraying water into the enclosure on the floor or against the walls or decoration every second day. Make sure to allow proper ventilation to avoid any mold.

The Phyllocrania Paradoxa is a medium-sized praying mantis species with a very intriguing appearance. It mimics dead and dried leaves and can camouflage perfectly between twigs, leaves, and branches. It will become almost invisible to the human eye. The color of the individual Phyllocrania Paradoxa can vary depending on the environment, the praying mantis lives in. The colors can vary from light beige to dark brown, but black or greenish coloring is also possible.

After L4 it is possible to differentiate between the sexes. The males have longer, thinner “crowns” on their heads than the females. The females have rather wide and straight “crowns”.

The antennae of the males are longer and thicker than the ones of the females, and after the last molt, the males have 8 segments while the females only have 6.

The abdomen of the females is bigger than the males because they produce the oothecae.

Males can live up to a year while females can live up to 1.5 years. Females always live longer than the male praying mantis because after finding a partner for reproduction, the males will either be eaten by the females or simply have no further task in life and will die after a while. The females on the other hand have to produce the oothecae and lay those in order to ensure the survival of the species.

Reproduction

If you are planning to breed, you will need an adult praying mantis. Females reach adulthood in L8 (after 7 molts), and males in L7 (after 6 molts). In some cases, the number of molts can vary. You can recognize the final state because both males and females will have wings. Only the males can actually fly. After the final molt, it takes another 1 to 2 weeks for the male and 2 to 3 weeks for the female to be ready to mate.

Even if males and females are the same age, they can mate because the males will live for a few more months after the final molt and can wait until the female is ready to mate. If you want to be extra safe, you can keep the males in a slightly cooler container (but never lower than 68° F (approx. 20° C)) to make sure that females and males reach adulthood around the same time.

Before putting males and females together, make sure that the females are well-fed and not hungry. Otherwise, the females will attack and eat the male before he was even able to mate. If males and females were kept together anyways, they should all be well-fed and will eventually mate without your assistance.

In some cases, the males will hop on the females’ backs and stay there for several hours before the mating process starts. After a successful mating process, the female will start to glue oothecae (egg cases) in different parts of the cage. The humidity should not be increased dramatically, spraying water into the enclosure every second day is enough.

The egg cases of praying mantis are called ootheca. The plural is oothecae. The Oothecae of the Phyllocrania Paradoxa can be up to 2 in (approx. 5 cm) in length and is rather flat and dark brown. The females tend to glue the egg cases to thin twigs. After the final molt, it takes approximately 4 to 5 weeks until the female lays her first oothecae. After that, she will continue to lay oothecae every 1 to 2 weeks. Oothecae of the Phyllocrania Paradoxa can contain up to 50 eggs, but the average is around 25 eggs.

A female Phyllocrania Paradoxa can lay up to 15 oothecae, but usually, the first few ones are the “best” with the most outcome.

The incubation period is the time the oothecae need until the nymphs hatch. This period is 4 to 6 weeks for the Phyllocrania Paradoxa. The temperature and humidity should be the same as for the adults during the incubation time. The average eclosion rate is around 80 nymphs that are usually around 0.2 in (approx. 0.5 cm) when they hatch.

ghost mantis temperature

Overall Difficulty Rating

The Phyllocrania Paradoxa is a very popular praying mantis species for beginners and advanced keepers. It is fascinating to look at and rather easy to care for compared to other praying mantis species. It is rather hardy and medium-sized which means that the enclosure does not have to be super big.

The overall difficulty rating is easy to medium for this species.

Here is an article on whether praying mantis can be kept as pets: https://animal-knowledge.com/can-you-keep-praying-mantis-as-a-pet/

Here you can find the answer to your question if praying mantis make good pets: https://animal-knowledge.com/are-praying-mantis-good-pets/

Here is a list of the best beginner praying mantis species: https://animal-knowledge.com/what-are-good-beginner-praying-mantis-species/

Lisa

Lisa is one of the two founders of Animal-Knowledge. She has been very interested in animals and insects from a very young age and has owned different kinds of pets such as snails, ants, fish, turtles, mice, rats, hamsters, rabbits, a dog, … you get the idea 🙂

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The Ghost Mantis: Your Complete Guide

Resembling a fallen leaf, the ghost mantis or Phyllocrania paradoxa is a Madagascan species, with a unique appearance and fascinating behavior. Just as every species belonging to the extensive praying mantis family, they’re voracious predators and effective hunters, by sneakily sitting among the leaves and waiting for the prey .

Having them as pets it’s like having a small version of the wild in your home. They stay motionless for hours and sometimes move like leaves dancing in the wind. You see their amazing hunting method, shedding their skins, and growing process.

Read on to discover everything you need to know about the ghost mantis, from its appearance and size to its habitat and mating. You’ll also learn about how you can keep a ghost mantis as a pet.

What Does A Ghost Mantis Look Like?

Ghost mantises belong to the praying mantises family, but compared to its cousins, it’s considered a “miniature species” growing to only about 45 to 50 millimeters (1.8 to 2.0 in) long. Like most insects, ghost mantises have six legs, two wings, and two antennae. The modified front legs help them catch and hold their prey.

Ghost mantis on a branch

The ghost mantis looks precisely like a dead leaf. So, the smart insect can camouflage effortlessly among the falling leaves waiting for its prey. The resemblance is so close that it’s almost impossible to tell a ghost mantis from actual leaves. The twisted leaf-shaped part on the head and broken leaf-like legs contribute to this similarity.

Adult female ghost mantises have a wider prothorax, six abdominal segments, and their wings are as long as the abdomen. The female’s crown is as broad as its head, smoother, and has more lines. On the other hand, you can recognize the male adults by their longer antennae, thinner bodies, and transparent wings, which are longer than their eight-segmented abdomen.

As they mature, they develop pronounced veins throughout their body parts, making them look even more like leaves.

Their appearance keeps them safe from predators such as insect-eating birds. At the same time, it makes it easier for them to hunt flies, crickets, and other small insects.

What Color Is The Ghost Mantis?

Ghost mantises are found in different colors, ranging from black and dark brown to light brown and green or greenish-gray. However, darker colors are more common.

Ghost mantis blending in with dead leaves

Their coloration has nothing to do with genetics. It’s the environment that determines their colors based on the light, humidity, and of course, the color of their surroundings. For example, ghost mantises in more humid areas tend to be green.

If you are interested in the colors of praying mantis, then it would be worth checking another article we have written called, Do Praying Mantis Change Color ?

Where Do Ghost Mantises Live?

Being native to the lush forests of Madagascar, Africa, you can find the leaf resembling insects in trees, bushes, shrubs, and on open land, usually hanging upside down from tree branches. They live in areas with a moderate temperature between 20º C to 30º C and can’t tolerate temperatures below 18º C for long. The perfect temperature is about 26º C because they prefer warm places with relatively high humidity, 60 to 90 percent.

What Does A Ghost Mantis Eat?

Ghost mantises mainly eat flying insects like flies and crickets, but sometimes they hunt slow-moving cockroaches as well. They only eat live prey and prefer highly active insects.

Ghost mantis eating a cricket

They’re called a sit-and-wait predator, meaning they camouflage until the food comes along, and then they attack very fast. Before the target realizes it, it’s stuck between the claws of this predator and only catches its prey if it’s moving in their grabbing distance.

Interestingly, the ghost mantis, especially an adult male, can easily get intimidated by its prey’s size and even run away instead of attacking it.

We do have an entire article on the diets and hunting habits of praying mantis if you are interested. The article is called, What Do Praying Mantis Eat? (With Video Hunting A Fish)

The Ghost Mantis Life Cycle

Life stages.

Ghost mantises are hemimetabolous insects, which means they don’t undergo a complete metamorphosis like a butterfly or beetle. Butterflies, as an example, go through the larva stage, pupa, and adult. They look entirely different in each stage of their life in a way that an adult has nothing like the larva. On the other hand, a newborn praying mantis looks like its adult parents except for the size, color, and wings.

Before reaching adulthood, a mantis nymph sheds its skin about six to nine times, depending on the species and sex. The mantis will grow every time it sheds. It can’t grow in between molts because of its hard skin.

Scientists use a number to designate every stage of a mantis’ life. A newborn mantis is L1 and becomes an L2 after its first shedding. The number is incremented until the nymph becomes an adult.

The females live between 8 to 12 months, depending on their living conditions. They molt approximately seven times before adulthood (which is L8). The males have shorter lifespans. On average, a male ghost mantis lives for 7.5 months: two months as an adult and 5.5 months before that. It passes six molts to turn into an adult (L7)

Mating Time

Ghost mantises are ready for mating about two weeks after their final molt. When the time comes, the male sits on top of the female without copulating. It takes several hours to make a move, and that’s why mating can last several days.

Within several weeks, the female sticks some clutches of eggs to branches or sidewalls. The eggs need the same conditions as the adults, warm and humid.

Laying Eggs

The female mantis lays eggs in the form of an ootheca, a cluster of eggs stuck together by foam. The foam immediately hardens to protect the eggs from predators, cold weather, and drying up.

The average number of eggs in an ootheca is 10 to 40 eggs, but it can contain up to 50. To stick their ootheca, females release a foamy liquid containing protein by spiral-shaped abdomen movements. The egg case becomes rigid and forms a firm sponge-like cocoon.

The nymphs need approximately four weeks before they’re ready to hatch through the thin wall around them. The ideal hatching temperature is 29º C.

For more information about praying mantis eggs, we have written another article called, Do Praying Mantis Die After Laying Eggs?

How To Keep Ghost Mantises as Pets

It’s fun to have a mantis pet, and it’s not difficult at all. However, like all animals, there are some basic rules to consider if you want a healthy pet.

To keep a ghost mantis in an enclosed space, you need a box, cage, or terrarium with the right dimensions. It should be at least three times the animal’s length in height and at least twice its length in width. This measurement means at least 15 cm in height and 10 cm in width so that the mantis has enough space to walk around and shed its skin.

Put something that absorbs water and doesn’t mold easily on the bottom of the box. It could be tissue paper, shredded wood, or sand. Vermiculite or potting earth can also do the trick. The goal of this flooring is to release water slowly and keep constant humidity in the box.

Add some branches, plants, reeds, or sticks to the box where your mantis can sit or hang from. Fake plastic ones are okay too, but make sure they don’t contain any glue or insecticides. Also, make sure the box doesn’t get too cramped once you add the plants.

The container must have a top to let the mantis hang upside down when molting and prevent it from escaping. Several ventilation holes are also necessary so that it has enough air to breathe easily and the extra moisture drys up. A mesh door can provide sufficient ventilation.

Room temperature is acceptable in the summer, but you need a heating mat during winter.

To clean the container, empty it, remove any half-eaten food, and wash it with hot water. Don’t use any detergents because they harm the mantis. Dry the box and put new substrate.

Ghost mantises don’t drink water from a container like other pets- they use the droplets on the plants. You need to spray water to cause a light mist for your mantis to simulate similar conditions. However, they don’t like to be sprayed directly, so you should spray around them. If the container has a mesh door, you can spray water on it, and it’ll be like raindrops.

It’s better not to use regular tap water, instead, use spring water, distilled water, or reverse osmosis (RO) filtered water. When the mantis is young, spraying five to seven times a week is suitable, but you should reduce it to three times a week for adults.

To feed your mantis, give it flies, although they don’t say no to small grasshoppers and crickets. Remember that they only eat live insects, and they can catch prey more easily if it moves a lot. That’s why a fly is better than insects that might hide, such as cockroaches.

The food should be the same size as their head because a large prey can frighten them. Plus, their arms aren’t strong enough to hold a giant insect, and it’s difficult for them to eat it.

Large tweezers or the owner’s hand can scare the mantis too and make it refuse the prey. If this happens during feeding, just wait fifteen minutes and try again. When you feed them, watch them and make sure they eat the food, or else they might not find it and starve.

The younger ones eat a lot. The males tend to become less voracious as they mature, but the adult female eats a lot every day.

To make your ghost mantises mate and reproduce, just put a male and a female in the same place two weeks after their last molt. If they’re in groups, there’s nothing to do, and they’ll reproduce as usual. Remember to feed the females very well as expected because they eat more than males.

Frequently Asked Questions About Ghost Mantises

How does a ghost mantis see the world.

Praying mantises have a much better sight compared to other insects because of their stereo-vision. This kind of vision means they can look at a spot with two eyes and recognize the distance accurately. They have other senses such as hearing, feeling, taste, and smell, but they mostly rely on their sight.

Are Ghost Mantises Dangerous For Humans?

While their spooky name, bizarre appearance, and bad rep may seem a terrifying combination for some, ghost mantises do not pose any danger to humans.

Don’t be fooled though, they will most definitely bite you if you approached aggressively. The bite, however, does minor damage, and it’s not lasting as they don’t have any venom.

For more about the bite of praying mantis check out his article we have written, Do Praying Mantis Bite?

Do Ghost Mantises Eat Each Other?

Unlike most mantis species, ghost mantises aren’t aggressive and can live together without cannibalism. However, they need plenty of space and food, such as flies to prey, because even these quiet species will turn on each other if they run out of food.

They also need to be of the same age and size. So, there’s still a small risk of cannibalism.

The Wrap Up

The ghost mantis is a leaf-like praying mantis from Madagascar. It can camouflage effortlessly among dry leaves because of its look. It prefers warm areas around 26ºC with a high relative humidity level. This sit-and-wait predator eats flying insects or other small insects that move around.

They live about 7 to 12 months and shed their skin about 6 or 7 times before entering adulthood. After mating, the females reproduce by laying 10 to 40 eggs in a cluster. When they hatch, the newborns look like adults with slight differences.

The ghost mantis can be a great pet and requires minimal care to stay healthy and strong. 

Interested in knowing more about other species of praying mantis or maybe you are looking at keeping a praying mantis as a pet? Then you might be interested in these other articles we have written:

Are White Praying Mantises Rare?

The Giant Asian Mantis: Your Complete Guide

The Devil’s Flower Mantis: Your Complete Guide

The Budwing Mantis: Your Complete Guide

The Spiny Flower Mantis: Your Complete Guide

https://www.antskingdom.com/ghost-mantis-phyllocrania-paradoxa.html

https://www.panterrapets.com/pages/ghost-mantis-caresheet

https://www.exotic-pets.co.uk/ghost-mantis.html

https://insektenliebe.com/haltungsberichte/keeping-repords-about-mantids/phyllocrania-paradoxa-ghost-mantis/?lang=en

https://www.pbspettravel.co.uk/blog/keeping-praying-mantis-as-pets-the-beginners-guide/

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Info by Species

How to care for your ghost mantis.

The ghost mantis ( Phyllocrania paradoxa ) is a small, diurnal, carnivorous invertebrate primarily native to the forests of Madagascar and Africa. 

Ghost mantises are unique-looking mantises with bodies built for maximum camouflage, and their bodies are shaped to look like they’re made from dead leaves. Their head in particular is topped by a jagged, leaflike crest. Coloring varies from almost black to greenish, and may be influenced by local humidity. Although just 2” long as adults, their extraordinary appearance still makes them eye-catching — if you can find them! 

Ghost mantises are intermediate-level pet invertebrates. Total lifespan is up to 7-12 months, depending on sex and the temperature at which it’s kept.

How much space do ghost mantises need?

The general rule with housing praying mantises is that the enclosure length and width should be at least twice that of the mantis, and the height should be at least three times the mantis’ length. 32oz deli cups with fabric vented lids often work well for juveniles. Adults and subadults should be housed in a Kritter Keeper, terrarium, or mesh box measuring at least 4”L x 4”W x 6”H, although larger is optimal.

Ghost mantises are one of the few mantises that can be safely housed in groups with a low risk of cannibalism. For success, avoid overcrowding and maintain groups of roughly the same age. For example, an enclosure with two ghost mantises should be twice as big as the minimum for one.

Do ghost mantises need special lighting?

As long as the mantis’ enclosure is in a room that receives ~12 hours/day of artificial or bright natural light, then additional lighting equipment is unlikely to be necessary. However, if it is being kept in a dark room or the terrarium contains live plants, then ~6500K fluorescent or LED illumination is required.

Do not put mantis enclosures on windowsills, as the sunlight can make temperatures inside the enclosure lethally hot!

What temperatures do ghost mantises need?

Ghost mantises usually do well between 70-80°F, so they can be kept at room temperature. Avoid temperatures above 86°F and below 68°F. Ideal ambient temperature for nymphs is 78°F when possible. Keep track of the temperatures inside your enclosure with a digital thermometer like the Zoo Med Digital Thermometer & Humidity Gauge , with the probe placed in the middle. 

It’s best practice to provide a temperature gradient within the enclosure so they can self-regulate their body temperature according to their needs and preference. To prevent potential overheating, avoid using heat sources with mantis nymphs. However, it should be safe to use a heat lamp in a full-size mantis enclosure. 

To provide a “basking spot” for your ghost mantis, use a Zoo Med Nano Dome Lamp Fixture with a low-wattage heat bulb like the 25w Zoo Med Nano Basking Spot or similar. Place this on the extreme left or right of the enclosure. Do not place the lamp on top of the mesh, as this can burn your mantis. Instead, suspend the lamp from a Zoo Med Reptile Lamp Stand or similar. The heat lamp should be turned off every night.

Note that heat lamps should not be used with Kritter Keepers or other plastic-top enclosures.

What humidity levels do ghost mantises need?

Humidity is very important for successfully keeping praying mantises as pets, as it helps ensure successful molting and general wellbeing. The ghost mantis requires average humidity levels of 60-90% to stay healthy.

To increase and maintain healthy humidity levels, lightly mist your mantis’ enclosure with a spray bottle at least 2x/day. If you are using a mesh rather than glass/plastic enclosure, then you will likely need to spray more heavily and more often.

Humidity levels should be monitored with a Zoo Med Digital Thermometer & Humidity Gauge or similar with the probe placed in the middle of the enclosure. 

What substrate is good for ghost mantises?

Substrate is important to an ghost mantis setup because it helps maintain healthy humidity levels. Many mantis keepers prefer to use a bioactive soil substrate with springtails, isopods, beneficial bacteria and fungi, and live plants because it makes it easier to keep the enclosure clean. However, bioactive can be complicated to get right if you’re new to it, so here are some other substrate options:

  • Zoo Med Creatures Eco Soil
  • Zoo Med Creature Soil
  • Zoo Med ReptiBark
  • Eco Earth Plantation Soil
  • Exo Terra Forest Bark
  • Zilla Bark Blend

You don’t need very much substrate. Depending on the size of the enclosure, 1-2” should be plenty. However, you will need more for the plants’ roots if you plan to create a bioactive setup.

To keep your ghost mantis’ enclosure clean, replace the substrate weekly and completely rinse out the enclosure and décor with hot water. Don’t use soap or disinfectants, as the residue may harm your pet!

What décor can you use in a ghost mantis terrarium?

Ghost mantises like having things to climb and hide behind in their enclosure. This encourages natural behaviors, which makes them more fun to watch, and decreases stress, which in turn increases lifespan. Here are some ideas:

  • live plants
  • artificial foliage

Climbing objects should be arranged at a variety of angles to give your mantis options. Hot glue is excellent for adhering climbing objects and artificial foliage to terrarium walls.

Make sure to leave an open space at the top of the enclosure at least twice the height of your mantis for molting.

What do ghost mantises eat?

Praying mantises are carnivorous , which means that they eat other insects and sometimes even small animals. Avoid overfeeding, as this will shorten your pet’s lifespan. Food should be offered every other day, as much as your mantis will take — they stop eating when they’re full. (Note that praying mantises will refuse food for 1-2 days before molting.)

As a general rule, feeders should be live and no larger than 1/2 of the mantis’ length. Because ghost mantises are ambush hunters and prefer not to chase down their prey, flying insects and insects that can climb up the walls of the enclosure are the best. Options include:

  • Fruit flies ( D. hydei or D. melanogaster )
  • Black soldier flies
  • Blue/green bottle flies
  • Red runners

Due to parasite/disease concerns, it’s generally considered best practice to avoid using crickets as feeders for praying mantises. Uneaten prey should be removed from the enclosure after 24 hours.

All feeders should be generously hydrated and gutloaded for at least 24 hours prior to offering to your mantis. This makes sure that your pet gets the best nutrition possible from its meal. Good foods for feeder insects include:

  • Repashy Bug Burger
  • Repashy Superfly
  • Repashy Superhorn

Another way to make sure your mantis gets balanced nutrition is to offer a wide variety of different types of feeder insects.

Do ghost mantises like to be handled?

Generally speaking, it’s best practice not to handle pet invertebrates very much, if at all, and this certainly applies to the ghost mantis. Instead, every day becomes a fun “I Spy” challenge with their expert camouflage!

*This care sheet contains only very basic information. Although it’s a good introduction, please do further research with high-quality sources to obtain additional information on caring for this species.

"Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa)" by Frupus is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

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Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa)

Are you thinking of getting a Ghost Mantis as a pet?

This beginner’s guide to caring for Phyllocrania paradoxa will help you properly nurture your tiny new friend from the first day you bring it home.

We’ll cover the essentials like lifespan and nutrition, discuss how to create an ideal environment and arm you with tips for avoiding some common problems.

Table Of Contents:

What Are Ghost Mantis?

Ghost Mantis is a species of colorful, and very small tropical praying mantis from the family Mantidae.

Though Native to Central and West Africa, they are now found almost anywhere in the world due to the pet trade.

Ghost Mantes grow to an average size of a few inches in length and are shy but hardy, making them a great choice for a first-time pet praying mantis .

What Do Ghost Mantis Look Like?

Phyllocrania paradoxa range in length from 1.5 to 2 inches and possess a unique coloration of yellowish-brown and grey.

Their long antennae and two legs measuring around three times their body length, help them blend into their natural environment.

These critters are covered in wrinkled sheets all over their body, giving them an almost leaf texture.

Along the top of its head are two pronounced spines, while the legs are lined with tiny spines.

The Ghost Mantis has large eyes and compound eyes on the sides of their heads.

Benefits Of Using Ghost Mantis

 Ghost Mantis is often used in vivariums like terrariums or paludariums due to their ability to act as both pest controllers and decorations.

They are renowned for their low-maintenance care requirements and their ability to tolerate and thrive in a wide range of temperatures.

As carnivorous predators, Phyllocrania paradoxa feeds on various small insects in the enclosure, which helps to keep the other animals healthy by reducing the number of pests.

micro-ecosystems also provide a safe and conducive environment for breeding and raising the mantis.

Ghost Mantis Facts

Phyllocrania paradoxa is a small insect that inhabits dry, warm climates in Africa.

Their diet is primarily small insects and they are considered to be quite docile and low-maintenance pets.

With proper care, Ghost Mantis can have an average lifespan of several months, and can even be bred in captivity.

Phyllocrania paradoxa is a species of praying mantis that is native to tropical areas of Africa.

They typically inhabit densely-vegetated areas like the rainforest, jungles, and savannas where there are plenty of flowers, plants, and other insects to hunt.

Ghost Mantis have been known to adapt well to some urban environments as well.

In its natural habitat, P. paradoxa  mainly feeds on small insects like moths, beetles, and flies.

They wait in ambush for their prey to come close enough to be snatched up by their well-developed raptorial forelegs.

They are also known to eat smaller mantis species.

Temperament

Ghost Mantis are usually quite passive when it comes to interacting with humans and other animals.

Although they are capable of biting, they typically don’t display aggressive behavior.

With regular handling, they can become used to being around people and animals.

If Phyllocrania paradoxa feels threatened, their natural instinct is to try to escape rather than lash out.

Ghost Mantis has a lifespan of about 8 to 12 months, depending on habitat and nutrition.

They have three stages in their life cycle, starting from an egg.

When they hatch, they enter the first stage as a nymph.

The nymphs go through several molting phases and morph into adulthood in the final stage.

As adults, Ghost Mantis usually die at the end of the summer, though they can live for a few months after. 

Good nutrition and a healthy environment are essential if you want P. paradoxa to live its full lifespan.

Ghost Mantis reproduce by laying ootheca , which is a protective egg capsule that typically contains hundreds of eggs.

Female mantis can produce up to 6 oothecae in their lifetime. After the ootheca is produced, it can take up to 8 weeks for the eggs to hatch.

Young nymphs typically emerge during the warmer months of spring and summer.

If conditions are ideal, the young nymphs can reach adulthood in as little as 4 months. 

Males and females will typically mate in the same way as praying mantises, with the male gripping onto the female’s back.

During the mating process, the female will usually take a few bites out of the male’s head.

This behavior isn’t unusual to the male and is simply nature’s way of making sure the female is satisfied with the partner she has chosen for reproduction. 

Once the mating process is complete, the female will begin creating the protective ootheca to lay her eggs.

After the eggs have hatched, the cycle will start all over again as the Ghost Mantis nymphs mature and begin to mate.

Where To Find Ghost Mantis

Phyllocrania paradoxa is found in a variety of sub-Saharan countries, including Congo, Uganda, Tanzania, and Benin.

They can traditionally be found in dry savannahs and forests, and can sometimes be spotted on tree branches.

For those looking to buy Ghost Mantis, there are many vendors online.

Make sure to purchase from a vendor with impeccable reviews, as you want to ensure that your new pet has been sustainably sourced and properly cared for.

It’s also vital to check for parasites before introducing the mantis to your home.

Lastly, if you’re considering wild-captured Ghost Mantis, it’s good practice to note that this can be dangerous and damaging to the environment.

Capturing critters from the wild can disrupt populations, and transferring wild critters can introduce unwanted pests into your home.

Wild capture is strictly discouraged.

Ghost Mantis Care

To care for a Phyllocrania paradoxa  properly, provide an appropriate habitat, and balanced nutrition, and pay attention to common problems such as dehydration, overfeeding, and pest infestations.

Following these guidelines will help ensure the most optimal lifespan for your Ghost Mantis.

Tank Requirements

The ideal tank for a Ghost Mantis is a vivarium with tall sides and a mesh lid to provide excellent ventilation.

The tank should be kept clean with regular maintenance of the substrate.

The ideal pH for the tank should be 6–7, Hardness <5, and Temperature between 63°F – 90°F (17°C – 32°C).

The substrate used should be loosely packed and soft such as terrarium sand , peat moss , or coco fiber soil .

Lastly, the terrarium lighting should be natural or simulated.

The tank should have a photoperiod of 12 hours for natural light and 12 hours off, while for artificial lighting, you should provide 14 hours on and 10 hours off.

What Does Ghost Mantis Eat?

Feeding Phyllocrania paradoxa is a critical part of caring for them effectively.

Luckily, you have a few options when it comes to providing them with the nutrition they need to stay healthy.

Here’s a quick guide on how to feed your Ghost Mantis: 

  •  Provide a balanced diet of small insects such as fruit flies, crickets, spiders, and other small bugs. 
  •  Depending on its size, a mantis may require 1-2 insects per day. 
  • Any leftover food should be removed to avoid overfeeding and the spread of disease. 
  • To supplement the diet, you can also provide a nutrient-rich powder or gel that you can sprinkle or squeeze onto the mantis’ food. 
  • Ensure a clean and safe environment by removing any debris and uneaten food.

Following these tips will help ensure that your praying mantis has a nutritious and balanced diet. 

If you’re looking for a more detailed approach to feeding these critters, be sure to check out my ultimate DIY Praying Mantis food guide. I give a more in-depth explanation of the best foods and my favorite recipe.

What Do Mantises Eat? | Best Mantis Food & Feeding Guide!

Best Tankmates For Ghost Mantis

Phyllocrania paradoxa do best in tanks with tankmates that share similar beneficial qualities. Some good tank mates include: 

  • Land Hermit Crabs: These small nocturnal crustaceans help keep the tank’s substrate clean by scavenging the bottom for tasty morsels, while they and the mantis will not compete for food. 
  • Isopods : True to their name, isopods are insect-like organisms that can mimic some of the natural behaviors of the mantis. They are beneficial to the overall health and vitality of the Ghost Mantis’s environment.
  • Springtails : These small, harmless critters can help reduce mold growth in the tank, are harmless to the P. paradoxa,  and consume organic waste to help balance the tank’s environment. 

Overall, paired with the proper care and environment, these harmless tankmates can help keep your praying mantis active.

In conclusion, providing the correct care for your Phyllocrania paradoxa is essential to keeping it healthy and active.

Understanding tankmates, diet, environment, and a few common problems can help you create the ideal living conditions for your mantis.

With a little research and a lot of love, you and your Ghost Mantis will have a long and enjoyable relationship.

Frequently Asked Questions

No , ghost m antis ( Phyllocrania paradox ) are native to West and Central Africa .

Yes , ghost mant ises (Phyllocrania paradox ) are typically friendly and have gentle dispos itions , making them suitable for those seeking a pet insect .

Adult ghost mant ises ( Ph yll ocr ania paradox ) can reach lengths of 1 to 2 inches.

Yes , ghost mant ises ( Phyllocrania paradox) are fairly easy to care for , requiring a humid environment with temperatures from 63  to 90 ° F . They also must be fed live insects such as fruit flies , small cr ickets , or other small bugs .

Ghost mant ises ( Phyllocrania paradox ) should be fed regularly , up to once a day for adults . You may want to feed your m antis more frequently as it grows .

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Ghost Mantis – Species Profile & Facts

There are plenty of options to choose from if you’re interested in cool, alternative pets. I’m talking venomous snakes, big wild cats, bears, wolfdogs, tarantulas, and pet rocks. But if you’re not into such dangerous companions, you don’t have to stick to cats or fish for all eternity.

ghost mantis temperature

There are still many exotic pets to choose from, and they won’t fatally bite you or eat you alive!

The Ghost Mantis is one of them. This pet has become quite popular thanks to its great personality, awesome appearance, and it also doesn’t cost you a fortune!

It’s a win-win-win. If you’re interested in adopting one or more Ghost Mantises, we’re going to cover this subject in-depth in this article. So, stick around to find out more!

Ghost Mantis Natural Habitat

This camo wizard creature is well adapted to warm and humid climates with mild winters. The Ghost Mantis covers a wide area of Africa, including Cameroon, Cape Province, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Madagascar, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, and more. It can even be found in parts of southern Europe.

It inhabits dry areas and it can usually be found in bushes or hanging upside-down on tree branches. Basically, they can live anywhere where there’s warm enough, and where there’s vegetation they can hide in. Many people also breed them in captivity for either fun or profit.

Ghost Mantis Characteristics

There are over 2,400 species of mantis in the world, each with slightly different appearance and characteristics. The Ghost Mantis, also known as Phyllocrania paradoxa, is among the most beautiful and popular ones, and for many good reasons. So, let’s see what makes this species so unique and widely appreciated.

– Appearance

The most obvious distinguishing characteristic of the Ghost Mantis is its look. This mantis can easily blend in with its surroundings thanks to its appearance. It has an elongated head and irregularly shaped protrusions on its legs and forewing. Its prothorax (upper body) is also long and flat. Its body has irregular edges and a desiccated, leaf-like appearance.

Besides its withered leaf-like shape, its earthy colors also contribute to its camouflage abilities. The most common colors include shades of dark and light brown, but Ghost Mantis can also be green. Their color is determined by their environment.

Ghost Mantises inhabiting dry areas are usually dark to light brown, while Ghost Mantises in humid areas are more likely to be green.

– Size & Growth

The Ghost Mantis is special not only because of its appearance but also because of its proportions. Compared to other species of Praying Mantis, this miniature Mantis only measures up to 2 inches (50 mm) in length when fully developed. Males and females are approximately the same size.

For the first two months of its life (L1-L5), the Ghost Mantis is smaller than the width of a small coin. Typically, the lower body and wings are the last to fully develop. They reach their adult size of 1.8-2.0 inches (45-50 millimeters) after about 5 months (L8). Beyond this point, female Ghost Mantises can live up to an additional 3-6 months, and males will typically live an additional 2-3 months.

– Temperament

Ghost Mantises are calm albeit usually weary of their surroundings. They can stay camouflaged and wait for a long time, assessing the perfect moment to latch onto their prey. When threatened, they get easily intimidated, especially if the prey is larger. In such cases, male Ghost Mantises will fly away, while females will play dead.

Unlike many other types of Praying Mantis , the Ghost Mantis isn’t aggressive with other Mantis species. This quiet, peaceful Mantis can get along with its cousins and brethren without cannibalism, as long as there’s enough space and food for everyone. They’re a mellow and communal species.

– Defense

The Ghost Mantis, like many other species of Praying Mantis, is non-aggressive, so attacking isn’t their preferred form of defense. However, they do have other means of protecting themselves from dangerous predators such as birds and other insects.

First, they have a very efficient natural camouflage thanks to their leaf-like appearance. They can easily blend in with the environment, going unnoticed even by the sharpest observer. Another thing they do to protect themselves is running or flying away, especially if they’re preyed on by a larger insect.

Females and larger Ghost Mantises in general resort to thanatosis (playing dead) when intimidated. If the enemy isn’t significantly larger than them, Ghost Mantises might also try to scare it away. Like many other Praying Mantises, they’ll assume a tall up-right position and extend their limbs out as far as possible to appear larger.

– Life Cycle

Like other Praying Mantises, the Ghost Mantis goes through three stages in its life cycle. A Ghost Mantis’ life starts with the egg stage. A female Mantis lays up to 300 eggs shortly before she dies. In the wild, the eggs have time to develop over the winter.

The second stage begins once the little Mantises hatch, typically right after winter ends. At this stage, the little Mantis is called a “nymph”. Nymphs typically look very similar to their adult counterparts but are way more vulnerable to predators.

The nymphs will shed their skin multiple times as they grow in size. Many nymphs don’t make it into adulthood either due to larger predators, weather conditions, or cannibalism.

Last but not least comes the adult stage. The Ghost Mantis is not fully developed and ready to take over the world! Well, maybe not. Most Praying Mantises are large enough to hunt and kill small birds at this stage, but this little guy chose a different path. Once they’ve reached adulthood, Ghost Mantises live for an additional 3-6 months.

Ghost Mantis Care

A Ghost Mantis’ development and longevity will depend on its living conditions. In the wild, most animals and insects live shorter lives due to the harsher environment and predators.

In the wild, female Ghost Mantises live up to 8 months, while males die a lot earlier. But in captivity, Ghost Mantises have been reported to live up to 18 months! So, let’s see how to make that happen…

– Diet & Nutrition

Ghost Mantises like feasting on flying prey. Think flies (fruit flies, house flies, etc), crickets, wasps, grasshoppers, beetles, moths, or butterflies. The key here is to ensure the prey is smaller than your Mantis’ head. Ghost Mantises are easily intimidated by larger prey. For this reason, the most common feed choices are flies and crickets.

– Housing

You can house more Ghost Mantises together thanks to their peaceful demeanor. As long as there’s food to go around, they won’t turn on each other.

The enclosure should provide enough space, adequate ventilation, and some way for your mantis to hang upside-down when molting, whether that means a mesh or some decorative installment. Typically, the enclosure should be three times as long and three times as wide as the length of your mantis.

– Environment

Besides enough space and ventilation, the enclosure should also meet certain temperature and humidity parameters. The ideal temperature for Ghost Mantises is around 79°F (26°C), but they can also tolerate temperatures of up to 86°F (30°C). However, never let the temperature fall below 64.4°F (18°C)!

Due to their natural habitat, Ghost Mantises prefer high levels of humidity, somewhere around 50-80%. You might have to mist the enclosure often or use a humidifier to achieve such levels.

Last but not least, you should decorate the tank to look as close to the mantis’ natural environment as possible. Sticks, live plants, and even dry leaves make the perfect décor for this leafy boy.

– Health Problems

While they’re not predisposed to health problems, sometimes Ghost Mantises suffer from certain ailments. During molting, when they’re especially vulnerable, Ghost Mantises might acquire deformities such as shortened limbs.

Vomiting and parasites as well as improper development result from improper feeding. Make sure the insects you feed your mantis are healthy and that they don’t come into contact with pesticides or bad bacteria.

– Reproduction

You don’t need any special prep to mate your Ghost Mantis. Just make sure that they’re well-fed and 2-4 weeks past the last molting. After you introduce your male and female Ghost Mantis in the same enclosure, all you have to do is wait.

Mating typically lasts for several hours or up to several days. Luckily, in this species, the female mantis rarely cannibalizes her male partner. If the temperature is constant and high enough, the nymphs will hatch after about 4 weeks.

Ghost Mantises are easy to care for, but the experience is not any less rewarding. They grow and develop quickly and they’re fascinating to watch along the way. And even the most insect-repulsed person will have to admit that your pet looks dope as hell.

Unlike other mantises, the Ghost Mantis is also not a pain in the butt. You don’t have to bother separating them, because they can actually inhabit the same space without eating each other.

Recommended Readings

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  • Wild Animals
  • Invertebrates

Ghost Mantis: Habitat and Characteristics

Ghost Mantis: Habitat and Characteristics

All cited sources were thoroughly reviewed by our team to ensure their quality, reliability, currency, and validity. The bibliography of this article was considered reliable and of academic or scientific accuracy.

  • Oufiero, C. E., Nguyen, T., Sragner, A., & Ellis, A. (2016). Patterns of variation in feeding strike kinematics of juvenile ghost praying mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa): are components of the strike stereotypic?.  Journal of Experimental Biology ,  219 (17), 2733-2742. Recogido el 9 de noviembre de 2021 de: https://journals.biologists.com/jeb/article/219/17/2733/15387/Patterns-of-variation-in-feeding-strike-kinematics
  • Fernández, M. D. Sobre las ootecas de los mántidos (Insecta, Mantodea) de Castilla-La Mancha (España). Recogido el 11 de noviembre de 2021 de: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Miguel-Domenech-Fernandez/publication/344072137_Sobre_las_ootecas_de_los_mantidos_Insecta_Mantodea_de_Castilla-La_Mancha_Espana_About_the_oothecae_of_the_mantids_Insecta_Mantodea_of_Castilla-La_Mancha_Spain/links/5f50dcb992851c250b8c7ccd/Sobre-las-ootecas-de-los-mantidos-Insecta-Mantodea-de-Castilla-La-Mancha-Espana-About-the-oothecae-of-the-mantids-Insecta-Mantodea-of-Castilla-La-Mancha-Spain.pdf

The contents of My Animals are written for informational purposes. They can't replace the diagnosis, advice, or treatment from a professional. In the case of any doubt, it's best to consult a trusted specialist.

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General Information:

If you like bizarre and special, you can’t really get past Phyllocrania paradoxa. The high crown and also its appearance in shape and colour camouflage the ghost mantis perfectly as a withered leaf. I always catch myself looking over the animals when I look into the terrarium, as they merge almost perfectly with the environment.

ghost mantis temperature

 They also offer you more in terms of colour than other mantids. From brown over beige to green Phyllocrania paradoxa are available and provide a welcome change in the terrarium. Because with the possible group keeping another positive aspect is added, that the interest of the praying mantis rises with every mantid holder.

ghost mantis temperature

The coloration has nothing to do with the genetics of the parent animals, but small different climatic conditions within a terrarium play a role.  Phyllocrania paradoxa forgives every beginner the one or other mistake that you will surely make at the beginning and is almost perfect for every beginner! Due to the relatively undemanding and dry attitude you can slowly get to grips with the hobby of mantid keeping. Right at the beginning you will have several positive experiences which may motivate you later to try a more demanding species.

Size / life expectancy / moult:

males: 5.0 cm / total 7.5 months (5.5 months to adult + 2 months as adult) / approx. 6 moults

females: 5,0 cm / total 12 months (6 months to adult + 6 months as adult) / approx. 7 moults

L1/L2: Small fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster

L3/L4: Large fruit flies Drosophila hydei

L5/L6: Greenbottle flies Lucilia sericata

L7/adult: blowflies Calliphora sp.

Living space:

The ghost mantis can be found on strongly branched shrubs, bushes, trees and in open terrain. It has a relatively large catchment area that extends south of the Sahara to Madagascar. They populate relatively dry areas and have little to no requirements for humidity. The temperature there is usually between 25-30°C during the day and 20°C at night. The large catchment area is a further indication that the ghost mantis is not particularly susceptible to minor fluctuations.

ghost mantis temperature

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Keeping in Insectarium:

I keep them in groups at this stage in a 500 g/ml packaging cup. Of course you can also incubate them directly in a BraPlast can and also pull them up there. I cut out an opening in the lid and used organza with hot glue as ventilation grid. For safety reasons I added a ventilation at the side. In the beginning I use untreated wood wool as climbing material and kitchen towels as flooring. There must always be twice the size of the mantids in place at the bottom so that the moulting can run smoothly. Every 3-4 days I spray the substrate slightly. Better start spraying a little more carefully and approach slowly. Stagnant moisture is more dangerous for your animal than a slightly lower humidity. There should always be enough Drosophilas as food in the container. I change the kitchen cloth at least once a week, depending on the density of the crew. 

I use BraPlast tins with the dimensions 18,5×18,5×19,0cm. There should be enough branches or climbing possibilities in the upper area.

If you take branches from nature, put them in the microwave for 20 seconds or in the oven at 100°C for 15 minutes. This will kill all the mites and other parasites that you have brought with you and that can cause you problems later on. The motto is also valid there, less is more. Praying mantises are lurkers, you should not pack it full. Leave space for moulting, as this moment is the most dangerous time in the life of your guest. I will go into more detail on the topic of terrarium size and group housing in the article „Terrarium size and ventilation“. You are also welcome to watch the video of the article.

Get your praying mantis | Terrarium size + ventilation!

Easily explained.

Sex determination:

The sex determination can be reliably carried out from L4/ L5 onwards. Females have a large, relatively straight crown, while males have a longer, thin, curved crown. The antennae of the males are longer and thicker than those of the females, likewise the praises and pronotum of the female and the entire abdomen are wider than those of the male. If you are unsure, you are welcome to send me photos by e-mail and I will determine the sex for you.

ghost mantis temperature

If you want to know more about sex determination, you can read more about it in the article about mantis sex determination

Sexual maturity:

The females become adult after about 7 moultings, thus in L8. Male Phyllocrania paradoxa after 6 moults, thus in L7. Females need another 2 weeks after moulting to be ready for mating. Males only 1 week. This means that males become sexually mature one week before moulting. This is a rather unproblematic period, because the males live for about 2 months after moulting. The difference in sex can be seen from L4 at the latest. So you can keep the males a bit cooler than the females as a precaution. Please remember not to go below 20°C. So about 2 weeks after the moulting the animals are ready for mating.

Breeding is relatively easy, about 2 weeks after the adult moult you put males and females together and wait, the females should be well fed as usual. If kept in a group, the whole thing is unnecessary and fertilization is an unstoppable by-product of keeping together.

Often the male sits on top of the female after the bounce, just sitting there without copulating. It can take several hours for the male to make his first attempts at copulation. Thus the mating can last several days. The female will then stick some clutches of eggs to branches or side walls within several weeks. The clutches and young animals are kept under the same conditions as the adults. Also with the larvae the humidity should not rise excessively and I spray there also only every 3-4 days briefly into the insectarium.

Oothek storage:

The Ootheca can contain up to 50 eggs, but the average is 10-40 eggs. In contrast to the free ootheca of cockroaches, the mantis stick their roundish, elongated, shield-like, drop-shaped or packet-like ootheca to different substrates. Often they are attached to the climbing facilities or to the gauze cover. For this purpose they first apply a protein-containing secretion to the substrate. With spiral-shaped movements of the abdomen, even more of this foamy secretion is now released, whereby the eggs are now laid one after the other in the same in such a way that they are in a certain arrangement to each other and each occupy a compartment of the ootheca. Finally the secretion is pulled out in a more or less long thread before it hardens to a sponge-like, very firm cocoon. Along the surface lies the thinnest walled area from which the nymphs hatch. It is usually visible as a large-pored, seam- or comb-like strip. You can find more about the Oothek here.

Incubation :

The hatching is strongly temperature-copied. At 29° C the nymphs hatch after about 4 weeks. It is recommended to offer the newly hatched Phyllocrania Paradoxa nymphs directly the first food. 

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Mantis care sheet captive bred praying mantis found all over the world mantis place.com & mantidpets.com are the same company, we have just combined them to make shopping easier for you   mantis species care information madagascan green mantis african mantis orchid mantis giant asian mantis ghost mantis budwing mantis wide armed mantis gambian boxer mantis gambian spotted-eye flower mantis devil's flower mantis peruvian stick mantis south american green mantis tarachodes sp. wahlbergii mantis giant shield mantis idolomantis diabolica deroplatys dessicata (dead leaf mantis) violin mantis taiwan flower mantis asian bark mantis ant mantis pnigomantis medioconstricta texas unicorn mantis ceratomantis saussurii indian flower mantis sybilla dolosa   madagascan green mantis tarachomantis aloatrana the madagascan green mantis is a medium sized mantis reaching 3 inches long, and are medium in their bulkiness. differing shades of green are the common color. the unusual aspect of this mantis is that they grow to reach adulthood very fast, one of the fastest growing species in the world. food - the prey must have movement to trigger the hunt, so crickets, flies, moths, and butterflies are good choices. water - right after hatching, and for the first month or so, the mantis nymph requires misting with water daily. from about the one month time to adulthood, mist every other day. once adulthood is reached (the wings finally appear), you may reduce to twice per week. housing - temperature should be about 75 degrees. moisture-holding substrata will help keep the humidity at about 55% which is not only needed for successful molting, but this species needs humidity more than other mantis. a screen top for air also serves as the mantis’ favorite resting place. for molting, the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis to “crawl out of their skin.” this mantis is cannibalistic, so only one per container. difficulty - medium in difficulty in the early stages, but easier to care for when misting is reduced to every other day/week. summary - the madagascan green mantis is one of the most beautiful green mantis species.   african mantis sphodromantis lineola the african mantis is a medium-large mantis reaching 3 to 4 inches long with a bulky appearance. colors can be tans, browns, and greens. this mantis is a hunter of its food, and will not hesitate to run after an escaping meal food - the prey must have movement to trigger the hunt, so crickets, flies, moths, and butterflies are good food sources. water - until the mantis reaches adulthood, spray every other day. once the mantis reaches adulthood (the wings finally appear), the mantis will get most of the water from the food, so you may reduce spraying to about once every other week. housing - temperature should be about 75 degrees, but this mantis can live in a wide range of temperatures, so indoors it typically needs no heat source. humidity should be about 55% which will be needed for molting. a screen top for air also serves as the mantis’ favorite resting place. for molting, the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis for room to “crawl out of the old skin.” this mantis is cannibalistic, so only one per container. difficulty - this is the best mantis for a beginner because of the wide range of temperature it can endure, and the reduced watering needs. summary - if you want an aggressive, large, minimal care mantis that is a hunting machine, then the african mantis is for you. if you want more information on mantis, visit www.mantidforum.com. for supplies and mantis, visit www.mantisplace.com. orchid mantis hymenopus coronatus is possibly the worlds’ most beautiful mantis, and the most sought after. it gets its name from sitting unnoticed amoung the orchid flowers of thailand. the colors of pink and white are impressive. yet as a hatchling, the orchid looks like a black and red fire ant   food - the orchid mantis wait for the food to come within reach, so flies are your best food source. feed the flies honey and bee pollen to maximize natural food sources.   water - the orchid mantis needs twice daily misting when young, once every other day at the l-3 to l4 stages, and 4 or 5  time a week as an adult (adults have wings). housing - temperature should be about 85 degrees, humidity must be kept at 75 % by using moisture holding substrata, and good ventilation is required. the container should be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis.   difficulty - lack of misting claims many young nymphs, but as adults, they are an easy species. summary - if it’s beauty you want-buy an orchid.   giant asian mantis hierodula membranacea one of the largest mantis in the world, reaching 4 to 5 inches long colors range from green to brown. the asian mantis is an ambusher, waiting for its food to come within reach, but will also stalk its prey at times. food - the prey must have movement to trigger the feeding so crickets, flies, moths, and butterflies, are good food sources. water - every day mist the moisture- holding substrata. housing - temperature should be about 75 degrees. moisture-holding substrata will help keep the humidity at about 55% which will be needed for molting. a screen top for air also serves as the mantis’ favorite resting place. for molting, container height should be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis for room to “crawl out of their skin.” this mantis is cannibalistic, so only one per container. difficulty - this is one of the easiest mantis to care for, a great beginners mantis. summary - the giant asian mantis is big and powerful, and is a super predator in the insect world.   ghost mantis phyllocrania paradoxa at 3 inches as an adult, you would miss this little camouflage expert in the wild. colors range from dark brown to light green or golden. food - ghost mantis wait for their meals; the meal must come within reach. flies are the best food source, but most adult females really like blue bottle flies & moths. water - the ghost mantis needs misting every day, and is able to live in 60% humidity. housing - temperature is about 80 degrees, although they are quite forgiving. the ghost mantis can be housed together as cannibalism is not the rule. have enough food and perching places available, and you have yourself a breeding colony difficulty - not a hard species to have at all, and the camouflage is unbelievable captive bred. summary - incredible appearance, communal, and they don’t eat each other with an ample supply of feeder insects - what’s not to like about this species budwing mantis agrionina/affinis the budwing mantis is a large mantis reaching to about 4 inches, and very bulky in size. typically the coloration is light browns to light gray tones. the females have very short stubby wings which is where the common name of budwing originated. food - this mantis is not hard to feed at all the budwing mantis will eat just about any thing you put in the habitat. crickets and flies are the most common feeder insects used in the raising of the budwing. they will take mealworms, especially from forceps. water - as an adult, mist the habitat every other day. housing - the ideal temperature is about 82 degrees, but at normal room temperature the budwing will do fine. the lower the temperature, the less the mantis will eat and move around, but for normal growth and activity levels, keep the temperature about 82 degrees. mantises need 2 to 3 times the length of their body to molt successfully. they literally crawl out of their skin, and need to have room to do this, or it will result in a bad molt, which leads to deformity or death. if the budwing has wings the molting is completed, so there is no danger. difficulty - the budwing is a great beginner’s mantis, it is easy to care for and it gets big summery - there are 4 mantis that i would recommend to beginners, and the budwing is one of those. wide armed mantis cilnia humeralis the wide armed mantis is a medium sized mantis. adult female is very bulky and has body length of around 2.5 to 3-inch while male adult is slender and about 2.5-inch in length. as the name implies its front arms are bigger in girth than most mantis species. the coloration is typically green or brown. but this species changes color several times especially after each molt. food - the wide armed mantis will eat house flies, crickets moths and butterflies. water - as nymphs the container must be misted daily. after the mantis turns adult (the wings appear) mist the container 3-34 times per week. housing - temperature should be about 75-85 degrees. moisture-holding substrata such as perlite or sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 60 % and above which is necessary for the molting process. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. this mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container. provide some sticks in your cage too as this species likes hanging out on the twigs. difficulty - the wide armed mantis is a fairly easy mantis to keep, and is a fairly aggressive feeder. summary - if you are looking for an impressive powerful looking hunter, the wide armed mantis is for you boxer mantis  : oxypilus distinctus - this is a small flower mantis grows up to just 1 inch. they are originally from gambia and resemble mantis with combination of ceratomantis and boxer mantis, i.e. large raptorial arm with “horns” on the head. food - the hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from l1-l4, and move on to eat house flies, moths and butterflies when larger. this species is aggressive and will attack any prey. water- this species does not need frequent misting. 1-2 times every week is sufficient for nymphs from l1-l4, and only once a week is required after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). after you spray once, if the mantis bends down to drink, spray a second time. if the mantis doesn't bend down, do not spray again for several days. housing - this species needs higher temperature at around 85 f but will be alright to keep them at 70-80f at night. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. it is always advisable to keep this species individually. difficulty - this species is not difficult to raise. feed them mainly flying insects. they grow rather fast with sufficient food and warmth. summary - if you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you gambian spotted-eye flower mantis pseudoharpax virescen - this is a small flower mantis grows up to just 1 inch. they are originally from gambia and has two “eyes” on the abdomen from dorsal view. food - the hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from l1-l4, and move on to eat house flies, moths and butterflies when larger. this species is aggressive and will attack any prey. water - this species does not need frequent misting. 3-4 times every week is sufficient for nymphs from l1-l4, and only once a week is required after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). after you spray once, if the mantis bends down to drink, spray a second time. if the mantis doesn't bend down, do not spray again for several days. housing - this species needs higher temperature at around 85 f but will be alright to keep them at 70-80f at night. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. it is always advisable to keep this species individually, but i have had much suscess keeping them together. difficulty - this species is not difficult to raise. feed them mainly flying insects. they grow rather fast with sufficient food and warmth. summary - if you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you devil’s flower mantis blepharopsis mendica - the devil’s flower mantis grows up to about 2 -3 inches. this is a desert species with nice coloration, showing light green and white stripes. food - the hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from l1-l4, and move on hydei fruit flies, house flies, crickets moths and butterflies when larger. this species is aggressive and will attack any prey. water - this species does not require frequent misting. spray this species once every two weeks - it will get it's water from it's food. housing - this species needs higher temperature at around 85-95 f but will be alright to keep them at 70-80f at night. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. this species is very cannibalistic; it is always advisable to keep them individually. difficulty - this species is difficult to raise. feed them mainly flying insects. they grow slowly and the final molt can take 3-4 weeks. summary - if you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you peruvian stick mantis                                                                  pseudovates peruviana - the peruvian stick is a medium sized mantis. as the name implies, it has slender body resembles a twig and blended well with its environment in the bush. the coloration is typically dark brown with two dark markings on its wings.   food - the peruvian stick mantis will eat house flies, crickets moths and butterflies. water - this species does not need frequent misting. 2-3 times every week is sufficient for nymphs from l1-l4, and only once a week is required after that. it is also a good idea to mist the substratae when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). housing - this species needs slightly lower temperature at around 75f but will be alright to keep them at 80f. moisture-holding substrata such as sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 60% which is necessary for the molting process. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. this species is fairly communal, you can keep a few together but always have sufficient food in the cage. difficulty - the peruvian stick mantis grows slightly slower than other tropical species but is a fairly easy mantis to keep. summary - if you are looking for a twig mimicking species with nice coloration, the peruvian stick mantis is for you south american green mantis oxyopsis gracilis the south american green mantis is a medium sized mantis, with the females reaching 3” in length, while the males reach about 1-1/2” in length. as the name implies the color of this species is typically green. food - the peruvian mantis will eat house flies, crickets, moths, and butterflies. water - as nymphs the container must be misted every other day. after the mantis turns adult (the wings appear) mist the container twice per week. as the nymph rejects food and begins to move slower, mist the container, as these are signs that the nymph is about to molt. housing - temperature should be about 75 to 80 degrees.moisture-holding substrata such as sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 60% which is necessary for the molting process. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. this mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container. difficulty - the south american mantis is a fairly easy mantis to keep. summary - if you are looking for a medium sized green tropical mantis, the south american mantis is for you bark mantis tarachodes sp. the tarachodes mantis grows to be about 2” in length, in both the male and female.. the coloration is the outstanding trait of this species, as it is one of the few mantids that look just like tree bark. food - the tarachodes mantis will eat fruit flies as a young nymph, and as an adult prefers flies, moths, and butterflies. water - as nymphs, the container must be misted every 1-2 times per week. after the mantis turns adult (the wings appear) mist the container twice per week. after you spray once, if the mantis bends down to drink, spray a second time. if the mantis doesn't bend down,  spray again the next day. housing - temperature should be about 78 degrees. moisture-holding substrata such as sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 70 % which is necessary for the molting process. this species needs branches to camouflage themselves. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. this mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container. difficulty -the tarachodes mantis is medium in it’s difficulty level. when supplying branches, be sure there is enough room for molting if the mantis hangs from the branch. this will probably require a larger enclosure, and creative branch attaching. summary -the tarachodes mantis is one of the most unusual colored species available. if you like the challenge of setting up a unique enclosure, take on tarachodes wahlbergii mantis pseudocreobotra wahlbergii the wahlbergii mantis is known by several names: wahlbergii, spiny flower mantis, and also the #9 mantis due to the wing markings looking like the number nine. the #9 mantis is a smaller sized mantis, with the females reaching 1-1/2 inches, and the males reaching 1-1/4 inches. the coloration is a collage of green stripes and spots of color that help it blend in with the flowers it ambushes prey on. the # 9 on the back is bright yellow, and possibly mirrors a large eye to ward off predators. food -the #9 mantis is a “waiter” not a stalker. flying food is best, if not mandatory. when first born, fruit flies, and then houseflies and blue bottle flies as the mantis can handle the size. water - the #9 mantis gets most of its liquid from its food, but the need for high humidity will require misting into a moisture holding substrata, like sphagnum moss. misting 2 to 3 times per week is best. housing - temperature should be about 80 degrees. moisture-holding substrata such as sphagnum moss should be used to hold humidity levels at about 65 % which is necessary for the molting process. this mantis likes to hang and ambush, so twigs for hanging are a good idea. due to the high humidity, good ventilation is required to keep bacterial infections from forming, which will kill the mantis. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. this mantis is cannibalistic, so only one mantis per container. difficulty -the #9 mantis is a more difficult mantis to keep, due to the high humidity levels required, which can easily cause bacterial infections. breeding is more difficult with this species, and temperatures of 80 degrees may be hard to maintain. summary -the #9 mantis is one of the most beautifully colored species available. if you are looking for a challenge, this is the mantis for you giant shield mantis rhombodera sp. - the giant shield mantis lives up to its name with extended thorax mimicking a leaf in the wild and blend in well in the bush. the female mantis grows to about 3" long (8cm). the coloration is a green body and blue hue on the head, which is very unusual. food - the giant shield mantis nymphs feed on fruit flies as hatchlings, and will move on to house flies and small crickets after 3-4 molts, and blue bottles or other flying insects when larger. thus species is a feeding machine, so plenty of food needs to be available before cannibalism kicks in. water - this species requires 60-70% humidity, so spraying once  a day will be necessary, with sphagnum moss as a substrata. good ventilation is essential. housing - the giant shield mantis likes branches with leaves to hang on as they do in the wild. the cage needs three times the length of the mantis. temperature should be about 80°-90f. difficulty - this species is not difficult to keep, but appears to be a challenge in breeding. also, cannibalism is very common for this aggressive species. summary - if you are looking for a exotic leaf-like mantis, the giant shield mantis fits the bill giant devils flower mantis or idol care sheet idolmantis diabolica - the giant devils flower mantis is (we think) is the most impressive of the flower mantids. with white, burgundy, brown, and green colorations, it is stunning. diabolica is a larger sized mantis, with sexual differences in two areas; the females have six to seven abdomen segments, the males eight and the antennae of the male are feathery and split, while the females are thin and straight. both male and female adults have full wings. food - diabolica is a flower mantis, so flying food is required, as they do not tend to hunt ground prey. some have reported feeding crickets can result in females laying infertile ooths. from l1 the mantis will eat hydei fruit flies; by l2 stable house flies, they will move onto houseflies and blue bottle flies as well as larger flying insects. be sure to feed the flies honey or yens blend before feeding the mantis as the better your feeders are the healthier the mantis will be. water - until adulthood, when molts are finished, spray the mantis enclosure to maintain a 70-85% humidity in the am and again at night, good humidity level when molting is important. the humidity helps to soften the skin. once adult, once a day misting is required. housing - the enclosure needs adequate height for molting; three times the length of the mantis. diabolica will sit in the same place for days, so perching branches are a good addition, as silk flowers, which will replicate the environment mantis lives in, and are non-toxic. & easily bleached & cleaned. the temperature should be about 80-90f and can take a night drop of 75-80f. a substrate of sphagnum moss will help keep humidity levels up. difficulty - not for beginners. breeding and incubating ootheca is more difficult than other mantis. molting prior to adulthood is still a challenge to many in the hobby. summary - the idolomantis diabolica is probably the most sought after mantis in the world due to it's large size, amazing colorations. if you are hooked on raising mantids, this has got to end up in your collection dead leaf mantis/lobata deroplyats dessicata - the dead leaf mantis lives up to its name with various shades of browns and patterning just like a dead leaf. this mantis is a larger size with an extended shield on thorax, and when frightened, will drop to the ground and play dead when frightened, the dead leaf mantis will place it's forearms on it's head and spread it's wings. food - the dead leaf mantis nymph will move to the larger hydei fruit flies almost immediately, due to their large hatchling size. this species is similar to ghost and violin mantids in that it tends to wait for food rather than stalk it. therefore flies are the best food source, but occasionally, crickets can be offered. water - this species requires 70% humidity, so spraying once a day will be necessary, with sphagnum moss as a substrata. housing - the dead leaf likes branches to hang on, and dead leafs on those branches would replicate what the mantis would do in the wild. since this mantis gets so long, remember the container needs three times the length of the mantis. temperature should be about 80°f. difficulty - some sources say this mantis is easy, others difficult. if you don't mind misting and keeping 80°f as a temperature, this mantis is average difficulty. (this species is also vulnerable when it comes to molting, and can go on without food many days after molting.) summary - if you are looking for a large, cryptic mantis, the dead leaf mantis fits the bill   violin mantis gongylus gongylodes - the violin mantis grows up to about 4-5 inches and is one of the largest species. this species has nice rust/brown coloration. the elongated thorax really creates an unusual look. this is where the name violin mantis is originated. food - the violin mantis is a master of catching flying insects, which is why you should feed them mainly flies. the hatchling of this species is very large with long legs, feed them hydei fruit flies from l1-l2, and move on to house flies, blue bottle flies, moths, and butterflies when larger. this species is one of the few communal species. water - this species does not require constant misting, but keep humidity at 50%. sphagnum moss is a good substrata. housing - this species requires temperature at around 85-100°(f) during the day, and around 80° (f) at night. the container needs to be two to three times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. as this is a communal species, you can keep a group of them in the same cage but do not overcrowd the enclosure. difficulty - this species is not for a beginner as it needs plenty of heat and specific food requirements. they require flying insects as they tend to wait for their prey to come in reach.. they grow slowly and the final molt can take 3-4 weeks. (high temperature of 100f is required to initiate mating). summary - if you are looking for an exotic and unusual mantis, this is the one for you taiwan flower mantis acromantis farmosana - the taiwan flower mantis grows up to about 1-1.5 inches. this is the only acromantis species from taiwan. they are skittish species but nice brown color. female can be identify with pointy wing at the end (near abdomen). food - the hatchling of this species is small and feed on fruit flies from l1-l3, and move on to house flies, medium size crickets, moths and butterflies when larger (l5/l6 and above). they prefer flying insects. water - this species need misting once every 2 days but ventilation is important for this species to keep them healthy. housing - this species needs moderately higher temperature at around 85 f but will be alright to keep them at 70-80f at night. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. it is always advisable to keep them individually. difficulty - this species is not too difficult to rear. feed them mainly flying insects. they grow very fast with plenty of food and warmth. summary - if you are looking for an exotic flower mantis, this is the mantis for you asian bark mantis theopompa ophthalmica - this is a medium size bark mantis grows up to about 2 inches. they can be found around eastern and south east asia. very colorful mantis with nice color stripe on the body for camouflage purpose during nymphs stage. they also appear to be a nocturnal species prefer to feed later in the afternoon. food - the hatchling of this species is very small but bulky, so feed them small fruit flies from l1-l4, and move on to stick mantis will eat house flies, moths and crickets when larger. this species is moderate in aggressiveness and feed sparingly. water - this species needs frequent misting. 1-2 times everyday is required for nymphs from l1-l4, and once every other day is required after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). this species required a higher humidity. housing - this species needs lower temperature at around 75 f. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. it is always advisable to keep this species individually. tree bark is also required in the cage as this species does not climb the plastic or glass wall very well. difficulty - this species required additional care and is not recommended for beginner summary - if you are looking for an exotic and colorful bark mantis, this is the mantis for you east asian ant mantis - odontomantis planiceps odontomantis planiceps - this is a small mantis grows up to just 1 inch. they are originally from east asia and nymphs resembles little ant. food - the hatchling of this species is very small, so feed them small fruit flies from l1-l4, and move on to stick mantis will eat house flies, moths, crickets, and samll butterflies when larger. this species is aggressive and will attack any prey. water - this species need frequent misting, 1-2 times everyday is necessary for nymphs from l1-l4, and only once every other day after that but also a good idea to mist the surrounding when all signs point to a nymph getting ready to molt (rejecting food, moving slowly, etc). housing - this species needs higher temperature at around 85 f but will be alright to keep them at 70-80f at night. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. it is always advisable to keep this species individually. difficulty - this species is not difficult to raise. they are eager eaters and not choosy on prey. they grow rather fast with sufficient food and warmth. summary - if you are looking for an aggressive mantis with ant appearance, this is the mantis for you pnigomantis medioconstricta pnigomantis medioconstricta this is one of the most colorful mantids to come out of indonesia, specifically the island of flores. the females grow to 4 inches in length, and both sexes have brown as the main color, but the nymphs are much brighter in both green and brown colorations. nymphs seem to be more prone to green colorations when the humidity is kept high. food - this species has large overall size, and is aggressive in feeding. the female eats small vertebrates without hesitation feeding can be quite entertaining; this mantis will stalk and pounce. water - this species can be watered 4 to 5 times a week, and every day as nymphs. housing - temperature should be about 85 degrees, with humidity about 45%. split siblings before l3, or cannibalism will be the rule, not the exception. difficulty - very easy species to keep, be sure to give enough vertical room to molt. summary - pnigomantis medioconstricta are an entertaining feeder, brightly colored as nymphs, and have bulky size, all good traits texas unicorn mantis phyllovates chlorophaea - the popular native species of the usa grows up to about 3 inches. this is a species found only near southern texas bordering mexico. it is one of the two species of native mantis that grow “horn” on the head (the other is arizona unicorn mantis). food - the hatchling of this species is very active, they are not skittish species and able to handle prey the size of their body. feed them fruit flies from l1-l3, and move on to house flies, crickets moths and butterflies when larger. this species is a good feeder and will attack any prey. water - this species need misting once every day but ventilation is important for this species to keep them healthy. housing - this species needs moderately higher temperature at around 85-90 f but will be alright to keep them at 70-80f at night. the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis so there is enough height for successful molting. this species is a communal species and you can keep a group of them in a large net as long as it is not too crowded. difficulty - this species is not too difficult to rear. feed them mainly flying insects. they grow very fast with plenty of food and warmth. adult male is vulnerable to female’s attack during courtship, so just make sure that female has plenty of food before pairing up an adult pair. summary - if you are looking for an exotic native mantis, this is the mantis for you ceratomantis saussurii ceratomantis saussurii - is another fascinating small mantis from indonesia (central thailand). adult females and males grow up to 1 inch in length. freshly hatched nymphs l1 are 2-3 mm in length. nymphs in all stages are milky white/brown. adult mantids are white with brown and black spots on their bodies. males are capable to fly. mantids in all stages are using their front legs to communicate with each other or to scare off any kind of predator. food - nymphs l1-l2 are big enough to capture fruit flies. adult mantids can capture insects that are at least their own size. those include flies, moths, crickets etc. water - since those species live in the tropical forest in indonesia mantids in all stages need to be sprayed at least 3-4 times a week. housing - temperature should be about 75-90 degrees. moisture-holding substrata will help keep the humidity at about 60-80% which is needed for successful molting. a screen top for air also serves as the mantis' favorite resting place. for molting, the container needs to be 2 to 3 times the length of the mantis to "crawl out of their skin." nymphs l1-l3 can be keep together but in l4 all nymphs should be separated, one mantis per container. difficulty - medium in difficulty to keep. if you breed any other flower mantid you can try to get few nymphs ceratomantis saussurii. summary - ceratomantis saussurii is a really amazing species of mantids to watch, much more interesting than any other small species of mantids because of their amazing behavior. indian flower mantis creobroter gemmatus - the indian flower mantis is a smaller mantis with the adult females reaching about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in length, the males are slightly smaller. both male and female are green and white with a distinctive yellow spot encircled in black on the back that looks like a large eye. it is believed this is a defense against predators. the wings under the cover wings are an intense red with black, and when displayed, this is an awesome color show the young nymphs are colored in red, brown, and black, which disguises them to look like fire ants or assassin bugs. food - the nymphs are small and will eat melanogaster fruit flies in l1/l2, and will move on to hydei fruit flies about l3/l4. being a flower mantis, the "wait for my dinner" approach requires you have insects that come to the mantis, not ground crawlers. the best food source is house flies and blue bottle flies, and any butterflies or moths will be eaten immediately as well. water - this species comes from the rain forests of indonesia, so high humidity is required. nymphs should be misted lightly twice a day as l1/l2, and once a day until adulthood. as adults once every other day should be adequate. housing - this species requires higher temperatures than many other species, around 85 degrees ( 30 celsius). breeders report that nymphs can be kept up to l4 in group housing, but i would suggest splitting them into their own containers by l3. be sure the height of the container is 2 to 3 times the length of the mantid when it hangs from it's back legs, to facilitate molting. difficulty - with the exception of the misting requirements as nymphs, this species is not difficult to raise. summary - this species has some of the brightest colors when displaying. it is a small flower mantis, but a great addition to any keepers collection. sybilla dolosa sybilla dolosa - the sybilla dolosa is one of the most amazing looking of the mantis species. the wings are a bright green and are shaped in a perfect oval. the rest of the mantis is dark brown, which gives it great contrast. the females reach about 2 inches (5 centimeters), the males are slightly smaller. the body is skinny with grows at the leg joints that look like dead leaves-impressive food - as with most mantids, the nymphs will be on the 2 sizes of fruit flies, and then progress to house flies and blue bottle flies. water - nymphs should be sprayed twice a day in l1/l2, and once a day l3 to adulthood. after adulthood, once every 2 days should be enough. housing - this species is a communal species, and can exist together without cannibalism. that being said, any "communal" species will cannibalize given lack of food/room. as always give enough room to molt. the enclosure should have branches and leaves, as ooths are laid on the leaves regularly. temperature should be 80 degrees ( 26 celsius ), and humidity should be kept high, about 80%. difficulty - this is a very skinny dainty mantid, and when young, can be easily lost in the container, especially if you use moss as a substrata the food accordingly must be smaller, it will be several instars before house flies can be introduced. summary - exotic, cryptic, weird, this mantis has it all      .

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Phyllocrania paradoxa

These mantis can be found widely across Africa and in parts of South Europe. Ghost mantis prefer in live in dry areas, in trees, shrubs, and bushes. They can be kept at room temperature and will tolerate temperature from 65-85°, but prefer to be between 72-80°. With humidity between 40% and 70% this can be achieved by misting the cage 1-2 times a day when nymphs but, once they have had a few molts you can back the amount of times you mist to 2-3 a week. The enclosure should be at least three times the length of the animal and three times as tall. It should be well ventilated and have areas for the mantis to climb as they are arboreal. Ghost mantis are uncharacteristically not cannibalistic and can be kept community groups. These mantis are sexually dimorphic, so the female is larger than the males. After the 3rd instar molt you should be able to sex your mantis by the number of abdominal segments. Males have a shorter more narrow abdomen with eight segments, females will have a longer, wider abdomen with six segments. At the 5th instar the males will have smaller appendages and be thinner overall. Where the female will have larger appendages and be more compact. At the 6th instar the males will show transparent wings that are longer than the abodomin, have thicker antenna, and are visibly thinner than the females. In the 6th instar and above the crown of the males and females differ greatly. With the females crown being as wide as their head, straighter and more smooth. Both the male and the female molt seven times. The males may take longer to reach maturity that the females. The average life span for this species is 5½ months but sometimes can be convinced to go longer. What to feed these mantis depends on their size. As newly hatched nymphs you should fed fruit flies after their fist molt you may feed them hydei flies. As the size increases you may feed them house flies (cultured), and green bottle flies(cultured). This species of mantis prefers to eat flying insects but you may be able to target feed them and sometimes they will even take wax worms from a pair of feeding tongs or tweezers. Don’t be surprised if your male ghost mantis wont eat in his adult life. They will still be active and fly readily. If you keep the females well fed they will rarely attack the males. To breed you will want to put male in a large (80oz) cup and keep him humid and warm for 2 days before putting in the female. You will find them connected soon after and this can last for 2-8 hours. You should take care to make sure the female is not too warm so that she lays longer oothecae every 1-2 weeks instead of smaller ones every few days. Each female can lay up to 12 ooths in their lifetime. You can incubate the oothecae at room temperature misting 2 times a week for 6-10 weeks with the average hatching being between 20-60 nymphs

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IMAGES

  1. Ghost Mantis Care, Information, & Pictures

    ghost mantis temperature

  2. Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania Paradoxa): Care, Pictures & Facts

    ghost mantis temperature

  3. Ghost Mantis Care, Information, & Pictures

    ghost mantis temperature

  4. Ghost Mantis: Care Guide, Pictures, Lifespan & More

    ghost mantis temperature

  5. Caring for Your Ghost Mantis

    ghost mantis temperature

  6. Ghost Mantis Care Sheet (Phyllocrania paradoxa)

    ghost mantis temperature

VIDEO

  1. Giant angry Vietnamese ghost mantis

  2. Ghost Praying Mantis In It's Natural Habitat

  3. the ghost mantis of christmas! day 3! #mantis #Adventcalendar #holidayswithshorts #rock_n_insectes

  4. Feeding my Mantis Shrimp 15 ghost shrimps!!

COMMENTS

  1. Ghost Mantis

    It's color is usually dark brown, but can also be sand, light brown or even green. The natural habitat of the Ghost mantis is Madagascar and continental Africa. To learn more about keeping this mantis as a pet, continue reading this caresheet below. This is the head of a male Ghost mantis - Phyllocrania paradoxa

  2. Ghost Mantis Care Sheet (Phyllocrania paradoxa)

    Introduction: The Ghost mantis is one of my favorite, stand by praying mantis species! Why? Because I think they are the absolute best choice for new mantis keepers. They are one of the easiest of the exotic species to keep, but yet they still look very exotic and unique.

  3. Ghost Mantis: Care Guide, Pictures, Lifespan & More

    Molting Your Ghost Mantis will molt seven times in its life. L1 - L2 will occur once the Mantis has reached about two weeks old. L2 - L3 will occur only a few days later. L3 - L4 will usually occur less than three weeks later. L4 - L5 will usually occur in about one month.

  4. Ghost Mantis Care, Information, & Pictures

    Hydration: Misting Habitat: Glass or screen enclosure Temperature: Friendly Lifespan: Approximately 8 months Size: 2" Care Level: Easy Compatibility: Can raise males and females together if well fed What Is A Ghost Mantis? So, what exactly is a Ghost Mantis? The Ghost Mantis is small and only grows to about two inches long.

  5. Ghost Mantis Caresheet (Phyllocrania paradoxa)

    They should do well being kept anywhere between 65°F and 80°F. Ideally, humidity should stay in the range of 50% to 70% relative humidity (RH). The enclosure should be given a light misting at least once a day so they can drink. When kept in mesh cages, we mist their enclosures twice a day.

  6. Ghost Mantis Care Sheet

    Nighttime temps should be no lower than 68°F. Best humidity levels for ghost mantises Providing the right amount of humidity is very important for making sure that your praying mantis is able to molt properly and stays generally healthy. Too high and too low will both cause problems.

  7. Ghost Mantis: A Complete Phyllocrania Paradoxa Care Guide

    Diet In you natural habitat, P. paradoxa mainly feeders on small insects same moths, ladybug, additionally flies. She wait in ambushed used her prey to come close adequately to be wrestling up by the well-developed raptorial hindlimb. They are moreover known till eat smaller mantis species. Temperament

  8. Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa) Care Sheet

    The Ghost Mantis is a surprisingly small species, when you compare it with many of the other popular pet mantids (such as the Dead Leaf Mantis) with adult females growing to just 4-5cm in body length. The males can be even smaller that this, though are easily told part by the number of abdominal segments.

  9. The Enigmatic Ghost Mantis: Phyllocrania paradoxa

    Prepare to be enchanted by the captivating world of the Ghost Mantis, scientifically known as Phyllocrania paradoxa. This mysterious mantis species belongs to. ... Lighting and Temperature. Ghost Mantises thrive under daylight conditions. Natural light is sufficient, but incorporating halogen lights can provide additional warmth and mimic the ...

  10. Ghost Mantis Care Sheet (Phyllocrania paradoxa)

    Are it looking to buying a ghost mantis? If so, it will want to prepare furthermore educate yourself on whereby to care with a ghost mantis! This care sheet walking over everything from food instructions, enclosures, temperature humidity requirements furthermore more!

  11. Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania Paradoxa): Care, Pictures & Facts

    The Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania Paradoxa) is an enigmatic mantis species native to the African continent and Madagascar. The Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania Paradoxa) is an enigmatic mantis species native to the African continent and Madagascar. ... Temperature and Humidity. The GM can live comfortably with temperatures around 68 °F to 86 °F, but ...

  12. Phyllocrania Paradoxa

    The Phyllocrania Paradoxa is commonly referred to as "Ghost Mantis" due to its' impressive camouflaging skills. It is a praying mantis species that can be found almost everywhere south of the Sahara in Africa and in Madagascar. ... The temperature and humidity should be the same as for the adults during the incubation time. The average ...

  13. Ghost Mantis Care Sheet (Phyllocrania paradoxa)

    Leave at room temperature and they will hatch out. they must be left out at room temperature. Once they hatchery you may site them in to refrigerator to "calm them down" so they don't fly outside and then you can grab a few at put into your mantis enclosure. Small/Medium Red Runner Circle:

  14. The Ghost Mantis: Your Complete Guide

    They live in areas with a moderate temperature between 20º C to 30º C and can't tolerate temperatures below 18º C for long. The perfect temperature is about 26º C because they prefer warm places with relatively high humidity, 60 to 90 percent. What Does A Ghost Mantis Eat?

  15. Ghost Mantis: A Complete Phyllocrania Paradoxa Care Guide

    This massive guide on Ghost Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa) provides a close look at the terrarium pet. Find care tips and "how-to" feeding & breeding strategies. ... Phantom Mantis (Phyllocrania paradoxa) Endure Updated set: 06/02/2023 by CJ Abney. Twinge. Pin. Share.

  16. How to Care for Your Ghost Mantis

    Ghost mantises usually do well between 70-80°F, so they can be kept at room temperature. Avoid temperatures above 86°F and below 68°F. Ideal ambient temperature for nymphs is 78°F when possible.

  17. Some questions about Ghost Mantis care : r/mantids

    65-80 degrees Fahrenheit

  18. Ghost Mantis: A Complete Phyllocrania Paradoxa Care Guide

    Characteristics: Common Name Ghost Mantis Family Name Mantidae Scientific Name Phyllocrania paradoxa Pets Non-aggressive Lifespan 8 to 12 Months Insectivore Adult Size Breeding Type Egg Layer Care Level Moderate Minimum Tank Size 6.0-7.0 Moderate 63-90°F

  19. Ghost Mantis

    It's a win-win-win. If you're interested in adopting one or more Ghost Mantises, we're going to cover this subject in-depth in this article. So, stick around to find out more! Ghost Mantis Natural Habitat This camo wizard creature is well adapted to warm and humid climates with mild winters.

  20. Ghost mantis: habitat and characteristics

    Dark brown: Humidity between 40 and 50%. Black: Humidity less than 30%. It has an elongated head with an extended and flattened prothorax. It also has protuberances on its extremities that facilitate its camouflage. It also has a dorsal keel that resembles a desiccated leaf, and the folds of its wings are actually shadows of pigment.

  21. Phyllocrania paradoxa- Ghost Mantis

    The ghost mantis can be found on strongly branched shrubs, bushes, trees and in open terrain. It has a relatively large catchment area that extends south of the Sahara to Madagascar. They populate relatively dry areas and have little to no requirements for humidity. The temperature there is usually between 25-30°C during the day and 20°C at ...

  22. Praying Mantis Care Sheets

    Differing shades of green are the common color. The unusual aspect of this mantis is that they grow to reach adulthood very fast, one of the fastest growing species in the world. Food - The prey must have movement to trigger the hunt, so crickets, flies, moths, and butterflies are good choices.

  23. Ghost Mantis

    Ghost Mantis. Phyllocrania paradoxa. These mantis can be found widely across Africa and in parts of South Europe. Ghost mantis prefer in live in dry areas, in trees, shrubs, and bushes. They can be kept at room temperature and will tolerate temperature from 65-85°, but prefer to be between 72-80°. With humidity between 40% and 70% this can be ...