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Blog Beginner Guides How To Make a Good Presentation [A Complete Guide]

How To Make a Good Presentation [A Complete Guide]

Written by: Krystle Wong Jul 20, 2023

How to make a good presentation

A top-notch presentation possesses the power to drive action. From winning stakeholders over and conveying a powerful message to securing funding — your secret weapon lies within the realm of creating an effective presentation .  

Being an excellent presenter isn’t confined to the boardroom. Whether you’re delivering a presentation at work, pursuing an academic career, involved in a non-profit organization or even a student, nailing the presentation game is a game-changer.

In this article, I’ll cover the top qualities of compelling presentations and walk you through a step-by-step guide on how to give a good presentation. Here’s a little tip to kick things off: for a headstart, check out Venngage’s collection of free presentation templates . They are fully customizable, and the best part is you don’t need professional design skills to make them shine!

These valuable presentation tips cater to individuals from diverse professional backgrounds, encompassing business professionals, sales and marketing teams, educators, trainers, students, researchers, non-profit organizations, public speakers and presenters. 

No matter your field or role, these tips for presenting will equip you with the skills to deliver effective presentations that leave a lasting impression on any audience.

Click to jump ahead:

What are the 10 qualities of a good presentation?

Step-by-step guide on how to prepare an effective presentation, 9 effective techniques to deliver a memorable presentation, faqs on making a good presentation, how to create a presentation with venngage in 5 steps.

When it comes to giving an engaging presentation that leaves a lasting impression, it’s not just about the content — it’s also about how you deliver it. Wondering what makes a good presentation? Well, the best presentations I’ve seen consistently exhibit these 10 qualities:

1. Clear structure

No one likes to get lost in a maze of information. Organize your thoughts into a logical flow, complete with an introduction, main points and a solid conclusion. A structured presentation helps your audience follow along effortlessly, leaving them with a sense of satisfaction at the end.

Regardless of your presentation style , a quality presentation starts with a clear roadmap. Browse through Venngage’s template library and select a presentation template that aligns with your content and presentation goals. Here’s a good presentation example template with a logical layout that includes sections for the introduction, main points, supporting information and a conclusion: 

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2. Engaging opening

Hook your audience right from the start with an attention-grabbing statement, a fascinating question or maybe even a captivating anecdote. Set the stage for a killer presentation!

The opening moments of your presentation hold immense power – check out these 15 ways to start a presentation to set the stage and captivate your audience.

3. Relevant content

Make sure your content aligns with their interests and needs. Your audience is there for a reason, and that’s to get valuable insights. Avoid fluff and get straight to the point, your audience will be genuinely excited.

4. Effective visual aids

Picture this: a slide with walls of text and tiny charts, yawn! Visual aids should be just that—aiding your presentation. Opt for clear and visually appealing slides, engaging images and informative charts that add value and help reinforce your message.

With Venngage, visualizing data takes no effort at all. You can import data from CSV or Google Sheets seamlessly and create stunning charts, graphs and icon stories effortlessly to showcase your data in a captivating and impactful way.

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5. Clear and concise communication

Keep your language simple, and avoid jargon or complicated terms. Communicate your ideas clearly, so your audience can easily grasp and retain the information being conveyed. This can prevent confusion and enhance the overall effectiveness of the message. 

6. Engaging delivery

Spice up your presentation with a sprinkle of enthusiasm! Maintain eye contact, use expressive gestures and vary your tone of voice to keep your audience glued to the edge of their seats. A touch of charisma goes a long way!

7. Interaction and audience engagement

Turn your presentation into an interactive experience — encourage questions, foster discussions and maybe even throw in a fun activity. Engaged audiences are more likely to remember and embrace your message.

Transform your slides into an interactive presentation with Venngage’s dynamic features like pop-ups, clickable icons and animated elements. Engage your audience with interactive content that lets them explore and interact with your presentation for a truly immersive experience.

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8. Effective storytelling

Who doesn’t love a good story? Weaving relevant anecdotes, case studies or even a personal story into your presentation can captivate your audience and create a lasting impact. Stories build connections and make your message memorable.

A great presentation background is also essential as it sets the tone, creates visual interest and reinforces your message. Enhance the overall aesthetics of your presentation with these 15 presentation background examples and captivate your audience’s attention.

9. Well-timed pacing

Pace your presentation thoughtfully with well-designed presentation slides, neither rushing through nor dragging it out. Respect your audience’s time and ensure you cover all the essential points without losing their interest.

10. Strong conclusion

Last impressions linger! Summarize your main points and leave your audience with a clear takeaway. End your presentation with a bang , a call to action or an inspiring thought that resonates long after the conclusion.

In-person presentations aside, acing a virtual presentation is of paramount importance in today’s digital world. Check out this guide to learn how you can adapt your in-person presentations into virtual presentations . 

Peloton Pitch Deck - Conclusion

Preparing an effective presentation starts with laying a strong foundation that goes beyond just creating slides and notes. One of the quickest and best ways to make a presentation would be with the help of a good presentation software . 

Otherwise, let me walk you to how to prepare for a presentation step by step and unlock the secrets of crafting a professional presentation that sets you apart.

1. Understand the audience and their needs

Before you dive into preparing your masterpiece, take a moment to get to know your target audience. Tailor your presentation to meet their needs and expectations , and you’ll have them hooked from the start!

2. Conduct thorough research on the topic

Time to hit the books (or the internet)! Don’t skimp on the research with your presentation materials — dive deep into the subject matter and gather valuable insights . The more you know, the more confident you’ll feel in delivering your presentation.

3. Organize the content with a clear structure

No one wants to stumble through a chaotic mess of information. Outline your presentation with a clear and logical flow. Start with a captivating introduction, follow up with main points that build on each other and wrap it up with a powerful conclusion that leaves a lasting impression.

Delivering an effective business presentation hinges on captivating your audience, and Venngage’s professionally designed business presentation templates are tailor-made for this purpose. With thoughtfully structured layouts, these templates enhance your message’s clarity and coherence, ensuring a memorable and engaging experience for your audience members.

Don’t want to build your presentation layout from scratch? pick from these 5 foolproof presentation layout ideas that won’t go wrong. 

excellent presentation with

4. Develop visually appealing and supportive visual aids

Spice up your presentation with eye-catching visuals! Create slides that complement your message, not overshadow it. Remember, a picture is worth a thousand words, but that doesn’t mean you need to overload your slides with text.

Well-chosen designs create a cohesive and professional look, capturing your audience’s attention and enhancing the overall effectiveness of your message. Here’s a list of carefully curated PowerPoint presentation templates and great background graphics that will significantly influence the visual appeal and engagement of your presentation.

5. Practice, practice and practice

Practice makes perfect — rehearse your presentation and arrive early to your presentation to help overcome stage fright. Familiarity with your material will boost your presentation skills and help you handle curveballs with ease.

6. Seek feedback and make necessary adjustments

Don’t be afraid to ask for help and seek feedback from friends and colleagues. Constructive criticism can help you identify blind spots and fine-tune your presentation to perfection.

With Venngage’s real-time collaboration feature , receiving feedback and editing your presentation is a seamless process. Group members can access and work on the presentation simultaneously and edit content side by side in real-time. Changes will be reflected immediately to the entire team, promoting seamless teamwork.

Venngage Real Time Collaboration

7. Prepare for potential technical or logistical issues

Prepare for the unexpected by checking your equipment, internet connection and any other potential hiccups. If you’re worried that you’ll miss out on any important points, you could always have note cards prepared. Remember to remain focused and rehearse potential answers to anticipated questions.

8. Fine-tune and polish your presentation

As the big day approaches, give your presentation one last shine. Review your talking points, practice how to present a presentation and make any final tweaks. Deep breaths — you’re on the brink of delivering a successful presentation!

In competitive environments, persuasive presentations set individuals and organizations apart. To brush up on your presentation skills, read these guides on how to make a persuasive presentation and tips to presenting effectively . 

excellent presentation with

Whether you’re an experienced presenter or a novice, the right techniques will let your presentation skills soar to new heights!

From public speaking hacks to interactive elements and storytelling prowess, these 9 effective presentation techniques will empower you to leave a lasting impression on your audience and make your presentations unforgettable.

1. Confidence and positive body language

Positive body language instantly captivates your audience, making them believe in your message as much as you do. Strengthen your stage presence and own that stage like it’s your second home! Stand tall, shoulders back and exude confidence. 

2. Eye contact with the audience

Break down that invisible barrier and connect with your audience through their eyes. Maintaining eye contact when giving a presentation builds trust and shows that you’re present and engaged with them.

3. Effective use of hand gestures and movement

A little movement goes a long way! Emphasize key points with purposeful gestures and don’t be afraid to walk around the stage. Your energy will be contagious!

4. Utilize storytelling techniques

Weave the magic of storytelling into your presentation. Share relatable anecdotes, inspiring success stories or even personal experiences that tug at the heartstrings of your audience. Adjust your pitch, pace and volume to match the emotions and intensity of the story. Varying your speaking voice adds depth and enhances your stage presence.

excellent presentation with

5. Incorporate multimedia elements

Spice up your presentation with a dash of visual pizzazz! Use slides, images and video clips to add depth and clarity to your message. Just remember, less is more—don’t overwhelm them with information overload. 

Turn your presentations into an interactive party! Involve your audience with questions, polls or group activities. When they actively participate, they become invested in your presentation’s success. Bring your design to life with animated elements. Venngage allows you to apply animations to icons, images and text to create dynamic and engaging visual content.

6. Utilize humor strategically

Laughter is the best medicine—and a fantastic presentation enhancer! A well-placed joke or lighthearted moment can break the ice and create a warm atmosphere , making your audience more receptive to your message.

7. Practice active listening and respond to feedback

Be attentive to your audience’s reactions and feedback. If they have questions or concerns, address them with genuine interest and respect. Your responsiveness builds rapport and shows that you genuinely care about their experience.

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8. Apply the 10-20-30 rule

Apply the 10-20-30 presentation rule and keep it short, sweet and impactful! Stick to ten slides, deliver your presentation within 20 minutes and use a 30-point font to ensure clarity and focus. Less is more, and your audience will thank you for it!

9. Implement the 5-5-5 rule

Simplicity is key. Limit each slide to five bullet points, with only five words per bullet point and allow each slide to remain visible for about five seconds. This rule keeps your presentation concise and prevents information overload.

Simple presentations are more engaging because they are easier to follow. Summarize your presentations and keep them simple with Venngage’s gallery of simple presentation templates and ensure that your message is delivered effectively across your audience.

excellent presentation with

1. How to start a presentation?

To kick off your presentation effectively, begin with an attention-grabbing statement or a powerful quote. Introduce yourself, establish credibility and clearly state the purpose and relevance of your presentation.

2. How to end a presentation?

For a strong conclusion, summarize your talking points and key takeaways. End with a compelling call to action or a thought-provoking question and remember to thank your audience and invite any final questions or interactions.

3. How to make a presentation interactive?

To make your presentation interactive, encourage questions and discussion throughout your talk. Utilize multimedia elements like videos or images and consider including polls, quizzes or group activities to actively involve your audience.

In need of inspiration for your next presentation? I’ve got your back! Pick from these 120+ presentation ideas, topics and examples to get started. 

Creating a stunning presentation with Venngage is a breeze with our user-friendly drag-and-drop editor and professionally designed templates for all your communication needs. 

Here’s how to make a presentation in just 5 simple steps with the help of Venngage:

Step 1: Sign up for Venngage for free using your email, Gmail or Facebook account or simply log in to access your account. 

Step 2: Pick a design from our selection of free presentation templates (they’re all created by our expert in-house designers).

Step 3: Make the template your own by customizing it to fit your content and branding. With Venngage’s intuitive drag-and-drop editor, you can easily modify text, change colors and adjust the layout to create a unique and eye-catching design.

Step 4: Elevate your presentation by incorporating captivating visuals. You can upload your images or choose from Venngage’s vast library of high-quality photos, icons and illustrations. 

Step 5: Upgrade to a premium or business account to export your presentation in PDF and print it for in-person presentations or share it digitally for free!

By following these five simple steps, you’ll have a professionally designed and visually engaging presentation ready in no time. With Venngage’s user-friendly platform, your presentation is sure to make a lasting impression. So, let your creativity flow and get ready to shine in your next presentation!

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6 presentation skills and how to improve them

smiling-woman-introducing-her-presentation-to-her-team-at-work-presentation-skills

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What are presentation skills?

The importance of presentation skills, 6 presentation skills examples, how to improve presentation skills.

Tips for dealing with presentation anxiety

Learn how to captivate an audience with ease

Capturing an audience’s attention takes practice. 

Over time, great presenters learn how to organize their speeches and captivate an audience from start to finish. They spark curiosity, know how to read a room , and understand what their audience needs to walk away feeling like they learned something valuable.

Regardless of your profession, you most likely use presentation skills on a monthly or even weekly basis. Maybe you lead brainstorming sessions or host client calls. 

Developing effective presentation skills makes it easier to contribute ideas with confidence and show others you’re someone to trust. Although speaking in front of a crowd sometimes brings nerves and anxiety , it also sparks new opportunities.

Presentation skills are the qualities and abilities you need to communicate ideas effectively and deliver a compelling speech. They influence how you structure a presentation and how an audience receives it. Understanding body language , creating impactful visual aids, and projecting your voice all fall under this umbrella.

A great presentation depends on more than what you say. It’s about how you say it. Storytelling , stage presence, and voice projection all shape how well you express your ideas and connect with the audience. These skills do take practice, but they’re worth developing — especially if public speaking makes you nervous. 

Engaging a crowd isn’t easy. You may feel anxious to step in front of an audience and have all eyes and ears on you.

But feeling that anxiety doesn’t mean your ideas aren’t worth sharing. Whether you’re giving an inspiring speech or delivering a monthly recap at work, your audience is there to listen to you. Harness that nervous energy and turn it into progress.

Strong presentation skills make it easier to convey your thoughts to audiences of all sizes. They can help you tell a compelling story, convince people of a pitch , or teach a group something entirely new to them. And when it comes to the workplace, the strength of your presentation skills could play a part in getting a promotion or contributing to a new initiative.

To fully understand the impact these skills have on creating a successful presentation, it’s helpful to look at each one individually. Here are six valuable skills you can develop:

1. Active listening

Active listening is an excellent communication skill for any professional to hone. When you have strong active listening skills, you can listen to others effectively and observe their nonverbal cues . This helps you assess whether or not your audience members are engaged in and understand what you’re sharing. 

Great public speakers use active listening to assess the audience’s reactions and adjust their speech if they find it lacks impact. Signs like slouching, negative facial expressions, and roaming eye contact are all signs to watch out for when giving a presentation.

2. Body language

If you’re researching presentation skills, chances are you’ve already watched a few notable speeches like TED Talks or industry seminars. And one thing you probably noticed is that speakers can capture attention with their body language. 

A mixture of eye contact, hand gestures , and purposeful pacing makes a presentation more interesting and engaging. If you stand in one spot and don’t move your body, the audience might zone out.

two-women-talking-happily-on-radio-presentation-skills

3. Stage presence

A great stage presence looks different for everyone. A comedian might aim for more movement and excitement, and a conference speaker might focus their energy on the content of their speech. Although neither is better than the other, both understand their strengths and their audience’s needs. 

Developing a stage presence involves finding your own unique communication style . Lean into your strengths, whether that’s adding an injection of humor or asking questions to make it interactive . To give a great presentation, you might even incorporate relevant props or presentation slides.

4. Storytelling

According to Forbes, audiences typically pay attention for about 10 minutes before tuning out . But you can lengthen their attention span by offering a presentation that interests them for longer. Include a narrative they’ll want to listen to, and tell a story as you go along. 

Shaping your content to follow a clear narrative can spark your audience’s curiosity and entice them to pay careful attention. You can use anecdotes from your personal or professional life that take your audience along through relevant moments. If you’re pitching a product, you can start with a problem and lead your audience through the stages of how your product provides a solution.

5. Voice projection

Although this skill may be obvious, you need your audience to hear what you’re saying. This can be challenging if you’re naturally soft-spoken and struggle to project your voice.

Remember to straighten your posture and take deep breaths before speaking, which will help you speak louder and fill the room. If you’re talking into a microphone or participating in a virtual meeting, you can use your regular conversational voice, but you still want to sound confident and self-assured with a strong tone.

If you’re unsure whether everyone can hear you, you can always ask the audience at the beginning of your speech and wait for confirmation. That way, they won’t have to potentially interrupt you later.

Ensuring everyone can hear you also includes your speed and annunciation. It’s easy to speak quickly when nervous, but try to slow down and pronounce every word. Mumbling can make your presentation difficult to understand and pay attention to.

microphone-presentation-skills

6. Verbal communication 

Although verbal communication involves your projection and tone, it also covers the language and pacing you use to get your point across. This includes where you choose to place pauses in your speech or the tone you use to emphasize important ideas.

If you’re giving a presentation on collaboration in the workplace , you might start your speech by saying, “There’s something every workplace needs to succeed: teamwork.” By placing emphasis on the word “ teamwork ,” you give your audience a hint on what ideas will follow.

To further connect with your audience through diction, pay careful attention to who you’re speaking to. The way you talk to your colleagues might be different from how you speak to a group of superiors, even if you’re discussing the same subject. You might use more humor and a conversational tone for the former and more serious, formal diction for the latter.

Everyone has strengths and weaknesses when it comes to presenting. Maybe you’re confident in your use of body language, but your voice projection needs work. Maybe you’re a great storyteller in small group settings, but need to work on your stage presence in front of larger crowds. 

The first step to improving presentation skills is pinpointing your gaps and determining which qualities to build upon first. Here are four tips for enhancing your presentation skills:

1. Build self-confidence

Confident people know how to speak with authority and share their ideas. Although feeling good about your presentation skills is easier said than done, building confidence is key to helping your audience believe in what you’re saying. Try practicing positive self-talk and continuously researching your topic's ins and outs.

If you don’t feel confident on the inside, fake it until you make it. Stand up straight, project your voice, and try your best to appear engaged and excited. Chances are, the audience doesn’t know you’re unsure of your skills — and they don’t need to.

Another tip is to lean into your slideshow, if you’re using one. Create something colorful and interesting so the audience’s eyes fall there instead of on you. And when you feel proud of your slideshow, you’ll be more eager to share it with others, bringing more energy to your presentation.

2. Watch other presentations

Developing the soft skills necessary for a good presentation can be challenging without seeing them in action. Watch as many as possible to become more familiar with public speaking skills and what makes a great presentation. You could attend events with keynote speakers or view past speeches on similar topics online.

Take a close look at how those presenters use verbal communication and body language to engage their audiences. Grab a notebook and jot down what you enjoyed and your main takeaways. Try to recall the techniques they used to emphasize their main points, whether they used pauses effectively, had interesting visual aids, or told a fascinating story.

woman-looking-at-video-from-tablet-while-cooking-dinner-presentation-skills

3. Get in front of a crowd

You don’t need a large auditorium to practice public speaking. There are dozens of other ways to feel confident and develop good presentation skills.

If you’re a natural comedian, consider joining a small stand-up comedy club. If you’re an avid writer, participate in a public poetry reading. Even music and acting can help you feel more comfortable in front of a crowd.

If you’d rather keep it professional, you can still work on your presentation skills in the office. Challenge yourself to participate at least once in every team meeting, or plan and present a project to become more comfortable vocalizing your ideas. You could also speak to your manager about opportunities that flex your public speaking abilities.

4. Overcome fear

Many people experience feelings of fear before presenting in front of an audience, whether those feelings appear as a few butterflies or more severe anxiety. Try grounding yourself to shift your focus to the present moment. If you’re stuck dwelling on previous experiences that didn’t go well, use those mistakes as learning experiences and focus on what you can improve to do better in the future.

Tips for dealing with presentation anxiety 

It’s normal to feel nervous when sharing your ideas. In fact, according to a report from the Journal of Graduate Medical Education, public speaking anxiety is prevalent in 15–30% of the general population .

Even though having a fear of public speaking is common, it doesn’t make it easier. You might feel overwhelmed, become stiff, and forget what you were going to say. But although the moment might scare you, there are ways to overcome the fear and put mind over matter.

Use these tactics to reduce your stress when you have to make a presentation:

1. Practice breathing techniques

If you experience anxiety often, you’re probably familiar with breathing techniques for stress relief . Incorporating these exercises into your daily routine can help you stop worrying and regulate anxious feelings. 

Before a big presentation, take a moment alone to practice breathing techniques, ground yourself, and reduce tension. It’s also a good idea to take breaths throughout the presentation to speak slower and calm yourself down .

2. Get organized

The more organized you are, the more prepared you’ll feel. Carefully outline all of the critical information you want to use in your presentation, including your main talking points and visual aids, so you don’t forget anything. Use bullet points and visuals on each slide to remind you of what you want to talk about, and create handheld notes to help you stay on track.

3. Embrace moments of silence

It’s okay to lose your train of thought. It happens to even the most experienced public speakers once in a while. If your mind goes blank, don’t panic. Take a moment to breathe, gather your thoughts, and refer to your notes to see where you left off. You can drink some water or make a quick joke to ease the silence or regain your footing. And it’s okay to say, “Give me a moment while I find my notes.” Chances are, people understand the position you’re in.

men-giving-conference-sitting-on-a-chair-with-microphone-presentation-skills

4. Practice makes progress

Before presenting, rehearse in front of friends and family members you trust. This gives you the chance to work out any weak spots in your speech and become comfortable communicating out loud. If you want to go the extra mile, ask your makeshift audience to ask a surprise question. This tests your on-the-spot thinking and will prove that you can keep cool when things come up.

Whether you’re new to public speaking or are a seasoned presenter, you’re bound to make a few slip-ups. It happens to everyone. The most important thing is that you try your best, brush things off, and work on improving your skills to do better in your next presentation.

Although your job may require a different level of public speaking than your favorite TED Talk , developing presentation skills is handy in any profession. You can use presentation skills in a wide range of tasks in the workplace, whether you’re sharing your ideas with colleagues, expressing concerns to higher-ups, or pitching strategies to potential clients.

Remember to use active listening to read the room and engage your audience with an interesting narrative. Don’t forget to step outside your comfort zone once in a while and put your skills to practice in front of a crowd. After facing your fears, you’ll feel confident enough to put presentation skills on your resume.

If you’re trying to build your skills and become a better employee overall, try a communications coach with BetterUp. 

Elevate your communication skills

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Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

The 11 tips that will improve your public speaking skills

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23 presentation examples that really work (plus templates!)

Three professionals engaged in a collaborative meeting with a Biteable video maker, a laptop, and documents on the table.

  • 30 Mar 2023

To help you in your quest for presentation greatness, we’ve gathered 23 of the best business presentation examples out there. These hand-picked ideas range from business PowerPoint presentations, to recruitment presentations, and everything in between.

As a bonus, several of our examples include editable video presentation templates from  Biteable .

Biteable allows anyone to create great video presentations — no previous video-making skills required. The easy-to-use platform has hundreds of brandable templates and video scenes designed with a business audience in mind. A video made with Biteable is just what you need to add that wow factor and make an impact on your audience.

Create videos that drive action

Activate your audience with impactful, on-brand videos. Create them simply and collaboratively with Biteable.

Video presentation examples

Video presentations are our specialty at Biteable. We love them because they’re the most visually appealing and memorable way to communicate.

1. Animated characters

Our first presentation example is a business explainer from Biteable that uses animated characters. The friendly and modern style makes this the perfect presentation for engaging your audience.

Bonus template:  Need a business video presentation that reflects the beautiful diversity of your customers or team? Use  Biteable’s workplace scenes . You can change the skin tone and hair color for any of the animated characters.

2. Conference video

Videos are also ideal solutions for events (e.g. trade shows) where they can be looped to play constantly while you attend to more important things like talking to people and handing out free cheese samples.

For this event presentation sample below, we used bright colours, stock footage, and messaging that reflects the brand and values of the company. All these elements work together to draw the attention of passers-by.

For a huge selection of video presentation templates, take a look at our  template gallery .

Business PowerPoint presentation examples

Striking fear into the hearts of the workplace since 1987, PowerPoint is synonymous with bland, boring presentations that feel more like an endurance test than a learning opportunity. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Check out these anything-but-boring business PowerPoint presentation examples.

3. Design pointers

This PowerPoint presentation takes a tongue-in-cheek look at how the speakers and users of PowerPoint are the problem, not the software itself.

Even at a hefty 61 slides, the vintage theme, appealing colors, and engaging content keep the viewer interested. It delivers useful and actionable tips on creating a better experience for your audience.

Pixar, as you’d expect, redefines the meaning of PowerPoint in their “22 Rules for Phenomenal Storytelling”. The character silhouettes are instantly recognizable and tie firmly to the Pixar brand. The bright colour palettes are carefully chosen to highlight the content of each slide.

This presentation is a good length, delivering one message per slide, making it easy for an audience to take notes and retain the information.

Google slides examples

If you’re in business, chances are you’ll have come across  slide decks . Much like a deck of cards, each slide plays a key part in the overall ‘deck’, creating a well-rounded presentation.

If you need to inform your team, present findings, or outline a new strategy, slides are one of the most effective ways to do this.

Google Slides is one of the best ways to create a slide deck right now. It’s easy to use and has built-in design tools that integrate with Adobe, Lucidchart, and more. The best part — it’s free!

5. Teacher education

Here’s a slide deck that was created to educate teachers on how to use Google Slides effectively in a classroom. At first glance it seems stuffy and businessy, but if you look closer it’s apparent the creator knows his audience well, throwing in some teacher-friendly content that’s bound to get a smile.

The slides give walkthrough screenshots and practical advice on the different ways teachers can use the software to make their lives that little bit easier and educate their students at the same time.

6. Charity awareness raiser

This next Google slide deck is designed to raise awareness for an animal shelter. It has simple, clear messaging, and makes use of the furry friends it rescues to tug on heartstrings and encourage donations and adoptions from its audience.

Pro tip: Creating a presentation is exciting but also a little daunting. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed — especially if the success of your business or nonprofit depends on it.

Prezi presentation examples

If you haven’t come across  Prezi , it’s a great alternative to using static slides. Sitting somewhere between slides and a video presentation, it allows you to import other content and add motion to create a more engaging viewer experience.

7. Red Bull event recap

This Prezi was created to document the Red Bull stratosphere freefall stunt a few years ago. It neatly captures all the things that Prezi is capable of, including video inserts and the zoom effect, which gives an animated, almost 3D effect to what would otherwise be still images.  

Prezi has annual awards for the best examples of presentations over the year. This next example is one of the 2018 winners. It was made to highlight a new Logitech tool.

8. Logitech Spotlight launch

What stands out here are the juicy colors, bold imagery, and the way the designer has used Prezi to its full extent, including rotations, panning, fades, and a full zoom out to finish the presentation.

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Sales presentation examples

If you’re stuck for ideas for your sales presentation, step right this way and check out this video template we made for you.

9. Sales enablement video presentation

In today’s fast-paced sales environment, you need a way to make your sales enablement presentations memorable and engaging for busy reps.  Sales enablement videos  are just the ticket. Use this video presentation template the next time you need to present on your metrics.

10. Zuroa sales deck

If you’re after a sales deck, you can’t go past this example from Zuora. What makes it great? It begins by introducing the worldwide shift in the way consumers are shopping. It’s a global phenomenon, and something we can all relate to.

It then weaves a compelling story about how the subscription model is changing the face of daily life for everyone. Metrics and testimonials from well-known CEOs and executives are included for some slamming social proof to boost the sales message.

Pitch presentation examples

Pitch decks are used to give an overview of business plans, and are usually presented during meetings with customers, investors, or potential partners.

11. Uber pitch deck

This is Uber’s original pitch deck, which (apart from looking a teensy bit dated) gives an excellent overview of their business model and clearly shows how they intended to disrupt a traditional industry and provide a better service to people. Right now, you’re probably very grateful that this pitch presentation was a winner.

You can make your own pitch deck with Biteable, or start with one of our  video templates  to make something a little more memorable.

12. Video pitch template

This video pitch presentation clearly speaks to the pains of everyone who needs to commute and find parking. It then provides the solution with its app that makes parking a breeze.

The video also introduces the key team members, their business strategy, and what they’re hoping to raise in funding. It’s a simple, clear pitch that positions the company as a key solution to a growing, worldwide problem. It’s compelling and convincing, as a good presentation should be.

13. Fyre Festival pitch deck

The most epic example of a recent pitch deck is this one for Fyre Festival – the greatest event that never happened. Marvel at its persuasion, gasp at the opportunity of being part of the cultural experience of the decade, cringe as everything goes from bad to worse.

Despite the very public outcome, this is a masterclass in how to create hype and get funding with your pitch deck using beautiful imagery, beautiful people, and beautiful promises of riches and fame.

Business presentation examples

Need to get the right message out to the right people? Business presentations can do a lot of the heavy lifting for you.

Simply press play and let your video do the talking. No fumbling your words and sweating buckets in front of those potential clients, just you being cool as a cucumber while your presentation does the talking.

Check out two of our popular templates that you can use as a starting point for your own presentations. While they’re business-minded, they’re definitely not boring.

14. Business intro template

Modern graphics, animations, and upbeat soundtracks keep your prospects engaged as they learn about your business, your team, your values, and how you can help them.

15. Business explainer template

Research presentation examples.

When you’re giving a more technical presentation such as research findings, you need to strike the perfect balance between informing your audience and making sure they stay awake.

As a rule, slides are more effective for research presentations, as they are used to support the speaker’s knowledge rather can capture every small detail on screen.

With often dry, complex, and technical subject matter, there can be a temptation for presentations to follow suit. Use images instead of walls of text, and keep things as easy to follow as possible.

16. TrackMaven research deck

TrackMaven uses their endearing mascot to lighten up this data-heavy slide deck. The graphs help to bring life to their findings, and they ensure to only have one bite-size takeaway per slide so that viewers can easily take notes.

17. Wearable tech research report

Obviously, research can get very researchy and there’s not a lot to be done about it. This slide deck below lays out a ton of in-depth information but breaks it up well with quotes, diagrams, and interesting facts to keep viewers engaged while it delivers its findings on wearable technology.

Team presentation examples

Motivating your team can be a challenge at the best of times, especially when you need to gather them together for….another presentation!

18. Team update template

We created this presentation template as an example of how to engage your team. In this case, it’s for an internal product launch. Using colorful animation and engaging pacing, this video presentation is much better than a static PowerPoint, right?

19. Officevibe collaboration explainer

This short slide deck is a presentation designed to increase awareness of the problems of a disengaged team. Bright colors and relevant images combine with facts and figures that compel viewers to click through to a download to learn more about helping their teams succeed.

Recruitment presentation examples

Recruiting the right people can be a challenge. Presentations can help display your team and your business by painting a dynamic picture of what it’s like to work with you.

Videos and animated slides let you capture the essence of your brand and workplace so the right employees can find you.

20. Company culture explainer

If you’re a recruitment agency, your challenge is to stand out from the hundreds of other agencies in the marketplace.

21. Kaizen culture

Showcasing your agency using a slide deck can give employers and employees a feel for doing business with you. Kaizen clearly displays its credentials and highlights its brand values and personality here (and also its appreciation of the coffee bean).

Explainer presentation examples

Got some explaining to do? Using an explainer video is the ideal way to showcase products that are technical, digital, or otherwise too difficult to explain with still images and text.

Explainer videos help you present the features and values of your product in an engaging way that speaks to your ideal audience and promotes your brand at the same time.

22. Product explainer template

23. lucidchart explainer.

Lucidchart does a stellar job of using explainer videos for their software. Their series of explainers-within-explainers entertains the viewer with cute imagery and an endearing brand voice. At the same time, the video is educating its audience on how to use the actual product. We (almost) guarantee you’ll have more love for spiders after watching this one.

Make a winning video presentation with Biteable

Creating a winning presentation doesn’t need to be difficult or expensive. Modern slide decks and video software make it easy for you to give compelling presentations that sell, explain, and educate without sending your audience to snooze town.

For the best online video presentation software around, check out Biteable. The intuitive platform does all the heavy lifting for you, so making a video presentation is as easy as making a PowerPoint.

Use Biteable’s brand builder to automatically fetch your company colors and logo from your website and apply them to your entire video with the click of a button. Even add a  clickable call-to-action  button to your video.

Share your business presentation anywhere with a single, trackable URL and watch your message turn into gold.

Make stunning videos with ease.

Take the struggle out of team communication.

Try Biteable now.

  • No credit card required
  • No complicated design decisions
  • No experience necessary

Ideas and insights from Harvard Business Publishing Corporate Learning

Learning and development professionals walking and talking

Powerful and Effective Presentation Skills: More in Demand Now Than Ever

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When we talk with our L&D colleagues from around the globe, we often hear that presentation skills training is one of the top opportunities they’re looking to provide their learners. And this holds true whether their learners are individual contributors, people managers, or senior leaders. This is not surprising.

Effective communications skills are a powerful career activator, and most of us are called upon to communicate in some type of formal presentation mode at some point along the way.

For instance, you might be asked to brief management on market research results, walk your team through a new process, lay out the new budget, or explain a new product to a client or prospect. Or you may want to build support for a new idea, bring a new employee into the fold, or even just present your achievements to your manager during your performance review.

And now, with so many employees working from home or in hybrid mode, and business travel in decline, there’s a growing need to find new ways to make effective presentations when the audience may be fully virtual or a combination of in person and remote attendees.

Whether you’re making a standup presentation to a large live audience, or a sit-down one-on-one, whether you’re delivering your presentation face to face or virtually, solid presentation skills matter.

Even the most seasoned and accomplished presenters may need to fine-tune or update their skills. Expectations have changed over the last decade or so. Yesterday’s PowerPoint which primarily relied on bulleted points, broken up by the occasional clip-art image, won’t cut it with today’s audience.

The digital revolution has revolutionized the way people want to receive information. People expect presentations that are more visually interesting. They expect to see data, metrics that support assertions. And now, with so many previously in-person meetings occurring virtually, there’s an entirely new level of technical preparedness required.

The leadership development tools and the individual learning opportunities you’re providing should include presentation skills training that covers both the evergreen fundamentals and the up-to-date capabilities that can make or break a presentation.

So, just what should be included in solid presentation skills training? Here’s what I think.

The fundamentals will always apply When it comes to making a powerful and effective presentation, the fundamentals will always apply. You need to understand your objective. Is it strictly to convey information, so that your audience’s knowledge is increased? Is it to persuade your audience to take some action? Is it to convince people to support your idea? Once you understand what your objective is, you need to define your central message. There may be a lot of things you want to share with your audience during your presentation, but find – and stick with – the core, the most important point you want them to walk away with. And make sure that your message is clear and compelling.

You also need to tailor your presentation to your audience. Who are they and what might they be expecting? Say you’re giving a product pitch to a client. A technical team may be interested in a lot of nitty-gritty product detail. The business side will no doubt be more interested in what returns they can expect on their investment.

Another consideration is the setting: is this a formal presentation to a large audience with questions reserved for the end, or a presentation in a smaller setting where there’s the possibility for conversation throughout? Is your presentation virtual or in-person? To be delivered individually or as a group? What time of the day will you be speaking? Will there be others speaking before you and might that impact how your message will be received?

Once these fundamentals are established, you’re in building mode. What are the specific points you want to share that will help you best meet your objective and get across your core message? Now figure out how to convey those points in the clearest, most straightforward, and succinct way. This doesn’t mean that your presentation has to be a series of clipped bullet points. No one wants to sit through a presentation in which the presenter reads through what’s on the slide. You can get your points across using stories, fact, diagrams, videos, props, and other types of media.

Visual design matters While you don’t want to clutter up your presentation with too many visual elements that don’t serve your objective and can be distracting, using a variety of visual formats to convey your core message will make your presentation more memorable than slides filled with text. A couple of tips: avoid images that are cliched and overdone. Be careful not to mix up too many different types of images. If you’re using photos, stick with photos. If you’re using drawn images, keep the style consistent. When data are presented, stay consistent with colors and fonts from one type of chart to the next. Keep things clear and simple, using data to support key points without overwhelming your audience with too much information. And don’t assume that your audience is composed of statisticians (unless, of course, it is).

When presenting qualitative data, brief videos provide a way to engage your audience and create emotional connection and impact. Word clouds are another way to get qualitative data across.

Practice makes perfect You’ve pulled together a perfect presentation. But it likely won’t be perfect unless it’s well delivered. So don’t forget to practice your presentation ahead of time. Pro tip: record yourself as you practice out loud. This will force you to think through what you’re going to say for each element of your presentation. And watching your recording will help you identify your mistakes—such as fidgeting, using too many fillers (such as “umm,” or “like”), or speaking too fast.

A key element of your preparation should involve anticipating any technical difficulties. If you’ve embedded videos, make sure they work. If you’re presenting virtually, make sure that the lighting is good, and that your speaker and camera are working. Whether presenting in person or virtually, get there early enough to work out any technical glitches before your presentation is scheduled to begin. Few things are a bigger audience turn-off than sitting there watching the presenter struggle with the delivery mechanisms!

Finally, be kind to yourself. Despite thorough preparation and practice, sometimes, things go wrong, and you need to recover in the moment, adapt, and carry on. It’s unlikely that you’ll have caused any lasting damage and the important thing is to learn from your experience, so your next presentation is stronger.

How are you providing presentation skills training for your learners?

Manika Gandhi is Senior Learning Design Manager at Harvard Business Publishing Corporate Learning. Email her at [email protected] .

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Storydoc

27 Presentation Examples That Engage, Motivate & Stick

Browse effective professional business presentation samples & templates. Get great simple presentation examples with perfect design & content beyond PowerPoint.

Author

7 minute read

Presentation examples

helped business professionals at:

Nice

Short answer

What makes a good presentation.

A good presentation deck excels with a clear, engaging narrative, weaving information into a compelling story. It combines concise, relevant content with visually appealing design to ensure simplicity and impact.

Personalizing the story to resonate with the audience's interests also enhances engagement and understanding.

Let’s face it - most slides are not interesting - are yours?

We've all been there—trapped in a never-ending session of mind-numbing slides, with no hope in sight. It's called "Death by PowerPoint," and it's the silent killer of enthusiasm and engagement. But fear not! You're a short way from escaping this bleak fate.

We've curated perfect presentation examples, crafted to captivate and inspire., They will transform your slides from yawn-inducing to jaw-dropping. And they’re all instantly usable as templates.

Prepare to wow your audience, command the room, and leave them begging for more!

What makes a bad presentation?

We've all sat through them, the cringe-worthy presentations that make us want to reach for our phones or run for the hills. But what exactly pushes a presentation from mediocre to downright unbearable? Let's break it down:

Lack of clarity: When the presenter's message is buried in a heap of confusing jargon or irrelevant details, it's hard to stay focused.

Poor visuals: Low-quality or irrelevant images can be distracting and fail to support the main points.

Overloaded slides: Too much text or clutter on a slide is overwhelming and makes it difficult to grasp the key ideas.

Monotonous delivery: A presenter who drones on without variation in tone or pace can quickly put their audience to sleep.

No connection: Failing to engage with the audience or tailor the presentation to their needs creates a disconnect that stifles interest.

What makes an exceptional presentation?

A clear structure set within a story or narrative: Humans think in stories. We relate to stories and we remember stories, it’s in our genes. A message without a story is like a cart full of goods with no wheels.

Priority and hierarchy of information: Attention is limited, you won’t have your audience forever, 32% of readers bounce in the first 15 seconds and most don’t make it past the 3rd slide. Make your first words count. They will determine whether your audience sticks around to hear the rest.

Interactive content: Like 99% of us, you’ve learned that presentation = PowerPoint. But that’s the past, my friend. PowerPoint is inherently static, and while static slides can be really beautiful, they are all too often really boring. Interactive slides get the readers involved in the presentation which makes it much more enjoyable.

Wanna see the actual difference between static and interactive slides? Here’s an example. Which one would you lean into?

Static PPT example

Get started with business presentation templates

We have quite a few presentation examples to show you further down the page (all of them creative and inspiring), but if you’re itching to start creating your first interactive presentation I don’t blame you.

You can grab a presentation template that you like right here, right now and get started on your best presentation yet, or you can check out our perfect presentation examples and get back to your template later…

Business presentations by type and use

The arena of business presentations is deep and wide. You can easily get lost in it. But let us be your guide in the business document jungle.

Below is a quick bird’s eye view of the main presentation types, what each type is used for, where it’s situated in the marketing and sales funnel, and how you should measure it.

Let's dive right in.

Perfect presentation examples to inspire you

Feeling ready to unleash your presentation skills? Hold on to your socks, because we've got a lineup of battle-tasted business presentation samples that'll knock ’em right off!

From cutting-edge design to irresistible storytelling, these effective business presentations exemplify best practices and are primed to drive results.

See exceptional presentations by type:

Report presentations

Effective report presentations distil complex data into clear insights, essential for informed decision-making in business or research. The key lies in making data approachable and actionable for your audience.

Meta interactive corporate report

SNC DeserTech long-form report

Business report

Pitch deck presentations

Pitch deck presentations are your storytelling canvas to captivate investors, blending inspiring ideas with solid data. It's essential to create a narrative that showcases potential and practicality in equal measure.

Cannasoft investment pitch deck

Y Combinator pitch deck

Investor pitch deck

One-pager presentations are a masterclass in brevity, offering a snapshot of your product or idea. This concise format is designed to spark interest and invite deeper engagement.

Yotpo SaaS product one-pager

Octopai outbound sales one-pager

Startup one-pager

Sales deck presentations

Serving as a persuasive tool to convert prospects into customers, sales deck presentations emphasize product benefits and solutions. The goal is to connect with your audience's needs and present a compelling solution.

ScaleHub sales deck

Deliveright logistics sales deck

AI sales deck

Product marketing presentations

Product marketing presentations are a strategic showcase, introducing a new product or feature to the market with a focus on its unique value proposition. It's not just about listing features; it's about weaving a narrative that connects these features to real customer needs and desires.

Mayku physical product deck

Matics digital product brochure

Modern product launch

Business proposal presentations

At the heart of closing deals, business proposal presentations combine persuasive argumentation with clear data. Articulating the unique value proposition and the mutual benefits of the proposal is key.

WiseStamp personalized proposal deck

RFKeeper retail proposal deck

General business proposal

White papers

White paper presentations are an authoritative deep dive into a specific problem and its solution. Providing well-researched, informative content educates and influences your audience, showcasing your expertise.

Drive automotive research white paper

Executive white paper

Business white paper

Case studies

Case study presentations use real-world success stories as a storytelling tool. Building trust by showcasing how your product or service effectively solved a client's problem is their primary function.

Boom25 interactive case study deck

Light mode case study

Business case study

Business plan presentations

Business plan presentations lay out your strategic roadmap, crucial for securing funding or internal buy-in. Clearly articulating your vision, strategy, and the practical steps for success is vital for a successful deck.

Start-up business plan

Business plan one-pager

Light mode business plan

Best presentation content examples

The secret sauce for a business presentation that leaves a lasting impression lies in delivering your content within a story framework.

3 presentation content examples that captivate and inspire the audience:

1. Inspirational story:

An emotional, relatable story can move hearts and change minds. Share a personal anecdote, a customer success story, or an account of overcoming adversity to create a deep connection with your audience.

Remember, vulnerability and authenticity can be your greatest assets.

2. Mystery - Gap theory:

Keep your audience on the edge of their seats by building suspense through the gap theory. Start by presenting a problem, a puzzle, or a question that leaves them craving the answer. Gradually reveal the solution, creating anticipation and excitement as you guide them through the resolution.

3. The Hero's Journey:

Transform your presentation into an epic adventure by incorporating the classic hero's journey narrative.

Introduce a "hero" (your audience), and introduce yourself or your company as a “guide” that will take them on a transformative journey filled with challenges, lessons, and triumphs.

This powerful storytelling structure helps your audience relate to your message and stay engaged from start to finish.

Here’s a great video on how to structure an effective sales story:

How to structure a

Best presentation document formats

Selecting the right format for your business presentation plays a huge part in getting or losing engagement. Let's explore popular presentation document formats, each with its own unique advantages and disadvantages.

PowerPoint : Microsoft's PowerPoint is a tried-and-true classic, offering a wide array of design options and features for crafting visually appealing static presentations.

Google Slides : For seamless collaboration and real-time editing, Google Slides is the go-to choice. This cloud-based platform allows you to create static presentations that are accessible from anywhere.

Keynote : Apple's Keynote offers a sleek, user-friendly interface and stunning design templates, making it a popular choice for crafting polished static presentations on Mac devices.

PDF: PDF is ideal for sharing static presentations that preserve their original layout, design, and fonts across different devices and operating systems.

Prezi : Break free from traditional slide-based presentations with Prezi's dynamic, zoomable canvas. Prezi allows you to create interactive decks, but it follows a non-chronological presentation format, so it may take some time to get the hang of it.

Storydoc : Elevate your presentations with Storydoc's interactive, web-based format. Transform your static content into immersive, visually rich experiences that captivate and inspire your audience.

Best tool to create a perfect presentation

There are countless presentation software options. From legacy tools like PowerPoint or Google Slides to more modern design tools such as Pitch or Canva.

If you want to create pretty presentations any of these tools would do just fine. But if you want to create unforgettable, interactive experiences , you may want to consider using the Storydoc interactive presentation maker instead.

Storydoc specializes in storytelling. You get special storytelling slides built to help you weave your content into a compelling narrative.

You can do better than “pretty” - you can make a presentation that engages, motivates and sticks.

Storydoc presentation make

Hi, I'm Dominika, Content Specialist at Storydoc. As a creative professional with experience in fashion, I'm here to show you how to amplify your brand message through the power of storytelling and eye-catching visuals.

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Blog > Tips for good PowerPoint Presentations

Tips for good PowerPoint Presentations

08.14.21   •  #powerpoint #tips.

If you know how to do it, it's actually not that difficult to create and give a good presentation.

That's why we have some examples of good PowerPoint presentations for you and tips that are going to make your next presentation a complete success.

1. Speak freely

One of the most important points in good presentations is to speak freely. Prepare your presentation so well that you can speak freely and rarely, if ever, need to look at your notes. The goal is to connect with your audience and get them excited about your topic. If you speak freely, this is much easier than if you just read your text out. You want your audience to feel engaged in your talk. Involve them and tell your text in a vivid way.

2. Familiarize yourself with the technology

In order to be able to speak freely, it is important to prepare the text well and to engage with the topic in detail.

However, it is at least as important to familiarize yourself with the location’s technology before your presentation and to start your PowerPoint there as well. It is annoying if technical problems suddenly occur during your presentation, as this interrupts your flow of speech and distracts the audience from the topic. Avoid this by checking everything before you start your talk and eliminate any technical problems so that you can give your presentation undisturbed.

  • Don't forget the charging cable for your laptop
  • Find out beforehand how you can connect your laptop to the beamer. Find out which connection the beamer has and which connection your laptop has. To be on the safe side, take an adapter with you.
  • Always have backups of your presentation. Save them on a USB stick and preferably also online in a cloud.
  • Take a second laptop and maybe even your own small projector for emergencies. Even if it's not the latest model and the quality is not that good: better bad quality than no presentation at all.

3. Get the attention of your audience

Especially in long presentations it is often difficult to keep the attention of your audience. It is important to make your presentation interesting and to actively involve the audience. Try to make your topic as exciting as possible and captivate your audience.

Our tip: Include interactive polls or quizzes in your presentation to involve your audience and increase their attention. With the help of SlideLizard, you can ask questions in PowerPoint and your audience can easily vote on their own smartphone. Plus, you can even get anonymous feedback at the end, so you know right away what you can improve next time.

Here we have also summarized further tips for you on how to increase audience engagement.

Polling tool from SlideLizard to hold your audience's attention

4. Hold eye contact

You want your audience to feel engaged in your presentation, so it is very important to hold eye contact. Avoid staring only at a part of the wall or at your paper. Speak to your audience, involve them in your presentation and make it more exciting.

But also make sure you don't always look at the same two or three people, but address everyone. If the audience is large, it is often difficult to include everyone, but still try to let your eyes wander a little between your listeners and look into every corner of the room.

5. Speaking coherently

In a good presentation it is important to avoid jumping from one topic to the next and back again shortly afterwards. Otherwise your audience will not be able to follow you after a while and their thoughts will wander. To prevent this, it is important that your presentation has a good structure and that you work through one topic after the other.

Nervousness can cause even the best to mumble or talk too fast in order to get the presentation over with as quickly as possible. Try to avoid this by taking short pauses to collect yourself, to breathe and to remind yourself to speak slowly.

6. Matching colors

An attractive design of your PowerPoint is also an important point for giving good presentations. Make sure that your slides are not too colorful. A PowerPoint in which all kinds of colors are combined with each other does not look professional, but rather suitable for a children's birthday party.

Think about a rough color palette in advance, which you can then use in your presentation. Colors such as orange or neon green do not look so good in your PowerPoint. Use colors specifically to emphasize important information.

To create good PowerPoint slides it is also essential to choose colors that help the text to read well. You should have as much contrast as possible between the font and the background. Black writing on a white background is always easy to read, while yellow writing on a white background is probably hard to read.

Using colours correctly in PowerPoint to create good presentations

7. Slide design should not be too minimalistic

Even though it is often said that "less is more", you should not be too minimalistic in the design of your presentation. A presentation where your slides are blank and only black text on a white background is likely to go down just as badly as if you use too many colors.

Empty presentations are boring and don't really help to capture the attention of your audience. It also looks like you are too lazy to care about the design of your presentation and that you have not put any effort into the preparation. Your PowerPoint doesn't have to be overflowing with colors, animations and images to make it look interesting. Make it simple, but also professional.

avoid too minimalistic design for good presentation slides

8. Write only key points on the slides

If you want to create a good presentation, it is important to remember that your slides should never be overcrowded. Write only the most important key points on your slides and never entire sentences. Your audience should not be able to read the exact text you are speaking in your PowerPoint. This is rather annoying and leads to being bored quickly. Summarize the most important things that your audience should remember and write them down in short bullet points on your presentation. Then go into the key points in more detail in your speech and explain more about them.

Avoid too much text on your presentation slides

9. Do not overdo it with animations

Do never use too many animations. It looks messy, confusing and definitely not professional if every text and image is displayed with a different animation. Just leave out animations at all or if you really want to use them then use them only very rarely when you want to draw attention to something specific. Make sure that if you use animations, they are consistent. If you use transitions between the individual slides, these should also always be kept consistent and simple.

10. Use images

Pictures and graphics in presentations are always a good idea to illustrate something and to add some variety. They help keep your audience's attention and make it easier to remember important information. But don't overdo it with them. Too many pictures can distract from your presentation and look messy. Make sure the graphics also fit the content and, if you have used several images on one slide, ask yourself if you really need all of them.

example of good PowerPoint slide with image

11. Choose a suitable font

Never combine too many fonts so that your presentation does not look messy. Use at most two: one for headings and one for text. When choosing fonts, you should also make sure that they are still legible at long distances. Script, italic and decorative fonts are very slow to read, which is why they should be avoided in presentations.

It is not so easy to choose the right font. Therefore, we have summarized for you how to find the best font for your PowerPoint presentation.

How you should not use fonts in PowerPoint

12. Do not use images as background

In a good presentation it is important to be able to read the text on the slides easily and quickly. Therefore, do not use images as slide backgrounds if there is also text on them. The picture only distracts from the text and it is difficult to read it because there is not much contrast with the background. It is also harder to see the image because the text in the foreground is distracting. The whole thing looks messy and distracting rather than informative and clear.

Do not use images as a background in good PowerPoint slides

13. Never read out the text from your slides

Never just read the exact text from your slides. Your audience can read for themselves, so they will only get bored and in the worst case it will lead to "Death by PowerPoint". You may also give them the feeling that you think they are not able to read for themselves. In addition, you should avoid whole sentences on your slides anyway. List key points that your audience can read along. Then go into more detail and explain more about them.

14. Don't turn your back

Never turn around during your presentation to look at your projected PowerPoint. Not to read from your slides, but also not to make sure the next slide is already displayed. It looks unprofessional and only distracts your audience.

In PowerPoint's Speaker View, you can always see which slide is currently being displayed and which one is coming next. Use this to make sure the order fits. You can even take notes in PowerPoint, which are then displayed during your presentation. You can read all about notes in PowerPoint here.

excellent presentation with

15. Do not forget about the time

In a good presentation, it is important to always be aware of the given time and to stick to it. It is annoying when your presentation takes much longer than actually planned and your audience is just waiting for you to stop talking or you are not able to finish your presentation at all. It is just as awkward if your presentation is too short. You have already told everything about your topic, but you should actually talk for at least another ten minutes.

Practice your presentation often enough at home. Talk through your text and time yourself as you go. Then adjust the length so that you can keep to the time given on the day of your presentation.

timer yourself to know how long your presentation takes

16. Avoid a complicated structure

The structure of a good presentation should not be complicated. Your audience should be able to follow you easily and remember the essential information by the end. When you have finished a part, briefly summarize and repeat the main points before moving on to the next topic. Mention important information more than once to make sure it really gets across to your audience.

However, if the whole thing gets too complicated, it can be easy for your audience to disengage after a while and not take away much new information from your presentation.

17. Choose appropriate clothes

On the day of your presentation, be sure to choose appropriate clothing. Your appearance should be formal, so avoid casual clothes and stick to professional dress codes. When choosing your clothes, also make sure that they are rather unobtrusive. Your audience should focus on your presentation, not on your appearance.

Choose appropriate clothing

18. Adapt your presentation to your audience

Think about who your audience is and adapt your presentation to them. Find out how much they already know about the topic, what they want to learn about it and why they are here in the first place. If you only talk about things your audience already knows, they will get bored pretty soon, but if you throw around a lot of technical terms when your audience has hardly dealt with the topic at all, they will also have a hard time following you. So to give a successful and good presentation, it is important to adapt it to your audience.

You can also ask a few questions at the beginning of your presentation to learn more about your audience and then adapt your presentation. With SlideLizard , you can integrate polls directly into your PowerPoint and participants can then easily answer anonymously from their smartphone.

19. Mention only the most important information

Keep it short and limit yourself to the essentials. The more facts and information you present to your audience, the less they will remember.

Also be sure to leave out information that does not fit the topic or is not relevant. You will only distract from the actual topic and lose the attention of your audience. The time your audience can concentrate and listen with attention is rather short anyway, so don't waste it by telling unimportant information.

20. Talk about your topic in an exciting way

Tell compelling and exciting stories to make your presentation really good. If you speak in a monotone voice all the time, you are likely to lose the attention of your audience. Make your narration lively and exciting. Also, be careful not to speak too quietly, but not too loudly either. People should be able to understand you well throughout the whole room. Even if it is not easy for many people, try to deliver your speech with confidence. If you are enthusiastic about the topic yourself, it is much easier to get your audience excited about it.

microphone for presentations

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Helena Reitinger

Helena supports the SlideLizard team in marketing and design. She loves to express her creativity in texts and graphics.

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Complete Guide for Effective Presentations, with Examples

July 9, 2018 - Dom Barnard

During a presentation you aim to look confident, enthusiastic and natural. You’ll need more than good words and content to achieve this – your delivery plays a significant part. In this article, we discuss various techniques that can be used to deliver an effective presentation.

Effective presentations

Think about if you were in the audience, what would:

  • Get you to focus and listen
  • Make you understand
  • Activate your imagination
  • Persuade you

Providing the audience with interesting information is not enough to achieve these aims – you need to ensure that the way you present is stimulating and engaging. If it’s not, you’ll lose the audience’s interest and they’ll stop listening.

Tips for an Effective Presentation

Professional public speakers spend hours creating and practicing presentations. These are the delivery techniques they consider:

Keep it simple

You shouldn’t overwhelm your audience with information – ensure that you’re clear, concise and that you get to the point so they can understand your message.

Have a maximum of  three main points  and state them at the beginning, before you explain them in more depth, and then state them at the end so the audience will at least remember these points.

If some of your content doesn’t contribute to your key message then cut it out. Also avoid using too many statistics and technical terminology.

Connect with your audience

One of the greatest difficulties when delivering a presentation is connecting with the audience. If you don’t  connect with them  it will seem as though you’re talking to an empty room.

Trying to make contact with the audience makes them feel like they’re part of the presentation which encourages them to listen and it shows that you want to speak to them.

Asking the audience questions during a presentation

Eye contact and smile

Avoiding eye contact is uncomfortable because it make you look insecure. When you  maintain eye contact  the audience feels like you’re speaking to them personally. If this is something you struggle with, try looking at people’s foreheads as it gives the impression of making eye contact.

Try to cover all sections of the audience and don’t move on to the next person too quickly as you will look nervous.

Smiling also helps with rapport and it reduces your nerves because you’ll feel less like you’re talking to group of faceless people. Make sure you don’t turn the lights down too much before your presentation so you can all clearly see each other.

Body language

Be aware of your body language and use it to connect:

  • Keep your arms uncrossed so your  body language is more open .
  • Match your facial expressions with what you’re saying.
  • Avoid fidgeting and displaying nervous habits, such as, rocking on your feet.
  • You may need to glance at the computer slide or a visual aid but make sure you predominantly face the audience.
  • Emphasise points by using hand gestures but use them sparingly – too little and they’ll awkwardly sit at your side, too much and you’ll be distracting and look nervous.
  • Vary your gestures so you don’t look robotic.
  • Maintain a straight posture.
  • Be aware of  cultural differences .

Move around

Avoid standing behind the lectern or computer because you need to reduce the distance and barriers between yourself and the audience.  Use movement  to increase the audience’s interest and make it easier to follow your presentation.

A common technique for incorporating movement into your presentation is to:

  • Start your introduction by standing in the centre of the stage.
  • For your first point you stand on the left side of the stage.
  • You discuss your second point from the centre again.
  • You stand on the right side of the stage for your third point.
  • The conclusion occurs in the centre.

Watch 3 examples of good and bad movement while presenting

Example: Movement while presenting

Your movement at the front of the class and amongst the listeners can help with engagement. Think about which of these three speakers maintains the attention of their audience for longer, and what they are doing differently to each other.

Speak with the audience

You can conduct polls using your audience or ask questions to make them think and feel invested in your presentation. There are three different types of questions:

Direct questions require an answer: “What would you do in this situation?” These are mentally stimulating for the audience. You can pass a microphone around and let the audience come to your desired solution.

Rhetorical questions  do not require answers, they are often used to emphasises an idea or point: “Is the Pope catholic?

Loaded questions contain an unjustified assumption made to prompt the audience into providing a particular answer which you can then correct to support your point: You may ask “Why does your wonderful company have such a low incidence of mental health problems?” The audience will generally answer that they’re happy.

After receiving the answers you could then say “Actually it’s because people are still unwilling and too embarrassed to seek help for mental health issues at work etc.”

Delivering a presentation in Asia

Be specific with your language

Make the audience feel as though you are speaking to each member individually by using “you” and “your.”

For example: asking “Do you want to lose weight without feeling hungry?” would be more effective than asking “Does anyone here want to lost weight without feeling hungry?” when delivering your presentation. You can also increase solidarity by using “we”, “us” etc – it makes the audience think “we’re in this together”.

Be flexible

Be prepared to adapt to the situation at the time, for example, if the audience seems bored you can omit details and go through the material faster, if they are confused then you will need to come up with more examples on the spot for clarification. This doesn’t mean that you weren’t prepared because you can’t predict everything.

Vocal variety

How you say something is just as is important as the content of your speech – arguably, more so.

For example, if an individual presented on a topic very enthusiastically the audience would probably enjoy this compared to someone who covered more points but mumbled into their notes.

  • Adapt your voice  depending on what are you’re saying – if you want to highlight something then raise your voice or lower it for intensity. Communicate emotion by using your voice.
  • Avoid speaking in monotone as you will look uninterested and the audience will lose interest.
  • Take time to pronounce every word carefully.
  • Raise your pitch when asking questions and lower it when you want to sound severe.
  • Sound enthusiastic – the more you sound like you care about the topic, the more the audience will listen. Smiling and pace can help with this.
  • Speak loudly and clearly – think about projecting your voice to the back of the room.
  • Speak at a  pace that’s easy to follow . If you’re too fast or too slow it will be difficult for the audience to understand what you’re saying and it’s also frustrating. Subtly fasten the pace to show enthusiasm and slow down for emphasis, thoughtfulness or caution.

Prior to the presentation, ensure that you  prepare your vocal chords :

  • You could read aloud a book that requires vocal variety, such as, a children’s book.
  • Avoid dairy and eating or drinking anything too sugary beforehand as mucus can build-up leading to frequent throat clearing.
  • Don’t drink anything too cold before you present as this can constrict your throat which affects vocal quality.
  • Some people suggest a warm cup of tea beforehand to relax the throat.

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Pause to breathe

When you’re anxious your breathing will become quick and shallow which will affect the control you have on your voice. This can consequently make you feel more nervous. You want to breathe steadily and deeply so before you start speaking take some deep breaths or implement controlled breathing.

Controlled breathing is a common technique that helps slow down your breathing to normal thus reducing your anxiety. If you think this may be useful practice with these steps:

  • Sit down in an upright position as it easier for your lungs to fill with air
  • Breathe in through your nose and into your abdomen for four seconds
  • Hold this breathe for two seconds
  • Breathe out through your nose for six seconds
  • Wait a few seconds before inhaling and repeating the cycle

It takes practice to master this technique but once you get used to it you may want to implement it directly before your presentation.

Take a deep breath when delivering a presentation

Completely filling your lungs during a pause will ensure you reach a greater vocal range.

During the presentation delivery, if you notice that you’re speaking too quickly then pause and breathe. This won’t look strange – it will appear as though you’re giving thought to what you’re saying. You can also strategically plan some of your pauses, such as after questions and at the end of sections, because this will give you a chance to calm down and it will also give the audience an opportunity to think and reflect.

Pausing will also help you  avoid filler words , such as, “um” as well which can make you sound unsure.

  • 10 Effective Ways to use Pauses in your Speech

Strong opening

The first five minutes are  vital to engage the audience  and get them listening to you. You could start with a story to highlight why your topic is significant.

For example, if the topic is on the benefits of pets on physical and psychological health, you could present a story or a study about an individual whose quality of life significantly improved after being given a dog. The audience is more likely to respond better to this and remember this story than a list of facts.

Example: Which presentation intro keeps you engaged?

Watch 5 different presentation introductions, from both virtual and in-person events. Notice how it can only take a few seconds to decide if you want to keep listening or switch off. For the good introductions, what about them keeps you engaged?

More experienced and confident public speakers use humour in their presentations. The audience will be incredibly engaged if you make them laugh but caution must be exercised when using humour because a joke can be misinterpreted and even offend the audience.

Only use jokes if you’re confident with this technique, it has been successful in the past and it’s suitable for the situation.

Stories and anecdotes

Use stories whenever you can and judge whether you can tell a story about yourself because the audience are even more interested in seeing the human side of you.

Consider telling a story about a mistake you made, for example, perhaps you froze up during an important presentation when you were 25, or maybe life wasn’t going well for you in the past – if relevant to your presentation’s aim. People will relate to this as we have all experienced mistakes and failures. The more the audience relates to you, the more likely they will remain engaged.

These stories can also be  told in a humorous way  if it makes you feel more comfortable and because you’re disclosing a personal story there is less chance of misinterpretation compared to telling a joke.

Anecdotes are especially valuable for your introduction and between different sections of the presentation because they engage the audience. Ensure that you plan the stories thoroughly beforehand and that they are not too long.

Focus on the audience’s needs

Even though your aim is to persuade the audience, they must also get something helpful from the presentation. Provide the audience with value by giving them useful information, tactics, tips etc. They’re more likely to warm to you and trust you if you’re sharing valuable information with them.

You could also highlight their pain point. For example, you might ask “Have you found it difficult to stick to a healthy diet?” The audience will now want to remain engaged because they want to know the solution and the opportunities that you’re offering.

Use visual aids

Visual aids are items of a visual manner, such as graphs, photographs, video clips etc used in addition to spoken information. Visual aids are chosen depending on their purpose, for example, you may want to:

  • Summarise information.
  • Reduce the amount of spoken words, for example, you may show a graph of your results rather than reading them out.
  • Clarify and show examples.
  • Create more of an impact. You must consider what type of impact you want to make beforehand – do you want the audience to be sad, happy, angry etc?
  • Emphasise what you’re saying.
  • Make a point memorable.
  • Enhance your credibility.
  • Engage the audience and maintain their interest.
  • Make something easier for the audience to understand.

Visual aids being used during a presentation

Some general tips for  using visual aids :

  • Think about how can a visual aid can support your message. What do you want the audience to do?
  • Ensure that your visual aid follows what you’re saying or this will confuse the audience.
  • Avoid cluttering the image as it may look messy and unclear.
  • Visual aids must be clear, concise and of a high quality.
  • Keep the style consistent, such as, the same font, colours, positions etc
  • Use graphs and charts to present data.
  • The audience should not be trying to read and listen at the same time – use visual aids to highlight your points.
  • One message per visual aid, for example, on a slide there should only be one key point.
  • Use visual aids in moderation – they are additions meant to emphasise and support main points.
  • Ensure that your presentation still works without your visual aids in case of technical problems.

10-20-30 slideshow rule

Slideshows are widely used for presentations because it’s easy to create attractive and professional presentations using them. Guy Kawasaki, an entrepreneur and author, suggests that slideshows should  follow a 10-20-30 rule :

  • There should be a maximum of 10 slides – people rarely remember more than one concept afterwards so there’s no point overwhelming them with unnecessary information.
  • The presentation should last no longer than 20 minutes as this will leave time for questions and discussion.
  • The font size should be a minimum of 30pt because the audience reads faster than you talk so less information on the slides means that there is less chance of the audience being distracted.

If you want to give the audience more information you can provide them with partially completed handouts or give them the handouts after you’ve delivered the presentation.

Keep a drink nearby

Have something to drink when you’re on stage, preferably water at room temperature. This will help maintain your vocal quality and having a sip is a subtle way of introducing pauses.

Practice, practice, practice

If you are very familiar with the content of your presentation, your audience will perceive you as confident and you’ll be more persuasive.

  • Don’t just read the presentation through – practice everything,  including your transitions  and using your visual aids.
  • Stand up and speak it aloud, in an engaging manner, as though you were presenting to an audience.
  • Ensure that you practice your body language and gesturing.
  • Use VR to  practice in a realistic environment .
  • Practice in front of others and get their feedback.
  • Freely improvise so you’ll sound more natural on the day. Don’t learn your presentation verbatim because you will sound uninterested and if you lose focus then you may forget everything.
  • Create cards to use as cues – one card should be used for one key idea. Write down brief notes or key words and ensure that the cards are physically connected so the order cannot be lost. Visual prompts can also be used as cues.

This video shows how you can practice presentations in virtual reality. See our  VR training courses .

Two courses where you can practice your presentations in interactive exercises:

  • Essential Public Speaking
  • How to Present over Video

Try these different presentation delivery methods to see which ones you prefer and which need to be improved. The most important factor is to feel comfortable during the presentation as the delivery is likely to be better.

Remember that the audience are generally on your side – they want you to do well so present with confidence.

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Top Tips for Effective Presentations

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  • What is a Presentation?
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  • Managing your Presentation Notes
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How can you make a good presentation even more effective?

This page draws on published advice from expert presenters around the world, which will help to take your presentations from merely ‘good’ to ‘great’.

By bringing together advice from a wide range of people, the aim is to cover a whole range of areas.

Whether you are an experienced presenter, or just starting out, there should be ideas here to help you to improve.

1. Show your Passion and Connect with your Audience

It’s hard to be relaxed and be yourself when you’re nervous.

But time and again, the great presenters say that the most important thing is to connect with your audience, and the best way to do that is to let your passion for the subject shine through.

Be honest with the audience about what is important to you and why it matters.

Be enthusiastic and honest, and the audience will respond.

2. Focus on your Audience’s Needs

Your presentation needs to be built around what your audience is going to get out of the presentation.

As you prepare the presentation, you always need to bear in mind what the audience needs and wants to know, not what you can tell them.

While you’re giving the presentation, you also need to remain focused on your audience’s response, and react to that.

You need to make it easy for your audience to understand and respond.

3. Keep it Simple: Concentrate on your Core Message

When planning your presentation, you should always keep in mind the question:

What is the key message (or three key points) for my audience to take away?

You should be able to communicate that key message very briefly.

Some experts recommend a 30-second ‘elevator summary’, others that you can write it on the back of a business card, or say it in no more than 15 words.

Whichever rule you choose, the important thing is to keep your core message focused and brief.

And if what you are planning to say doesn’t contribute to that core message, don’t say it.

4. Smile and Make Eye Contact with your Audience

This sounds very easy, but a surprisingly large number of presenters fail to do it.

If you smile and make eye contact, you are building rapport , which helps the audience to connect with you and your subject. It also helps you to feel less nervous, because you are talking to individuals, not to a great mass of unknown people.

To help you with this, make sure that you don’t turn down all the lights so that only the slide screen is visible. Your audience needs to see you as well as your slides.

5. Start Strongly

The beginning of your presentation is crucial. You need to grab your audience’s attention and hold it.

They will give you a few minutes’ grace in which to entertain them, before they start to switch off if you’re dull. So don’t waste that on explaining who you are. Start by entertaining them.

Try a story (see tip 7 below), or an attention-grabbing (but useful) image on a slide.

6. Remember the 10-20-30 Rule for Slideshows

This is a tip from Guy Kawasaki of Apple. He suggests that slideshows should:

  • Contain no more than 10 slides;
  • Last no more than 20 minutes; and
  • Use a font size of no less than 30 point.

This last is particularly important as it stops you trying to put too much information on any one slide. This whole approach avoids the dreaded ‘Death by PowerPoint’.

As a general rule, slides should be the sideshow to you, the presenter. A good set of slides should be no use without the presenter, and they should definitely contain less, rather than more, information, expressed simply.

If you need to provide more information, create a bespoke handout and give it out after your presentation.

7. Tell Stories

Human beings are programmed to respond to stories.

Stories help us to pay attention, and also to remember things. If you can use stories in your presentation, your audience is more likely to engage and to remember your points afterwards. It is a good idea to start with a story, but there is a wider point too: you need your presentation to act like a story.

Think about what story you are trying to tell your audience, and create your presentation to tell it.

Finding The Story Behind Your Presentation

To effectively tell a story, focus on using at least one of the two most basic storytelling mechanics in your presentation:

Focusing On Characters – People have stories; things, data, and objects do not. So ask yourself “who” is directly involved in your topic that you can use as the focal point of your story.

For example, instead of talking about cars (your company’s products), you could focus on specific characters like:

  • The drivers the car is intended for – people looking for speed and adventure
  • The engineers who went out of their way to design the most cost-effective car imaginable

A Changing Dynamic – A story needs something to change along the way. So ask yourself “What is not as it should be?” and answer with what you are going to do about it (or what you did about it).

For example…

  • Did hazardous road conditions inspire you to build a rugged, all-terrain jeep that any family could afford?
  • Did a complicated and confusing food labelling system lead you to establish a colour-coded nutritional index so that anybody could easily understand it?

To see 15 more actionable storytelling tips, see Nuts & Bolts Speed Training’s post on Storytelling Tips .

8. Use your Voice Effectively

The spoken word is actually a pretty inefficient means of communication, because it uses only one of your audience’s five senses. That’s why presenters tend to use visual aids, too. But you can help to make the spoken word better by using your voice effectively.

Varying the speed at which you talk, and emphasising changes in pitch and tone all help to make your voice more interesting and hold your audience’s attention.

For more about this, see our page on Effective Speaking .

9. Use your Body Too

It has been estimated that more than three quarters of communication is non-verbal.

That means that as well as your tone of voice, your body language is crucial to getting your message across. Make sure that you are giving the right messages: body language to avoid includes crossed arms, hands held behind your back or in your pockets, and pacing the stage.

Make your gestures open and confident, and move naturally around the stage, and among the audience too, if possible.

10. Relax, Breathe and Enjoy

If you find presenting difficult, it can be hard to be calm and relaxed about doing it.

One option is to start by concentrating on your breathing. Slow it down, and make sure that you’re breathing fully. Make sure that you continue to pause for breath occasionally during your presentation too.

For more ideas, see our page on Coping with Presentation Nerves .

If you can bring yourself to relax, you will almost certainly present better. If you can actually start to enjoy yourself, your audience will respond to that, and engage better. Your presentations will improve exponentially, and so will your confidence. It’s well worth a try.

Improve your Presentation Skills

Follow our guide to boost your presentation skills learning about preparation, delivery, questions and all other aspects of giving effective presentations.

Start with: What is a Presentation?

Continue to: How to Give a Speech Self Presentation

See also: Five Ways You Can Do Visual Marketing on a Budget Can Presentation Science Improve Your Presentation? Typography – It’s All About the Message in Your Slides

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Elements of a Great Presentation

The 10 Key Elements of a Great Presentation Explained

Whether we’re at a team meeting or making a presentation for an audience, we all have to speak in public once in a while. 

We can do it well, or we can do it badly, but one thing is sure: the result will affect what other people will think about us.

That’s why public speaking causes so much anxiety and worry; the good news is that with preparation, practice, and other techniques, you will overcome your nervousness and perform exceptionally well! In this article, you will learn which elements make an excellent presentation.

The 10 Key Elements of a Great Presentation

The question that arises then is…

The 10 key elements of a GREAT presentation a 1. PREPARATION AND PLANNING 

Before getting into a strong presentation opening, the overall delivery techniques to keep the audience engaged and so on, we have got to talk about Planning. In order for a Great presentation to come to be, there needs to be serious planning for it (like many things in life).  

Unless, of course, you’re making an impromptu speech , then that is a different story, and you can learn more about how to successfully deliver those here .

What are the key aspects of Planning a Great Presentation?

  • Get to know Your Audience
  • Select a Relatable Topic
  • Plan the Delivery from Beginning to the End
  • Write down a simple speech outline
  • Get some interesting Quotes and Stories ready
  • Rehearse and Rehearse some more!
  • Finish under 10% below the Real Presentation allotted time
  • Familiarize with the venue
  • Arrive early and test all the tech before starting the delivery

2. THE DEBUT AND OPENING

A successful entry will give you energy, a good connection with the audience, and establish your presence on stage.

Most presentations are often determined by the quality of how they begin; hardly an audience will be interested in what you have to say if a negative image is already created in their head.

Start big and make your mark! Before entering the stage, you will be backstage, seated in the back of the stage or at the foot of it.

As soon as your turn arrives, enter the stage by walking with a determined step, neither too soft nor too fast, make eye contact with the audience as soon as possible ( keep on reading, and we will explain to you why this is crucial ).

To deliver the presentation, we advise you to move to the center of the stage, take your support and count to three before you start talking.

3. SHARE VALUABLE INFORMATION

To prepare your presentation, make a list of some ideas; they must be in a few words and be logically linked: it is the structure of your outline that you must know by heart.

Each of these points must be simple enough to be dealt with in less than ten minutes; too long a development would make you lose attention.

When you hold your structure, you can work on transitions. These are key moments where you release the audience and mobilize their attention again for the next part.

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4. PRESENTATION STYLE

There are many ways to tell your story. Some people, primarily if they are not used to speaking in public, prefer to write a text and read it aloud; others prefer to make a list of things they want to talk about.

Finally, some people who speak in public do not need notes to make their presentations. 

Choose the style that suits you best, and you will probably notice that your presentation style will change over time or depending on the audience you are speaking to.

If you want to learn more, we have an interesting piece on the different methods of speech delivery . Check it out, it should prove helpful in deciding your approach.

5. GOOD ARTICULATION OF IDEAS

Being an excellent speaker requires having some degree of knowledge of the topic of discussion, it is not helpful to not have anything to say; this is why we always advise starting by identifying the key message.

Be aware of the words you use and make sure they are appropriate for your audience. For example, if you talk to young people, use words they understand.

Use terms that will attract their attention based on their interests; whatever you say, be yourself, and don’t use slang or jargon if you don’t know the meaning. 

6. ENGAGE THE AUDIENCE WITH COMPELLING STORYTELLING 

Telling a story is much catchier and can be very visual and engaging to the audience when it comes to delivering the message and engaging the audience.

There are several ways to do this, but none draws so much attention to the public and creates future memories, such as using a good story. 

Inserting experiences, facts, and anecdotes will make the whole thing more personal, appeal to each listener, and make it easier to remember your message more.

According to the book “Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive, and Others Die,” in a speech, only one in ten students counts one.

It is curious to note that after the end of the speech, about 63% of the public say they remember the stories told. It seems so obvious this is a great way to create an impactful presentation.

7. CONTENT OF THE PRESENTATION 

Be sure to highlight the three key ideas you want to share; these ideas will be the thread of your presentation and will prevent you from getting lost along the way.

The simpler and clearer they are, the better. The same goes for the visual support, and we hope it is user-friendly without it becoming a distraction to what you have to say. Less is more; that is the rule.

In video conferencing, the same approach applies; opt for a simple presentation, with moments for your audience to ask questions. 

If you need to submit complex charts, you can also send them in advance to avoid losing your audience’s attention.

8. VISUAL CONTACT

One of the most common mistakes is to address everyone as a group; the best way to hook an audience is to look at people individually and face-to-face, and spend 3-5 seconds talking to each one of them, as you shift to a different sentence or idea.

If you have a videoconference, choose to look at the virtual eyes and try to look at the camera rather than yourself; this way, you will not give the impression of looking elsewhere.

If it intimidates you, we look for an open and benevolent gaze in the audience to which we can return whenever the nervousness takes over.

In a video conference, you can hang a picture of a person you are comfortable with above your camera and pretend to present it to that person to look in the right place. Although, some people may see through this trick.

9. BODY LANGUAGE 

A good body language also is natural, open, and expressive. Natural, because it corresponds to your style. If you are rather expansive, you can make significant and many gestures.

Each gesture has a meaning, so if you try to adapt some motion that doesn’t correspond to your natural communication style, it can be noticed, and everything may seem forced.

We will explain how to practice the gestures, but before that, let us list some gestures to avoid:

  • Putting one or two hands in the pockets gives an impression of disregard, of flippancy;
  • Contrary to a common myth, keeping your arms crossed does not mean that you have a closed attitude; it is usually just a comfortable position and may sound a bit informal.
  • Having the arms behind the back this is a position indicating a certain discomfort on the part of the speaker;
  • Finger-pointing (regardless of a finger): This is a gesture that is considered coarse or inappropriate in many cultures;
  • If you want to show a direction, it is better to do it by extending the whole hand, using an image, or verbally.

10. STRESS MANAGEMENT (Keeping Fear in Check) 

Fortunately, there are different methods to manage this stress; we are all different, and what works for one person does not necessarily work for another. 

For example, some people will use meditation to relax before delivering a presentation, or in other situations, they get anxious or nervous. In contrast, for others, it will only increase their stress.

However, fundamentally, the root causes are almost the same for everyone:

A. The fear of facing judgment and the eyes of the public, this fear can also derive from fear of failure;

B. The fear of the unknown, the impossibility of controlling the future, generates anguish of sometimes unbearable waiting.

To combat these two causes, there are many methods. I will list a few here:

  • Repeat to yourself the content until you know you know it. Lack of preparation is one of the significant causes of stress and one of the reasons why people choose reading notes;
  • Stay in the present moment by counting each time you inhale and exhale to avoid building disaster scenarios or worrying about the future;
  • Treat the content like a casual conversation you will relate your friends in so it will be easier for you to remember without anxiety because it’s familiar.
  • Do not assume that you don’t know enough, teach what you know, and endeavor to keep learning about what you don’t know. One sentence of what you know today could very well change the life of one or more people in your audience.

9 Basic Elements of a Great Persuasive Speech

9 Basic Elements of a Great Persuasive Speech

As human beings, we commonly face debates, sales pitch, or even casual conversations, where we discuss with an audience (that can be familiar or not) about a subject that we want to convince, to think in a similar or same perspective that we do. If we are playing the speaker role, we need to bring…

11 Best Body Language Tips For Engaging Presentations (#11 is Underrated)

11 Best Body Language Tips For Engaging Presentations (#11 is Underrated)

Growing up, we were always taught how we should have manners while talking to others and that there were some things we could not do in front of people like sprawling or even putting our elbows on the table while eating because it was rude. In the examples above, the rudeness comes from gestures, not…

The 7 Basic Elements of Public Speaking

The 7 Basic Elements of Public Speaking

Remember that time you had to present a topic in front of a crowd? Probably it was a proposal at work or an oral report in grade school. You took the time to prepare and gather materials, after which you climbed the podium and started talking. There are seven basic elements of public speaking that…

Conclusion 

Public speaking is an area where we progress with each experience; your presentation will never be perfect, especially if it is the first one. Embrace it and be authentic.

Reference and Further Reading

AcethePresentation. 7 Basic Elements of Public Speaking.

AcethePresentation. How to Stand Out In a Presentation.

Inc. 6 Key Elements of a Great Presentation.

Seawater Foundation. 9 Elements of Great Presentations.

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17 PowerPoint Presentation Examples That Show Style and Professionalism

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By Iveta Pavlova

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17 PowerPoint Presentation Examples That Show Style and Professionalism

There are way too many bad PowerPoint presentation examples that can bore you to death. Well, today’s post is not about them. We believe that it’s always important to show the good examples out there and follow their lead. We admit it, it was pretty hard to dig out the good PowerPoint presentation examples from the mass. We’ve added our opinion on each piece and why we believe it’s worthy of being included in this collection. Let’s begin!

You may be interested in  The Best Free PowerPoint Templates to Download in 2022

1. The Sketchnote Mini-Workshop by Mike Rohde

An eye-catchy PowerPoint presentation example whose content is fully hand-written. What we love about this design, is the high personalization level that is achieved via handwriting. It almost feels like the author is drawing and writing in front of the viewers’ eyes. A digital presentation that conveys a physical feeling.

2. 10 Ways to Spread The Love in The Office by Elodie A.

The following presentation is a real eye candy. We can’t help it, the cartoon style lives in our hearts. An incredibly appealing PowerPoint presentation that brings positive vibes and a good mood through vibrant cartoon illustrations. It gets bonus points for the usage of bullet points and little text.

3. The Great State of Design with CSS Grid Layout and Friends by Stacy Kvernmo

A presentation that tells a story is always a good example that everyone should follow. This PowerPoint presentation has a lot of slides that tell different mini-stories. The way they are depicted is really engaging – they almost look like a sequence of frames that make up a video. This technique really nails the viewers’ attention.

4. We live in a VUCA world by Little Dragon Films

A classy design of a PowerPoint presentation example – a dark theme and white font on top with just a single color accent – red. Such designs are really suitable for serious topics like this one. To soften the contrast between the black background and white font, the author has used a gradient on the background which gives the illusion of soft light in the middle of the design.

5. 2017 Marketing Predictions—Marketo by Marketo

A design that was made over a year ago but it’s still really trendy. In the following PowerPoint presentation example, we can see the combination of 3D shapes, beautiful hand-written fonts, negative space techniques, and more. The overall feeling is of futuristic design. Moreover, they used the color of 2018 – Ultra Violet for their color scheme. Maybe, they did predict the future after all.

6. 10 Ways Your Boss Kills Employee Motivation by Officevibe

Who doesn’t like to see a familiar face? We know your audience does! It’s proven that if you show a familiar face to your viewers, you nail their attention and boost their engagement level. This is the technique used in the following PowePoint presentation. Moreover, the inner slides of the presentation are also cartoons with big conceptual illustrations and little text. The formula for a really good presentation.

7. How to Successfully Run a Remote Team from Weekdone.com

We haven’t really seen many PowerPoint presentation examples with top-view illustrations. The following presentation really reminded us that when presenting to an audience, you should always think: How to make your design stand out from the rest? Well, this one really caught our eye. In addition, we love the bright colors, geometric shapes, and overall flat feeling, all of which are among the graphic design trends for 2022 .

8. SXSW 2018 – Top Trends by Matteo Sarzana

People love visuals and this is an undeniable fact. The whole PowerPoint presentation is built on high-quality photos, each including a little tagline in the middle. We love the consistency, we love the factor of surprise, and we love the high engagement level this presentation creates. Just make sure to back up such presentation type with a good speech!

9. How to study effectively? by sadraus

Semi-transparent overlays, geometric shapes, a video inside… Everything about this PowerPoint presentation screams “modern”. The grayscale coloring is accompanied by a fresh green color accent. The choice of images clearly suggests that the target audience is young people. The overall feeling that we get from this PowerPoint presentation – is youthful and modern.

10. Study: The Future of VR, AR, and Self-Driving Cars by LinkedIn

A presentation about the future should look futuristic, right? The following PowerPoint presentation example is proof that you should always connect the subject of your presentation to its design. Everything in this presentation speaks of futuristic: the choice of fonts, colors, effects, and even some elements look like holograms from the future.

11. 9 things I’ve learned about SaaS by Christoph Janz

A PowerPoint presentation example created in a consistent style by using a blue theme. Why did we include this presentation? We love the fact that the author has shown an alternation of text and visuals (from slides 7 to 22). This technique is proven to hold the attention of the viewer. Moreover, the way the graphics are presented (on a napkin) draws the interest even more.

12. How To Achieve Something Extraordinary In Life by Sultan Suleman Chaudhry

A PowerPoint presentation example that shows consistency and style by using a strict color scheme: orange, beige, and deep blue. Orange and blue are one of the most popular contrasting combinations widely used in all kinds of designs. If you are not sure what colors to go with, simply choose a tested color scheme.

13. New trends to look out for 2018 winter season by FemmeConnection

Geometric shapes and negative space techniques are among the  graphic design trends for 2018  which is why we see them often in PowerPoint presentation examples and other designs. In the following presentation, we can see a collection of women’s clothes presented in a very engaging way with the help of rounded geometric shapes, negative space technique, and the color pink.

14. Fear of Failure by Sultan Suleman Chaudhry

Speaking of the usage of geometric elements in the presentation’s design, let’s see another example. An elegant design decorated with circles, triangles, and more geometric details. What else we love about this presentation is that it only has one color accent – light yellow which looks classy and pleasant for the eye.

15. The Three Lies About Your Age by Sean Si

A great choice of fonts, beautiful semi-transparent geometric elements, and trendy futuristic colors. This is one of the PowerPoint presentation examples that we absolutely love. The story is engaging and the design is extremely appealing – a combination that keeps the viewers’ eyes on the screen from the beginning till the end.

16. Secrets to a Great Team by Elodie A.

Bright, fun, using lots of illustrations and cartoon characters – definitely our kind of PowerPoint presentation. Why do we love it so much? Well, cartoons are real ice-breakers between you and your audience. Moreover, cartoon characters are easier to relate to than a real human face. If you need to connect on a deeper level with your audience, this is your kind of presentation!

You’d probably like to learn  4 Invaluable Presentation Design Tips You Wish You Knew Earlier

17. How to Build a Dynamic Social Media Plan by Post Planner

A great presentation PowerPoint example with watercolor illustrations and backgrounds that look hand-drawn. We also see semi-transparent colorful overlays, high-quality conceptual photos, and great, useful content. What more would you want from a presentation, right?

We always love to hear your opinion about stuff. So, what do you think of these PowerPoint presentation examples? Do you think that you’ve created a presentation better than these? We’d love to see your own creations in the comments below if you want to share them with us.

You may also be interested to read these related articles:

  • 7 Most Popular Software for Presentations
  • 4 Invaluable Presentation Design Tips You Wish You Knew Earlier
  • 70 Inspiring Presentation Slides with Cartoon Designs
  • Need PowerPoint Backgrounds?The Best Places to Check Out [+ Freebies]

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Iveta Pavlova

Iveta is a passionate writer at GraphicMama who has been writing for the brand ever since the blog was launched. She keeps her focus on inspiring people and giving insight on topics like graphic design, illustrations, education, business, marketing, and more.

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How to Present to an Audience That Knows More Than You

  • Deborah Grayson Riegel

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Lean into being a facilitator — not an expert.

What happens when you have to give a presentation to an audience that might have some professionals who have more expertise on the topic than you do? While it can be intimidating, it can also be an opportunity to leverage their deep and diverse expertise in service of the group’s learning. And it’s an opportunity to exercise some intellectual humility, which includes having respect for other viewpoints, not being intellectually overconfident, separating your ego from your intellect, and being willing to revise your own viewpoint — especially in the face of new information. This article offers several tips for how you might approach a roomful of experts, including how to invite them into the discussion without allowing them to completely take over, as well as how to pivot on the proposed topic when necessary.

I was five years into my executive coaching practice when I was invited to lead a workshop on “Coaching Skills for Human Resource Leaders” at a global conference. As the room filled up with participants, I identified a few colleagues who had already been coaching professionally for more than a decade. I felt self-doubt start to kick in: Why were they even here? What did they come to learn? Why do they want to hear from me?

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  • Deborah Grayson Riegel is a professional speaker and facilitator, as well as a communication and presentation skills coach. She teaches leadership communication at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and has taught for Wharton Business School, Columbia Business School’s Women in Leadership Program, and Peking University’s International MBA Program. She is the author of Overcoming Overthinking: 36 Ways to Tame Anxiety for Work, School, and Life and the best-selling Go To Help: 31 Strategies to Offer, Ask for, and Accept Help .

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10 Good PowerPoint Presentation Examples

Engaging presentations are the secret sauce of effective communication. They bring life to ideas and transform information into inspiration. They are the heartbeat of any memorable message, connecting with your audience. With the power to captivate, educate, and motivate your audience, the best PowerPoint presentations can turn complex ideas into easy-to-understand visuals. Hence, we will discuss good PowerPoint presentation examples.  

An engaging PowerPoint presentation perfectly blends content, design, and to-the-point information. A presentation’s visual appeal can significantly shape perceptions of credibility, commitment to a project, and relatability. Therefore, we have curated a list of good PowerPoint presentation examples for you to take inspiration from and make your next presentation stand out. 

What Makes A Good PowerPoint Presentation?

Shows Best powerpoint presentations

To create the best PowerPoint presentations, we can go overboard with numerous designs and template options in PowerPoint. Having a variety of choices, like colors, formats, visuals, and fonts, is a creative opportunity. However, being selective is vital because not all design choices lead to success and make for PowerPoint presentation examples. 

There’s no one correct way to design your next PowerPoint presentation. Still, some good and bad presentation example designs are more effective than others. While a bad presentation can give off an unprofessional look, a good one can visually establish your brand and leave a lasting impression on your audience. 

Let’s look at some of the excellent PowerPoint presentation examples that will help you up your presentation game:

  • Limited text
  • Less or minimal transitions and animations
  • Cohesive color pallet
  • Keeping contextual graphics
  • Customized illustrations
  • Use no font size smaller than 18 point
  • Logical flow of content
  • Effective use of bullet points
  • Proper symmetry between different paragraphs and pointers
  • Having an engaging summary with a clear Call to Action

Limited Text

Limited text in a PowerPoint presentation works wonders, transforming it into an engaging and crystal-clear presentation. Less is more when it comes to text on slides. Keeping your content concise allows your audience to focus on your message instead of squinting at paragraphs of information.

A slide with a striking image or impactful phrase instantly grabs attention and conveys your point. Using this approach makes your presentation look great. It also helps your audience remember key takeaways, making it one of the best PowerPoint presentation examples

PRO TIP: The golden rule of holding the audience’s attention is using 30 words per slide or a minimum of 6-8 lines on each slide to help create a seamless flow where graphics complement your spoken words.

Best PowerPoint Presentation Examples With Limited Text:

Best PPT Presentation Example-Limited Text

Less or Minimal Transitions And Animations

Too many animations and transitions may not be your presentation’s best buddies. They can steal the spotlight from the core of your message. Best PowerPoint presentations shine by keeping animations and transitions in check. Use it in moderation to emphasize a point or draw attention to specific elements in your visuals.

One of the best PowerPoint presentation examples in terms of transitions and animations is using a “fade-in” animation for bullet points or critical pieces of information. Instead of displaying all the text at once, you can set it to appear one at a time as you discuss each one. This gradual reveal creates curiosity and keeps your audience engaged and focused on the current topic. 

READ MORE: How to add animation in PowerPoint?  

Best PowerPoint Presentation Examples with Minimal Transitions:

Cohesive color pallet.

Another PowerPoint presentation examples includes a cohesive color palette throughout the presentation. We are not saying you must brush up on the color theory game before making your presentation, but knowing what colors to use can make a real difference. A well-thought-out color palette combination that complements and harmonizes can effectively direct your audience’s focus. It highlights what matters and downplays less critical information when needed.

Now, picking the right colors might seem like a puzzle. The golden rule is to use colors that work well together and provide a clear contrast without straining the eyes. If you’re short on time or inspiration, Microsoft Office’s ready-made color schemes can be a lifesaver.

PowerPoint Presentation Examples with cohesive color pallet:

Best PPT Presentation Example - Cohesive Color Pallet

Keeping Contextual Graphics 

A picture really can say a thousand words. Good PowerPoint presentation examples incorporate graphs, photos, and illustrations that enhance your points and keep your audience engaged. But remember, it’s crucial to put these visuals in context. Having contextual graphics or illustrations and explaining why they’re there verbally will help the audience connect the dots and understand the material. It looks great and ensures your message is crystal clear and memorable.

Best PowerPoint Presentations with Contextual Graphics:

Shows Growth Strategy Template

Customized Illustrations 

Adding customized illustrations to your PowerPoint slides is one of the best PowerPoint slide examples. It’s like giving your presentation a unique personality and a touch of authenticity. It’s a game-changer that can take your slides from ordinary to outstanding. Generic stock images or clip art can feel impersonal and overused. On the other hand, customized illustrations are tailored to your message and brand, making your content exclusive. They allow you to convey your ideas in a way that is distinctively “you,” establishing a stronger connection with your audience.

PowerPoint Presentation Examples with Illustrations:

30 60 90 Day Plan PowerPoint Template

Use no Font Size Smaller Than 18 point

Maintaining a minimum font size of 18 points in your best PowerPoint presentations is like giving your audience the gift of clarity and readability. It’s a simple yet impactful way to ensure your message shines through and your presentation looks professional. No one wants to squint or strain their eyes to read a tiny text on a slide. 

When you use an 18-point font or larger, your content becomes instantly more accessible. Your audience can comfortably read what’s on the screen, allowing them to stay focused on your message rather than struggling to make out the words. An easily readable font is not only a good PowerPoint example, but it also helps your audience digest your content and perceive your presentation as professional and user-friendly.

PowerPoint Presentation Examples with Font Sized 18:

Good PowerPoint Slide Example- Font Sized 18

READ MORE: Best Presentation Fonts

Logical Flow of Content 

Good PowerPoint presentation examples had a logical flow of content. You should maintain a logical flow of the content in your PowerPoint presentation. It is like crafting a smooth, well-executed experience for your audience. The roadmap keeps them engaged, helps them follow your story, and ensures your message hits the mark. 

A presentation with a chaotic sequence of ideas or topics can leave your audience puzzled and disconnected. A logical flow, on the other hand, guides your audience seamlessly from one point to the next, making it easy for them to grasp the bigger picture. When your content unfolds in a logical order, it forms a narrative that’s easier for the human brain to digest and remember. You can also create great slideshow presentation examples with good logical flow.

Best PowerPoint Presentation Examples with FlowChart:

Shows Agile Project Management Flow Chart PowerPoint Template

EXPLORE: Flowchart PowerPoint Templates

Effective Use of Bullet Points

To create the best PowerPoint presentations you need to Effectively use bullet points in your PowerPoint presentation is like serving bite-sized portions of information to your audience. It is an excellent way of keeping them engaged and ensuring your message is digestible and memorable. Bullet points break down complex ideas into concise, easy-to-follow chunks. They act as signposts, guiding your audience through your content with a clear roadmap.

Limiting the number of bullet points to 8-10 per slide prevents information overload and gives each point the attention it deserves. People have a limited attention span, so bullet points are your allies in delivering information efficiently. They allow your audience to absorb key takeaways without feeling overwhelmed. Plus, bullet points serve as excellent prompts for your verbal delivery, keeping you on track and ensuring you don’t forget essential details. 

Best PowerPoint Presentation Examples with Bullet Points:

Shows Architecture Review Board Setup Process with Responsibilities and Members

Proper Symmetry Between Different Paragraphs and Pointers

Ensuring proper symmetry between different paragraphs and pointers in your presentation is similar to creating a smooth flow that captivates your audience. It’s all about balance, and when done right, it can significantly enhance the appeal and effectiveness of your slides. Just as a well-balanced meal is more appetizing, slides with balanced content are more visually appealing. 

When you maintain a consistent and symmetrical structure, it creates a sense of order and professionalism. Symmetrical layouts help your audience anticipate what’s coming next. When they see a pattern, like consistent bullet point structure or paragraph formatting, it becomes easier for them to follow your narrative. This predictability allows your audience to focus, not jumble. 

Best PowerPoint Presentation Examples with Symmetry:

Good PowerPoint Slide Example- Symmetry

Having an Engaging Summary With a Clear Call to Action

Last on this list of best PowerPoint presentations is an engaging summary with a clear call to action. Think of the summary as the highlight of your presentation. It recaps the essential takeaways, ensuring your audience fully grasps the key messages you want to convey. This reinforcement is critical because it’s what your audience will most likely remember long after your presentation. 

A clear CTA is like extending a helping hand to your audience, guiding them on what steps to take next. Whether it’s encouraging them to explore further resources, make a decision, or get in touch with you. Adding an engaging summary with a clear CTA to your slides is the grand finale that ties your presentation together.

Best PowerPoint Presentation Examples with Clear Call to Action:

Good PowerPoint Slide Example- Clear Call to Action

EXPLORE: Call to Action PowerPoint Templates  

Best PowerPoint Presentation Examples

Now you know the essential things to include to make better presentations. As a busy professional, it might be time-consuming and hectic for you to create presentations from scratch. Therefore, we have created templates for multiple purposes for you to use. You can directly download them and customize them as per your requirements. We have mentioned the examples of PowerPoint presentations below:

Project Kick-Off PowerPoint Presentation Examples

Use this template to share your project initiation plans with your teams and stakeholders. It helps you start a project and aligns your audience with your vision. These slides examples give your audience a complete overview of your project, including your project goals and objectives, timeline, team members, plans, etc. Use this to ensure that your team members and stakeholders know all the initial project details.

Shows Project KickOff Presentation

This template has multiple slides dedicated to different purposes, such as meeting agendas, project charters, approaches and methodologies, timelines, team mapping, roles and responsibilities, etc. Its consistent theme makes it professional and attractive. Download and customize it according to your needs.

Business Review Presentation PowerPoint Template

shows Business Review Powerpoint presentation examples

Business professionals can use this template to assess and review various stages of their business. The purpose is to help your team members, investors, and stakeholders understand the business’s overall performance. You can also use this to outline strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities for effective business planning.

It includes multiple MS PowerPoint slide examples on topics such as market analysis, sales review, people’s review, strategies, etc. You can also include market trends, customer feedback, and updates on new product launches. Just download the template and edit it to suit your company guidelines.

Project Status Review Deck PowerPoint Presentation Examples

Shows Project status powerpoint presentation examples

Use this template to review your business’s current state. It helps you outline your project progress, challenges, risks, and milestones. It is an excellent tool for project managers to help them inform and align their team members, customers, and stakeholders about the project. It transparently conveys key information and builds trust with the audience.

It includes multiple slides dedicated to different purposes, such as a Project progress summary, milestones, project work plan, Budget Summary, Risk analysis, and metrics to track performance. It allows better collaboration among team members and facilitates an efficient process. Different types of graph elements, like charts and graphs, enhance the visual appeal of this presentation.

SWOT Analysis 

You can use this template to assess internal and external factors affecting your business. It stands for Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. It helps you in strategic planning by outlining the strong areas, limitations, upcoming opportunities, and external threats that may stop you from achieving your goals.

Shows Personal SWOT Analysis Template

This template uses multiple graphic elements and an attractive theme, making it appealing to the audience. It is fully editable, and you can also add elements to it. Add your company theme or colors to match your brand identity.

Business Roadmap PowerPoint Presentation Examples

This template acts as a visual communication tool to convey the steps you need to achieve a business objective. It outlines the goals, timelines, and milestones of your business projects. It’s easier for teams to work together on a common objective when all the tasks and steps are clear, along with deadlines. Roadmap templates exactly do that for you.

Business Roadmap PowerPoint Template

It has a highway road visual with destinations, which visualizes the objectives to reach in chronological order. The audience will immediately understand the topic and tasks. Download this template and use it to enhance your team’s performance.

Marketing Plan Deck

This marketing plan deck helps you outline all your marketing plans. It lets you visually communicate your strategy, goals, target persona, and work action plans to your team members and stakeholders. It includes multiple slides for Brand Planning, Brand implementation, and Brand tracking, which give your audience a detailed overview of all your marketing efforts.  

Shows Marketing Plan Deck PowerPoint Template

The consistent blue theme for all the slides makes it easy for the audience to follow. It also includes multiple graphical elements. You can add background images along with colors to personalize the presentation according to your brand identity. Just download it and start using it to create outstanding presentations.

Business Pitch Deck PowerPoint Presentation Examples

Do you have a new product or idea and want to create it in reality? However, a lack of funds limits your ability to pursue this. Then, you need to present your ideas to investors or stakeholders to get their funding and support. It would be best if you made them trust you by inspiring them with the potential of your idea or product. This business pitch template will help you with that.

Shows Business Pitch Deck PowerPoint Template

It consists of multiple slides showcasing your purpose, problem statement, and solution. It also includes the current market size, competitor analysis, and business model. It’s better to add teams to this presentation, as it boosts investors’ confidence if there is a solid team to achieve the desired results. Download this template and create excellent presentations to get your investors on board.

SMART Goals PowerPoint Presentation Examples

This template assists you in making structured goals. Smart goals stand for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. It means your goals should be specific and easy to measure. The goal should be achievable and relevant and have a deadline. 

Shows SMART Goals Example for the Sales team

Let’s consider an example:

A typical goal will be: Increase traffic on our website.

Its Smart Goals version will be: Increase monthly website traffic by 20% compared to the previous month by implementing SEO optimization, content marketing, and social media promotion strategies within the next six months.

There are 5 sections in which you can fill in your goals. It’s fully editable, and you can customize it as per your needs. Add colors, images, icons, etc. This Smart goals presentation will help you achieve your goals effectively.

Important PowerPoint Presentation Tips

While building a PowerPoint presentation’s design, content, and flow shall be tailored to hit its target audience. Making your presentation eye-catching is essential to steer clear of Call to Action goals. However, taking your PowerPoint presentations to the next level can be time-consuming. So, getting yourself help from professional PowerPoint examples as provided like SlideUpLift can be a game-changer you’ll want to know about.

PRO TIP: It’s important that you follow the Who, What, and Where tips to up your presentation game.

SlideUpLift provides expert guidance on presentation best practices and helps you customize your slides as per your requirements. Our extensive library covers a wide range of industries and topics. But that’s not all. SlideUpLift also offers a collection of beautifully designed templates, graphics, and icons and provides professional PowerPoint Templates for your needs. 

What makes a PowerPoint presentation "good"?

A good PowerPoint presentation effectively communicates its message, engages the audience, and utilizes clear, visually appealing slides with well-structured content.

Where Can I Find Examples Well-Designed PowerPoint Presentation examples For Inspiration?

You can find good PowerPoint presentation examples of well-designed presentations on websites and platforms that offer presentation templates like SlideUpLift.

What are some key examples of good presentation?

Successful PowerPoint presentations often include: 

  • concise content
  • engaging visuals
  • a logical flow
  • limited use of text, and 
  • a clear call to action

How can I ensure my PowerPoint presentation aligns with the best practices?

To ensure your presentation follows best practices, focus on storytelling, maintain visual consistency, limit bullet points, use high-quality visuals, and practice your delivery.

Are there any tools or resources to help me improve my PowerPoint presentations?

Yes, SlideUpLift provides various tools and resources, including PowerPoint add-ins, design templates, and online tutorials that help you enhance your presentation skills and create compelling slides.

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  • Case Report
  • Open access
  • Published: 11 May 2024

Metaplastic breast cancer with a unique presentation and complete response to chemotherapy: a case report

  • Fouad Nahhat   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-2954 1 ,
  • Modar Doyya 1 ,
  • Kareem Zabad 1 &
  • Hazem Ksiri 2  

BMC Women's Health volume  24 , Article number:  285 ( 2024 ) Cite this article

Metrics details

Metaplastic breast carcinomas are a rare variant group of breast carcinomas. They are usually high-grade and triple-negative tumors. They often present with large primary tumor sizes. However, the involvement of axillary lymph nodes is infrequent at the time of diagnosis. Metaplastic breast carcinomas are associated with a worse prognosis and a poorer response to chemotherapy in comparison with other non-metaplastic triple-negative breast cancers. Up until this point, there are no specific treatment recommendations for metaplastic breast carcinomas beyond those intended for invasive breast cancer in general.

Case presentation

A 40-year-old woman complained of a palpable mass in her left axilla. On ultrasonography, the mass was solid, spindle-shaped, hypoechoic with regular borders, and exhibited decreased vascularity. At first, the mass appeared to be of a muscular origin. There was not any clinical nor ultrasonic evidence of a primary breast tumor. On magnetic resonance imaging, the axillary mass was a well-defined with regular borders, measuring 24 × 35 mm. Needle biopsy showed a spindle cell tumor with mild to moderate atypia. The subsequent surgical resection revealed a spindle cell neoplasm within a lymph node, favoring a metastatic origin of the tumor. The tumor cells lacked expression of estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. PET-CT scan indicated pathological uptake in the left breast. Accordingly, the patient was diagnosed with metaplastic breast cancer that had metastasized to the axillary lymph node. She commenced a combined chemotherapy regimen of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide. After six treatment cycles, she underwent left modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection. Pathological examination of the specimens revealed a total burn-out tumor in the breast due to excellent treatment response. There were no residual tumor cells. All dissected lymph nodes were free of tumor. At the one-year follow-up, the patient showed no signs of tumor recurrence.

This report sheds light on a distinctive presentation of metaplastic breast carcinoma, emphasizing the need for vigilance in diagnosing this rare and aggressive breast cancer variant. In addition, the patient’s remarkable response to chemotherapy highlights potential treatment avenues for metaplastic breast cancer.

Peer Review reports

Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MpBC) makes up an estimated 0.2–5% of all invasive breast cancers. It represents a heterogeneous group of tumors in which neoplastic cells display differentiation towards squamous epithelium as well as mesenchymal components, such as spindle, chondroid, osseous, or rhabdoid cells [ 1 ].

The WHO classification of metaplastic breast cancer subtypes includes mixed metaplastic carcinoma, low-grade adenosquamous carcinoma, fibromatosis-like, squamous cell carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, myoepithelial carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma with mesenchymal differentiation (chondroid, osseous) [ 1 ].

MpBCs are often aggressive in nature, typically presenting as high-grade tumors with a triple-negative phenotype (negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2) [ 2 ].

Upon presentation, most MpBC patients tend to exhibit large primary tumor sizes, often exceeding 5 cm. Nevertheless, the involvement of axillary lymph nodes is infrequent at the time of diagnosis compared to other types of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) [ 3 ].

Considering that MpBC possesses a worse prognosis than other non-metaplastic TNBCs, carries twice the risk of recurrence, and has a shorter disease-free and overall survival (71% 5-year overall survival for MpBC compared to 88% for IDC) [ 4 ], it is worth noting that The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines do not offer specific treatment recommendations for MpBC beyond those intended for invasive breast carcinoma in general [ 5 ].

Over the past years, conventional therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation have been used to treat MpBC. However, the inadequacy of these treatment methods, as reflected by poor survival rates, has necessitated the need for novel therapeutic options such as targeted and immunotherapies, which are still undergoing experimental trials and evaluation [ 6 ].

The objective of this study was to report a case of metaplastic breast cancer with a unique presentation and complete response to chemotherapy.

A 40-year-old woman presented to the clinic complaining of a palpable mass in her left axilla, which had been present for two months. Otherwise, she had no other complaints. Her medical history was unremarkable.

Upon physical examination, the left axillary mass was fixed and measured approximately 30 mm in size, displaying no visible signs on the skin such as redness, ulceration, or swelling. Additionally, there was nipple induration noted in both breasts in the absence of any palpable masses.

Ultrasonography revealed numerous benign cysts in both the left and right breasts. In addition, it detected two fibroadenomas in the left breast: one measuring 13–20 mm and the other, smaller at 12 mm but notably hypoechoic. The left axillary mass was solid, spindle-shaped, hypoechoic with regular borders, and exhibited decreased vascularity (Fig.  1 ). It measured approximately 31 mm. It was adjacent to the axillary artery and contiguous with the tendon of one of the rotator cuff muscles. Thus far, the mass appeared to be of a muscular origin. Moreover, ultrasonography identified three enlarged lymph nodes that were hypoechoic and measuring 7–8 mm.

figure 1

Ultrasonography of the axillary mass

Mammography did not reveal any additional findings beyond those obtained by ultrasound.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the left axilla demonstrated a well-defined mass with regular borders, measuring 24 × 35 mm. It was directly adjacent to the axillary nerve that they were practically indistinguishable (Fig.  2 ). On T1-weighted images, the lesion exhibited low signal intensity, while on T2-weighted images, it demonstrated heterogeneously high signal intensity. Following contrast administration, the mass showed heterogeneously marked enhancement.

figure 2

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the axillary mass

In accordance with MRI findings, the differential diagnosis primarily included nerve tumors such as schwannoma and possibly a metastatic lymph node.

A needle biopsy of the axillary mass showed a spindle cell tumor with mild to moderate atypia. An excisional biopsy was recommended for comprehensive evaluation.

The subsequent mass resection pathology revealed a malignant high-grade spindle cell neoplasm within a lymph node, favoring a metastatic origin of the tumor. Immunostaining of the sample was positive for CK (Cytokeratin), Vimentin (focally), and S100 markers and negative for TLE (Transducin-like enhancer of split), CD34, CK5/6, and p63 markers. Furthermore, the tumor cells lacked expression of estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors (triple negative). The Ki-67 index was low (< 10%).

PET-CT scan indicated pathological uptake of FDG in the upper inner quadrant of the left breast (SUV = 3) (Fig.  3 ). There was no pathological metabolic activity observed in other parts of the body.

figure 3

PET-CT scan showing pathological uptake of FDG in the left breast

Accordingly, the diagnosis was triple-negative metaplastic breast cancer (of a spindle cell carcinoma subtype) that had metastasized to the axillary lymph node.

The patient subsequently commenced a combined chemotherapy regimen of doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and cyclophosphamide (AC).

After completing six treatment cycles, there was a mild decrease in nipple induration and the patient underwent left modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection as the accurate primary tumor location could not be identified because no biopsy was taken from the primary tumor and no clip was placed in its site, as this technique is not available in Syria anyway [ 7 , 8 ].

Pathological examination of the surgical specimens revealed a total burn-out tumor in the breast due to excellent treatment response. There were no residual tumor cells. All 19 dissected lymph nodes were reactive and free of tumor.

At the one-year follow-up, the patient showed no signs of tumor recurrence.

Discussion and conclusions

Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MpBC) is a rare subtype of invasive breast cancer characterized by the presence of both epithelial and mesenchymal elements and typically presents as an aggressive triple-negative tumor [ 1 , 2 ].

MpBC usually manifests as a palpable breast mass [ 9 ]. However, it often spares axillary lymph nodes. In an analysis of 892 MpBC cases, only 174 (21.9%) had axillary node involvement at presentation [ 2 ]. Even in studies with smaller samples, the percentage of patients with positive axillary lymph nodes at diagnosis did not exceed 38–40% [ 10 , 11 ].

In contrast, our patient presented uniquely with a relatively big axillary mass, which was later identified as a metastatic lymph node in the absence of any clinical evidence of the primary breast tumor.

Ultrasonography of MpBCs usually shows irregular tumor shadow, micro-lobulated margins, complex echogenicity, parallel orientation, and posterior acoustic enhancement [ 9 ]. On the other hand, the most common feature of MpBCs on MRI is the high intensity of signal on T2-weighted images [ 12 ]. In addition, these tumors usually have irregular margins and display heterogeneous internal enhancement on MRI [ 9 ].

In our case, ultrasonography and mammography of the breasts were only remarkable for multiple bilateral cysts and two benign lesions in the left breast, which were considered fibroadenomas at that time. They did not reveal any suspicious findings, which made the breast origin of the axillary mass less likely at first.

However, MpBCs tend to display more benign features, such as round or oval shapes with well-defined borders, in comparison with ductal carcinomas [ 13 ]. The circumscribed margins of the mass on mammography might reflect the spindle-cell component of these tumors [ 14 ].

Relative to other non-metaplastic TNBCs, MpBCs have a worse prognosis and poorer response to chemotherapy. While TNBCs typically exhibit a pathological complete response (pCR) rate of 33.6% to neoadjuvant chemotherapy [ 15 ], the response rates for MpBCs are generally lower. Results from four studies on neoadjuvant chemotherapy for MpBC indicated pCR rates of 2% in one study involving 44 patients [ 16 ], 17% in another study with 29 patients [ 17 ], 11% in a study with 18 patients [ 18 ], and 16% in the last one involving six patients [ 19 ].

Despite the unique presentation, our patient achieved a pCR to the combined chemotherapy regimen (AC), highlighting its potential role in unusual cases of MpBC.

In the upcoming era, chemotherapy alone might not constitute the definitive curative approach for MpBC. However, it could be used in combination with targeted and immunotherapies, which are still undergoing experimental trials and evaluation [ 6 ].

Novel therapeutic options for MpBC are emerging based on the specific molecular characteristics of the disease. TP53 mutations, which are very common in MpBC, and mutations in PI3K have been identified as promising targets for therapy [ 20 , 21 , 22 ].

TP53 mutations are also associated with elevated VEGF-A levels, suggesting potential sensitivity to anti-VEGF agents such as bevacizumab [ 23 , 24 ]. Notably, mTOR inhibitors such as temsirolimus and everolimus have shown secondary effects on angiogenesis, providing the base for investigating combinations with bevacizumab in clinical trials [ 25 , 26 ]. Furthermore, the combination of temsirolimus with bevacizumab and various chemotherapy agents, including platinums, taxanes, and anthracyclines, has been studied [ 27 ].

Additionally, MpBC is characterized by the overexpression of PD-L1 and high tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which set the basis for treating MpBC with immunotherapeutic agents [ 22 , 28 ].

In summary, this report sheds light on a distinctive presentation of metaplastic breast carcinoma (MpBC), emphasizing the need for vigilance in diagnosing this rare and aggressive breast cancer variant. In addition, the patient’s remarkable response to chemotherapy highlights potential treatment avenues for MpBC.

One limitation of our study was the absence of suspicious findings on breast imaging, which precluded the opportunity to perform a biopsy for confirmation. Consequently, the diagnosis relied on the correlation between PET-CT scan findings and lymph node pathology.

Another limitation to acknowledge is that our study was conducted on a single patient. While this case provided valuable insights, the findings may not be fully generalizable to a broader population and larger studies are required.

Data availability

All data are included in this article.

Abbreviations

Metaplastic Breast Carcinoma

World Health Organization

Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2

Triple-negative Breast Cancer

Overall Survival

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network

Adriamycin (Doxorubicin) & Cyclophosphamide

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Cytokeratin

Transducin-like enhancer of split

Positron Emission Tomography

F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose

Pathological Complete Response

Tumor Protein 53 gene

Phosphoinositide 3-kinases

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A

Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

Programmed Death-ligand 1

Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes

Reis-Filho JS, et al. Metaplastic carcinoma. The WHO classification of tumours breast tumours. 5th ed. Lyon: IARC; 2019.

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Fouad Nahhat, Modar Doyya & Kareem Zabad

Department of Oncology, Albairouni University Hospital, Damascus, Syria

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FN reviewed the literature and wrote the introduction and discussion sections. MD wrote the abstract and designed the figures with their captions. KZ reviewed the literature and wrote the case presentation section. HK participated in the patient’s care and supervised the manuscript preparation, scientifically and academically. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Nahhat, F., Doyya, M., Zabad, K. et al. Metaplastic breast cancer with a unique presentation and complete response to chemotherapy: a case report. BMC Women's Health 24 , 285 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-024-03134-8

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  • Metaplastic breast Cancer
  • Spindle cell carcinoma
  • Triple-negative breast Cancer
  • Axillary Lymph Node
  • Chemotherapy
  • Doxorubicin
  • Cyclophosphamide

BMC Women's Health

ISSN: 1472-6874

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