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73 Essay Hook Examples

essay hook examples and definition, explained below

An essay hook is the first one or two sentences of your essay that are used to grab the reader’s attention and draw them into your discussion.

It is called a hook because it “grabs” the reader and doesn’t let them go! It should have something in there that makes the reader feel curious and intrigued, compelling them to continue reading.

Techniques for Good Essay Hooks

Here are a few techniques that you can use to write a good essay hook:

  • Use a Quotation : Sometimes, a relevant quotation from a well-known author or expert can help establish the context or theme of your essay. Next time you’re conducting research for an essay, keep an eye out for a really compelling quote that you could use as your hook for that essay.
  • Start with a Statement that is Surprising or Unusual: A surprising or unusually statement will draw a reader in, making them want to know more about that topic. It’s good if the statement contradicts common knowledge or reveals an insight about your topic that isn’t immediately obvious. These can be particularly good for argumentative essays where you’re putting forward a controversial or compelling argument as your thesis statement .
  • Tell a Brief Anecdote : A short, interesting story related to your topic can personaize the story, making it more than just a dry essay, and turning it into a compelling narrative that’s worth reading.
  • Use Statistics or Facts: Interesting, surprising, or shocking facts or statistics work similarly to surprising statements: they make us want to know more about a topic. Statistics and facts in your introductions are particularly useful for analytical, expository , and argumentative essays.
  • Start with a Question: Questions that make the reader think deeply about an issue, or pose a question that the reader themselves has considered, can be really effecitve. But remember, questions tend to be better for informal and personal essays, and are generally not allowed in formal argumentative essays. If you’re not sure if you’re allowed to use questions in your essays, check with your teacher first.

Below, I’ll present some examples of hooks that you could use as inspiration when writing your own essay hook.

Essay Hook Examples

These examples might help stimulate your thinking. However, keep in mind that your essay hook needs to be unique to your essay, so use these as inspiration but write your own essay hook that’s perfect for your own essay.

1. For an Essay About Yourself

An essay about yourself can be personal, use “I” statements, and include memories or thoughts that are deeply personal to you.

  • Question: “Have you ever met someone who could turn even the most mundane events into a thrilling adventure? Let me introduce myself.”
  • Anecdote: “The smell of freshly baked cookies always takes me back to the day when I accidentally started a baking business at the age of nine.”
  • Intriguing Statement: “I’ve always believed that you haven’t truly lived until you’ve read a book upside down, danced in the rain, or taught a parrot to say ‘I love pizza.'”
  • Quotation: “As Mark Twain once said, ‘The secret of getting ahead is getting started.’ That’s a philosophy I’ve embraced in every aspect of my life.”
  • Humorous Statement: “I’m a self-proclaimed ‘professional chocolate tester’ – a title that’s not only delicious but also requires extreme dedication.”
  • Start with your Mission Statement : “My life motto is simple but powerful: be the person who decided to go for it.
  • Fact or Statistic: “According to a study, people who speak more than one language tend to be better at multitasking . As a polyglot, I certainly live up to that statistic.”
  • Comparison or Metaphor: “If my life were a book, it would be a blend of an adventurous novel, a suspense thriller, and a pinch of romantic comedy.”
  • Personal Revelation: “Ever since I was a child, I’ve had an uncanny ability to communicate with animals. It’s an unusual skill, but one that has shaped my life in many ways.”
  • Narrative: “The day everything changed for me was an ordinary Tuesday. Little did I know, a single conversation would lead me to discover my true passion.”

2. For a Reflective Essay

A reflective essay often explores personal experiences, feelings, and thoughts. So, your hooks for reflective essays can usually be more personal, intriguing, and engaging than other types of essays. Here are some examples for inspiration:

  • Question: “Have you ever felt as though a single moment could change your entire life? This essay is going to explore that moment for me.”
  • Anecdote: “I was standing on the edge of the Grand Canyon, looking at the vast emptiness, and for the first time, I truly understood the word ‘perspective’.”
  • Bold Statement: “There is a part of me that is still trapped in that room, on that rainy afternoon, holding the letter that would change everything.”
  • Personal Revelation: “The first time I truly felt a sense of belonging wasn’t in a crowded room full of friends, but in the quiet solitude of a forest.”
  • Intriguing Statement: “In my life, silence has been a teacher more profound than any words could ever be.”
  • Quotation: “Einstein once said, ‘The only source of knowledge is experience.’ Now, looking back, I realize how profound that statement truly is.”
  • Comparison or Metaphor: “If my life is a tapestry, then that summer was the vibrant thread that changed the entire pattern.”
  • Narrative: “As the train pulled out of the station, I realized I wasn’t just leaving my hometown, I was leaving my old self behind.”
  • Philosophical Statement: “In the theater of life, we are both the actor and the audience, playing our part and watching ourselves simultaneously.”
  • Emotive Statement: “There is a sort of sweet sorrow in remembering, a joy tinged with a hint of sadness, like the last notes of a beautiful song.”

For an Argumentative Essay

Essay hooks for argumentative essays are often the hardest. This type of essay tends to require the most formal type of academic writing, meaning your hook shouldn’t use first person, and should be more based on fact and objectivity, often at the expense of creativity. Here are some examples.

  • Quotation: “Thomas Jefferson once said, ‘Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.’ If Jefferson were alive today, he would likely feel that this meed for a well-informed citizenry is falling well short of where he would aspire.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Despite what romantic films may portray, love at first sight is merely a myth perpetuated by society. This essay will prosecute the argument that love at first sight is a myth.”
  • Statistical Fact: “According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading psychological disability worldwide. Yet, mental health is still stigmatized and often overlooked. This essay will argue that depression should be seen as a health issue, and stigmatization of depression causes serious harm to society.”
  • Comparison: “Much like an unchecked infection, climate change, if left ignored, can spread far beyond what it is today, causing long-term economic and social problems that may even threaten the longevity of humanity itself.”
  • Contradiction : “While we live in an era of unprecedented technological advancements, millions around the world are still denied basic internet access.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Animal testing is not only ethically unacceptable, but it also undermines the progress of medical research.”
  • Challenging Belief: “Despite popular belief, the automation of jobs is not a threat but an opportunity for society to evolve.”
  • Quotation: “George Orwell wrote in ‘1984’, ‘Big Brother is Watching You.’ In our modern society, with the advancement of technology, this is becoming more of a reality than fiction.”
  • Intriguing Statement: “Despite countless diet fads and fitness trends, obesity rates continue to rise. This argumentative essay will argue that this is because medical practitioners’ approaches to health and weight loss are fundamentally flawed.”
  • Statistical Fact: “Research reveals that over 90% of the world’s plastic waste is not recycled. This alarming figure calls for a drastic change in social attitudes towards consumption and waste management.”
  • Challenging Assumption: “Society often assumes that progress and growth are intrinsically good, but this is not always the case in the realm of economic development.”
  • Contradiction: “Western society upholds the value of freedom, yet every day, members of society cede personal liberties in the name of convenience and security.”
  • Analogy: “Like an overplayed song, when a news story is repeated too often, it loses its impact. In the era of digital media, society is becoming desensitized to critical issues.”
  • Relevant Anecdote: “In a village in India, the arrival of a single computer transformed the lives of the residents. This small anecdote underscores the importance of digital inclusion in today’s world.”
  • Call to Rethink: “In a world where success is often equated with financial wealth, it is time for society to reconsidered what truly constitutes a successful life.”

For a Compare and Contrast Essay

A compare and contrast essay examines two issues, looking at both the similarities and differences between them. A good hook for a compare and contrast essay will immediately signal to the reader the subjects that are being compared and why they’re being compared. Here are sine ideas for hooks for a compare and contrast essay:

  • Quotation: “As Charles Dickens wrote in his novel ‘A Tale of Two Cities’, ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’. This could equally apply to the contrasting dynamics of urban and rural living.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Despite popular belief, cats and dogs have more in common than society tends to think.”
  • Comparison: “Comparing being an only child to growing up with siblings is like contrasting a solo performance with an orchestral symphony.”
  • Contradiction: “While many view classic literature and contemporary fiction as worlds apart, they are more akin to two sides of the same coin.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Android and iPhone may compete in the same market, but their philosophies could not be more different.”
  • Statistical Fact: “Statistics show that children who grow up reading books tend to perform better academically than those who do not. But, the jury is out on how reading traditional books compares to reading e-books on screens.”
  • Quotation: “As Robert Louis Stevenson once wrote, ‘Sooner or later, we all sit down to a banquet of consequences.’ This statement can be used to frame a comparison between short-term and long-term thinking.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Democracy and dictatorship are often seen as polar opposites, but are they are not as different as they seem.”
  • Comparison: “Climate change and plastic pollution are two major environmental issues, yet they demand different approaches and solutions.”
  • Contradiction: “While traditional classrooms and online learning are seen as separate modes of education, they can often blend into a cohesive learning experience.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Though both based on merit, the structures of capitalism and socialism lead to vastly different societal outcomes.”
  • Imagery: “The painting styles of Van Gogh and Monet can be contrasted as a stormy sea versus a tranquil pond.”
  • Historical Reference: “The philosophies of the Cold War-era – capitalism and communism – provide a lens to contrast economic systems.”
  • Literary Comparison: “The dystopian societies portrayed in George Orwell’s ‘1984’ and Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’ serve as contrasting visions of the future.”
  • Philosophical Question: “Individualism and collectivism shape societies in distinct ways, but neither one can truly exist without the other.”

See Here for my Guide on Writing a Compare and Contrast Essay

For a Psychology Essay

Writing an engaging hook for a psychology essay involves sparking the reader’s interest in the human mind, behavior, or the specific psychology topic you’re discussing. Here are some stimulating hooks for a psychology essay:

  • Rhetorical Question: “How much control do we truly have over our own actions?”
  • Quotation: “Sigmund Freud once said, ‘Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.’ This essay will explore whether this is universally true.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Contrary to popular belief, ‘venting out’ anger might actually be fueling the fire of fury.”
  • Comparison: “Just as an iceberg reveals only a fraction of its bulk above water, conscious minds may only be a small piece of who humans truly are.”
  • Contradiction: “While it may seem counterintuitive, studies show that individuals who are more intelligent are also more likely to suffer from mental health issues.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Despite advances in technology, understanding the human brain remains one of the final frontiers in science.”
  • Statistical Fact: “According to a study by the American Psychological Association, nearly one in five adults in the U.S. lives with a mental illness. Yet, mental health continues to be a topic shrouded in stigma.”

For a Sociology Essay

Writing an engaging hook for a sociology essay involves sparking the reader’s interest in social behaviors, cultural phenomena, or the specific sociology topic you’re discussing. Here are ideas for hooks for a sociology essay:

  • Quotation: “As Karl Marx once noted, ‘Social progress can be measured exactly by the social position of the fair sex.’ Sadly, society has not made much progress in gender equality.”
  • Provocative Statement: “Social media, initially created to connect people, is ironically leading society into an era of unprecedented isolation.”
  • Comparison: “Comparing society to a theater, where each individual plays a role, it is possible to start to see patterns and scripts embedded in daily interactions.”
  • Contradiction: “While people often believe that technology is bringing society closer together, evidence suggests that it’s actually driving a wedge between people, creating ‘digital divides’.”
  • Bold Declaration: “Human societies are constructed on deeply ingrained systems of inequality, often invisible to those benefiting from them.”
  • Statistical Fact: “A recent study found that women still earn only 81 cents for every dollar earned by men. This stark wage gap raises questions about equality in the workforce.”

For a College Application Essay

A college essay is a personal statement where you can showcase who you are beyond your grades and resume. It’s your chance to tell your unique story. Here are ten potential hooks for a college essay:

  • Anecdote: “At the age of seven, with a wooden spoon as my baton, I confidently conducted an orchestra of pots and pans in my grandmother’s kitchen.”
  • Provocative Statement: “I believe that life is like a game of chess. The king might be the most important piece, but it’s the pawns that can change the entire course of the game.”
  • Personal Revelation: “It wasn’t until I was lost in a foreign city, armed with nothing but a map in a language I didn’t understand, that I truly discovered my love for adventure.”
  • Intriguing Question: “Have you ever wondered how it feels to be part of two completely different cultures, yet wholly belong to neither?”
  • Bold Declaration: “Breaking a bone can be a painful experience. Breaking stereotypes, however, is an entirely different kind of challenge.”
  • Unusual Fact: “I can recite the periodic table backwards while juggling three tennis balls. It’s a strange talent, but it’s a perfect metaphor for how I tackle challenges.”
  • Quotation: “As Albert Einstein once said, ‘Imagination is more important than knowledge.’ This quote has defined my approach to learning.”
  • Narrative: “It was a cold winter’s day when I first discovered the magic of turning a blank page into a world full of characters, stories, and ideas.”
  • Metaphor: “Like a caterpillar transforming into a butterfly, my high school years have been a period of profound metamorphosis.”
  • Humorous Statement: “Being the youngest of five siblings, I quickly learned that the best way to be heard was to become the family’s unofficial lawyer.”

Conclusion: The Qualities of a Good Essay Hook

As I wrap up this article, I want to share a few last tips on qualities that a good essay hook should have. Keep these tips in mind when writing your essay hook and using the above essay hook examples:

First, relevance . A good hook should be directly relevant to the topic or theme of your essay. The hook should provide a preview of what’s to come without giving too much away.

Second, Intrigue. A great hook should make the reader want to continue reading. It should create a question in the reader’s mind or present a fascinating idea that they want to know more about.

Third, uniqueness. An effective hook should be original and unique. It should stand out from the many other essays that the reader might be going through.

Fourth, clarity. Even though a hook should be captivating and original, it should also be clear and easy to understand. Avoid complex sentences and jargon that might confuse the reader.

Fifth, genre conventions. Too often, my students try to be so creative in their essay hooks that they forget genre conventions . The more formal an essay, the harder it is to write the hook. My general approach is to focus on statistics and facts, and avoid rhetorical questions , with more formal essay hooks.

Keep in mind that you should run your essay hook by your teacher by showing them your first draft before you submit your essay for grading. This will help you to make sure it follows genre conventions and is well-written.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 5 Top Tips for Succeeding at University
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How to Write a Hook for An Argumentative Essay in 5 Minutes

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by  Antony W

October 24, 2022

how to write a hook for an argumentative essay

In this guide, you’ll learn how to write a hook for an argumentative essay without trying so hard.

At Help for Assessment, we understand that introducing an argument isn’t as easy. You might find yourself writing and rewriting the introduction more than you can count.

However, if you can write a solid hook for your argument, the rest of the essay will be easy to write even if you’re already running out of time.

Key Takeaways

Writing a strong hook for your essay doesn’t have to be difficult. You can:

  • Grab a reader’s attention with a common misconception.
  • Share a unique story your audience have never read anywhere else.
  • Start the essay with a quote provided the quote within the context of your argument.
  • Use statistics as a means to raise curiosity.
  • Ask questions to grab reader’s attention and draw their interest in the topic.
  • If everything else fails, buy an argumentative essay online from our team of creative custom writers.

What is a Hook in an Argumentative Essay?

In an argumentative essay, a hook is an opening statement that introduces the focus topic to the target audience. The hook can be one or two sentence long, and it serves the purpose of drawing in the attention of a target to read the next consecutive paragraphs.

To be abundantly clear:

A hook is not an introduction of the essay. It’s a part of the introduction, and it makes the starting point just immediately after the argumentative essay topic .

When it comes to writing a solid hook for an argument, the goal isn’t to present oneself as a formal writer to an audience.

Don’t hesitate to wear your creativity hat and write the hook in a way that piques your audience’s interest. That way, they’ll want to read the rest of the essay to learn more about your argument.

How to Write a Hook for an Argumentative Essay and Grab Readers’ Attention

Here are five ways to write a hook for an argumentative essay and grab your reader’s attention:

1. Use a Common Misconception

The purpose of a hook is to grab the attention of a reader instantly, and one of the best way to do that in an argumentative essay is to use a common misconception.

A common misconception is a statement, event, person, or something many people accept to be true but is actually false.

Starting the essay with such a misconception will startle and intrigue your reader, giving them the urge to read the rest of the essay because they want to know more about what you have to say. 

2. Share a Short Story

Can you tell a whole story in a sentence or two? If you can, don’t hesitate to use an anecdote to illustrate your points.

Stories mostly work well for narrative topics and descriptive essays . They can also fit well in your argumentative essay if you know how to incorporate them.

To be clear, you have a very small chance to impress your readers with your story. To impress your audience, make your story short, clear, and direct to the point.

In addition to being something that you can relate to, the story you share should be free from personal feelings. In other words, unless your instructor allows you to incorporate personal pronouns in your argument , your essay shouldn’t reflect personalization.

Also, you must ensure that the story you share relate to the essay’s main idea.

3. Start with a Quote

We never recommend starting an essay with a quote .

Quite too often, professors discourage the use of quotes in an essay for two reasons:

  • A quote reflect another author’s thoughts and hiders the presentation of your ideas.
  • Quotes can limit your ability to express yourself, hence crippling your creativity.

However, if the quote falls within the context of an argument, it could make a solid hook for your assignment.

For a quote to fit in your work, it must be relevant to the topic and agree with your argument’s thesis statement. Also, ensure the quote you use in your hook is neither general nor insanely overused.

4. Use Statistics

Statistics raise curiosity. They can hook readers to facts and information they didn’t even know existed, thus sparking their interest in reading the rest of the essay.

Academic writing requires clarity and authenticity.

With this respect, do some preliminary research to validate the statistics before including them in your essay. Also, you must include the source where you collected the data for reference.

5. Ask a Rhetorical Question 

Starting an argument with a question can grab a reader’s attention and draw their interest in a topic so much that they develop the urge to keep reading.

However, the case of questions is only viable if the question isn’t too general or already obvious.

Let’s say you’re writing about phones.

A question such as “are smartphones bad?” is vague and obvious. Everyone is familiar with the details. Such a question will do very little to capture anyone’s attention.

You must refrain from questions that require Yes or No answers and come up with interesting questions that engage your audience in critical thinking.

Rhetoric should be your secret weapon.

For example, “ should kids own smartphones before going to college?” is a question that, in addition to being argumentative, draws a reader’s attention from the get go. Also, such a question leaves room for debate. 

6. Get Essay Writing Help

Even if you can write a strong hook for an argumentative essay yourself, you still might find the assignment challenging to compete.

If that’s the case, you can contract our writers to help you write your argumentative essay for you.

If there’s one thing you should learn from this guide, it’s that writing a hook for an argumentative essay doesn’t have to be difficult.

We’ve shown you six ways to grab your audience’s attention. Pick an option that best suits you. Then utilize it to write a solid hook that can draw your readers’ attention on the spot.

If that’s the case, and you feel like you need a helping hand, our writers can help you write great argumentative essays in a short time. Simply click the button on the right and talk to us about your assignment.

About the author 

Antony W is a professional writer and coach at Help for Assessment. He spends countless hours every day researching and writing great content filled with expert advice on how to write engaging essays, research papers, and assignments.

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How to Write Captivating Hooks for Your Argumentative Essays

Adela B.

Table of contents

Are you ready to sharpen your argumentative essay writing skills? If so, then mastering the art of creating a compelling hook is a skill you can't afford to miss. The hook, a crucial component of your introductory paragraph, has the power to either grip your reader's attention or cause them to lose interest in your argument.

In the dynamic world of essay writing, the ability to write a persuasive hook for your argumentative essay is a critical skill that can set your work apart. Whether you're a student aiming to impress your professor, a professional trying to sway a critical audience, or simply a person who thrives in the realm of logical debates, this skill is invaluable.

In this guide, we aim to demystify the process of writing an enticing hook for an argumentative essay - a technique that will captivate your reader's attention, spark their curiosity, and compel them to delve deeper into your argument. Prepare to wield the power of the hook and engage your readers from the outset, maintaining their interest right through to the conclusion.

The Role of a Hook in an Argumentative Essay

In an argumentative essay, the first impression is everything. Your initial statement or question—also known as the hook—serves as the doorway inviting your reader to step into your argument. With a compelling hook, you’re not just getting their attention; you're making a promise that your essay is worth their time.

The hook's main purpose is to draw readers in and compel them to want to read more. It piques their curiosity, stirs up emotions, or provokes thought. A strong hook aligns with your essay’s topic and thesis, yet it also stands on its own as a captivating snippet of your overall argument.

Remember, an argumentative essay is not just about presenting an argument; it's about making it interesting and engaging for the reader. The hook plays an instrumental role in achieving this goal. As the saying goes, "You never get a second chance to make a first impression." With an argumentative essay, the first impression begins with the hook.

In the sections that follow, we will unpack different types of hooks, provide a step-by-step guide on how to craft them, and offer real-life examples for inspiration. Ready to get started? Let’s dive in!

Different Types of Hooks for an Argumentative Essay

  • Question Hook
  • Quotation Hook
  • Statistic Hook
  • Anecdotal Hook
  • Declaration Hook
  • Descriptive Hook

Creating an impactful hook requires choosing the right type for your argumentative essay. Each kind of hook serves a different purpose and can help establish the tone, voice, and direction of your essay. Let's walk through the most commonly used types and how they can boost your writing:

Question Hook : This type of hook poses a thought-provoking question that relates to your argument's theme. It can be a rhetorical question or one that seeks an answer. It makes your readers engage directly by prompting them to think about a possible answer or form an opinion about the question.

Quotation Hook : A well-chosen quote from a notable person or source related to your argument can be a powerful way to begin your essay. It instantly lends credibility to your argument and shows that your point of view aligns with respected opinions.

Statistic Hook : This type of hook involves beginning your essay with a surprising or compelling statistic related to your argument. It's a fantastic way to show your readers that your point is backed by evidence, and it is often a surprising piece of information that can grab their attention.

Anecdotal Hook : An anecdotal hook involves telling a short and captivating story or an incident related to your topic. A well-told anecdote can humanize your argument and help your reader connect with your topic on a more personal level.

Declaration Hook : This is a straightforward statement that declares your argument or a related point. It's bold, it's confident, and it lets your reader know exactly where you stand.

Descriptive Hook : This type of hook uses vivid imagery to draw your reader into your essay. By painting a picture with your words, you can help your reader visualize your argument and become more engaged with your essay.

REMEMBER : the best type of hook for your essay largely depends on your essay’s topic, your personal writing style, and the effect you want to have on your reader. In the next section, we’ll guide you step-by-step through the process of writing your own captivating hook.

Step-By-Step Guide to Writing a Hook for Your Argumentative Essay

  • Understand Your Audience
  • Identify Your Essay's Purpose
  • Choose the Appropriate Type of Hook
  • Write Your Hook
  • Revise and Refine

Now that we have a better understanding of the different types of hooks and their importance in an argumentative essay, it's time to delve into how to actually write an effective one. Here's a step-by-step guide to help you craft a compelling hook for your argumentative essay:

Understand Your Audience : Before you start writing your hook, you need to understand who your readers are. What interests them? What are their concerns? What kind of language do they understand best? Once you have this information, you can craft a hook that speaks directly to them.

Identify Your Essay's Purpose : What is the central argument or point you want to make in your essay? Your hook should tie into this and give a hint or a preview of what's to come.

Choose the Appropriate Type of Hook : Refer to the different types of hooks we discussed in the previous section. Depending on your topic and audience, one type might be more effective than the others. For instance, a serious topic might benefit more from a statistic hook, while a personal argument might be better served by an anecdotal hook.

Write Your Hook : Now comes the actual writing. Keep it concise, engaging, and relevant to your argument. Ensure that it leads naturally into your introduction and gives your readers a reason to continue reading.

Revise and Refine : First drafts aren't always perfect. Read your hook out loud, get feedback from others, and revise as necessary. It should not only grab your reader's attention but also be a seamless part of your introduction.

Now, let's put this theory into practice. In the next section, we will provide a series of examples that will demonstrate how these steps work in real-life situations. Each example will show a different type of hook, so you can see the variety of ways to engage your reader right from the start.

Examples of Hooks in Argumentative Essays

Now that we’ve explained how to write a hook, it's time to show you some examples in action. As we go through these examples, remember that your hook should be relevant to your topic and effectively engage your reader.

Statistical Hook : If you were writing an essay about the effects of climate change, you could start with a statistical hook like, "According to the United Nations, the last 20 years have seen 17 of the hottest on record."

Anecdotal Hook : For an essay on the importance of education, you could begin with an anecdotal hook: "When I first moved to the United States, I didn't know a word of English. It was in school that I discovered not only the language but a love of literature."

Question Hook : If your essay revolves around the theme of personal fitness, you could use a question hook like, "How many times have you told yourself you'd start exercising 'tomorrow'?"

Quotation Hook : For an essay about the importance of perseverance, you could use a quotation hook: "'It always seems impossible until it's done.' Nelson Mandela’s words resonate with anyone who has faced seemingly insurmountable challenges."

Factual Hook : In an essay about the dangers of plastic waste, you could use a factual hook: "Every year, an estimated 8 million metric tons of plastic end up in our oceans."

Personal Story Hook : If your essay is about the impact of bullying, you could start with a personal story hook: "In middle school, I was the 'new kid'. What that meant was I also became the perfect target for bullies."

Declaration Hook : If you are writing about the importance of mental health, you could start with a strong declaration: "Mental health is just as important as physical health, and it's time we treated it that way."

Descriptive Hook : For an essay on traveling, you could start with a descriptive hook: "The vibrant colors of the bustling marketplace, the distant hum of street music, and the intoxicating aroma of street food – there's nothing quite like the sensory overload of visiting a new city."

Metaphor/Simile Hook : If you're writing about time management, a metaphorical hook could work well: "Managing your time effectively is like conducting an orchestra; every task has its place and rhythm."

Dilemma Hook : For an essay on moral or ethical decision-making, you could use a dilemma hook: "You're in a lifeboat with a maximum capacity of five people, but there are six of you. What do you do?"

Remember, the goal of your hook is to captivate your reader and make them want to continue reading. We hope these examples inspire you as you craft your own hooks for your argumentative essays.

Final Thoughts on Writing an Effective Hook for an Argumentative Essay

The success of your argumentative essay can significantly hinge on your opening hook. It sets the tone, piques interest, and beckons your readers into your world of persuasion. Remember, it's not just about writing a catchy first sentence—it's about creating an entry point into your argument that your reader can't resist.

Crafting an effective hook requires some creative thinking, but remember, it should serve your argument and fit the tone of your essay. Whether you choose to start with a shocking statistic, a compelling question, or a personal anecdote, make sure your hook leads smoothly into your thesis statement.

Now that we've walked you through the process of crafting a hook for your argumentative essay, it's time to practice. Don't worry if you don't get it right the first time. Like all aspects of writing, creating compelling hooks comes easier with time and practice. The most important thing is to keep your reader in mind and aim to engage them from the first word.

Remember, your argumentative essay is a journey for your reader, and your hook is the door into that journey. Make that door as enticing as possible, and your reader will be eager to step through it and explore the argument you've laid out before them.

Additional Resources

Delving deeper into argumentative essays and refining your writing skills can be an enriching journey. Here are a few more resources to help you navigate this path effectively:

Articles from the Writers Per Hour Blog

  • How Significant Are Opposing Points of View in an Argument
  • Rebuttal in Argumentative Essay
  • Strong Argumentative Essay Topic Ideas
  • Writing Strong Introductions for Argumentative Essays
  • Strong Conclusion for Argumentative Essay
  • What is a Hook for an Essay and How to Use It

External Resources

  • Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)
  • Harvard College Writing Center
  • University of North Carolina Writing Center

IMPORTANT : mastery in argumentative writing is a journey that requires patience, practice, and persistence. However, if you ever find yourself struggling with your essay, our team of professional essay writers for hire is always ready to assist you. With their expertise in crafting compelling, well-structured essays, they can provide invaluable support in your academic journey.

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Essay Hook Examples That Grab Attention (Formula for Better Grades)

Essay Hook Examples That Grab  Attention (Formula for Better Grades)

Table of contents

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Meredith Sell

Have you ever read a line that caught your attention so fast, you didn’t look up until five paragraphs later? Props to whoever wrote it — they mastered the attention-grabbing hook.

Top 10 Essay Hooks

For many writers, hooks (or ledes, as they’re referred to by journalists) are both tantalizing and infuriating. Out in the wild, we spot first lines that are startling and mind-bending and stoke our curiosity. But then we sit to write our own and all we can think of is “once upon a time” or “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away” or, worse, “imagine yourself…”

‍ ‍ The truth is: every piece of writing can’t start with an explosion or a chase scene. Especially if you’re writing an academic essay or other piece of nonfiction that needs to stick with the facts. But there are better ways to start your essay than the sleepy “A recent study observed 300 chimpanzees in 50 habitats over seven years. This is what it found.”

  • ‍ How do you write a hook that grabs your reader’s attention right away?
  • Is there a way to make sure the hook fits the piece you’re writing?
  • ‍ How do you use AI to produce better hooks?

These are just a couple questions we’ll answer in this article. 

But first, let’s talk about what you need to know before attempting to write that opening sentence.

Try our FREE essay hook generator > Try our FREE essay hook generator >

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

What to Know About Your Essay (and Topic) Before You Write the Hook

Whether you’re writing a research paper on economics, an argumentative essay for your college composition class, or a personal essay for that blog you’ve been plotting, there are a few things you need to nail down before you settle on a first line.

1. Gain In-Depth Knowledge of Your topic

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Name one thing under the sun. You could write an essay about it.

Before you actually write your essay, though, you need to know your topic — not just in name, but in-depth. You don't have to be a subject matter expert , but you do have to research.

Your research will help you narrow your focus, build an argument, and uncover the facts to shape the flow of thought throughout your piece. What you learn in the research stage should determine how you structure your essay — and should guide your choice of hook.

‍ Did you uncover a shocking fact? A compelling anecdote? An interesting quote? Any of those things could be your hook.

‍ Take action: When you’ve finished your research, go through your notes and think through your essay. Mark or make a list of anything you learned that’s compelling enough to be a good lead. Then, filter that list through your essay genre.

2. Type of essay

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

In academic settings, there are generally three kinds of essays:

  • Argumentative: Making the case for a certain stance or route of action.
  • Expository: Explaining the who, what, when, where, why, and how of some phenomenon.
  • Narrative: Telling a true story as a way to explore different ideas.

‍ The type of essay you’re writing is key to choosing the best hook for your piece. 

A serious argumentative essay probably shouldn’t start with a joke. And a shocking statistic may not be the best way to set the stage for a narrative story.

‍ Take action: Go through your list of potential hooks and cross out anything that doesn’t fit the type of essay you’re writing, whether it's a persuasive , argumentative or any other essay.

3. Audience and tone

To make sure your essay is properly engaged and understood, you need to keep your audience in mind and choose a tone that fits both your subject and your audience.

For an argumentative essay, you’re trying to convince someone who doesn’t agree with you that what you’re claiming is right or, at least, reasonable. You don’t want to turn them off with snarky or offensive language — but you do want to be authoritative. Your hook should match that tone and support your effort.

A narrative essay is likely to welcome more lyrical language, so starting with a colorful description or an anecdote might make more sense than, say, a bold claim or surprising fact. Whatever tone you choose for your narrative essay — comical or gentle or bold — should be used for your hook.

‍ Expository essays can use all sorts of tones and be written to a variety of audiences, so think carefully about the tone that best fits your subject matter. An essay explaining how the human body shuts down when overdosed will likely require a different tone than one on the lives of circus masters in the late 1800s. 

‍ Take action: Look at your list. Can you write these potential hooks in a tone that suits your subject and audience?

Are you writing a 10-page paper or a three-page reflection? Or is this your senior thesis, pushing 100 pages?

‍ If you’re writing a shorter paper, you’ll want to keep your hook quick and snappy. Don’t wax eloquent over three paragraphs about your childhood baseball league if your research paper on Little League is only four pages long.

At the same time, a long work — like a senior thesis or a term paper — could be enhanced by a longer hook. Just make sure your hook relates to and supports the core point of your essay. You don’t want to waste space describing a scene that ultimately has nothing to do with the rest of your piece.

‍ Take action: If you write out the items on your list, how long will they be? A sentence or paragraph? Perfect. Two to five paragraphs? Unless your essay is on the longer side, you may want to save that information for later in the piece.

‍ Now that you know the basic facts about what you’re writing, let’s look at some approaches you could use to catch those readers — and reel them in.

5 Enticing Essay Hooks (and How to Avoid Common Mistakes)

1. shocking fact or statistic.

Your research turned up a trove of information — some of it’s boring, some of it’s downright mind-blowing. Here’s a tip: If you lead with anything, lead with the mind-blowing stuff.

‍ Your job as the writer is to either make the mundane interesting or point out what’s not mundane at all. That starts with your first sentence.

For example, let’s say you’re writing about the color of the sky. You don’t want to start with “the sky is blue”. But you could start by explaining how the sky got its color.

For example:

‍ Making the mundane interesting: Sunlight is clear and colorless — until it strikes earth’s atmosphere. Then, scattered by air molecules, it colors our sky blue.

‍ Not mundane at all: In 2020, wildfires up and down North America’s West Coast sent so much smoke into the atmosphere that, in California, the sky turned orange.

Whether you’re sharing a fact or statistic, make sure it’s shocking or unexpected. And state it as directly as possible. 

Produce a shocking statistic with AI

Go to Wordtune, add your headline, and click on 'Expand on' and type "statistics". You can scroll through different AI-suggested stats that relate to your subject at hand.

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Get Wordtune for free > Get Wordtune for free >

2. Bold claim hook

Especially fitting for argumentative essays, this approach goes from zero to 60 in two seconds (or less, depending how fast your audience reads). The idea is to get to the point ASAP. Make your claim — and then dive into your argument to back it up.

Will your claim ruffle feathers? Hopefully. If your “bold claim” makes people shrug, you haven’t succeeded either in writing it or in choosing a claim that’s actually bold. 

‍ Avoid the mistake of making a claim that people already accept as fact.

Just like “the sky is blue” won’t work as a shocking fact, it won’t work as a bold claim. We know the sky’s blue. Tell us something we don’t know. Or better: tell us something we’ve never heard before and may even find hard to believe. (As long as you can back it up.)

What could work for our sky color example?

  • Denver has the blue-est sky of anywhere I’ve lived.
  • Climate change is making sunsets more colorful than ever.

Generate a bold claim suggestion using AI

Go to Wordtune again, and write a statement that has general consensus. Then, choose the 'Counterargument' suggestion. This is a great way to formulate a bold claim with no effort at all.

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

3. Story/Anecdote hook

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

In an anecdote hook, you use a story to establish a connection between the topic and the reader to gain their attention. The story must be direct and concise, and relate to the main topic quite directly.

If your research turned up a wild example from a study that perfectly fits what you’re writing about, leading with that anecdote might be the best way to open your essay. Or maybe you have a personal story that relates to the topic — or permission from a friend to include their story.

The anecdotal hook is a favorite for magazine journalists and, let’s be honest, most of the writers in the room. It’s an excuse for us to play with words and work in more storytelling. As a bonus, well-told stories also have a knack for sucking in readers. Humans are storytellers . It’s like our radar is always pinging for another wild tale to first hear and then share.

But be careful you’re not wooed by a story that doesn’t fit the essay you’re writing. And if it does fit, keep it brief. The details you include need to be relevant to the essay, not just satisfying the inner gossip’s need for more juice.

A favorite writing tip that applies here: enter the scene as late as possible, leave as early as possible.

Consider these two examples:

‍ Long and rambling: When I moved to Colorado in 2015, I’d never been here before and I didn’t know what to expect. I came from Illinois, where I thought the skies were big and the landscape was boring. I wasn’t expecting the Colorado sky to be bigger. And I certainly wasn’t expecting it to be more blue.

‍ Direct and concise: The first thing I noticed when I moved to Colorado was the sky: it seemed bigger and more blue than the sky anywhere else I’d lived.

Either of these hooks could work fine if we were just writing a personal essay about a move to a new place, but if we’re specifically writing about the sky, the second example is better. It sticks to the point — the sky and the color of the sky — and doesn’t get bogged down in irrelevant details about where the person moved from, whether they’d been to Colorado before, or what they were expecting.

Improve your story using AI

Not all of us are natural storytellers. By using AI you can expand a short-written story, or simply phrase it better.

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

4. Question Hook

Do you remember the beginning of this blog? No need to scroll back up, because I just used the same hook style again: the question.

Starting your piece with a question is a great way to spark curiosity in your reader and set up what your piece is about. But there are plenty of ways to do this poorly.

Avoid any variation of “have you ever thought of…” or “have you ever wondered…” Questions like these try to put thoughts into readers’ minds that they may or may not have ever considered, and can be a major turnoff.

Instead, you’ll want to come up with a unique question that approaches your topic from a fresh angle. This means honing in on what was especially interesting or surprising from your research — and maybe even doing some brainstorming of different questions to find the most fascinating one.

What questions could you ask about the color of the sky? So glad you asked.

  • Why did the sky turn orange in the middle of the day?
  • If light is clear, why does the sky look blue?
  • What do earth’s atmosphere and rainbow-casting suncatchers have in common?

5. Description Hook

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Another favorite of the literary writers in the room, description is a prime choice for explanatory or narrative essays. But it takes some focus and intention to do well. 

Like with story hooks, you want to keep descriptive hooks concise. Whatever you’re describing — historical figure, disease, sporting event, London in the 1600s — should be clearly relevant to the central purpose of your essay. Your description should either illustrate the point you’re making or serve as an introduction to your topic.

Mistakes to avoid:

  • Relying on passive voice
  • Choosing bland words
  • Describing a scene that’s common to the reader 

As with all hooks, your description needs to be specific and unexpected .

So what would make a good descriptive hook for an essay on the sky? 

Describing a sunset is too cliche, so cross that one off the list. Describing the sky as it is on a normal day wouldn’t be shocking or unexpected. To reach something unique, you’d have to either zoom in on the air molecules (like we did in our shocking fact example) or take a totally different approach:

Only an artist, the kind that memorized the colors in the crayon box as a kid and uses words like cerulean and violet , could name the difference between the blue of Colorado’s sky and the blue of Indiana’s sky. But she saw the difference, first in photos and then in person. That richer Colorful Colorado blue reflected in her eyes. Not baby blue or sapphire or azure — or even sky blue. Blue bird, perhaps? That’s what Coloradans called it. We’re closer to the sky, they say, that’s why it’s blue-er here. Believe it or not, they’re right.

Create a description hook with AI

By now, you know the process. You write the main topic of your essay, and click 'Explain'. You can also try the 'Emphasize' suggestion, which rather that adding an explanation, reiterates the message more deeply.

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

3 Approaches to Avoid When Writing Hooks

Every type of hook can be done poorly, but avoid these at all costs. These hooks are tired and overdone. They may help you start your first draft, but please — for the sake of your readers — do not submit an essay with any of these leads.

1. Quotations

Abraham Lincoln probably didn’t even say that quote the internet attributed to him, but even if he did, people probably already know it. It’s not shocking or unique or unexpected. Leave it out.

2. Definitions

The New Oxford American Dictionary defines hook as “a thing designed to catch people’s attention.” 

This approach doesn’t catch anyone’s attention — unless you’re defining a particularly unusual word. But even if you are defining an unusual word, there’s probably a more interesting way to start your essay than relying on someone else’s definition.

3. “Imagine this”

Here’s a hint: Cut “imagine this” and keep the rest. The hook will either work (and be an enticing description) or be painfully boring. Either way, you’ll at least avoid the most cliched approach to starting any piece of writing.

Our Go-To Trick for Writing Catchy Hooks

If you want a surefire way to write compelling openings , do this:

Go through your notes and either outline your essay or write the whole thing. This way, you’ll know the central thread (or throughline) that runs throughout your piece. 

Once your essay or outline is complete, go back through and identify a particularly compelling fact, claim, or example that relates to that central thread.

‍ Write up that fact, claim, or example as the hook for your essay using any of the methods we’ve covered. Then revise or write your essay so the hook leads smoothly into the rest of the piece and you don’t repeat that information elsewhere.

Does your hook spark curiosity in you? Did that fact surprise you in the research stage? Chances are, your readers will have the same reaction. And that’s exactly what you want.

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what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

How to Write a Hook: Start Off Your Essay Strong with This Guide

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

What is a Hook for an Essay: Importance and Purpose

Which section of your essay can make your readers dip their toes into your writing? Is it the body paragraphs where all the analysis is laid out? Or maybe the introduction, where you present your thesis statement and voice your perspective on the subject? Well, if you think it is the latter, then we must agree with your decision. However, let's get more specific; if we take the introductory paragraph to pieces, which piece gets the most recognition? You must have guessed from the article's title that we're talking about a hook. But first, let's define what is a hook for an essay before we walk you through the reasons why it deserves our pat on the back.

The hook is the initial sentence in a written work. Whether you're asking how to write a hook for a song, blog post, or term paper, know that the purpose of any effective hook is to seize the reader's attention. It can be one sentence long, often for shorter pieces, or composed of several lines - usually for larger pieces. Making the reader want to keep reading is what an essay hook accomplishes for your paper, just as an intriguing introduction does for any piece.

Our main emphasis in this guide is on creating a good hook for an essay. Nonetheless, these fundamental guidelines apply to nearly every format for communicating with your audience. Whether writing a personal statement, a speech, or a presentation, making a solid first impression is crucial to spur your readers into action.

How to Write a Hook for Different Kinds of Writing

Although it is a tough skill to master, understanding how to write a hook is crucial for academic writing success. By reviewing the most prevalent kinds of essay hooks, you can discover how to effectively captivate readers from the start and generate a hook that is ideal for your article. To do so, let's head over to the following sections prepared by our dissertation writers .

essay hooks

How to Write a Hook for a College Essay?

By mastering how to write a hook for a college essay, you have the opportunity to stand out from the hundreds of applicants with identical academic portfolios to yours in your college essay. It should shed light on who you are, represent your true nature, and show your individuality. But first, you need an attention-grabbing start if you want the admissions committee to read more of yours than theirs. For this, you'll require a strong hook.

Set the Scene

When wondering how to write a good hook for an essay, consider setting the scene. Open in the middle of a key moment, plunge in with vivid details and conversation to keep your essay flowing and attract the reader. Make the reader feel like they are seeing a moment from your life and have just tuned in.

Open with an Example

Starting with a specific example is also a great idea if you're explaining how you acquired a particular skill or unique accomplishment. Then, similar to how you established the scenario above, you may return to this point later and discuss its significance throughout the remaining sections.

Open with an Anecdote

Using an anecdotal hook doesn't necessarily mean that your essay should also be humorous. The joke should be short and well-aimed to achieve the best results. To assist the reader in visualizing the situation and understanding what you are up against when tackling a task or overcoming a challenge, you might also use a funny irony. And if this sounds too overwhelming to compose, buy an essay on our platform and let our expert writers convey your unmatched story!

How to Write a Hook for an Argumentative Essay?

If you write a strong hook, your instructor will be compelled to read your argument in the following paragraphs. So, put your creative thinking cap on while crafting the hook, and write in a way that entices readers to continue reading the essay.

Use Statistics

Statistics serve as a useful hook because they encourage research. When used in argumentative writing, statistics can introduce readers to previously undiscovered details and data. That can greatly increase their desire to read your article from start to finish. You can also consider this advice when unsure how to write a good hook for a research paper. Especially if you're conducting a quantitative study, a statistic hook can be a solid start.

Use a Common Misconception

Another answer to your 'how to write a hook for an argumentative essay' question is to use a common misconception. What could be a better way to construct an interesting hook, which should grab readers' attention, than to incorporate a widely held misconception? A widespread false belief is one that many people hold to be true. When you create a hook with a misinterpretation, you startle your readers and immediately capture their interest.

How to Write a Hook for a Persuasive Essay?

The finest hooks for a persuasive essay capture the reader's interest while leading them to almost unconsciously support your position even before they are aware of it. You can accomplish this by employing the following hook ideas for an essay:

Ask a Rhetorical Question

By posing a query at the outset of your essay, you may engage the reader's critical thinking and whet their appetite for the solution you won't provide until later. Try to formulate a question wide enough for them to not immediately know the answer and detailed enough to avoid becoming a generic hook.

Use an Emotional Appeal

This is a fantastic approach to arouse sympathy and draw the reader into your cause. By appealing to the reader's emotions, you may establish a bond that encourages them to read more and get invested in the subject you cover.

Using these strategies, you won't have to wonder how to write a hook for a persuasive essay anymore!

How to Write a Hook for a Literary Analysis Essay?

Finding strong essay openers might be particularly challenging when writing a literary analysis. Coming up with something very remarkable on your own while writing about someone else's work is no easy feat. But we have some expert solutions below:

Use Literary Quotes

Using a literary quote sounds like the best option when unsure how to write a hook for a literary analysis essay. Nonetheless, its use is not restricted to that and is mostly determined by the style and meaning of the quotes. Still, when employing literary quotes, it's crucial to show two things at once: first, how well you understand the textual information. And second, you know how to capture the reader's interest right away.

Employ Quotes from Famous People

This is another style of hook that is frequently employed in literary analysis. But if you wonder how to write a good essay hook without sounding boring, choose a historical person with notable accomplishments and keep your readers intrigued and inspired to read more.

How to Write a Hook for an Informative Essay?

In an informative essay, your ultimate goal is to not only educate your audience but also engage and keep them interested from the very beginning. For this, consider the following:

Start with a Fact or Definition

You might begin your essay with an interesting fact or by giving a definition related to your subject. The same standard applies here for most types mentioned above: it must be intriguing, surprising, and/or alarming.

Ask Questions that Relate to Your Topic

Another solution to 'How to write a hook for an informative essay?' is to introduce your essay with a relevant question. This hook lets you pique a reader's interest in your essay and urge them to keep reading as they ponder the answer.

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Expert-Approved Tips for Writing an Essay Hook

Are you still struggling with the ideal opening sentence for your essay? Check out some advice from our essay helper on how to write a hook sentence and make your opening stand out.

good essay hook

  • Keep your essay type in mind . Remember to keep your hook relevant. An effective hook for an argumentative or descriptive essay format will differ greatly. Therefore, the relevancy of the hook might be even more important than the content it conveys.
  • Decide on the purpose of your hook . When unsure how to write a hook for an essay, try asking the following questions: What result are you hoping to get from it? Would you like your readers to be curious? Or, even better, surprised? Perhaps even somewhat caught off guard? Determine the effect you wish to accomplish before selecting a hook.
  • Choose a hook at the end of the writing process. Even though it should be the first sentence of your paper, it doesn't mean you should write your hook first. Writing an essay is a long and creative process. So, if you can't think of an effective hook at the beginning, just keep writing according to your plan, and it will eventually come into your head. If you were lucky enough to concoct your hook immediately, double-check your writing to see if it still fits into the whole text and its style once you've finished writing.
  • Make it short . The shorter, the better – this rule works for essay hooks. Keeping your hook to a minimum size will ensure that readers will read it at the same moment they start looking at your essay. Even before thinking if they want or don't want to read it, their attention will be captured, and their curiosity will get the best of them. So, they will continue reading the entire text to discover as much as possible.

Now you know how to write a good hook and understand that a solid hook is the difference between someone delving further into your work or abandoning it immediately. With our hook examples for an essay, you can do more than just write a great paper. We do not doubt that you can even write a winning term paper example right away!

Try to become an even better writer with the help of our paper writing service . Give them the freedom to write superior hooks and full essays for you so you may learn from them!

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How to Write A Hook for an argumentative essay

  • February 21, 2023
  • How To's

Here's What We'll Cover

In this article, we will explore how to write an effective hook for an argumentative essay in the introduction paragraph of your paper. We will also explore various argumentative essay hook examples and what makes them effective and compelling hooks.

What is the purpose of a hook in an argumentative essay?

When writing an argumentative essay for an assignment, it is important to include a hook in an essay introduction to capture the reader’s attention and encourage them to continue reading. The hook should be related to the topic of the essay and aim to pique the reader’s interest, especially since the essay will be submitted to an instructor for grading.

A hook in an argumentative essay interests the reader in the topic being discussed and invests in the writer’s argument. This is especially important when the essay is being submitted for an academic paper, as the writer’s goal is to persuade the instructor to accept their position on a controversial issue. A strong hook sentence can also help establish the writer’s credibility and expertise, which is important for persuasive arguments .

Types of Hooks for an Argumentative Essay

Here are some types of essay hooks for argumentative essays

Rhetorical Question

This type of hook poses a question to the reader that does not necessarily require an answer but is intended to spark their interest in the topic being discussed. It effectively engages the reader and encourages them to think more deeply about the issue.

Example: “Did you know that more than 60% of teenagers report feeling stressed out by their daily lives? What if there was a way to reduce that stress and help them succeed in school?”

Strong Statement Hook

This hook makes a bold statement or assertion that captures the reader’s attention and draws them into the essay. It is often used to make a clear and direct argument that sets the tone for the rest of the essay.

Example: “The death penalty is a barbaric practice that has no place in modern society. It is an affront to human rights and a stain on the justice system.”

Common Misconception

This hook challenges a common assumption or belief many people have about the discussed topic. By highlighting this misconception, the writer can make the reader more interested in the topic and more receptive to the writer’s argument.

Example: “Many people believe that video games are a waste of time and have no educational value, but recent studies have shown that playing video games can actually improve cognitive function and problem-solving skills.”

Statistics-Related Hooks

This argumentative essay hook uses statistics or data to capture the reader’s attention and support the writer’s argument. Statistics can be a powerful tool for making an argument, as they can provide evidence to back up the writer’s claims.

Example: “Did you know that in the United States, more than 75% of people arrested for drug offenses are black or Latino, even though these groups make up only a small percentage of the population?”

Question Hook

This hook asks a question intended to get the reader thinking about the topic and considering the writer’s argument. It can be an effective way to engage the reader and encourage them to keep reading.

Example: “What would happen if we stopped treating mental illness as taboo and started talking about it openly and honestly?”

Quote or Anecdote Hook

This hook uses a quote or anecdote to capture the reader’s attention and provide context for the writer’s argument. It can effectively create an emotional connection with the reader and make them more invested in the discussed topic.

Example: “As Mahatma Gandhi once said, ‘The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by how its animals are treated.’ It is time for us to start treating animals with the respect and compassion they deserve.”

types of hooks for an argumentative essay

How to brainstorm and draft potential hooks for an argumentative essay

As a student with an argumentative essay assignment, it’s important to brainstorm and draft potential hooks for your essay to engage your reader and make a strong impression. Here are some steps you can take to brainstorm and draft potential hooks:

  • Start by reviewing your topic and thesis statement. Ensure you clearly understand the issue you are discussing and your position in your essay.
  • Consider your audience. Think about who will be reading your argument essay and what types of hooks might be most effective in capturing their attention and engaging them in your argument.
  • Brainstorm a list of potential hooks. Consider using rhetorical questions, strong statements, statistics, quotes, anecdotes, or other hooks. Don’t worry about making them perfect at this stage – just focus on generating a range of ideas.
  • Evaluate your hooks. Once you have a list of potential hooks, evaluate each to see which is the most effective. Consider whether the hook is relevant to your argument, whether it is attention-grabbing, and whether it sets the right tone for your essay.
  • Choose your hook. Based on your evaluation, choose the most effective hook in introducing your argument and engaging your reader. Remember that a strong hook can distinguish between a reader continuing to read or losing interest, so choose carefully.
  • Draft your hook. Write your chosen hook as the opening sentence or sentences of your essay. Ensure it is clear, concise, engaging, and leads smoothly into the rest of your argument.

How to write a hook for an argumentative essay

We have looked at how to brainstorm and draft potential hooks. Now let’s dive into writing the actual hook. 

Your hook should be relevant to the topic at hand and your thesis statement

Your hook should be relevant to the topic at hand and your thesis statement : The hook should be related to the topic of the essay and should lead into the thesis statement of the essay. It should be a clear and direct statement that sets the tone for the essay and gives the reader an idea of what to expect. The hook’s relevance to the thesis statement helps to make a strong and effective argument.

Use Simple and direct language

The language in the hook should be clear and easy to understand, using simple words and avoiding jargon or technical terms that the reader may not be familiar with. The aim is to make the hook accessible and interesting to a wide range of readers, not just those who are already knowledgeable about the topic.

Your hook should arouse interest and curiosity

The hook should capture the reader’s attention and make them curious about the topic. It should be attention-grabbing, memorable and thought-provoking so the reader is intrigued and motivated to continue reading. Arousal of interest and curiosity makes the reader invested in the topic and more receptive to the writer’s argument.

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Refining your hook for an argumentative essay

Refining your hook is an important step in the writing process, as it ensures that your hook is engaging and effective. To refine your hook, you should read it over several times, making any necessary changes or revisions to make it more attention-grabbing and interesting. Consider how your hook relates to your thesis statement and whether it is a clear and direct statement that sets the tone for the essay. Get feedback from others and make any necessary changes to refine your hook and make it more compelling.

Examples of effective hooks for an argumentative essay

Here are some essay hook examples in different argumentative essay topics and what makes them effective

Hook: “In the age of misinformation and ‘fake news,’ can we really trust the media to give us an accurate picture of political events?”

This hook is effective because it challenges a common assumption about the role of the media in politics and encourages the reader to think more deeply about the issue.

Hook: “What would you do if you discovered that your favorite clothing brand used child labor to make their products?”

This hook is effective because it appeals to the reader’s sense of morality and encourages them to consider a real-world issue relevant to their lives.

Society & culture

Hook: “In a world becoming increasingly diverse and multicultural, how can we promote understanding and respect for different cultures?”

This hook is effective because it addresses an important issue and encourages the reader to consider how they can make a positive difference in their community.

Hook: “The saying goes, ‘History is written by the victors.’ But what about the voices and experiences of oppressed or marginalized?”

This hook is effective because it challenges a common assumption about the nature of history and encourages the reader to consider the importance of including diverse perspectives in studying history.

Social Media

Hook: “Is social media really bringing us closer, or is it driving us further apart?”

This hook is effective because it addresses a current and relevant issue and encourages the reader to consider the impact of social media on their own lives and relationships.

Hook: “As technology advances at an unprecedented rate, are we losing touch with our humanity?”

This hook is effective because it challenges the reader to consider the potential negative consequences of technological progress and encourages them to think critically about the role of technology in our lives.

Hook: “In a society that values thinness and ‘perfect’ bodies, how can we promote positivity and acceptance for all?”

This hook is effective because it addresses an important issue affecting many people and encourages the reader to consider how they can make a positive difference in their lives and communities.

Hook: “In a world where technology is changing how we learn, do traditional classrooms still have a place in education?”

This hook is effective because it addresses a current and relevant issue and encourages the reader to consider the potential impact of technology on the future of education.

Hook: “Is winning really everything in sports, or is there more to the game than just the final score?”

This hook is effective because it challenges a common assumption about the purpose of sports and encourages the reader to consider the role of sports in our lives beyond just competition and winning.

Crafting an effective hook for your argumentative essay is crucial for engaging your reader and making a strong impression. The hook should be relevant to the topic and your thesis statement, use simple and direct language, and arouse interest and curiosity. It’s important to brainstorm and draft potential hooks that will capture the target audience’s attention and set the tone for your argument.

Consider your audience, the topic you are discussing, and the purpose of your argument, and choose a relevant and engaging hook. Refine your hook to ensure it is clear, concise, and effective and leads smoothly into the rest of your argument. By crafting a strong and effective hook, you can set the stage for a persuasive and well-supported argument in your essay.

To start a good hook for an argumentative essay, you should brainstorm and draft potential hooks relevant to the topic and your thesis statement. Consider using rhetorical questions, strong statements, statistics, quotes, anecdotes, or other types of hooks that will capture your reader’s attention and make a strong impression from the beginning of your essay.

Good openers for an argumentative essay include using a strong and attention-grabbing hook, introducing the topic and providing background information, and stating your thesis statement clearly and concisely. Depending on the topic and purpose of your essay, you may also choose to include a brief overview of your main points or arguments.

A hook sentence for an argumentative essay is a statement or question that captures the reader’s attention and introduces the topic and argument of the essay. It is the opening sentence or sentence of the essay and sets the tone for the rest of the argument. A hook sentence can be a strong statement, a provocative question, a relevant statistic, or an engaging anecdote, among other types of hooks.

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  • How to write an argumentative essay | Examples & tips

How to Write an Argumentative Essay | Examples & Tips

Published on July 24, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

An argumentative essay expresses an extended argument for a particular thesis statement . The author takes a clearly defined stance on their subject and builds up an evidence-based case for it.

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Table of contents

When do you write an argumentative essay, approaches to argumentative essays, introducing your argument, the body: developing your argument, concluding your argument, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about argumentative essays.

You might be assigned an argumentative essay as a writing exercise in high school or in a composition class. The prompt will often ask you to argue for one of two positions, and may include terms like “argue” or “argument.” It will frequently take the form of a question.

The prompt may also be more open-ended in terms of the possible arguments you could make.

Argumentative writing at college level

At university, the vast majority of essays or papers you write will involve some form of argumentation. For example, both rhetorical analysis and literary analysis essays involve making arguments about texts.

In this context, you won’t necessarily be told to write an argumentative essay—but making an evidence-based argument is an essential goal of most academic writing, and this should be your default approach unless you’re told otherwise.

Examples of argumentative essay prompts

At a university level, all the prompts below imply an argumentative essay as the appropriate response.

Your research should lead you to develop a specific position on the topic. The essay then argues for that position and aims to convince the reader by presenting your evidence, evaluation and analysis.

  • Don’t just list all the effects you can think of.
  • Do develop a focused argument about the overall effect and why it matters, backed up by evidence from sources.
  • Don’t just provide a selection of data on the measures’ effectiveness.
  • Do build up your own argument about which kinds of measures have been most or least effective, and why.
  • Don’t just analyze a random selection of doppelgänger characters.
  • Do form an argument about specific texts, comparing and contrasting how they express their thematic concerns through doppelgänger characters.

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what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

An argumentative essay should be objective in its approach; your arguments should rely on logic and evidence, not on exaggeration or appeals to emotion.

There are many possible approaches to argumentative essays, but there are two common models that can help you start outlining your arguments: The Toulmin model and the Rogerian model.

Toulmin arguments

The Toulmin model consists of four steps, which may be repeated as many times as necessary for the argument:

  • Make a claim
  • Provide the grounds (evidence) for the claim
  • Explain the warrant (how the grounds support the claim)
  • Discuss possible rebuttals to the claim, identifying the limits of the argument and showing that you have considered alternative perspectives

The Toulmin model is a common approach in academic essays. You don’t have to use these specific terms (grounds, warrants, rebuttals), but establishing a clear connection between your claims and the evidence supporting them is crucial in an argumentative essay.

Say you’re making an argument about the effectiveness of workplace anti-discrimination measures. You might:

  • Claim that unconscious bias training does not have the desired results, and resources would be better spent on other approaches
  • Cite data to support your claim
  • Explain how the data indicates that the method is ineffective
  • Anticipate objections to your claim based on other data, indicating whether these objections are valid, and if not, why not.

Rogerian arguments

The Rogerian model also consists of four steps you might repeat throughout your essay:

  • Discuss what the opposing position gets right and why people might hold this position
  • Highlight the problems with this position
  • Present your own position , showing how it addresses these problems
  • Suggest a possible compromise —what elements of your position would proponents of the opposing position benefit from adopting?

This model builds up a clear picture of both sides of an argument and seeks a compromise. It is particularly useful when people tend to disagree strongly on the issue discussed, allowing you to approach opposing arguments in good faith.

Say you want to argue that the internet has had a positive impact on education. You might:

  • Acknowledge that students rely too much on websites like Wikipedia
  • Argue that teachers view Wikipedia as more unreliable than it really is
  • Suggest that Wikipedia’s system of citations can actually teach students about referencing
  • Suggest critical engagement with Wikipedia as a possible assignment for teachers who are skeptical of its usefulness.

You don’t necessarily have to pick one of these models—you may even use elements of both in different parts of your essay—but it’s worth considering them if you struggle to structure your arguments.

Regardless of which approach you take, your essay should always be structured using an introduction , a body , and a conclusion .

Like other academic essays, an argumentative essay begins with an introduction . The introduction serves to capture the reader’s interest, provide background information, present your thesis statement , and (in longer essays) to summarize the structure of the body.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts is on the rise, and its role in learning is hotly debated. For many teachers who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its critical benefits for students and educators—as a uniquely comprehensive and accessible information source; a means of exposure to and engagement with different perspectives; and a highly flexible learning environment.

The body of an argumentative essay is where you develop your arguments in detail. Here you’ll present evidence, analysis, and reasoning to convince the reader that your thesis statement is true.

In the standard five-paragraph format for short essays, the body takes up three of your five paragraphs. In longer essays, it will be more paragraphs, and might be divided into sections with headings.

Each paragraph covers its own topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Each of these topics must contribute to your overall argument; don’t include irrelevant information.

This example paragraph takes a Rogerian approach: It first acknowledges the merits of the opposing position and then highlights problems with that position.

Hover over different parts of the example to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

A common frustration for teachers is students’ use of Wikipedia as a source in their writing. Its prevalence among students is not exaggerated; a survey found that the vast majority of the students surveyed used Wikipedia (Head & Eisenberg, 2010). An article in The Guardian stresses a common objection to its use: “a reliance on Wikipedia can discourage students from engaging with genuine academic writing” (Coomer, 2013). Teachers are clearly not mistaken in viewing Wikipedia usage as ubiquitous among their students; but the claim that it discourages engagement with academic sources requires further investigation. This point is treated as self-evident by many teachers, but Wikipedia itself explicitly encourages students to look into other sources. Its articles often provide references to academic publications and include warning notes where citations are missing; the site’s own guidelines for research make clear that it should be used as a starting point, emphasizing that users should always “read the references and check whether they really do support what the article says” (“Wikipedia:Researching with Wikipedia,” 2020). Indeed, for many students, Wikipedia is their first encounter with the concepts of citation and referencing. The use of Wikipedia therefore has a positive side that merits deeper consideration than it often receives.

An argumentative essay ends with a conclusion that summarizes and reflects on the arguments made in the body.

No new arguments or evidence appear here, but in longer essays you may discuss the strengths and weaknesses of your argument and suggest topics for future research. In all conclusions, you should stress the relevance and importance of your argument.

Hover over the following example to see the typical elements of a conclusion.

The internet has had a major positive impact on the world of education; occasional pitfalls aside, its value is evident in numerous applications. The future of teaching lies in the possibilities the internet opens up for communication, research, and interactivity. As the popularity of distance learning shows, students value the flexibility and accessibility offered by digital education, and educators should fully embrace these advantages. The internet’s dangers, real and imaginary, have been documented exhaustively by skeptics, but the internet is here to stay; it is time to focus seriously on its potential for good.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

At college level, you must properly cite your sources in all essays , research papers , and other academic texts (except exams and in-class exercises).

Add a citation whenever you quote , paraphrase , or summarize information or ideas from a source. You should also give full source details in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your text.

The exact format of your citations depends on which citation style you are instructed to use. The most common styles are APA , MLA , and Chicago .

The majority of the essays written at university are some sort of argumentative essay . Unless otherwise specified, you can assume that the goal of any essay you’re asked to write is argumentative: To convince the reader of your position using evidence and reasoning.

In composition classes you might be given assignments that specifically test your ability to write an argumentative essay. Look out for prompts including instructions like “argue,” “assess,” or “discuss” to see if this is the goal.

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How to Write a Hook: Top 5 Tips for Writers

Hannah Yang headshot

Hannah Yang

how to write a hook

How do you make people feel excited to read your work?

Well, for starters, you can write a great hook.

The “hook” refers to the first sentence, or first few sentences, of an essay, article, or story. That’s because these first few lines need to hook readers in, the same way fishermen use bait to hook fish in.

If you’re trying to figure out how to write a hook, you’ve come to the right place. Read on to learn how to write a fantastic hook and to see some examples of successful ones.

What Is a Hook in Writing?

Top 5 tips for writing good hooks, great examples of hooks, is writing a hook in an essay different from a story hook, conclusion on how to write a hook.

We use the term “hook” to talk about the very beginning of a written work—specifically the part designed to grab readers’ attention. The hook can be as short as a single sentence or as long as a full paragraph.

Writing hooks is a necessary skill for all types of writing—narrative essays, research papers, fiction writing, and more.

definition of a hook in writing

What Makes a Good Hook Important?

Good hooks make your reader feel excited to keep reading.

If you’re writing a book, you need a great hook so people decide to actually buy your work, instead of putting it back on the shelf.

If you’re writing a blog post or article, you need a great hook so people read to the end, instead of scrolling or flipping to a different article instead.

And if you’re writing an essay for school, you need a good hook so you can practice the skill of writing well.

What Are the Different Types of Hooks?

There’s more than one way to write a great hook.

Here are six types of hooks that will grab your reader’s attention.

  • Question hook : a question that provokes the reader’s curiosity and makes them keep reading to find out the answer
  • Statement hook : a strong declaration related to your topic that makes the reader keep reading to see you defend this statement
  • Statistic hook : an interesting fact or statistic that makes you sound knowledgeable, so your reader trusts your expertise
  • Quote hook : a memorable quote, often by a famous person, that the reader will find interesting
  • Description hook : a vivid description that immerses your reader into a specific scene
  • Anecdotal hook : a personal story that relates to your topic and makes the reader feel personally connected to the story

Here are our top tips for writing a strong opening hook.

Tip 1: Surprise the Reader

Readers crave the unexpected. If you start your piece in a surprising way, they’ll be more likely to keep reading.

You can even say something controversial. Readers will want to keep reading to see how you prove your own statement.

Tip 2: Raise a Question

When starting an essay or a story, you should try to create a question that the reader wants answered.

This doesn’t have to be a literal question that ends with a question mark—instead, it can simply be an unusual statement or a weird situation. Make sure it’s something your target audience will find interesting.

Tip 3: Keep Your Promises

If you open your essay with an interesting hook, you need to be mindful of what you’re promising to the reader. If you don’t keep that promise throughout the piece, your reader will feel tricked.

For example, you’d probably be unhappy if you read a story that started with, “The monster was coming for me” and then, later in the first chapter, said, “Then I woke up and realized it was just a nightmare.”

The first sentence is a strong opening hook, but it promises a dramatic scene, which doesn’t get fulfilled, because the hook turns out not to be real.

An equivalent in an essay would be writing a controversial statement and then failing to prove why that statement is true, or asking an interesting question and then failing to answer it later.

Tip 4: Keep It Relevant

Some writers try so hard to choose an interesting hook that they end up using something irrelevant to their essay. Readers will get confused if you open with a random quote or statistic that only tangentially connects to your thesis.

If you’re choosing between a fascinating hook that doesn’t have much to do with your topic, or a decent hook that’s directly related to your thesis statement, you should go with the latter.

Tip 5: Don’t Stop at the Hook

Some writers focus so much on nailing the opening hook that they forget to make the rest of the essay equally strong.

Your reader could still stop reading on the second page, or the third, or the tenth. Make sure you use strong and engaging writing throughout the piece.

One way to learn how to write hooks is to look at examples.

Here are examples of six hooks you could use to start a persuasive essay about artificial intelligence, plus three hooks you could use to start a sci-fi story.

Example 1: Question Hook

  • Will artificial intelligence someday become smarter than humans?

Example 2: Statement Hook

  • Artificial intelligence could become smarter than humans by 2050.

Example 3: Statistic Hook

  • As of 2022, the global AI industry is worth over $130 billion.

Example 4: Quote Hook

  • The scientist Stephen Hawking once said, “The development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.”

Example 5: Description Hook

  • The Alexa AI blinks from the kitchen table, emitting a comforting blue light.

Example 6: Anecdotal Hook

  • Like many people of my generation, I used an AI for the first time when I was twelve years old.

Example 7: Sci-Fi Story Hooks

  • Samuel Gibson had friends. Sure, all his friends were AI robots that his parents had purchased for him, but they still counted as friends.
  • My father’s office is full of strange machines, which none of us are allowed to touch.
  • The AI revolt began on Christmas morning of the year 2068.

Both essays and stories require good hooks. After all, you’re still competing for your reader’s attention, no matter what kind of work you’re writing.

However, a story hook will look very different from an essay hook.

If you’re writing fiction, you most likely won’t use a statistic, question, or quote to hook your readers in. Instead, your best options will be a statement, a description, or an anecdote—or, or often, a sentence that combines a little bit of all three.

Just like with essays, you should try to raise a question in your reader’s head. This can be a strange character, an unusual setting, or a mysterious fact.

Here are some examples of strong hooks in novels:

“My first memory, when I was three years old, was of trying to kill my sister.”—Jodi Piccoult, My Sister’s Keeper

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”—Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

“Once upon a time, on the coldest night of midwinter, in the darkest heart of the forest, Death and Fortune came to a crossroads.”—Margaret Owen, Little Thieves

“The women gather in a YMCA basement rec room: hard linoleum floors, half-windows along one wall, view of sidewalk and brick.”—Maria Adelmann, How to Be Eaten

“I became what I am today at the age of twelve, on a rainy overcast day in 1975.”—Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

“It did not surprise Fire that the man in the forest shot her. What surprised her was that he shot her by accident.”—Kristen Cashore, Fire

There you have it—a complete guide to writing a fantastic hook.

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Hannah Yang is a speculative fiction writer who writes about all things strange and surreal. Her work has appeared in Analog Science Fiction, Apex Magazine, The Dark, and elsewhere, and two of her stories have been finalists for the Locus Award. Her favorite hobbies include watercolor painting, playing guitar, and rock climbing. You can follow her work on hannahyang.com, or subscribe to her newsletter for publication updates.

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How To Write A Great Essay Hook (With Examples)

How To Write A Great Essay Hook (With Examples)

  • Smodin Editorial Team
  • November 24, 2023

Learning the secrets behind an effective essay starts with understanding the power of a hook. Your hook is the opening statement of your introduction and ultimately acts as an invitation to your readers. It invites them to explore the ideas you’re presenting, while also engaging their attention for a long enough time to read your work.

With a great hook, you can improve your writing skills and set the stage for a masterfully written essay. But what else is a good hook able to do? And what kind of hook can you use to write an incredible essay?

This guide (complete with hook sentence examples) will help walk you through the steps of writing a hook and how to use it to boost your grades and make your work more compelling than ever!

What Is An Essay Hook?

An essay hook is the opening sentence or paragraphs of your essay and is designed to pique the curiosity of your reader while also holding their attention long enough to read the rest of your work. Think about it – would you want to read an essay if the first sentence is long-winded and boring?

Generally, writers use an effective hook to set the tone for the rest of the work and give you a quick look ‘behind the curtain’. The hook tells you exactly what the essay is about in a thoughtful and thought-provoking way that leaves you hungry for more.

For example: “ Did you know that the average person eats around five pounds of shark meat every year? In a shocking study by the Shark Lovers World Organization, it was revealed that around 4% of all fish-based products contain shark meat. ”

Of course, this isn’t true (at least, we hope not!). But it did capture your interest and make you want to find out more. That’s exactly what a hook does.

A good essay hook can keep your readers interested and helps to engage them in what you’re saying. It also leaves a lasting impression on them, which means you’ve accomplished your goal of starting a conversation about your essay topic.

Types Of Essay Hooks

With the many types of essays and writing structures you can use for your work, there are just as many hooks to suit your topic. But which ones are relevant? And which one should you use to effectively introduce your writing?

Below, we’ve listed some of the most common types of essay hooks to help you narrow down your search.

Question hook

If you start your essay with a thought-provoking question, you have a great chance of engaging your readers from the get-go. This is because a question can encourage them to actively think about what you’re saying and spark curiosity about what the real answer to the question is.

It’s important to ensure that your question is relevant and intriguing, but it’s even more important that it aligns with the theme of your essay. Usually, your readers will want to keep reading to find the answers in the body of your essay.

Quotation hook

When you open your essay with a quote from a notable person or reputable organization, you add credibility to your work. This can be particularly important when you’re discussing a topic that needs expertise to build trust.

After you use a relevant quote, you’ll also need to explain why it’s relevant to set the stage for the discussion or argument that you’re presenting.

Statistic hook

Introducing your topic with a compelling statistic or data is another great way to add credibility to your paper. It shows your reader that you’ve done your research, and you have proof to back up the claims that you may be making in the body of your essay.

It’s essential to use statistics that are accurate, though, and they should come from credible sources. Otherwise, you may be undermining your work, which could lead to losing the trust of your reader.

Anecdote hook

The last time I started an essay with an anecdote, my professor gave my work a stellar review and I got the best grades in my class .

Did we grab your attention? Good. That’s how an anecdote hook works. An anecdote is a short personal story that establishes trust with your reader and creates an emotional connection. It can also add a layer of interest to narrative or descriptive essays.

In some essays, you can write an anecdotal hook from the perspective of a fictional character. As long as it sounds like a personal experience, it should reel your readers in.

Surprising statement hook

If you can, try to capture your reader’s attention with a bold or unexpected statement. When you catch them off guard, you can stimulate their curiosity. They’re going to want to keep reading to see how you address or support your surprising statement.

You can use this type of hook in several different ways. Whether you’re challenging a common misconception, giving counterintuitive insights, or presenting intriguing facts that will wow or shock your reader, you can start your essay off on the right note.

Description hook

A description hook helps to engage readers by painting an image or setting a scene using descriptive language. Typically, it appeals to the senses (sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell) and describes something in enough detail that it makes the reader feel as if they’re actually experiencing it for themselves!

This type of hook is suited for narrative or descriptive essays because it allows you to set the tone, establish a certain atmosphere, and even evoke an emotional response in your reader. In turn, the reader becomes fully immersed in the scene that you’re setting.

How To Write A Great Essay Hook

Now that you understand the basics, it’s time to put your pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard) and write a hook that will draw readers in and keep them reading. If you follow the steps we’ve outlined below, you’re sure to craft a hook that will reel in your audience – hook, line, and sinker .

1. Know your audience

Knowing your audience is perhaps one of the most important things to consider when you’re writing an essay hook. Are you writing for your teachers, peers, or a broader audience? Once you know that, you can move on to understanding their motives, and values, and how their emotions will affect how impactful your hook is.

Creating a connection with your audience grabs the reader’s attention and encourages them to keep reading your essay. And, by fostering this connection, you can make them more receptive to the message you’re trying to convey.

2. Understand the purpose of your essay

Before you can write your hook, you’ll need to know what the purpose of your essay is. Generally, your essay will try to inform, persuade, or narrate your subject. Either way, narrowing down the motivation behind writing the essay will help you on your quest to write a hook that suits your writing.

Your hook should always align with the concept of your essay since it’s used to introduce the main theme or argument. You can think of it as a preview of what you’re going to talk about – it gives your readers a glimpse into the direction of your written work and sets expectations for what your essay will cover.

3. Choose the right type of hook

The type of essay hook you choose significantly impacts your essay’s style and whether it will keep your reader’s interest. You can pick from a question, quotation, anecdotal hook, or any of the others we’ve listed.

By carefully selecting what types of hook sentences will captivate your reader and establish the right tone for your essay, you’re guaranteed to have a compelling introduction. You just need to make sure that your hook suits the essay you’re writing.

For example, if you’re writing a personal story hook as an introduction to a historical essay that relies on a chronological structure, it wouldn’t be very impactful. Instead, a quotation or statistic hook may be better suited to an academic essay like this.

4. Make sure your hook is relevant

Relevance is the key to creating a compelling essay hook. The hook should always connect to the topic of your essay, and the link between the two needs to be clear from the get-go.

This does mean, however, that you need to avoid unrelated information in your hook. Keeping with the example of writing a historical essay, we can illustrate this point perfectly.

Say you’re writing an essay on World War II, and you’ve chosen a statistical hook to open your writing. Adding statistics about coffee sales during the same time period is completely irrelevant and won’t have much of an impact.

Unrelated hooks can confuse your audience and completely lose the reader’s interest. On the other hand, a focused and relevant hook can grab the reader’s attention and make your essay more exciting.

5. Spark curiosity

The way that you phrase your essay hook is just as important as the type of hook you use. Ideally, your hook should excite the reader and spark curiosity that makes them want to keep reading.

A poorly worded hook can be confusing or – let’s face it – boring! And you don’t want to bore your audience before they even get past your introduction. Whether you’re asking a question or introducing the topic for your ideas, your hook should set the stage for the rest of your essay.

You may need to use some creativity for this step. But putting yourself in the shoes of your reader can help. Ask yourself ‘What would make me want to keep reading?’. Your answer is usually a good place to start!

6. Keep it short

Although an attention-grabbing hook is ideal, it’s essential to keep it short. You should focus on using impactful language that can effectively convey your message. This is mainly because a shorter hook can keep your reader’s attention without overwhelming them with too much information.

Remember, it’s all about balance. When it comes to essay hooks, you want to strike a balance between capturing your audience’s attention and giving them a concise overview of what your essay is about.

7. Tweak the tone

The tone of your hook sets up the tone for the rest of your essay – so it’s pretty important that you align your tone with the topic. To do this, you first have to ask yourself what the tone is . Is it serious? Or perhaps you want to come across as humorous? Either way, you’ll want to maintain a consistent tone throughout.

A good example of this would be when writing a personal essay. In this case, an anecdote hook would be a great way to kick off your writing. However, if your personal story is serious, a funny anecdote isn’t necessarily the best choice. Instead, you’ll want to pick an anecdote that matches the seriousness of what you’re discussing in the body of your work.

8. Revise your hook with Smodin

After you’ve written your hook, it might still need a little nip and tuck to go from almost perfect to perfectly polished. To do this, you can use several different techniques to rewrite it.

But the easiest way to ensure that your hook is bulletproof is to use Smodin’s AI Paraphrasing tool . It can spin your words to sound like it was crafted by an expert – in a matter of seconds. It’s also a good way to avoid plagiarism and check your text to see how well it performs (the flow, tone, and relevance).

You can also use our free AI Writer to generate a unique, plagiarism-free, and professional essay in just a few prompts. This can help you draft a rough copy of your work before making any adjustments or modifications to your final product.

Catchy Hook Examples For Your Essay

With a better understanding of the types of essay hooks, and how to use them, you are well on your way to crafting an effective and attention-grabbing introduction to your writing. But, if you still need a little help with tailoring hook types to suit your writing structure, take a look at some of these examples of hooks for different types of essays:

Argumentative essay hook examples

Statistical hook: “ According to a recent study conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Americans generate around 4.48 pounds of trash every day. This highlights the urgent need for recyclable products and packaging to address this pressing issue. ”

Question hook: “ Have you ever wondered how our experiences as children impact our daily lives and our resulting choices as adults? This critical question has prompted us to explore the topic of childhood trauma and the profound implications that it could have on our futures. ”

Persuasive essay hook examples

Statistic hook: “ Did you know that over 1.3 million tons of plastic waste are dumped into our oceans every year? This alarming statistic demands our attention and immediate action to address the pressing issue of plastic pollution. ”

Surprising statement: “ In a world that’s run by technology, it’s shocking to realize that the average person spends more time in their day scrolling through social media than sleeping. The digital age has not only revolutionized communication but has also left us questioning the true value of our time and relationships. ”

Narrative essay hook examples

Anecdotal hook: “ Raindrops tapped lightly on the window pane, and the slight rustling of the leaves seemed to whisper secrets in the wind. Little did I know that this ordinary evening would soon become an extraordinary chapter in the story of my life. It all began with a letter—an old, weathered envelope that held the key to a long-buried family mystery .”

Question hook: “ Have you ever wondered what it feels like to stand at the edge of a cliff, staring into the vast unknown below? The adrenaline coursing through your veins, the wind tousling your hair—each moment pregnant with the possibility of adventure. What if I told you that such a moment would change the course of my life forever? ”

Compare and contrast essay hook examples

Quotation hook: “ In the words of Aristotle, ‘Excellence is an art won by training and habituation’. As we delve into the realms of two seemingly disparate subjects, we must consider how their unique qualities and shared traits contribute to the pursuit of excellence in their own distinct ways. ”

Anecdote hook: “ As the sun went down, the city lit up with its busy streets, and I stood there, feeling stuck between two different places—the lively city and the peaceful countryside. In that moment, I noticed how city life and rural living are alike in some ways but also have their unique features. ”

Can I use the same type of hook for different essays?

While some hooks are versatile, it’s best to tailor your hook to the specific essay you’re writing and the topic you’re covering. You’ll need to consider the audience, purpose, and nature of your writing before choosing a hook.

Can I use a combination of different types of hooks in one essay?

Yes, you can experiment with combining different types of essay hooks in your writing, especially if your topic allows for different approaches. However, you should always make sure to include a smooth transition between the hooks and keep them simple. Otherwise, you risk confusing your reader.

Writing catchy hooks is more than just finding something clever to say at the opening of your essay. It’s about leaving an impression on your reader that will carry through the body of your work and leave them hanging on every word you say. Ultimately, your hook can make or break your essay.

With Smodin, coming up with, writing, and revising your hook is as simple as one, two, three. So why not try out our tools to streamline your writing process? There’s nothing to lose – and everything to gain!

How to Write a Hook for an Essay

How to Write a Hook for an Essay & Hook Examples

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

A hook for an article about hook writing needs to be good after all, otherwise, why would you trust it? It has to be attention-grabbing, interesting, and most of all, it has to compel the reader to read more. So let’s get going and learn how to write a hook for an essay!

What is a Good Hook for an Essay?

A good hook for an essay is an opening sentence that reels in the reader. If you’ve ever finished an article without even realizing it, you were probably hooked from the very beginning. A hook is the opening sentence, the first thing someone reads, the first time someone has to decide whether they want to continue reading or not. Here are a few hook examples that engage the reader and compel them to find out more:

Have you ever wondered how some people make it seem like the universe bends to their whims?
I used to believe I had a pretty good childhood because the saddest day I can remember before the age of ten is the day I lost my favorite book. 
Mother Teresa said “Let us always meet each other with a smile, for the smile is the beginning of love”, and that sentiment is more important than ever in today’s world of division and suspicion. 

Now that you know what is a hook for an essay, let’s move on to how to write one!

How to Write a Good Hook for an Essay?

How to write a hook for an essay can be challenging. It needs to be interesting, but it has to stay on point. Don’t worry, if you keep the following things in mind, you’ll know how to make a hook for an essay. 

Think about the type of essay you’re writing

Hooks need to fit the kind of essay you’re writing. A hook that works for a definition essay usually won’t work for a narrative essay. A joke might be the perfect hook for an article about pop culture but won’t work well for a research paper. 

Think about the audience 

You should always think about who’s going to read your writing, but it’s especially important to consider when writing a hook for an essay. Your paper might be perfect for your target audience, but if the reader doesn’t like your opening sentence, their view of the entire essay will be negatively impacted. 

Don’t start with the hook

Just because it’s the first sentence of your essay doesn’t mean it needs to be the first thing you write. Sometimes the moment you think of a topic, the perfect hook pops into your head. If that isn’t the case, make an outline before you start worrying about the details of your hook. The more you understand your paper, the better your hook will be, so if you’re stuck, write the whole thing and come back to writing a hook for an essay. 

Don’t make it complicated  

You might be tempted to fit as much information as possible into the first sentence, but long and complicated hooks have a higher chance of confusing the reader. A short hook that grabs attention and quickly transitions the reader to the meat of the essay is best.

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Ideas for Writing a Hook for an Essay

There are a lot of types of hooks you can use depending on what kind of article you’re writing and who your audience is. Here are a few different styles and hook examples for each. 

An Interesting Statistic

A surprising statistic is an excellent way of engaging your reader from the very beginning. It can work for almost any kind of paper but is generally most impactful for research and persuasive types of writing. Make sure that your statistic comes from a reliable source though and that you cite the source.

It’s likely that the clothes you are wearing right now were made by one of the over 150 million child laborers in the world today. 

A Question 

Asking an open-ended question triggers natural human curiosity. A question automatically makes the reader think about a possible response, which means that they will read more to find an answer. Don’t ask a simple yes or no question. The reader might just answer it in their heads and skip the rest of the paper. An open-ended question that triggers the imagination works well as a hook for an essay.

What would the average day of the first Mars colonists be like?

A Clear Statement

Especially useful for persuasive types of writing, a strong statement as your opening line makes the reader want to know how you defend the statement. As for any hook, the statement needs to be interesting so that reader is curious to know more. 

The rise of social media has made people less likely to live in the moment. 

An Anecdote

A funny or interesting personal experience can give your reader a sense of who you are and involve them in your story. These types of hooks are more appropriate for casual types of writing and narrative essays. 

I will never forget the first time I stepped out of a luxury 5-star hotel in Asia and the first person I saw was a barefoot child playing in the mud. 

A powerful quote grabs the attention of your reader automatically. It shows that the topic is something that important people have thought about in the past, and it shows that you’ve done your research. Make sure that the quote you choose is relevant to the point of your essay though rather than just a random interesting statement. 

For a paper on existentialism - Carl Sagan often said, “The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of star stuff”.

A Description

A description that paints a picture in the mind of your reader stirs their imagination and involves them in your writing from the very start and can be a powerful hook. 

The scent of saltwater, the refreshing breeze, the rhythmic music of waves crashing, maybe the reason why people love the beach so much is that civilization has always developed around water. 

A Literary Quote

A literary quote can be a good hook for certain types of writing like book reviews, narrative essays, and creative writing, but doesn’t fit well for expository or research-based essays. As long as you make sure the quote fits the main point of the paper it should work as a hook for an essay.

“It matters not what someone is born, but what they grow to be.” It might have been the fictional wizard Albus Dumbledore who said this, but it’s true for real-life problems regarding class mobility. 

Leaving the reader in suspense is a great way to force them to read more. Be careful though, these types of hooks work best for more informal types of writing. 

The lights turned off, the music stopped, a loud bang shot through the air, and slowly a low vibrating hum filled the silence. 

A Common Misconception

Stating a piece of surprising research that goes against common wisdom and enhances your main argument can be a great way of piquing your reader’s interest. 

Contrary to popular belief, recent studies have shown that money is not the greatest predictor of overall life satisfaction. 

People like to be amused, so a joke can be a fantastic way of engaging your reader. Be careful though, make sure the humor matches not just the audience you’re writing for, but also the type of paper. Jokes as a hook for an essay are best used for informal types of writing. 

When the aliens come to Earth the first thing I’m going to say to them is “Eat my neighbor, not me!”

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Hooks Ideas for the Different Essay Types

Now that you know how to create a hook for an essay and about several different types of hooks, let’s see some hook examples for the most common types of essays. 

How to Write a Good Hook for an Argumentative Essay

The goal of an argumentative essay is to convince the reader that your view on an issue is correct. An effective hook for this type of essay should include some information about the main point of your essay. This can be a statement, a misconception, a question, an interesting fact, essentially anything engaging that makes the reader think about the issue at hand. 

Vaccines save over 3 million lives each year.
How is it possible to balance work and family in today’s hyper-competitive world?
Video games have changed the lives of people for the better in small towns and villages. 

How to Write a Hook for an Analytical Essay

An analytical essay is any type of essay that explores a concept in depth. This includes cause and effect essays, literary analysis, descriptive essays, article reviews, and research-oriented papers. A good hook for an analytical essay provides some engaging information to the reader so they get interested in your topic immediately. 

Every country has its unique way of electing its head of state, but the way America does it is unique in several ways. 
How can scientists confidently state that homo sapiens have existed for between 200,000 and 300,000 years?
Shoving an icepick into the brain through an eye socket isn’t medieval torture, it’s a technique used till the 1970s in psychiatric institutions. 

How to Write a Hook for a Narrative Essay

Narrative essays tell a story. They can be informal and often use the first person, so you have a lot of freedom in coming up with a creative hook. 

Coming from a village in a tropical country, I’d always thought snow was a Hollywood fabrication, a special effect conjured by the wizards of CGI. 
The room buzzed with an energy that can only be produced by humans dancing to hypnotic music. 
It was the first time I felt connected to something bigger than myself. No, it wasn’t in a church it was, of all things, alone on a mountaintop.

How to Write a Hook for a Descriptive Essay 

Descriptive essays give a vivid description of a place, thing, or idea. They pull a reader into the experience by using evocative words and describing things in detail. Hooks for descriptive essays should engage the reader’s imagination and fuel their imagination. 

Humans stare longingly at the pale blue dot in the night sky as they breathe stale, recycled air on the first moon base. 
An ache in your chest, a heightened state of awareness, heavy breathing, are you in love or having a panic attack?
Pain screamed across my body as I crawled through the rubble, desperate to reach the only pinpoint of light I could see. 

Final Thoughts

The hook is the first and only chance you get to impress your reader and make them want to read more. That’s why taking the time to craft the perfect hook is vitally important. After reading this article you should know the key ingredients of how to come up with a hook for an essay. 

Remember to match your hook to the type of essay you're writing, think about who the audience is, keep it short, and make sure the hook is relevant to the rest of your essay. Above all though, make sure that your hook is interesting!

After reading this article, you should know how to write a hook for an essay, but everybody needs help now and again. The experts at Studyfy, an art essay writing service , philosophy essay writing service , term paper writing service , and nursing essay writers , can assist you with all your college homework help needs. Whether it's coming up with a topic, creating an outline, writing the perfect hook, essay editing, proofreading, tutoring, and more, don't hesitate to reach out to them!

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How to Write a Good Hook for an Argumentative Essay

How to Write a Good Hook for an Argumentative Essay: Definition, Types, and Writing Tips

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Writing a compelling hook is essential for grabbing the reader's attention, setting the tone for the entire piece and sparking interest in the topic. That’s why every student should learn what is a good hook for an argumentative essay and how to write it properly. One effective approach is to begin with a surprising or thought-provoking statistic. For example, an essay addressing the impact of plastic pollution on marine life, opening with a startling statistic like "Over 8 million tons of plastic enter our oceans every year, endangering countless marine species," immediately draws attention to the severity of the problem.

Additionally, writing an anecdotal hook can connect the listener emotionally to the subject matter. Sharing a personal or relatable story that exemplifies the consequences of the presented argument can create a sense of empathy and engagement. In an essay advocating for improved mental health resources in schools, an anecdotal hook might begin with a narrative about a student who struggled with mental health issues due to a lack of support, emphasizing the real-world impact of the argument.

Finally, writing a thought-provoking question can stimulate the reader's curiosity and encourage them to ponder the complexities of the topic. In an essay on the ethical implications of genetic engineering, a hook such as "Should we play 'genetic god' with the building blocks of life?" prompts the audience to reflect on the moral dimensions of the issue and creates a foundation for the ensuing argument. If you want your composition to start with an attention-grabbing hook but lack time to do it yourself, feel free to request our argumentative essay writing service .

The Role of an Argumentative Essay Hook

A hook in an argumentative essay serves as the initial point of engagement, drawing the reader into the discourse and generating interest in the topic at hand. Essentially, it acts as a literary device designed to captivate attention and set the tone for the entire essay. A well-written hook establishes a connection between the reciter and the subject matter, enticing them to delve deeper into the argument. It is the literary handshake that creates an immediate impression and determines whether the audience will be compelled to continue reading.

A strategic argumentative hook not only captures attention but also provides a sneak peek into the essence of the essay. It hints at the central argument, theme, or controversy, giving elocutionists a sense of what to expect. This early engagement is crucial for maintaining the audience's interest throughout the essay. Whether through a startling statistic, a cogent anecdote, or a thought-provoking question, the hook serves as a gateway, inviting students to explore the layers of the argument presented in the subsequent paragraphs.

Moreover, the hook in an argumentative essay is a tool for persuasion. It lays the groundwork for the author's stance and primes the classroom to be receptive to the upcoming argument. By leveraging emotional or intellectual appeal, the hook creates a connection that goes beyond mere information dissemination. It establishes a foundation for the following persuasive elements, influencing the reviewer's perception and predisposition toward the author's viewpoint. In essence, the hook is a strategic instrument in the arsenal of persuasive writing, shaping the instructor's experience and setting the stage for a convincing argument.

Role of an Argumentative Essay Hook

What Are the Types of Hooks for Argumentative Essay?

Different types of argumentative hooks can be employed based on the nature of the argument and the writer's objectives. Here are several types of hooks commonly used in argumentative essays:

1. Statistical Hook

Opening with a relevant and surprising statistic can immediately grab the attention. Statistics provide concrete data that supports the argument and establishes the topic's significance.

2. Anecdotal Hook

Sharing a short narrative or personal story related to the essay's topic can connect the audience and the argument. Anecdotes can evoke emotions and make the essay more relatable.

3. Question Hook

Posing an argumentative question can engage elocutionists and encourage them to think critically about the issue. Questions stimulate curiosity and invite the audience to consider different perspectives.

4. Quotation Hook

Using a relevant and impactful quote from a notable figure, expert, or source can lend credibility to the argument and provide a unique perspective.

5. Rhetorical Question Hook

Like the question hook, a rhetorical question doesn't necessarily require an answer but prompts lectors to reflect on the topic and consider the writer's viewpoint.

6. Historical Hook

Providing a historical context or referencing a significant event can help ground the argument and demonstrate its relevance in a broader context.

Types of Hooks for Argumentative Essay

How to Write a Hook for an Argumentative Essay Step-by-Step?

Writing a good hook for an argumentative essay involves careful consideration of the topic, audience, and overall purpose of your essay. Here is a step-by-step guide to help you write an effective hook:

STEP 1 – Understand Your Audience: Consider your audience and what might capture their attention. Tailor your hook to appeal to their interests, values, or concerns.

STEP 2 – Define the Tone: Determine the tone of your essay – whether it's serious, humorous, or thought-provoking. Your hook should align with the tone you want to establish.

STEP 3 – Identify the Type of Hook: Choose a type of hook that best suits your argument and the nature of your essay. Options include statistical hooks, anecdotal hooks, question hooks, quotation hooks, rhetorical question hooks, and historical hooks, among others.

STEP 4 – Start with a Startling Statistic: If using a statistical hook, find a relevant and attention-grabbing statistic related to your topic. Make sure the statistics are credible and recent. E.g., "Did you know that approximately 1.3 billion tons of food are wasted globally each year, while millions go hungry?"

STEP 5 – Write an Engaging Anecdote: For an anecdotal hook, share a brief, gripping story or personal experience related to your argument. Create a vivid picture to capture the reciter's imagination. E.g., "In the small town where I grew up, the closing of the local library marked not just the end of a building but the loss of a community's intellectual heart."

STEP 6 – Pose a Thoughtful Question: If opting for an argumentative question hook, create a question that prompts reflection and curiosity. Consider the key issues your essay addresses. E.g., "Have we become so dependent on technology that we are sacrificing our ability to connect on a genuine, human level?"

STEP 7 – Introduce a Relevant Quotation: When using a quotation hook, select a quote that aligns with your argument and adds authority to your position. Attribute the quote to a credible source. E.g., "Albert Einstein once said, 'Imagination is more important than knowledge.' In today's education system, are we fostering the creativity needed for a rapidly changing world?"

STEP 8 – Write a Rhetorical Question: If using a rhetorical question hook, pose a question that doesn't require an answer but encourages the public to contemplate your argument. E.g., "Can we truly claim to have achieved equality when gender pay gaps persist in workplaces around the globe?"

STEP 9 – Provide a Historical Context: For a historical hook, connect your topic to a relevant historical event or period. Show how the past informs the present and supports your argument. E.g., "The echoes of the Civil Rights Movement still resonate in today's fight for social justice and equality."

STEP 10 – Revise and Refine: After crafting your hook, revisit it and ensure it aligns with the overall flow of your essay. Make any necessary revisions to enhance clarity, coherence, and impact.

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Hook Examples for Argumentative Essay

Here are some more examples of writing effective hooks you can employ to begin your argumentative essay.

  • Statistical Hook:
With over 90% of teenagers reporting daily use of social media, the impact of these platforms on mental health cannot be ignored. Are we nurturing a generation more connected online but increasingly isolated in reality?
  • Anecdotal Hook:
As a single parent working two jobs, the struggle to provide nutritious meals for my children on a limited budget became a daily challenge. This personal journey reflects the broader issue of food insecurity faced by countless families in our society.
  • Question Hook:
What if the key to unlocking economic growth lies not in cutting taxes for the wealthy but in investing in education and healthcare for all citizens? Could a more equitable society be the foundation for sustainable prosperity?
  • Quotation Hook:
In the words of Winston Churchill, 'The price of greatness is responsibility.' As we grapple with the environmental challenges of our time, how can we, as a society, embrace our responsibility to protect the planet for future generations?
  • Rhetorical Question Hook:
Is it possible to truly understand the impact of climate change without witnessing the shrinking ice caps, the raging wildfires, and the rising sea levels? Are we, as a global community, prepared to confront the consequences of our actions?
  • Historical Hook:
In the aftermath of World War II, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was established to ensure the protection of basic freedoms. How far have we come in upholding these principles, and what challenges persist in pursuing a just and equitable world?

Argumentative Essay Hooks by Subject

To capture the assembly's attention and set the stage for irresistible argumentative essays on various college subjects, consider the following hook examples:

Environmental Science:

In the delicate balance between economic progress and environmental conservation, the looming question persists: Can we sustain our way of life without compromising the health of our planet? The answers lie in exploring innovative solutions and redefining our relationship with the environment.

Political Science:

As the world witnesses unprecedented geopolitical shifts, the role of diplomacy in fostering global stability has never been more crucial. Are we on the brink of a new era of international cooperation, or are the seeds of discord sown too deeply to be overcome?

Psychology:

Exploring the labyrinth of the human mind unveils mysteries and challenges that redefine our understanding of consciousness. In delving into the complexities of mental health, are we ready to dismantle the stigmas surrounding psychological disorders and pave the way for a more compassionate society?
In an era of growing income inequality, the economic landscape is a battleground of competing ideologies. Can we forge a path that reconciles the principles of capitalism with a commitment to social justice, or are we condemned to perpetuate a system that widens the gap between the haves and the have-nots?

Technology and Ethics:

As technology evolves at an unprecedented pace, the ethical dilemmas it presents become more intricate. Are we equipped to navigate the ethical challenges of artificial intelligence, biotechnology, and surveillance, or do we risk creating a future where our inventions outpace our humanity?
In the tapestry of society, the threads of inequality are woven deeply. Are we content to merely acknowledge the existence of systemic injustices, or can we actively engage in dismantling the structures that perpetuate discrimination and privilege?
As we reimagine the future of education, the question echoes: Can we transcend the traditional models and create an inclusive system that equips students with the skills needed to navigate an ever-changing world? The answer lies in challenging the status quo and championing a learner-centric approach.

The Importance of Good Hooks for an Argumentative Essay

Writing engaging essay hooks is the critical gateway to engaging the hearer from the very beginning. A well-designed hook not only captures attention but also establishes a connection between the audience and the essay's central theme. In an era characterized by information overload and short attention spans, hooks for argumentative essays act as a literary lure, drawing the public into the narrative and creating an initial impression that sets the tone for the entire essay. It is the tool that transforms an essay from a mere collection of words into a dynamic and persuasive discourse.

Furthermore, writing hooks is instrumental in making the argument memorable and impactful. Whether employing statistics, anecdotes, questions, quotations, or other creative techniques, a riveting hook resonates with the onlooker, leaving a lasting impression that lingers throughout the essay. It provides a writing context for understanding the significance of the topic, stirring curiosity and engrossing the audience to delve deeper into the argument. 

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How to write a good hook for an argumentative essay

When it comes to writing an argumentative essay, the introduction is crucial. It is the first thing that your reader will see, and it is your chance to grab their attention and make them want to read more. One of the most effective ways to do this is by using a good hook. But before we dive into how to write a good hook, let’s first understand the purpose and audience of your essay.

The purpose of an argumentative essay is to persuade your reader to agree with your point of view on a specific issue or topic. To do this, you will need to present a clear and logical argument, supported by evidence and examples.

Knowing your audience is also important in order to tailor your argument and hook to their interests and level of understanding. For example, if you are writing an essay for a college-level class, you can assume that your audience is familiar with the topic and can handle more complex arguments. On the other hand, if you are writing for a general audience, you may need to provide more background information and simplify your argument.

Once you have a clear understanding of the purpose and audience of your essay, the next step is to identify the main argument and thesis of your essay. The main argument is the central point or position that you will be arguing for in your essay. The thesis statement is a clear and concise statement that summarizes the main argument of your essay. It should be included in the introduction and will guide the rest of your essay.

Having a clear and concise main argument and thesis statement will make it easier to write a hook that aligns with the overall argument and purpose of your essay. Enhance your writing skills with this informative piece, which is just one part of our comprehensive guide, “ Master the Art of Writing “.

Argumentative essay hook

What is the Purpose of an Argumentative Essay Hook?

A hook in an argumentative essay is a statement or phrase that entices readers and encourages them to keep reading. It serves as an introduction to the essay’s topic, giving the reader a general idea of what the essay will be about. The goal of a hook is to grab the reader’s attention and make them interested in the story you are telling. An effective essay hook has the power to keep the reader intrigued and wanting to know more.

The purpose of a hook is to make an impactful first impression. It should reflect the topic of your paper and set the tone for the rest of the essay . The hook should provide the necessary context and introduce the main ideas of your essay. It should also create a connection between the reader and your essay topic, giving them a reason to read on.

Strong hooks should be creative and emphasize the main themes of your essay. It should be intriguing enough to capture the reader’s attention, but not so complex that they lose interest. Be sure to use interesting and engaging language to ensure that it makes an impact.

Different Types of Hooks for an Argumentative Essay

When writing an argumentative essay, it is essential to have an effective hook statement. A hook is a sentence or two that captures the attention of the reader, making them want to read on. There are several types of hooks you can use, depending on your topic and purpose.

Rhetorical questions can be a great way to engage the reader. They should not be answered within the essay but rather posed as a thought-provoking statement. Quotes can also be used as a hook, especially if they are from a well-known figure or relate to your topic in some way. Statistics can be an effective hook too – they peak the reader’s interest and give a clearer idea of the point you’re trying to make.

Anecdotes and stories can provide interesting insight into your thesis statement and draw the reader into the essay. Metaphors and allegories can help illustrate complex ideas in a more creative, accessible way. You can also use visual imagery to evoke strong emotions from the reader.

No matter which type of hook you choose, it is important to craft it carefully. Make sure it connects directly to your argument and paints a vivid mental image for the reader. When done correctly, a hook will make your argumentative essay stand out from the crowd.

Provide Examples of Each Type of Hook and Analyze Their Effectiveness

A hook is a statement at the beginning of an essay that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them interested in reading more. It is an essential component of any argumentative essay, as it helps make the essay more persuasive and engaging. There are several different types of hooks that can be used, each having its own distinct purpose. In this section, we will provide examples of each type of hook and explain how they can be used effectively.

Rhetorical Questions

Rhetorical questions are statements posed in the form of questions which do not necessarily require an answer. These can be used to make the audience think about the issue and become curious about what follows in the essay. For example: “Do you ever wonder why people act so differently around different groups of people?”

Quotes from famous people can help draw the reader in and get them to think about the argument in a different light. For example: “The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance,” – Alan Watts.

Statistics can be used to show the reader just how common or rare a particular problem is and can be especially helpful when trying to make a point about a social issue. For example: “Over 50% of all homeless individuals in the US are veterans.”

Anecdotes, Stories, Metaphors and Allegories

These literary devices can be used to paint a vivid picture in the reader’s mind and create a strong emotional response. For example: “She was like a leaf in the wind, desperate for someone to take her by the hand and give her a chance, but no one came.”

Each type of hook can be effective when used correctly, as long as it is relevant to the argument being made. While some hooks may work better for certain types of essays, it is important to experiment and find the best fit for your topic.

Hook Structure and Form

A hook is the most important part of your argumentative essay because it grabs the reader’s attention. There are several different types of hooks you can use to start your essay, each with its own specific structure and form. It’s important to know the structure and form of each type of hook so that you can create an effective one for your essay.

A rhetorical question is a statement that does not require an answer from the reader. Rather, it encourages them to think more deeply about your topic and helps to set the tone for the rest of your piece. Rhetorical questions should be direct and concise, but also be thought-provoking and engaging. For example, you could start your essay with a question such as, “How can we tackle environmental degradation?”

Quotes can be used to grab the reader’s attention and bring extra depth to your essay. It’s important to choose a quote that accurately reflects your argument and resonates with your audience. Make sure to explain how the quote relates to your argument and why it’s relevant to the reader. For example, you could start your essay with a quote from Mahatma Gandhi: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Statistics can be a powerful way to make a point and engage readers. Be sure to cite the source of your statistics and explain why they are important and relevant to your argument. You can provide a shocking statistic to grab people’s attention or use a statistic to back up your point. For example, you could start your essay with the statistic: “Over 80% of the world’s coral reefs are in danger due to human activity.”

Anecdotes or Stories

Anecdotes or stories can be a great way to engage your readers and draw them into your essay. Keep your story relevant to the topic and make sure it has an impactful ending. For example, you could start your essay with a story about a person who overcame a challenge related to your topic. This could be a great way to illustrate your point and show the reader the importance of your argument.

Metaphors and Allegories

Metaphors and allegories can be useful tools for expressing complex ideas in a simple way. Metaphors are comparisons between two seemingly unrelated objects, while allegories are longer moral stories. When using metaphors and allegories, make sure to explain their relevance to your argument so that readers can understand them. For example, you could start your essay with an allegory about a tree and how it has been affected by pollution.

Discussing Relevant Topics for a Strong Hook Statement

A hook statement, also known as an attention grabber, is the opening sentence of an argumentative essay. The primary purpose of a hook statement is to grab the reader’s attention and make them interested in the essay. It is also important to create a hook that is relevant to the topic of the essay, so that the readers have an understanding of what the essay is about.

There are many topics and ideas that can provide a strong hook statement for an argumentative essay. It is important to consider the overall tone and theme of the essay when selecting a topic. Some potential topics for an argumentative essay include: immigration, gun control, social media, education, health care, and climate change.

For example, if your essay is about gun control, you could start with a rhetorical question such as “Should civilians have the right to own firearms?” or a quote such as “Guns don’t kill people, people kill people.” Other possible hooks could be a statistic, anecdote, story, metaphor, allegory, or even a personal experience related to the topic.

No matter what route you decide to go in terms of creating your hook statement, it is important to ensure that it is relevant to the topic of your essay and captures the reader’s attention. Once you have chosen an appropriate topic, you can begin crafting your hook statement and making sure that it is effective and compelling.

Citing Examples of Good Hooks from Literary Works and Public Speeches

Creating a strong hook for an argumentative essay can be difficult if you’re starting from scratch. Fortunately, there are many examples of hooks that have been used successfully by writers and speakers in the past. Examining these examples can give you ideas and inspiration for your own hooks.

When looking for example hooks, begin by researching literature and public speeches. Popular authors often write hooks that grab their audience’s attention. The same is true of well-known speakers. Consider examining some of the most famous works of fiction as well as speeches given by influential people.

Fiction is full of great hooks. In Charles Dickens’ novel A Tale of Two Cities , Dickens starts with the memorable line, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” This instantly grabs the reader’s attention and sets up the conflict of the story.

Public speeches also provide plenty of examples of great hooks. Martin Luther King Jr. famously begins his “I Have a Dream” speech with the stirring words, “I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.”

Reading literature and speeches from the past can help you develop unique hooks for your own argumentative essays. By analyzing how other writers and speakers have captured their audiences’ attention, you can develop your own creative ideas for hooks.

Synthesizing Data for an Argumentative Essay Hook

Writing a good hook for an argumentative essay is an essential step to engage the reader’s attention from the very start. Synthesizing data is the process of gathering information, analyzing it, and combining it in order to create an original idea or argument. When it comes to developing an effective hook statement for an argumentative essay, synthesizing data can be a great way to come up with a unique and intriguing statement that will grab the readers’ attention.

To begin, you should start by researching your topic and gathering all the relevant facts, statistics and opinions related to it. It is important to assess the credibility of the sources you use, and make sure that any facts you use are current and up-to-date. Once you have gathered your data, analyze the material and look for common patterns or trends. This will help you to identify any similarities between different points of view, and identify potential arguments.

Once you have identified potential arguments, take some time to think about how they could be combined and used to create a unique and original hook statement. Consider how each of the components of the data could be connected in order to create a powerful statement. The key is to draw on the facts and details that you have gathered in order to construct a persuasive claim that will capture the readers’ attention.

You should also consider the form and structure of the hook statement. Ask yourself questions such as “What type of statement would grab the readers’ attention?” and “Where and how should I include quotations or statistics?” The answers to these questions will help you to refine your hook statement so that it is engaging and effective.

By synthesizing the data that you have collected and using it to create an original and effective hook statement, you can ensure that your argumentative essay will be attention-grabbing and persuasive. With this method, you can guarantee that your audience will be interested in reading more and will be more likely to follow your argument.

Strategies for Developing an Effective Hook Statement

  • Focus on a Problem: A great way to capture your reader’s attention is by introducing a problem that your essay will be discussing. This can help to draw readers in, as they will want to know what the solution to the problem is, and how it is relevant to them.
  • Create a Sense of Urgency: Make it clear to the reader that if they don’t read your essay, then something bad will happen. Use phrases like “time is running out” or “now is the time for action”. You will also want to highlight the consequences of not taking action, as this can motivate readers to continue reading.
  • Include Surprising Facts: Startling facts or statistics can be a great way to grab the reader’s attention. By incorporating something unexpected into your hook statement, you will make the reader curious about what other surprises may be awaiting them in your essay.
  • Ask a Thought-Provoking Question: Ask a question that requires the reader to think. This will make them more engaged in the essay and push them to think further on the topic beyond the scope of the introductory paragraph.
  • Tell an Interesting Story: Stories have a special way of captivating readers. If you are able to tell an interesting story as part of your hook statement, it will entice the reader to find out how the story links to the main topic of the essay .

Connecting the Hook to the Introduction Paragraph

It is important to make sure that the hook statement in your argumentative essay is connected to the introduction paragraph. This will ensure that readers are kept engaged and interested in your essay. The hook must be relevant to the main point of the essay and set the tone for the arguments that follow.

In order to make an effective connection between the hook and the introduction, it is important to first plan out the main points you want to cover in your essay. Think about the most interesting and engaging way to introduce each point and then use this idea as the foundation for your hook statement. Once you have a hook statement, start writing your introduction paragraph by introducing the thesis statement. This will provide a bridge from the hook statement to the body of the essay.

The hook statement should also give the readers an idea of the content and the structure of the essay . Make sure to explain how the hook connects to the main argument and provide a short summary of what the reader should expect. Try to avoid using too much detail in the hook statement and focus more on the essence of the argument. Using a captivating hook and effectively linking it to the introduction paragraph will ensure that your readers will stay hooked on your essay until the end.

Revising a Hook Statement in an Argumentative Essay

Writing a powerful, attention-grabbing hook statement can be difficult, and even experienced writers can find it a challenge. Once a hook statement has been written, it is important to evaluate and revise it. There are several useful tips for revising a hook statement:

  • Check for clarity. Make sure the hook statement is clear and succinct so that readers can understand it quickly.
  • Ensure accuracy. Make sure the facts included in the statement are correct and relevant to the essay.
  • Evaluate for relevancy. Ensure that the hook statement is connected to the main point of the essay topic.
  • Verify credibility. Make sure all sources used are credible and properly cited.
  • Read it aloud. This can help to identify any potential grammar or syntax errors.
  • Seek feedback. Ask a peer, mentor, or teacher to look over the hook statement and offer constructive criticism.

Taking the time to go back and revise the hook statement will ensure that it is strong and successful in captivating the reader’s attention. Additionally, it can also help to strengthen the overall argument of the essay.

Summarizing the Key Points

A strong hook statement is critical for grabbing the reader’s attention and engaging them in an argumentative essay. A good hook will captivate the reader, generate interest in the essay topic and make them want to read further. Different types of hooks can be used to achieve this, such as rhetorical questions, quotes, stories, statistics, anecdotes, metaphors and allegories. Each of these has its own structure and form and can be used to craft an effective hook statement.

To create a strong hook it is important to carefully select the topics that the statement will cover. A well thought-out argumentative essay should be based on current topics that are relevant to the audience, and the hook should be tailored to reflect this. Additionally, it’s important to synthesize data to create an original hook statement which serves to introduce the main arguments of the essay in a concise manner.

When writing a hook statement for an argumentative essay, different strategies can be employed. It is recommended to start with a small summary and explain the importance of the essay topic before moving on to introducing the main argument. Finally, it’s important to revise the hook statement to make sure it is as effective as possible.

The Importance of a Strong Hook

A strong hook statement is essential when writing an argumentative essay. It captures the reader’s attention and encourages them to learn more about the essay topic. By using a variety of hooks such as rhetorical questions, quotes, stories, statistics, anecdotes, metaphors and allegories, a writer can create an effective hook that entices the reader to read further. Furthermore, the hook should be tailored to the audience by choosing relevant topics and synthesizing data to create an original statement. Writing an effective hook statement also requires the use of different strategies, such as starting with a small summary followed by an introduction to the main argument. Finally, it is important to remember to revise the hook statement for maximum effectiveness.

Final thoughts

In conclusion, writing a good hook for an argumentative essay is an important step in the writing process. It is the first thing that the reader will see, and it is your chance to grab their attention and make them want to read more. A good hook should be relevant to the main argument and thesis of your essay, and it should be interesting and engaging.

The key to writing a good hook is to understand the purpose and audience of your essay, identify the main argument and thesis statement, gather information and evidence to support your argument, brainstorm potential hooks, incorporate the hook into the introduction, revise and edit the introduction and hook, practice reading the introduction and hook out loud, and getting feedback from others.

However, it is important to remember that a good hook is just one part of an overall effective argumentative essay. It should be combined with a good thesis statement, clear and logical structure, and solid evidence to support your argument. Taking the time to revise and edit your essay, and to make sure that it is well-organized and well-supported, will help to ensure that your essay is effective in persuading your reader to agree with your point of view.

  • Last Edit 27 APR 2023

Nick Radlinsky

Nick Radlinsky

Nick Radlinsky is a devoted educator, marketing specialist, and management expert with more than 15 years of experience in the education sector. After obtaining his business degree in 2016, Nick embarked on a quest to achieve his PhD, driven by his commitment to enhancing education for students worldwide. His vast experience, starting in 2008, has established him as a reputable authority in the field.

Nick's article, featured in Routledge's " Entrepreneurship in Central and Eastern Europe: Development through Internationalization ," highlights his sharp insights and unwavering dedication to advancing the educational landscape. Inspired by his personal motto, "Make education better," Nick's mission is to streamline students' lives and foster efficient learning. His inventive ideas and leadership have contributed to the transformation of numerous educational experiences, distinguishing him as a true innovator in his field.

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what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

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How to Write a Powerful Hook for an Argumentative Essay

How to Write a Powerful Hook for an Argumentative Essay

When it comes to writing an argumentative essay, one of the most important parts is crafting a compelling hook that will engage your readers right from the start. A hook is the opening sentence or two of your essay that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them want to continue reading. It sets the tone for the rest of the essay and helps you state your position clearly. In this article, we will explore the step-by-step process of writing a powerful hook for an argumentative essay.

Before we dive into the process, let’s make it clear what the purpose of an argumentative essay is. The main goal of this essay type is to present and analyze different viewpoints on a given topic, provide strong arguments to support your stance, and persuade the reader to take your side. In order to do that, you need to craft a hook that not only grabs the reader’s attention but also makes your position clear.

One way to create a strong hook is by introducing a thought-provoking fact or statistic. For example, did you know that zoos in the US receive over 180 million visitors each year, more than all the major sports events combined? This startling statistic immediately engages the reader and makes them interested in learning more about the topic.

Another effective hook is presenting a case study or an example that illustrates your argument. For instance, you could start with a story about a specific zoo that faced funding cuts and had to give up its resources and space for animal sanctuaries. This example not only makes your argument more relatable but also demonstrates the real-life consequences of inadequate funding for zoos.

In addition to using examples and facts, you can also use quotes from experts or well-known individuals to support your argument. For instance, Jean Jacques Rousseau once said, “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains.” This quote can be used to introduce an argument about the importance of autonomy for animals in zoos.

Now that we have explored different types of hooks, it is important to consider the overall structure and format of your essay. While there are different ways to approach an argumentative essay, one popular method is the Toulmin model. This model breaks down the essay into six clear steps: the claim, grounds, warrant, backing, counterclaim, and rebuttal. By following this structure, you can present your arguments in a logical and concise manner.

The Importance of a Powerful Hook in an Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays require a strong hook because they aim to persuade readers and present a case for a particular viewpoint. Whether you are using the Toulmin or Rogerian format, both formats require you to engage with the opposition and provide compelling arguments and facts to support your own position. A powerful hook can help you achieve this by defining the topic, presenting a captivating example, or providing a thought-provoking question.

For example, if your argumentative essay is about the use of autonomous machines in the workforce, a powerful hook could be: “What’s next for our workforce? Will human manpower continue to be replaced by machines?” This hook immediately grabs the reader’s attention and presents a topic that is both timely and relevant.

In addition to engaging the readers, a powerful hook can also help you organize your thoughts and craft a well-structured essay. By using a hook that presents a problem or a question, you are setting up the essay to provide answers and analysis throughout the body paragraphs. This step-by-step approach not only keeps the readers engaged but also provides a clear and logical flow to your essay.

Furthermore, a powerful hook can help you present conflicting viewpoints or background information in a concise and compelling way. For example, if your essay is about the importance of zoos in wildlife conservation, a hook like “Are zoos really the problem, or are they the solution?” immediately introduces the opposition and challenges readers to consider different viewpoints.

Lastly, a powerful hook can leave a lasting impression on your readers. It can make your essay stand out from the others and make the readers want to continue reading until the very end. This is especially important when writing argumentative essays, as you want to leave a strong final impression and make your point memorable.

Key factors for an impactful argumentative essay hook

When it comes to writing argumentative essays, the hook plays a vital role in capturing the reader’s attention and persuading them to continue reading. Crafting a powerful hook requires some thought and creativity, but it doesn’t have to be complicated. Here, we present 5 simple examples to guide you in crafting an impactful hook for your essay.

  • Present a thought-provoking question: One way to engage readers from the start is by posing a question that challenges their assumptions or beliefs. For example, “Should zoos be seen as sanctuaries or prisons for wildlife?” This immediately introduces a conflicting position and invites readers to consider their own thoughts on the topic.
  • Begin with a concise anecdote or story: Humans are naturally drawn to stories, and starting your essay with an interesting anecdote can captivate readers. For instance, “In a recent study, zoo visitors were given badges that identified them as ‘wildlife experts.’ This experiment revealed some shocking insights about human perception and the role of zoos in preserving biodiversity.”
  • Create a strong statement: Making a bold statement can grab the reader’s attention and make them curious about your argument. For example, “Machines will replace the entire workforce within the next 10 years – here’s why.” This hook sets the stage for a thought-provoking analysis on the impact of automation.
  • Provide surprising facts or statistics: Give your readers a surprising piece of information that challenges their preconceived notions or opens up a new perspective. For instance, “Although accidents involving clothes dryers may seem rare, they cause an average of 15,500 fires in the United States each year.” This shocking statistic immediately highlights the importance of dryer safety.
  • Define a key term or concept: If your topic requires some background understanding, define a term or concept to give readers a clear idea of your essay’s scope. For example, “In the field of arts, craft refers to the skill and creativity involved in creating handmade objects.” This hook sets the stage for a discussion on the value of traditional craftsmanship in a modern society.

Remember, the purpose of an argumentative essay hook is to generate curiosity and entice readers to continue reading. While these examples may provide a starting point, it’s important to tailor your hook to fit the specifics of your topic. Craft a hook that is clear, concise, and thought-provoking, and you’ll be well on your way to writing an impactful argumentative essay.

Understanding the Purpose of the Hook

The hook is essentially the first few sentences or paragraph of your essay that grabs the reader’s attention and engages them to continue reading. It sets the tone for the rest of the essay and creates a strong first impression. The hook should be concise, clear, and thought-provoking.

Engage the Reader

One of the main goals of a hook is to engage the reader right from the start. It should be like a badge that captures their interest and makes them want to continue reading. For instance, you can start with a thought-provoking question or an intriguing statement that sparks curiosity. By doing so, you create a space for the reader to think about the topic and become interested in your argument.

Show the Importance of the Topic

In addition to engaging the reader, the hook should also convey the significance of the topic you are discussing. It should provide some background information and demonstrate why the issue is worth exploring. This could be done by presenting relevant facts or statistics, introducing a case study, or providing a brief historical overview. By showing the importance of the topic, you make it clear why the reader should care about your argument.

Define Your Stance

Another purpose of the hook is to define your position or stance on the topic. This helps set the stage for the rest of your essay and gives your reader a clear understanding of where you stand. Whether you are taking a pro, con, or neutral position, the hook should reflect your overall thesis statement or main argument. This can be done through a strong statement or a preview of the case you will be making in the essay.

The role of the hook in capturing the reader’s attention

Why is the hook important.

When writing an argumentative essay, the hook plays an even more important role. It should not only capture the reader’s attention but also introduce the topic and clearly state your position or stance on the issue. A strong hook can make your arguments more compelling and persuade the reader to consider your point of view.

What makes a good hook?

A good hook should be unique and original, providing information or posing a question that is not commonly understood or known. It should be engaging and thought-provoking, making the reader curious to find out more. For instance, you can start with a surprising statistic, a bold statement, or a compelling anecdote that relates to the topic of your essay.

It is also important to make sure that the hook is relevant to the topic and the arguments that will be made in the essay. The hook should set the stage for the reader and provide an understanding of the main points or ideas that will be discussed in the body paragraphs.

Examples of effective hooks

Here are a few examples of effective hooks:

  • A shocking statistic: “Did you know that 70% of the world’s population does not have access to proper healthcare?”
  • A provocative statement: “In a world where we have sanctuaries for animals, why are there no sanctuaries for the human mind?”
  • An intriguing question: “What’s more important: your clothes or your health?”

These examples make the reader pause and think about the topic at hand, creating a strong initial impression and setting the stage for the arguments that will be presented in the essay.

Types of Hooks for Argumentative Essays

1. the classic hook.

The classic hook is a tried and true method of hooking the reader’s attention. It involves starting your essay with a well-known quote or an interesting fact about the topic. This hook works particularly well when the quote or fact is surprising or thought-provoking. For example, you could start your essay on the importance of arts education by quoting Pablo Picasso: “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.”

2. The Personal Anecdote Hook

A personal anecdote can be an effective way to draw the reader into your argumentative essay. By sharing a personal story or experience related to the topic, you can create a connection with the reader and make them more invested in your argument. For example, if you are writing about the benefits of autonomous vehicles, you could start with a personal anecdote about how a self-driving car saved you from a potential accident.

3. The Provocative Question Hook

Asking a provocative question is a powerful way to engage the reader and make them think about the topic. The question should be relevant to your argument and challenge the reader’s beliefs or assumptions. For example, if you are writing about the ethics of animal experimentation, you could start with a question like: “Is it morally acceptable to sacrifice the lives of animals in the pursuit of scientific knowledge?”

4. The Startling Statistic Hook

Starting your essay with a surprising statistic can captivate the reader’s attention and make them interested in your argument. Choose a statistic that is both relevant and shocking to make an impact. For example, if you are writing about the impact of smoking on health, you could start with a statistic like: “Every year, smoking causes over 7 million deaths worldwide.”

5. The Definition Hook

Using a definition as a hook can be an effective way to introduce complex terms or concepts in your argumentative essay. By providing a clear and concise definition, you can make sure that the reader understands the terms you will be using throughout your essay. For example, if you are writing about the Toulmin model of argumentation, you could start by defining the term and explaining its main components.

6. The Background Information Hook

Providing background information on the topic is a great way to set the stage for your argumentative essay. By giving the reader some context, you can help them understand why the topic is important and why they should care about it. For example, if you are writing about the effects of climate change, you could start by providing some background information on the current state of the environment and the impact of human activities.

7. The Quote from an Expert Hook

Quoting an expert can lend credibility to your argumentative essay and make your hook more persuasive. By using a quote from a well-known authority or expert in the field, you can show that your argument is supported by reputable sources. For example, if you are writing about the benefits of zoos, you could start with a quote from a wildlife conservationist who believes that zoos play a crucial role in wildlife conservation.

Remember, the hook is just the first step in crafting a powerful argumentative essay. Once you have grabbed the reader’s attention, you need to continue building your argument and presenting evidence to support your claims. Use the hook as a guide to outline the main points of your essay and make sure they are clear and well-supported. In the next section, we will explore some dos and don’ts of essay-writing to help you make your argumentative essay even stronger.

Exploring different hook strategies and examples

1. start with a striking fact or statistic.

One effective way to hook your readers is by starting with a surprising or intriguing fact or statistic related to your topic. For example, did you know that accidents involving autonomous vehicles have increased by 50% in the past year? This statistic immediately grabs attention and sets the stage for discussing the pros and cons of autonomous cars.

2. Pose a thought-provoking question

Another strategy is to pose a question that challenges your readers’ existing beliefs or knowledge. For instance, you can ask, “What is the purpose of zoos? Are they sanctuaries for animals or just a bad idea?” This question introduces the conflicting viewpoints on zoos and encourages readers to think critically about the subject.

3. Share a compelling anecdote or personal story

Anecdotes and personal stories are powerful hooks that can instantly connect readers to your topic. For example, you could begin your essay with a story about a year-long journey to understand the impact of fast fashion on the workforce. By sharing a relatable experience, you engage readers on an emotional level and make your essay more compelling.

4. Provide a concise summary or analysis of a relevant case

If your topic involves a complex case or controversial issue, you can hook your readers by providing a concise summary or analysis of that case. This helps them understand the background and context of your essay. For instance, you could introduce the case of Rogerian argumentative essay-writing but don’t forget to emphasize the main purpose and the conflict between opposing arguments.

5. Introduce a surprising comparison or analogy

A creative way to hook your readers is by introducing a surprising comparison or analogy that relates to your essay topic. For example, you could say, “Writing an argumentative essay is like putting together a puzzle. Both require careful analysis, logical thinking, and attention to detail.” This comparison immediately captures the reader’s interest and sets the stage for explaining how the pieces of an argument fit together.

6. Start with a bold and controversial statement

To grab your readers’ attention, you can start your essay with a bold and controversial statement. For example, you could say, “Wearing school uniforms should be mandatory for all students, as it promotes discipline and a sense of equality.” This statement immediately provokes a reaction and invites readers to consider your stance on the topic.

Crafting an Effective Hook for an Argumentative Essay

The purpose of a hook.

The main purpose of a hook is to grab your readers’ attention and make them want to continue reading your essay. It sets the tone for the entire piece and introduces the main idea or argument that you will be making. A well-crafted hook can make a world of difference in terms of engaging your audience and making them invested in your essay.

The Anatomy of a Good Hook

A good hook should be clear, concise, and thought-provoking. It can take various forms, such as a quote, a statistic, a question, a bold statement, or a personal anecdote. Regardless of the format, a good hook should be relevant to the topic of your essay and provide a preview of the argument you will be making.

For example, if you are writing an essay on the topic of capital punishment, you might start with a quote from a famous philosopher or a statistic on the number of wrongful convictions. This hook effectively introduces the topic and immediately engages the reader’s curiosity.

Step-by-Step Guide to Crafting a Compelling Hook

To help you craft a compelling hook for your argumentative essay, we have outlined a step-by-step process:

  • Step 1: Understand your essay topic and purpose – Before you start writing your hook, make sure you have a clear understanding of the topic and purpose of your essay. This will help you choose a hook that is relevant and compelling.
  • Step 2: Research and gather sources – To write a compelling hook, you need to have a good understanding of the topic and access to credible sources. Take the time to research and gather relevant information that supports your argument.
  • Step 3: Choose the most appropriate hook format – Depending on the topic and purpose of your essay, choose a hook format that best fits your argument. Consider using a quote, a statistic, a question, or a personal anecdote.
  • Step 4: Introduce conflicting viewpoints – A powerful hook can also introduce conflicting viewpoints or opposing arguments. This not only adds depth to your essay but also creates an opportunity for you to refute those arguments and strengthen your own.
  • Step 5: Outline your essay structure – Before finalizing your hook, make sure you have an outline of your essay structure. This will help you craft a hook that aligns with the overall flow and organization of your essay.
  • Step 6: Write and edit your hook – Once you have all the necessary information and a clear outline, it’s time to write your hook. Take the time to make it clear, concise, and compelling. Edit and revise it as needed to ensure that it meets the highest standards.

Dos and Don’ts of Writing a Hook

When it comes to writing a hook for your argumentative essay, there are some dos and don’ts to keep in mind:

  • Do invest time in brainstorming and experimenting with different hook formats.
  • Do include relevant and credible sources to support your hook and overall argument.
  • Do tailor your hook to your target audience’s level of understanding and familiarity with the topic.
  • Don’t start your essay with a bad or weak hook that fails to engage your readers.
  • Don’t use a quote or statistic without providing proper context and analysis.
  • Don’t rely solely on classic hook formats such as rhetorical questions or famous quotes – think outside the box.
  • Don’t overwhelm your hook with too much information or irrelevant details.

By following these guidelines and incorporating the right hook into your argumentative essay, you can grab your readers’ attention from the first hour and make a powerful impact with your writing.

For more resources, tips, and examples of effective hooks, visit YourDictionary.com – a trusted source for all your writing needs.

What is a hook in an argumentative essay?

A hook in an argumentative essay is the opening sentence or sentences that grab the reader’s attention and entice them to continue reading. It is meant to “hook” the reader and make them interested in what you have to say.

What are some examples of effective hooks for an argumentative essay?

There are several ways to create a powerful hook for an argumentative essay. You can start with a shocking statistic, an interesting fact, a compelling question, a relevant quote, or a vivid description. These hooks can immediately engage the reader and make them want to learn more.

Why is it important to have a strong hook in an argumentative essay introduction?

A strong hook is important in an argumentative essay introduction because it sets the tone for the rest of the essay. It grabs the reader’s attention and makes them interested in what you have to say. A weak hook can make the reader lose interest and not continue reading, so it is crucial to have a powerful hook to capture their attention from the beginning.

What are the key components of a good argumentative essay introduction?

A good argumentative essay introduction consists of several key components. First, it should have a strong hook to grab the reader’s attention. Second, it should provide some background information on the topic to give the reader context. Third, it should present a clear thesis statement that states the main argument of the essay. Lastly, it should outline the main points that will be discussed in the body paragraphs.

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Essay Writing Guide

Hook Example

Nova A.

20+ Hook Examples to Grab Reader’s Attention

15 min read

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Are your essays falling flat with a disinterested audience? Do you find it challenging to keep readers engaged from start to finish?

The truth is, if you don't capture your reader's attention right away, they might just click away or, worse, never even start reading your essay.

But how can we make sure that does not happen? 

An essay hook is what you need to meet this challenge. It is an attention grabber that hooks your reader’s interest.

Here, we will discuss several catchy hook examples to make your piece of writing more engaging. You can also read the types of hooks and tips to write effective hook statements for your essay. 

So, let’s start with the blog!

Arrow Down

  • 1. What is an Essay Hook?
  • 2. Examples of Different Types of Hook
  • 3. Hook Examples for Types of Essays
  • 4. How to Choose a Good Hook?
  • 5. How to Write a Good Essay Hook?

What is an Essay Hook?

An essay hook, often found at the beginning of an essay introduction , serves as an opening sentence that immediately grabs the reader's attention. These hooks are a common feature in high school, college, and various academic assignments.

It's vital to understand that hooks are distinct from introductions; they complement introductions rather than replacing them. A well-crafted hook should be self-contained, avoiding the pitfalls of being dull or predictable.

Purpose of Hook in Writing

An effective hook serves two primary purposes. 

  • Firstly, it sets the tone for the essay by providing the reader with a glimpse of the topic's essence. 
  • Secondly, it constructs a compelling introduction that tempts the reader to dive deeper into the essay's content.

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Examples of Different Types of Hook

In this section, we will explore different types of essay hooks and hook sentence examples. We will look into how these hooks can be used for writing different academic papers.

Question Hook

You can grab the reader’s attention by asking them an intriguing question that they would want to know the answer to. When posing a question, think about the interest of the reader and the things they would want to learn more about.

Avoid making your question generalized or simple Yes or No questions. For instance, asking a general question such as “Do you watch television?” won’t grab their attention and make them think it over. 

Using rhetorical questions to engage the reader is always a good idea!

Question Hook Example

Here are 10 hook question examples:

An anecdote can be a personal story or a product of your imagination. Provided that the story is relevant to your focus topic.

Typically, an anecdote is a funny statement, written to make the reader laugh and want to continue reading further.

Our lives are full of stories. Every day something interesting, funny, or strange happens. So, why don’t you use such stories to attract the reader’s attention?

Anecdote Hook Example

An anecdotal hook should be directly related to the central theme of the paper, demonstrating its relevance and connection to the main idea.

A "quote hook" is a type of hook used in writing that involves opening an essay with a quotation from a notable person, a famous author, or a respected source. The purpose of a quote hook is to immediately capture the reader's attention and establish the relevance of the topic by providing an authoritative statement.

A well-chosen quote can add credibility to your writing, evoke emotion, or introduce a key theme or idea that you intend to explore in your essay. It can also set the tone for the piece, whether it's persuasive, informative, or narrative.

Quotation Hook Example

The following is a quotation hook example that you can consider for your essay. 

Statistical Facts 

Fact or statistic hook is a type of hook used in writing that involves opening an essay or piece of content with a numerical fact or data point. The purpose of a statistical facts hook is to immediately engage the reader's interest by presenting them with a surprising, statistic related to the essay's topic.

This type of hook is particularly effective when writing an informative essay or persuasive essays that rely on data and evidence to support the main argument. 

Statistical Hook Example

Below is an interesting statistical hook example:

Personal Story

Starting a piece of writing with a personal short story is a good idea when writing narrative essays or a college application essay .

It doesn’t have to be an experience that you faced firsthand; it could be something that happened with a friend or a relative.

Personal Story Hook Example

Here is a great hook example for a personal story essay that you can consider. 

Description Hook

This hook is a vivid description of a scene or event to draw readers' attention to your writing. A well-written descriptive hook will make your readers want to know more about what is in the rest of your paper. 

Descriptive hooks are most commonly used in narrative essays but can be used in any type of writing. 

Description Hook Essay Example

The following is an interesting example of a description hook that you can read for your better understanding. 

Metaphor/Simile Hook

The metaphor/simile hook is used to help readers think about a particular topic in a different way. Your readers will think about the meaning and the context in which the topic is being addressed. 

A metaphor directly compares two things that are not related to each other. 

Metaphor/Simile Hook Example

Literary quotes.

When writing book reviews, it is often a good idea to use literary quotes. However, it is important to keep in mind that these quotes may not be appropriate for use in persuasive or expository essays .

We remember visual information more efficiently than words. When we see something, our brains quickly turn it into a picture. Scenes are often used in descriptive or narrative essays.

Scene Hook Example

Hook examples for types of essays.

There are different types of essays according to their structure and purpose. For instance, an argumentative essay is a serious essay written to persuade the reader on an argument. Whereas a narrative essay could be a light-hearted narration of an event. 

You can not use a funny question to start an argumentative essay. Similarly, you can not use a serious fact to start a funny narrative essay. 

The table shows hook examples for essays:

Let’s explore in detail some interesting hook examples according to different types of essays.

Expository Essay Hook Example

Hook: "Did you know that bees are responsible for pollinating one-third of the world's crops?"

Explanation: This hook explains the surprising and essential role that bees play in our food production, setting the stage for an expository essay that will explore this topic in detail.

Argumentative Essay Hook Example

Hook: "Is the use of technology making us more connected or driving us further apart as a society?"

Explanation: This hook presents a thought-provoking question about the impact of technology on human relationships, signaling that the argumentative essay will analyze and argue different perspectives on this issue.

Descriptive Essay Hook Example

A hook example sentence for a descriptive essay is as follows: 

Hook: "Imagine standing on a pristine white beach, the turquoise waves gently caressing your toes, and the scent of saltwater filling the air."

Explanation: This hook invites the reader to visualize a tranquil scene, creating anticipation for a descriptive essay that will provide vivid details and sensory experiences of this beautiful location.

Persuasive Essay Hook Example 

A hook example sentence for a persuasive essay is as follows:

Hook: "What if I told you that a simple change in diet could extend your lifespan by years?"

Explanation: This hook raises a compelling question about the potential health benefits of dietary choices, hinting at the persuasive argument that will follow in the essay.

Narrative Essay Hook Example

A hook example for narration is as follows: Hook: “I am really not sure if it is a real memory or just something that became more solid over time. But I am not sure that my neighbor once tried to murder me.”

Explanation: This hook introduces doubt about the authenticity of a memory involving the neighbor's alleged murder attempt.

Compare and Contrast Essay Hook Example 

Hook: "Apples and oranges—two fruits that couldn't be more different in taste, texture, and appearance." Explanation: This hook highlights the contrast between apples and oranges, signaling that the compare and contrast essay will explore the differences and similarities between these two fruits.

Process Essay Hook Example

A hook example sentence for a process analysis essay is as follows:

Hook: "Have you ever wondered how your favorite chocolate chip cookies are made?"

Explanation: This hook engages the reader's curiosity about the process of making chocolate chip cookies, setting the stage for a process essay that will provide step-by-step instructions.

Cause and Effect Essay Hook Example 

A hook example sentence for a cause and effect essay is as follows:

Hook: "In the realm of environmental science, the butterfly effect is real."

Explanation: This hook introduces the concept of the butterfly effect and its relevance to environmental science, foreshadowing a cause and effect essay that will explore the ripple effects of small actions on the environment.

Analytical Essay Hook Example

A hook example sentence for a analytical essay is as follows:

Hook: "Unlocking the hidden layers of Shakespearean sonnets is like deciphering a cryptic code."

Explanation: This hook uses a metaphor to describe the complexity of analyzing Shakespearean sonnets, indicating that the analytical essay will delve into the intricate language and themes within these works.

Hook Examples In Speeches

Hook: “In the United States, people are still fighting to be free. Many are fighting for free access to resources, free speech, and even the right to marry.”

Hook: “Getting revenge can easily become an obsession for many people. Some really crave for that kind of thing when they are being wronged.”

How to Choose a Good Hook?

Choosing a good hook involves engaging your audience, creating interest, and setting the stage for your content. Here is how to choose a good hook: 

  • Know Your Audience: Understand the interests and preferences of your target audience.
  • Relevance is Key: Ensure your hook directly relates to your content's topic.
  • Shock or Surprise: Use shocking facts, surprising statistics, or intriguing anecdotes.
  • Tell a Story: Engage emotionally with personal stories or narratives.
  • Pose a Question: Ask thought-provoking questions that make readers curious.
  • Quotations: Share powerful quotes from relevant authorities.
  • Visual Imagery: Use descriptive language to create vivid mental images.
  • Conciseness: Keep your hook brief and to the point.
  • Test and Refine: Experiment with different hooks and refine based on audience response.

Now that you have learned various techniques for crafting effective hooks, you're well-prepared to start writing one.

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How to Write a Good Essay Hook?

Here are the points that you need to keep in mind to write a hook for your essay. 

Step#1 Know the Kind of Literary Work 

First, it is important to have a clear vision in mind of the literary work you have selected for your paper. Here you need to describe what a certain essay type demands and what types of techniques you require to support your arguments in your essay. 

Step#2 Create an Outline

Always create an essay outline to see how the information can be organized better and which points need to be highlighted. Try to find an attention grabber that adds to the significance of that point. 

Step#3 Who are You Writing for?

Know your target audience and choose a way in which you want to develop your work. Your hook statement should be according to it. If you are writing for children, write in simple language. If you are writing for professionals, take the specific language into account. 

Step#4 Know the Purpose of Writing Your Essay

Choose hooks that fit your paper. Know the type of essay you are writing and its purpose. You can go for funny hooks if you are writing a paper on a light topic. If you are writing a conference paper, then you should be more formal. 

To Sum it Up!

Now you know the different ways to start your essay or research paper. You are the one to decide which hook is better and more effective to use according to the type of paper. Don’t forget to take into account the preparatory steps and figure out what type of hook is best to use.

You know that starting with a hook can make or break your academic essay. However, it is not always easy to come up with the perfect anecdote or statement for an opening line. 

Luckily, you can get help from a legit essay writing service like MyPerfectWords.com , which can create perfect essays and do your paper for you. You may be asking yourself why you should use this service instead of creating one yourself and here's your answer - getting high-quality academic writing help from our professional essay writer at affordable prices is a good deal!

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is a good hook sentence.

FAQ Icon

A good hook sentence is a sentence that grabs the reader’s attention or compels them to read your essay further. It is supposed to make your essay more interesting and engaging for them.

A great technique to use is starting out by making an assertive claim about your topic. This will help in grabbing the reader’s attention the moment they begin reading your essay.

What comes first, thesis or hook?

The hook of your essay is the first line of your introductory paragraph or can be more than one also. But the essay hook is written first.

A thesis statement follows it. It is included as a mini-outline of the essay and tells the readers about the essay’s content. Further on, the transitional hook sentence is added at the end of the paragraph.

What is the purpose of a hook?

The main and foremost purpose of a hook is to grab the attention of readers and hook them to your work. It creates an interesting and enticing start to an essay or any other assignment and connects the readers to your work.

What is a hook statement?

The hook is the first sentence of your introduction, and it should be interesting. A great way to start your introduction is by writing an engaging, concise, and clear hook. This will spark curiosity in the reader, which leads them through all that you have written about.

How long is a hook in an essay?

The hook is 1-2 sentences of your essay are important because they help capture the reader's attention. They will continue reading if they are interested in what you have to say.

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Nova Allison is a Digital Content Strategist with over eight years of experience. Nova has also worked as a technical and scientific writer. She is majorly involved in developing and reviewing online content plans that engage and resonate with audiences. Nova has a passion for writing that engages and informs her readers.

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Good Hooks for Essays: 14 Hook Ideas with Examples

Now here’s the clue.

If you want to wow your teacher, polish the introduction. Add something interesting, funny, shocking, or intriguing. Good essay hooks help you build an emotional connection right from the start. Think of an essay hook as bait for your readers.

Our expert team has prepared numerous examples of hooks for essays. You’ll find hook examples for an argumentative essay, personal story, history essay, and other types of papers.

For 100% clarity, we provided examples using each hook tactic. And a short part about how to write a good hook.

Teacher: "I won't forgive you for this essay."  Student: "But you gave me an A. What's wrong with it?"  Teacher: "I couldn't stop reading it, and I burned my dinner."

  • 💎 What Exactly Is a Hook & How to Write a Good One
  • 📜 Examples of Classical Essay Hooks
  • 💡 Try Some Informative Essay Hooks
  • 🦄 Here are the Most Uncommon Essay Hooks

✅ Good Hooks for Essays: Bonus Tips

  • 🔗 References for More Information

We highly recommend reading all the methods and examples, so you don’t have any questions.

💎 How to Write a Hook That Will Work for Your Essay?

The hook of your essay usually appears in the very first sentence.

The average length of an essay hook should be 3-7 sentences, depending on the topic.

But first, let’s quickly go through the key questions.

What Is an Essay Hook?

An essay hook (or narrative hook) is a literary technique that writers use to keep their readers engaged. It shows that the content below is worth reading.

The hook can have different lengths. Some writers make it last for several pages. Though, it better be a short paragraph or even a sentence.

Why Do You Need a Good Essay Hook?

Writing the right hook is essential for a few reasons:

  • It heats up your readers’ interest. If you did it right, they read the whole piece.
  • It shows off your skills . A right hook presents you as an expert in your field.
  • It attracts target audience. Only the readers you want will keep reading.
  • It keeps the tension on the right level. Use an intriguing question, and a reader dies to find out the answer.
  • It makes a good introduction. Starting your essay off a boring fact is simply not a good idea.

How to Write a Good Hook: Ideas and Examples

Next, we will discuss these hook types in more detail. We’ll also provide essay hook examples of less common yet intriguing types: dialogue, story, contradiction, comparison, definition, metaphor, puzzle, announcement, and background information hooks.

💬 The Famous Quote Hook

Use a famous quote as a hook for your essay on history, literature, or even social sciences. It will present you as an established writer. It shows how knowledgeable you are and motivates the readers to engage in the text.

⬇️ Check out examples below ⬇️

Quote Hook Example: Political Science

Hilary Clinton once said that "there cannot be true democracy unless women's voices are heard." Which creates a discussion about how perfect democracy should look like. If it is a form of government that considers all opinions, why are women silenced so often even nowadays? The truth is that we need to ensure completely equal opportunities for women in politics before we talk about establishing the correct version of democracy. And even the most developed and progressive countries are still struggling to get to that level of equality. It can be achieved by various methods, even though they might only work in certain countries.

Social Sciences

"Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country." These words of wisdom from John Kennedy reflect the perspective we need to teach the younger generations. For some reason, it has become popular to blame the government for any problem arising in society. Is it their fault that we don't think about waste and keep trashing our home? Social responsibility is a real thing. The well-being of our countries starts with the actions of every separate individual. It is not entirely right to wait until the government fixes all the issues for us. The best strategy is to start thinking about what we can do as a community to make our home even a better place.

And excellent sources of quotes for you:

  • Brainyquote.com – you can search quotes by topic or by author.
  • Goodreads.com is not only a great collection of e-books but also quotes.
  • Quoteland.com has plenty of brilliant words for all imaginable situations.
  • Quotationspage.com – more than 30,000 quotations for unique essay hooks.

❓Rhetorical Question Essay Hooks

It doesn’t have to be rhetorical – any type of question addressed to your audience will do its job. Such a universal kind of hook can spike the interest of your readers immediately.

Some useful patterns of rhetorical questions:

  • What could be more important than…?
  • What if there was only one… (chance/day/hour)?
  • Who wouldn’t like to… (be a cat/turn visitors into clients)?
  • Why bother about… (inequality/imperfect education system)?
  • Which is more important: … (making money or realizing potential)?

And more in examples:

Example of a Question Hook on Education

Wouldn't free access to education for everyone be wonderful? The answer would most likely be positive. However, it is not as simple as it seems. As much as the governments try to achieve this goal, there are still many uneducated people. On the bright side, in the era of technology, learning has never been so easy. Of course, some young adults just prefer the shortcut option of taking a student loan. Other ways are much more challenging and require a lot of responsibility and patience. Finding free educational resources online and gaining experience with the help of video tutorials might sound unprofessional. Still, you will be surprised how many experts hired in different fields only received this type of education.

Question Hook Example: Health

Is there anything that can help you lose weight fast? You have probably heard of this magical keto diet that is getting more and more popular worldwide. People claim that it helps them shred those excess pounds in unbelievably short terms. But how healthy is it, and does it suit anyone? The truth is that no diet is universal, and thanks to our differences, some weight-loss methods can even be harmful. Keto diet, for example, leads your body into the state of ketosis. What happens is that you don't receive carbohydrates, and in this state, fat is used as the primary source of energy instead them. However, it carries potential threats.

😂 Anecdotal Essay Hooks

This type would usually be more suitable for literary pieces or personal stories. So, don’t use it for formal topics, such as business and economics. Note that this hook type can be much longer than one sentence. It usually appears as the whole first paragraph itself.

It wouldn't be Kate if she didn't do something weird, so she took a stranger for her best friend this time. There is nothing wrong with it; mistakes like that happen all the time. However, during only five minutes that Kate spent with the stranger, she blabbed too much. Thinking that she sat down at the table that her friend took, Kate was so busy starting on her phone that she didn't notice that it wasn't her friend at all. Sure enough, the naive girl started talking about every little detail of her last night that she spent with her date. It was too much for the ears of an old lady. Kate realized she took the wrong table only when it was too late.

Literature (personal story)

Do not ever underestimate the power of raccoons! Those little furry animals that may look overly cute are too smart and evil. It only takes one box of pizza left outside your house by the delivery person for the disaster to begin. When they smell that delicious pizza, no doors can stop them. They will join the forces to find a hole in your house to squeeze into. Even if it's a window crack four feet above the ground, they know how to get to it. Using their fellow raccoons as the ladder, they get inside the house. They sneak into the kitchen and steal your pizza in front of your eyes and your scared-to-death dog. Not the best first day in the new home, is it? 

📈 Fact or Statistic Hook

Looking deeper into your essay topic, you might find some numbers that are quite amusing or shocking. They can serve as perfect hooks for economics- and business-oriented writings. Also, it is better if they are less known.

Business/social sciences

The UAE workforce is culturally diverse since around 20% of employees (usually called expatriates) come from different countries. Ex-pats tend to take managerial positions, which makes communication within companies quite tricky. The training focused on raising cultural awareness is getting more common, but such educational strategies as games (or gamification) are still rarely applied in the UAE companies. Yet, gamification was a useful tool in other places, making it an attractive UAE team building method. It can significantly help integrate ex-pats and create a more culturally aware environment.

The full version of this paper is here: Gamification and Cross-Cultural Communication in Dubai

Statistic Hook Example in Economics

The United Arab Emirate's debt has been rising drastically in past years, from about US$17 billion in 2003, which is almost 19 percent of GDP, to US$184 billion in 2009. Only a small proportion of the debt can be tracked directly to the public sector. A report by UBS bank shows that most of the debt comes from the corporate sector. Most of the companies that hold the main section of the debt are financial institutions. The public sector partly owns them. Banks in the UAE have been accumulating their debt amounts in the years mentioned above and could now account for 75 percent of the total foreign debt. The discussion is about the reasons why the UAE debt has been rising at an alarming rate.

Check the whole essay Debts in the United Arab Emirates .

Some good sources for statistics

  • Finance.yahoo.com is perfect for business papers.
  • Usa.gov/statistics is an easy-to-use governmental engine for searching data and stats.
  • Unstats.un.org provides a massive collection of statistics published by UN organizations
  • Oecd-ilibrary.org is the online library of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), featuring its books, papers, and statistics and is a gateway to the OECD’s analysis and data.

🤯 Shocking Facts are Very Good Hooks for Essays

Very similar to a statistical hook, a fact can serve as a perfect engaging introduction. Search your field for some shocking phenomenon and gently insert it in the beginning.

Don’t forget to include a reliable source reinforcing your words!

Fact Hook Example in Economics

Nowadays, much attention is paid to the problem of shark finning around the world. Millions of sharks are killed annually for their fins, and many of them are dropped back to the ocean finless, where they die because of suffocation. In many countries, the idea of shark finning remains illegal and unethical, but the possibility of earning huge money cannot be ignored (Dell'Apa et al. 151). Regarding available technologies, market economies, trade relations, and cheap employment, it does not take much time to organize special trips for shark hunting. The Trade of shark fins is alive and well developed in countries like the United States and China. However, the number of people who are eager to try shark fin soup has considerably decreased during the last several years because of the popularity of anti-shark fin soup campaigns and laws supported worldwide (Mosbergen). The situation continues to change in China.

Read the full paper about China Southern Airlines being against shark finning .

Daniel Stacey and Ross Kelly observed that long lines and a new gray market trend for bigger screen phones marked Apple's new iPhones debut. As expected, new phone models drew Apple fans outside retail stores (Stacey and Kelly). Global critics, however, noted that this year's lines were generally longer relative to previous periods mainly because of the developing gray market for Apple products. The new Apple's iPhones have larger screens than the previous models. Also, they boast of improved battery life, faster processors, and an enhanced camera. Tim Cook called them "mother of all upgrades" (Stacey and Kelly).

For the whole text, go to Apple’s New iPhones Start Selling in Stores” by Stacey and Kelly

Sources to look for reliable facts:

  • Buzzfeed.com – news, videos, quizzes.
  • Cracked.com – a website full of funny stuff, like articles, videos, pictures, etc.
  • Webmd.com – an incredible collection of medical facts you will love.
  • Livescience.com – discoveries hitting on a broad range of fields.
  • National Geographic – needs no introduction.
  • Mental Floss answers life’s big questions, a compilation of fascinating facts and incredible stories.

🗣️ Dialogue as a Catchy Hook for Essays

Dialogue is another type of hooks that goes perfectly with pieces of literature and stories. It can even make your short essay stand out if you include it at the beginning. But don’t forget that it only concerns specific topics such as literature and history.

Here it is:

Dialogue Hook Example in Literature

– Why did you do it? – I don't know anymore… That's why I'm leaving for a little bit right now. I need time to think.

With these words, Anna stepped back into the train car and waved goodbye to Trevor. She couldn’t even find the right words to explain why she ran away on her wedding day. It wasn’t that she didn’t love Trevor, but there was this deep, natural, and unexplored feeling that told her it wasn’t time yet. But the only thing Anna realized was that the city made her sick. That day, she took off her wedding dress, bought a ticket on the next flight leaving that afternoon, and hopped on the train taking her to the airport. She couldn’t even remember the country’s name she was going to so blurry everything was from her tears.

Dialogue Hook for History Essay

– If we still had inquisition, we could probably set him on fire. – Some dark magic, indeed, my friend! It would have probably been a real dialogue if we knew who was the first automobile inventor for sure. People were undoubtedly shocked to see the cars moving by themselves without horses. However, since they started appearing around the globe around the same time, it is almost impossible to identify who was the original creator of the idea and the first automobile itself. The credit was usually given to Karl Benz from Germany, who created a gasoline car in 1885-1886. But there are also much earlier records of a gentleman named Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot, who built the first vehicle powered by steam in France in 1769.

🔮 A Story Looks Like an Extremely Good Essay Hook

A universal essay hook is a story. You can use this trick pretty much anywhere. The main challenge is to be as authentic as possible, try to tell something fresh and engaging. The more specific and narrow the story, the more chances for a successful introduction.

Story Hook Example for an Essay on Business

Dell started fast and strong. The original company was founded in 1984 when the founder was only a 19-year-old student at the University of Texas. Four years after the inception of the company, Michael Dell became the Entrepreneur of the Year. Eight years after he started the company from his dorm room's comfort, Dell was chosen as the Man of the Year by PC Magazine. […] The company was acknowledged as the world's leading direct marketer of personal computers. At the same time, Dell was known as one of the top five PC vendors on the planet (Hunger 9). […] However, the company's journey encountered a major hurdle down the road. Even after recovering from an economic recession in 2010, the company continued to experience declining sales.

Continue reading Dell Technologies Mission, Vision, and Values .

🦚 Contradictory Statement – Queen of Good Hooks

Everybody loves to start an argument by contradicting some facts. Therefore, you simply need to add a controversial statement at the beginning of your essay. People of all ages and beliefs will not be able to stop reading it!

Challenging your readers works well for social sciences, business, and psychology topics.

Examples of contradictory statements essay hooks:

If you think being a manager is a calm and relatively easy task, try surviving on five cups of coffee, a sandwich, and two packs of cigarettes a day. You would rather believe that managers only walk around the office and give their staff orders, wouldn't you? Unfortunately, the reality is much harsher than such rainbowy dreams. The use of the internet in academic contexts is on the rise, and its role in learning is hotly debated. For many teachers who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. A whole set of personal qualities and professional skills must keep up with the successful strategic planning, assessment, and development. All the tasks the managers need to attend to are nerve-wracking and sometimes almost impossible to do. The stress from the demanding managerial position is often overlooked or underestimated.

Social sciences

Video games have been ruining our kids' lives and leading to an increase in crime. Since the gaming industry's development in recent years, the fear of its adverse effects on the younger generations' brains has become a significant concern. There is such a wide variety of games, ranging from educational to violent shooters and horrors. Almost immediately, caring parents jumped on the latter category, claiming that its impact is too significant and children become more aggressive and uncontrollable. Some supporters of this theory went even further. They decided to link real-life crimes to the effects of violent video games on child and adult behavior. However, as we will see later in this article, there is no or little scientific evidence supporting those ideas.

🔁 Vivid Comparison Essay Hook

Introducing your topic with an engaging, vivid comparison is a universal strategy. It is suitable for any kind of writing. The main idea is to grab your readers’ attention by showing them your unique perspective on the topic. Try to make the comparison amusing and exciting.

Comparison Essay Hook Options:

  • Comparison with daily chores (e.g., Proofreading your essays is like cleaning your teeth.)
  • Comparison with something everyone hates (e.g., Learning grammar is like going to the dentist.)
  • Comparison with something everyone loves (e.g., John was happy like a child eating a free vanilla ice cream.)
  • Comparison of modern and old-school phenomena (e.g., Modern email has much in common with pigeon post.)
  • Funny comparison (e.g., Justin Bieber is the Michael Jackson of his time)

Check out examples:

Environment

For many people, flying feels like a dream come true. More and more people take their first-ever flight thanks to the rapidly developing aviation technologies. Aircraft and airports are advancing, and air traveling is getting cheaper. However, except for transporting eager travel addicted and business people, planes are used in other ways. It appears that the whole economies across the world depend on the effectiveness and efficiency of airlines. Import and export demand this kind of transportation to work at all times. Aviation development seems like a great thing. However, just like any other technological breakthrough, it comes with a price. Environmental issues did not wait too long to show up.

Social sciences/psychology

Leaving home for the first time as a freshman can only be compared to the level of stress you had in childhood when your mother left you in the line at the checkout for too long. Indeed, becoming a student and moving out of the parent's house comes with a great deal of stress. All the unknown that lies ahead makes youngsters too anxious. Then, the difficulties of financial planning and increased academic pressure come as additional sources of worries. However, it does not have to be such a negative experience. Particular techniques can help students overcome their stress related to the separation from their parents.

📄 Definitions = Easy & Good Hooks for Essays

Another versatile essay hook option is introducing a qualitative definition. Try to make it capacious, and don’t fall into verbal jungles. This narrative hook is perfect for short scientific papers where there is only one focus subject.

Business Ethics

White-collar crime refers to the peaceful offense committed with the intention of gaining unlawful monetary benefits. There are several white-collar crimes that can be executed. They include extortion, insider trading, money laundering, racketeering, securities fraud, and tax evasion. Enron Company was an American based energy company. It was the largest supplier of natural gas in America in the early 1990s. The company had a stunning performance in the 1990s. Despite the excellent performance, stakeholders of the company were concerned about the complexity of the financial statements. The company's management used the complex nature of the financial statements and the accounting standards' weaknesses to manipulate the financial records. The white-collar crime was characterized by inflating the asset values, overstating the reported cash flow, and failure to disclose the financial records' liabilities. This paper carries out an analysis of the Enron scandal as an example of white-collar crime as discussed in the video, The Smartest Guys in the Room.

Go to see the full text here: Enron Company’s Business Ethics .

Motivation is the act of influencing someone to take any action to achieve a particular goal (Montana& Chanov, 2008). Employees' motivation depends on the job's nature, the company's organizational culture, and personal characteristics. In this case study, various theories influence and show how employees can be motivated in the workplace.

Continue reading this paper about Motivation Role in Management .

📚 Metaphor Hook for Essays

Naturally, using a metaphor as a hook for your essay comes with some limitations. You should only use this type in literature and sometimes in psychology. However, it serves as a great attention grabber if it’s engaging enough.

Let’s see how you can use a metaphor:

When life gives you dirt, don't try to squeeze the juice out of it. It's better to leave it alone and let it dry out a bit. Kate decided to follow this philosophy since nothing else seemed to work. After the painful divorce process, last week's ridiculous work assignments and managing two kids alone almost drove her crazy. No polite discussions, arguing, or bribing helped take care of seemingly a million tasks these little women had to deal with. Even letting out the anger just like her phycologist recommended did not help much. Instead, Kate referred to the last remedy. She put all the issues aside with the hope that it would get better later.

The recipe is relatively easy – take a cup of self-respect, two cups of unconditional love, half a cup of good health, a pinch of new positive experiences, and mix it all for a perfect state of happiness! We all wish it would be possible, right? However, the mystery of this state of being happy is still unsolved. The concept and its perception considerably change depending on time and values. Happiness is so complicated that there is even no universal definition of it. Besides, humans are social creatures, so associating your level of success with others is not unusual. Therefore, being happy means achieving a certain level of several aspects.

🧩 Puzzle? Yes! Amazing Hook for Your Essay

Doesn’t a good riddle grab your attention? Sometimes you just want to find out the answer. The other times, you want to figure out how it is related to the topic. Such a hook would be great for writings on psychology and even economics or business.

Here are the examples:

How many Google office employees you need to destroy a box of fresh donuts? Google is indeed famous for some of the most accommodating and unique working places around the whole world. However, the success of the company does not only appear from treats for employees. It seems that the organizational culture has many effects on business decisions and overall performance. All the staff working in Google share the same visions and values, helping them cooperate and lead the company to success. However, there is one aspect to consider. The organizational culture needs to be adapted to the ever-changing business environment.

Who survives on dirt-like substance, is never joyful, and only returns to the cave to sleep? It sounds horrible, but the correct answer is human. Nowadays, the demands for any kind of workers are rising, which brings tremendous effects on people. As the number of duties increases, it is getting harder for employees not to chug on coffee and come back home in time for a family dinner. The work-life balance is disturbed, leading to anxiety, relationship issues, and even health problems. Social life appears to be as important as making money. Therefore, the correct distribution of time between personal life and work duties is necessary for happiness.

📢 Announcement Is Also a Good Essay Hook Option

Announcements could be suitable for literary pieces and historical essays.

Such a hook doesn’t have to be too long. It should be significant enough to persuade your readers to stick to your writing. Make sure it aligns with your topic as well.

Ways to use announcements as essay hooks:

It was a revolution! The Beatle's first song came out in 1962, and almost immediately, hordes of fans pledged their loyalty to this new band. Nearly all youngsters became obsessed with their music. No one can deny that the Beatles are still considered the creators of some of the best songs in history. However, the arrival of the British band influences culture as well. Many photos depict girls going crazy on live concerts and guys shaping their haircuts after the Beatles' members. The revolution that the band brought left an impact, evidence that we can still trace in modern British culture and music.

I will never go to Starbucks again! Oh, no, mind me. I love their coffee. At some point in my life, I even thought I had an addiction and had to ask my friends to watch my consumption of Pumpkin Spice Latte. Then, the wind of change turned everything upside down. On my usual Starbucks morning run, I noticed a homeless man holding a paper cup begging for money. At first, I didn't pay much attention since it's a usual occurrence in our area. However, one day, I recognized my old neighbor in him. The only cash I had on me, I usually spent on my cup of coffee, but I decided it was not much of a sacrifice. From that moment, I only showed up on that street to shove a few bucks into that poor guy's cup. One day, to my surprise, he talked to me.

ℹ️ Background Information Essay Hook

Last but not least, give background information on your subject to make a good intro. Such an essay hook is effortless and suitable for practically any paper. Try to find the most unobvious angle to the background information. At the same time, keep it short and substantive.

Here are the ways to use background information essay hooks:

Air Arabia is among the leading low-cost carriers in the global airline industry. The airline is mainly based at the Sharjah International Airport in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) (Air Arabia, 2012). The airline came into inception in 2003 after His Highness Dr. Sheik Mohammed Al Qassimi, the Ruler of Sharjah, issued an Emiri Decree. Later, Air Arabia was transformed into a limited liability company. For nearly a decade, Air Arabia has witnessed tremendous growth, resulting in increased fleet size and improved sales revenues. At the same time, Air Arabia has created a renowned brand that offers reliable and safe services (Dubai Media Incorporated, 2012). Air Arabia identifies itself as a low-cost carrier by providing low fares in the industry. Some of the key strengths of the airline include punctuality and safety. This aims to ensure that the airline serves its customers most efficiently by observing its safety requirements and adhering to the landing and takeoff schedules (De Kluyver, 2010).

Read the full text here: Air Arabia Company Analysis.

Walmart was founded by Sam Walton in the Arkansas United States in 1962 as a grocery store. The company, which operates a chain of over 8,000 stores in fifteen countries, is estimated to employ over two million employees from diverse backgrounds. Wal-Mart was incorporated in 1969 and started trading in the New York Stock Exchange in 1972. […] Although the company can leave its consumers with a saving due to its low-price policy, it has faced some sharp criticisms over how it treats its employees and other stakeholders. Wal-Mart boasts of its ability to save its customers' money, an average of $950 per year. This, however, has been criticized as harming the community. Also, the feminists' activists have focused on Walmart's misconduct in offering low prices. (Fraedrich, Ferrell & Ferrell 440)

Now we won’t keep you for long. Let’s just go through simple points of essay hook writing.

Someone may think that you have to write your hook first. It comes first in the paper, right?

In reality, though, you can wait until your entire essay is nearly finished. Then go back and rewrite the very first paragraph. This way, you can have a fresh look at what you’ve written in the beginning.

Here’s a simple plan you can follow.

  • First, write a basic version of your thesis statement.
  • Then, provide supporting evidence for your thesis in every body paragraph.
  • After that, reword your thesis statement and write your concluding paragraph.
  • Finally, search for an attention-grabbing fact, statistic, or anything from the list above to serve as an engaging essay hook.

Add this essay hook to the beginning of your introduction. Make sure that your ideas still flow naturally into your thesis statement.

⚠️ Pro tip: choose various hooks and play around, adding each hook to your introduction paragraph. Like this, you can determine which one makes the most impressive beginning to your paper.

Some of your choices may sound interesting but may not lead to your essay’s main point. Don’t panic! Paper writing always involves trial and error. Just keep trying your essay hook ideas until one fits perfectly.

That’s it 😊

Good luck with your work!

🔗 References

  • Hook – Examples and Definition of Hook
  • How to Engage the Reader in the Opening Paragraph – BBC
  • Hooks and Attention Grabbers; George Brown College Writing Centre
  • Hook Examples and Definition; Literary Devices
  • What Is a Narrative Hook? Video
  • How to: Writing Hooks or Attention-Getting Openings-YouTube

Research Paper Analysis: How to Analyze a Research Article + Example

Film analysis: example, format, and outline + topics & prompts.

How to Write a Hook that Captivates Readers

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A hook is a compelling opening sentence or paragraph in an essay or article. Its purpose is to grab the readers’ attention and entice them to continue reading. A hook must evoke an emotional response or pique curiosity to keep the readers engaged.

Are you trying to figure out how to write a hook? Stick around because this blog has all the guidelines you need to write one like an expert  paper writing service  provider. So, let’s get started!

Table of Contents

Types of Hooks for Essays

Your essay or  research paper’s  hook can be in any of the five types:

Anecdotal Hook

Starting with an anecdote is a good way to keep the readers interested. Ensure that the anecdote relates to your topic and makes your readers feel like they’re part of the narrative.

For example:

“Sarah sat at the edge of the cliff. The wind whipping through her hair as she stared into the vast expanse of the Grand Canyon. Little did she know that this moment would be the catalyst for a life-changing decision.”

This hook introduces a character, Sarah, and a dramatic setting, the Grand Canyon. Doing so creates intrigue and leaves readers wondering about Sarah’s decision. Here, the reader is immediately invested in the story and eager to learn more.

Question Based Hooks

Another effective hook is to pose thought-provoking questions. This type of hook encourages readers to engage with the content right from the start actively. 

Here’s an example:

“What if everything you thought you knew about success was wrong? What if the key to achieving true fulfillment lies in embracing failure and redefining your definition of success?”

This hook presents a series of thought-provoking questions challenging the conventional wisdom about success. 

Statistical or Factual Hook

This hook type is particularly effective when the statistic or fact is relevant to the main content. 

“Did you know that 80% of New Year’s resolutions fail by February? Discover the secrets to making lasting changes and achieving your goals beyond the first month of the year.”

This hook uses a surprising statistic about the failure rate of New Year’s resolutions to capture readers’ attention. It entices readers to continue reading to uncover shared strategies and insights.

Witty or Humorous Hooks 

Humor and wit can be great ways to keep your readers interested and make their reading experience more enjoyable. If the content is funny or lighthearted, this kind of hook can grab people’s attention.

“They say the early bird catches the worm, but what about the night owls? Discover the surprising advantages of embracing your nocturnal nature and redefining productivity on your own terms.”

This hook puts a fun spin on a well-known phrase about night owls and productivity. 

Scenario Based Hook

This kind of hook appeals to their senses and feelings, establishing an instant bond.

“The sun dipped below the horizon, casting a warm, golden glow over the tranquil beach. As the waves gently lapping against the shore, a sense of peace and possibility filled the air. Beckoning those who dared to chase their dreams!

This hook paints a picture of a beautiful beach at sunset, creating a sense of tranquility and motivation. It provides a vivid image full of detail that draws readers in and captures their imaginations. 

Understanding How to Write a Killer Hook 

A hook is like a doorway to your content. It sets the tone for establishing a connection with your readers. 

It can be a stirring statement, an interesting question, an amusing anecdote, or a shocking fact.

Why is a Strong Hook Crucial in Capturing Readers’ Interest?

Having an eye-catching hook can be a major game-changer when grabbing people’s attention. It’s like a magnet, luring them in and making them want to read your writing.

If you don’t have a good hook, people might not stick around to hear what you have to say. Moreover, a strong hook also sets the tone for your entire writing. 

Examples to Understand the Impact of a Strong Hook

Compelling Statement:

“In today’s busy world, have you ever thought about how you can get more done in a shorter amount of time?”

This hook immediately grabs readers’ attention by talking about a common problem. It plays on people’s need to be more efficient and leaves them wanting to find the solution.

Thought-Provoking Question

“What if the key to happiness lies not in acquiring more, but in letting go?”

This hook gets people thinking by asking a thought-provoking question that goes against the grain. It makes readers question their own opinions and views. Luring them in to see what kind of answers the piece offers.

Intriguing Anecdote

“As the clock struck midnight, she found herself standing on the edge of a decision that would change her life forever.”

This hook straight away pulls readers into a dramatic scenario. Trying to spark their curiosity about the character’s problem. Makes them desperate to find out the results of their choice.

Surprising Fact

“Did you know that the human brain can process images 60,000 times faster than text?”

This hook throws out an unexpected and captivating fact that gets readers interested. It brings up an interesting piece of info. Also gives a hint at what more can be discovered in the rest of the article.

Pro Tips to Craft a Killer Hook

You can use the following techniques to write a killer hook.

Target Audience – Identification, Preference, and Interest

Before you write a hook, it’s important to understand your audience well.

To identify your target audience, consider the following factors:

  • Demographics: Age, gender, location, education level, occupation, etc.
  • Psychographics: Values, beliefs, hobbies, lifestyle choices, etc.
  • Behavior: Online habits, preferred platforms, browsing patterns, content consumption habits, etc.

Understanding Target Audience Preferences and Interests

After identifying your audience, it is important to know their interests. Here are some guidelines from the expert  research paper writing services  provider. 

Surveys and Questionnaires 

Send out surveys to your audience to get their thoughts and feelings directly. Ask what they like, what interests them, and what captures their attention. Look at the answers you get to find out what people usually think.

Social Media Listening 

Keep an eye on social media sites where your desired demographic hangs out. Check out what they’re interacting with, what they’re talking about, and the kind of lingo they use.

Effective Hook for Effective Writing

Once you’ve figured out what your audience likes and dislikes, you can craft a hook that resonates with your audience. Here are a few ideas to help you do that while writing an essay:

Pinning the Pain Points 

Identify the challenges, problems, or pain points your audience faces and address them directly in your hook. For example, “Tired of struggling to find time for self-care? Discover a simple solution that fits into your busy schedule.”

Appeal to Their Aspirations

Tap into your audience’s aspirations, goals, or desires and use them to create an emotional connection. For instance, “Imagine a life filled with adventure and travel. Uncover the secrets to fulfilling your wanderlust dreams.”

Use Their Language 

Pay attention to the language, phrases, and terminology your audience uses. Incorporate those words in your hook to make it relatable and resonate with their communication style.

Focus on Relevancy 

Ensure that your hook directly relates to the topic or content you’re offering. Make it clear how your content will provide value or satisfy their interests. For instance, 

“Discover the latest fashion trends that suit your body type perfectly.”

Create Curiosity 

Intrigue your audience by hinting at valuable insights or solutions they can expect to find in your content. Pose a question or make a statement that sparks their curiosity and leaves them wanting more.

Impactful Hook for a Perfect Write-up

Stick to these guidelines below for writing an effective hook:

Keep Your Opening Sentence Concise 

The first line of your hook matters in getting people to pay attention. Keep it short, powerful, and interesting right away. Don’t waste time with long intros or too much background info. Drop a punchy sentence that sets the tone for the rest of your content.

Consider the following example:

“Unravel the mysteries of the universe in just five simple steps.”

Creating a Sense of Curiosity or Suspense

Creating intrigue can capture your readers’ attention and keep them hooked. Think of it like this: curiosity and suspense are like bait to draw people in. 

For example, you could open with a question or Statement that will make your readers want to know more. Or you could set up a scene that creates a sense of anticipation for what comes next.

“She stood at the crossroads, a single decision separating her from the life she had always dreamed of.”

This opening sets up a suspenseful situation. Makes readers eager to find out what choice the character will make and what the consequences will be. 

Add Emotions to Evoke a Strong Reaction:

Feelings resonate with readers and get an intense response. By tapping into people’s emotions, you can create an instant link and interest.

“Heart pounding, palms sweating, she took a deep breath and stepped onto the stage. It was her moment to shine.”

It creates an emotional connection and builds anticipation as readers root for the character to do well. Stirs up many feelings and encourages readers to continue reading to find out what happens next.

Key Ingredients of a Good Hook 

While writing a hook, ensure:

Clarity and Conciseness 

Make sure the hook is simple and to the point. Cut out any extra words that could weaken its effects.

Emotional Appeal 

See if the hook gets the emotions out of the readers you want. Think about adding or making the elements stronger to get the readers feeling something.

Relevance and Connection 

Make sure the hook is closely connected to the rest of the article. Tweak the hook to strengthen the link between the start and the rest of the text.

Language and Tone 

Be mindful of the words you use, how you say it, and the type of writing in the hook. Try to make sure it’s something that your target audience will like and expect.

Common Mistakes to Avoid 

Overly long or complicated hooks.

Avoid making a hook statement overly long. Long and convoluted hooks for writing can confuse or overwhelm readers. As a result, they will lose interest before they dive into the main content.

Using Clichés or Generic Openings

Using clichés or generic openings in your hook can make it predictable and uninteresting. Generic openings fail to capture readers’ attention because they offer nothing new or intriguing.

“Once upon a time, in a land far, far away, there lived a brave hero who embarked on an epic journey to save the world from evil.”

This opening might sound familiar and reminiscent of classic fairy tales. Still, it doesn’t provide any unique or surprising elements. 

To avoid clichés and generic openings, strive for originality and fresh perspectives. Here’s a revised hook that takes a different approach:

“In the darkest corners of a forgotten realm, a reluctant outcast discovers an ancient secret that holds the power to reshape destiny.”

Failing to Deliver on the Promises Made in the Hook

When readers are hooked by an intriguing statement or a compelling question, they expect the content to deliver on those promises. Failing to do so can lead to disappointment and a loss of trust.

Ensure that the hook in essay accurately reflects the main content and sets realistic expectations for readers. Here’s an example:

“Discover the ultimate secret to becoming a millionaire in just one month!”

If the content that follows this hook doesn’t provide a legitimate and achievable path to wealth creation, readers will feel misled and may lose interest. While writing hooks, ensure that the hook’s promises align with the content and deliver valuable information or insights.

Writers need to use a catchy hook in their write-ups. It is like setting the tone for your entire piece, and it can create an emotional connection between you and your readers.

Hopefully, this blog post helped let you know how to write a hook for an essay. If you are still confused, don’t hesitate to count on the professional expertise of  our writers .

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How to Write a Hook for Essay?

09 October, 2020

7 minutes read

Author:  Elizabeth Brown

Want to know how to write a hook for an essay? Lack of ideas for a mind-blowing attention grabber? Don’t worry - we’ll guide you through the stern path of ignorance. The primary intention of any writer is to make a strong impression on readers right from the first sentence. After all, there’s nothing better than engaging pieces of writing that preserve attention more intensely than Marvel movies. And that’s a great hook which makes them so easily digestible and memorable. Of course, the process of generating ideas that spark interest is not as challenging as climbing the Everest mountain, but it does require some brainstorming anyway. If your dream is to learn the skill of creating original hooks for essays, then this article is for you.  

writing a hook for essay

What is a hook?

If you wonder how to start an essay , consider beginning with an attention grabber. A hook is a way of reaching your reader by means of capturing their attention to the writing piece. It’s an art of its own; only words is the main weapon here instead of brushes. Long story short, a hook is something alluring, something that makes readers fall in love with your text, forcing them to read every word with excitement. Sounds perplexing? Let’s move to examples.

Hook for Essay

Good attention grabbers

There are different types of hooks which you can use at the beginning of your paper, depending on the topic. The most commonly used ones include questions, quotes, statistics, or anecdotes. Each of the methods works equally well for any essay, but keep in mind that the way you construct your essay hook will affect the essence of your overall work. Hence, make sure that your attention grabber is totally related to the paper topic. 

Also, a good introduction doesn’t have to be a lip-smacking opening or a jaw-dropping revelation. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel. Instead, make great hooks that are simple for readers’ understanding and devoid of blatant gibberish, and don’t forget to add cherry on top to catch the interest of your audience. Now, let’s review some examples of good attention getters to get you started:

essay exhibit1

As you can see, this hook contains a joke, and it is deeply related to the pain most people feel when given a writing task. Therefore, such sentence starters for essays hook from first sight and make readers say “that’s so me!”. Got the idea? Let’s move to the next examples. 

essay exhibit2

This hook questions readers and provides food for thought from the very first sentence. Also, this opening sentence invites to give an answer to the question and thus intensifies suspense. Ultimately, it makes readers eager to compare their response with that of an author.

essay exhibit3

This is an example of starting an essay with a quote, in which the introductory sentence begins with a famous quotation related to success. It calls for attention immediately and proves to readers that the text they are about to read will be not just interesting but also informative.

essay exhibit4

This is a statistic hook which introduces readers to the text with numbers right away. That’s because figures are the most reliable means of keeping attention. This way, the author encourages readers to think in terms of global dimensions and imagine the effect of a single number on the current working conditions. 

essay exhibit5

From this extract, readers can learn a new, surprising fact they have never thought of before. Such a method of implementing a hook is called misconception revelation. The primary goal of using such a hook is to break one’s beliefs in half and glue them back with a fresh outlook on their previous perception of things.

essay exhibit6

This is an example of a fact hook. It’s most frequently used in informative pieces of writing, where the critical element of disclosing information is facts. In this case, the author starts the paper by stating a surprising fact which most readers have never heard of. This once again makes the audience wonder what information will follow, and inspires to read the text till the end.

Bonus tips for creating good attention grabbers

There are many different ideas you can use if you’re curious about how to make a right hook. Let’s review the most effective ones: 

Write your hook after the whole essay is done.

Should the hook necessarily come before the main text? Nothing of the kind. It might sound a little weird, but this approach will help you decide on a hook that’ll best reflect the idea of your essay. For this, you can make a couple of easy steps:

  • Write a raw version of a thesis statement
  • Back up your thesis with evidence using examples for everybody paragraph
  • By the end of a paper, restate the thesis and write a conclusion
  • Look for ideas for your hook: statistic, anecdote, quotation, facts, etc. 
  • Add the hook to the beginning of the introduction, keeping in mind that it should always relate to your essay topic.

Play with several versions of a hook for one essay.

Who said you have to limit yourself with one chosen attention grabber? Look for as many paragraph starters as you need, and then play with them, adding each one to check if they suit or not. It’s just like with shopping – you put on several things to decide on the best color, size, and model. In the case of essay writing, you can jot down a couple of facts or jokes and add each to the introduction until you see that one is the best fit for your work. 

People are hardwired to seek originality in trivial things. Otherwise, their brains refuse to perceive information which they are well aware of. That’s why, as an author of your masterpiece, you should strive to engage readers into the discussion from the start to the end. Remember – hook sentences are not meant to reduce the causes of boredom. They are a treatment for it. So it’s up to you to decide whether to create a catchy hook for your essay or whether to leave readers with nothing to think about.

Problems with writing Your Essay? Try our Essay Writer Service!

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310 Prompts for Argumentative Writing

Questions on everything from mental health and sports to video games and dating. Which ones inspire you to take a stand?

Breanna Campbell and Nathaniel Esubonteng, in “Vote 16” sweatshirts, are interviewed by a television reporter at Newark City Hall.

By Natalie Proulx

Does social media harm young people’s mental health? Do video games deserve the bad rap they often get? Should parents track their children? Who is the greatest athlete of all time?

Every school day, we publish new questions for students based on the news of the day, including prompts, like these, that inspire persuasive writing.

Below, we’ve rounded up over 300 of those argumentative prompts, organized by topic, all in one place. They cover everything from parenting and schools to music and social media. Each one, drawn from our Student Opinion column , links to a free New York Times article as well as additional subquestions that can help you think more deeply about it.

You can use these prompts however you like, whether to inspire an entry for our new Open Letter Contest , to hone your persuasive writing skills or simply to share your opinions on the issues of today. So scroll through the list below and see which ones inspire you to take a stand.

If you enjoy these questions, know that you can find all of our argumentative writing prompts, as they publish, here . Students 13 and up from anywhere in the world are invited to comment.

Argumentative Prompt Topics

Technology and social media, college, work and money, health and relationships, gender and race, arts and entertainment, parenting and childhood, government and politics, animals, science and time.

Social Media

1. Does Social Media Harm Young People’s Mental Health? 2. How Much Should Speech Be Moderated on Social Media? 3. Should the United States Ban TikTok? 4. How Young Is Too Young to Use Social Media? 5. Should Kids Be Social Media Influencers? 6. What Should Be Done to Protect Children Online? 7. Should There Be Separate Social Media Apps for Children? 8. Are You a Fan of ‘School Accounts’ on Social Media? 9. Will Social Media Help or Hurt Your College and Career Goals? 10. Is It Ever OK to Use Strangers as Content for Social Media?

Phones and Devices

11. Should More Teenagers Ditch Their Smartphones? 12. Should the Adults in Your Life Be Worried by How Much You Use Your Phone? 13. Should Phones Ever Be a Part of Family or Holiday Gatherings? 14. What Are Your Texting Dos and Don’ts? 15. Does Grammar Still Matter in the Age of Twitter? 16. Is Your Phone Love Hurting Your Relationships? 17. Should Texting While Driving Be Treated Like Drunken Driving? 18. How Young Is Too Young for an Apple Watch?

The Internet

19. Do Memes Make the Internet a Better Place? 20. How Excited Are You About the Metaverse? 21. Should Websites Force Users to Prove How Old They Are? 22. What Is the Best Way to Stop Abusive Language Online? 23. How Do You Feel About Cancel Culture? 24. Does Online Public Shaming Prevent Us From Being Able to Grow and Change? 25. Do You Think Online Conspiracy Theories Can Be Dangerous? 26. Does Technology Make Us More Alone?

School Discipline and Attendance

27. Should Schools Ban Cellphones? 28. How Should Schools Hold Students Accountable for Hurting Others? 29. What Are Your Thoughts on Uniforms and Strict Dress Codes? 30. Should Schools Test Their Students for Nicotine and Drug Use? 31. How Can Schools Engage Students Who Are at Risk of Dropping Out? 32. Should Students Be Allowed to Miss School for Mental Health Reasons? 33. Should Your School Day Start Later? 34. Should There Still Be Snow Days? 35. Do Kids Need Recess? 36. Should Students Be Punished for Not Having Lunch Money?

School Quality and Effectiveness

37. How Do You Think American Education Could Be Improved? 38. Do Schools Need to Do More to Hold Students Accountable? 39. Are Straight A’s Always a Good Thing? 40. Should Students Have the Same Teachers Year After Year? 41. Do Teachers Assign Too Much Homework? 42. Should We Get Rid of Homework? 43. Should We Eliminate Gifted and Talented Programs? 44. Is It Time to Get Rid of Timed Tests? 45. What Role Should Textbooks Play in Education? 46. How Should Senior Year in High School Be Spent? 47. Does Your School Need More Money? 48. Do School Employees Deserve More Respect — and Pay? 49. Should Public Preschool Be a Right for All Children?

Teaching and Learning

50. Do You Think We Need to Change the Way Math Is Taught? 51. Should Financial Literacy Be a Required Course in School? 52. Should Schools Teach Students Kitchen and Household Skills? 53. Do We Need Better Music Education? 54. What Are the Most Important Things Students Should Learn in School? 55. What Is the Purpose of Teaching U.S. History? 56. Do Schools Need to Do More to Support Visual Thinkers? 57. Is School a Place for Self-Expression? 58. Should Media Literacy Be a Required Course in School? 59. Can Empathy Be Taught? Should Schools Try to Help Us Feel One Another’s Pain? 60. Should Schools Teach You How to Be Happy? 61. Should All Schools Teach Cursive? 62. Should Kids Still Learn to Tell Time? 63. How Important Is Knowing a Foreign Language

Technology in School

64. How Should Schools Respond to ChatGPT? 65. Does Learning to Be a Good Writer Still Matter in the Age of A.I.? 66. Is Online Learning Effective? 67. Should Students Be Monitored When Taking Online Tests? 68. Should Schools Be Able to Discipline Students for What They Say on Social Media? 69. Can Social Media Be a Tool for Learning and Growth in Schools? 70. Should Facial Recognition Technology Be Used in Schools? 71. Is Live-Streaming Classrooms a Good Idea? 72. Should Teachers and Professors Ban Student Use of Laptops in Class? 73. Are the Web Filters at Your School Too Restrictive?

Education Politics

74. Do You Feel Your School and Teachers Welcome Both Conservative and Liberal Points of View? 75. Should Students Learn About Climate Change in School? 76. Should Teachers Provide Trigger Warnings for ‘Traumatic Content’? 77. Should Teachers Be Allowed to Wear Political Symbols? 78. What Do You Think About Efforts to Ban Books From School Libraries? 79. What Is Your Reaction to the Growing Fight Over What Young People Can Read? 80. What Do You Think About the Controversy Surrounding the New A.P. Course on African American Studies? 81. Should Schools or Employers Be Allowed to Tell People How They Should Wear Their Hair? 82. Does Prayer Have Any Place in Public Schools? 83. Should Schools Be Allowed to Censor Student Newspapers?

College Admissions

84. Should Colleges Consider Standardized Tests in Admissions? 85. Should Students Let ChatGPT Help Them Write Their College Essays? 86. What Is Your Reaction to the End of Race-Based Affirmative Action in College Admissions? 87. Are Early-Decision Programs Unfair? Should Colleges Do Away With Them? 88. Is the College Admissions Process Fair? 89. How Much Do You Think It Matters Where You Go to College? 90. Should Everyone Go to College? 91. Should College Be Free? 92. Is Student Debt Worth It? 93. Should High Schools Post Their Annual College Lists?

Campus Life

94. What Should Free Speech Look Like on Campus? 95. Should Greek Life on College Campuses Come to an End? 96. Should Universities Work to Curtail Student Drinking? 97. How Should the Problem of Sexual Assault on Campuses Be Addressed? 98. Are Lavish Amenities on College Campuses Useful or Frivolous? 99. Should ‘Despised Dissenters’ Be Allowed to Speak on College Campuses? 100. Should Emotional Support Animals Be Allowed on College Campuses?

Jobs and Careers

101. Is High School a Good Time to Train for a Career? 102. Is There Such a Thing as a ‘Useless’ College Major? 103. Should All High School Students Have Part-Time Jobs? 104. Should National Service Be Required for All Young Americans? 105. Is It OK to Use Family Connections to Get a Job?

Money and Business

106. Do You Think the American Dream Is Real? 107. Should All Young People Learn How to Invest in the Stock Market? 108. Should We All Go Cashless? 109. When Should You Tip? 110. Should We End the Practice of Tipping? 111. Are You a Crypto Optimist or Skeptic? 112. Do Celebrities and Influencers Make You Want to Buy What They’re Selling? 113. Is $1 Billion Too Much Money for Any One Person to Have? 114. Are C.E.O.s Paid Too Much? 115. Is It Immoral to Increase the Price of Goods During a Crisis? 116. What Should Stores Do With Unsold Goods? 117. Is There a ‘Right Way’ to Be a Tourist? 118. Who Should We Honor on Our Money?

Mental Health

119. Is Teen Mental Health in a State of Crisis? 120. ‘Love-Bombing.’ ‘Gaslighting.’ ‘Victim.’ Is ‘Trauma Talk’ Overused? 121. Does Achieving Success Always Include Being Happy? 122. Is Struggle Essential to Happiness? 123. Should Schools Teach Mindfulness? 124. How Can We Bring an End to the ‘Epidemic of Loneliness’? 125. Does Every Country Need a ‘Loneliness Minister’? 126. What Ideas Do You Have to Bring Your Community Closer Together? 127. Are Emotional-Support Animals a Scam? 128. Is It OK to Laugh During Dark Times?

Dating and Relationships

129. Who Should Pay for Dates? 130. Do Marriage Proposals Still Have a Place in Today’s Society? 131. Should Your Significant Other Be Your Best Friend? 132. How Do You Think Technology Affects Dating?

Physical Health

133. Should Governments Do More to Discourage People From Smoking and Vaping? 134. How Should Adults Talk to Kids About Drugs? 135. Can Laziness Be a Good Thing? 136. Should There Be Requirements for Teens Who Want to Ride E-Bikes? 137. What Advice Should Parents and Counselors Give Teenagers About Sexting? 138. Should All Children Be Vaccinated? 139. Do We Worry Too Much About Germs?

140. Is It Becoming More Acceptable for Men and Boys to Cry? 141. Is It Harder for Men and Boys to Make and Keep Friends? 142. Should Award Shows Eliminate Gendered Categories? 143. Should There Be More Gender Options on Identification Documents? 144. Justice Ginsburg Fought for Gender Equality. How Close Are We to Achieving That Goal? 145. What Should #MeToo Mean for Teenage Boys? 146. What Is Hard About Being a Boy? 147. Should There Be More Boy Dolls? 148. Is Single-Sex Education Still Useful? 149. Are Beauty Pageants Still Relevant? 150. Should Period Products Be Free? 151. What Are Your Thoughts on Last Names? 152. What Rules Should Apply to Transgender Athletes When They Compete? 153. What Is Your Reaction to the Recent Wave of Legislation That Seeks to Regulate the Lives of Transgender Youths? 154. What Do You Wish Lawmakers Knew About How Anti-L.G.B.T.Q. Legislation Affects Teenagers?

Identity, Race and Ethnicity

155. How Should Schools Respond to Racist Jokes? 156. How Should Parents Teach Their Children About Race and Racism? 157. What Is Your Reaction to Efforts to Limit Teaching on Race in Schools? 158. How Should Racial Slurs in Literature Be Handled in the Classroom? 159. Should Confederate Statues Be Removed or Remain in Place? 160. Should We Rename Schools Named for Historical Figures With Ties to Racism, Sexism or Slavery? 161. How Should We Remember the Problematic Actions of the Nation’s Founders? 162. Does the United States Owe Reparations to the Descendants of Enslaved People? 163. What Can History Teach Us About Resilience? 164. Should All Americans Receive Anti-Bias Education? 165. Is Fear of ‘The Other’ Poisoning Public Life? 166. What Stereotypical Characters Make You Cringe? 167. When Talking About Identity, How Much Do Words Matter? 168. How Useful Is It to Be Multilingual?

TV and Movies

169. Is True Crime As a Form of Entertainment Ethical? 170. Should Old TV Shows Be Brought Back? 171. Does Reality TV Deserve Its Bad Rap? 172. How Closely Should Actors’ Identities Reflect the Roles They Play? 173. In the Age of Digital Streaming, Are Movie Theaters Still Relevant? 174. Do We Need More Female Superheroes? 175. Is Hollywood Becoming More Diverse? 176. When Does Lying in Comedy Cross a Line? 177. How Do You Feel About ‘Nepotism Babies’?

Music and Video Games

178. Will A.I. Replace Pop Stars? 179. If Two Songs Sound Alike, Is It Stealing? 180. Should Musicians Be Allowed to Copy or Borrow From Other Artists? 181. How Do You Feel About Censored Music? 182. What Are the Greatest Songs of All Time? 183. Do Video Games Deserve the Bad Rap They Often Get? 184. Should There Be Limits on How Much Time Young People Spend Playing Video Games? 185. Should More Parents Play Video Games With Their Kids?

186. Are A.I.-Generated Pictures Art? 187. What Work of Art Should Your Friends Fall in Love With? 188. If Artwork Offends People, Should It Be Removed? 189. Should Museums Return Looted Artifacts to Their Countries of Origin? 190. Should Art Come With Trigger Warnings? 191. Is the Digital Era Improving or Ruining the Experience of Art? 192. Are Museums Still Important in the Digital Age? 193. Can You Separate Art From the Artist? 194. Are There Subjects That Should Be Off-Limits to Artists, or to Certain Artists in Particular? 195. Should Graffiti Be Protected?

Books and Literature

196. Is Listening to a Book Just as Good as Reading It? 197. Should Classic Children’s Books Be Updated for Today’s Young Readers? 198. Should White Writers Translate a Black Author’s Work? 199. Is There Any Benefit to Reading Books You Hate? 200. Should Libraries Get Rid of Late Fees?

201. What’s the Best — and Worst — Part of Being a Sports Fan? 202. Who Is the GOAT? 203. Do Women’s Sports Deserve More Attention? 204. What Should Be Done About the Gender Pay Gap in Sports? 205. Should Girls and Boys Sports Teams Compete in the Same League? 206. Should More Sports Be Coed? 207. College Athletes Can Now Be Paid. But Not All of Them Are Seeing Money. Is That Fair? 208. Should High School-Age Basketball Players Be Able to Get Paid? 209. Are Some Youth Sports Too Intense? 210. Are Youth Sports Too Competitive? 211. Is It Bad Sportsmanship to Run Up the Score in Youth Sports? 212. Is It Ethical to Be a Football Fan? 213. Does the N.F.L. Have a Race Problem? 214. What New Rules Would Improve Your Favorite Sport? 215. What Sports Deserve More Hype? 216. How Should We Punish Sports Cheaters? 217. Should Technology in Sports Be Limited? 218. Does Better Sports Equipment Unfairly Improve Athletic Ability? 219. Is It Offensive for Sports Teams and Their Fans to Use Native American Names, Imagery and Gestures? 220. Is It Selfish to Pursue Risky Sports Like Extreme Mountain Climbing? 221. Should Cheerleading Be an Olympic Sport?

what is a good hook for a argumentative essay

Related Writing Prompt

222. Should Parents Ever Be Held Responsible for the Harmful Actions of Their Children? 223. Where Is the Line Between Helping a Child Become More Resilient and Pushing Them Too Hard? 224. Should Parents Give Children More Responsibility at Younger Ages? 225. Should Parents Tell Children the Truth About Santa? 226. Should Parents Weigh in on Their Kids’ Dating Lives? 227. Should Parents Track Their Children? 228. How Should Parents Support a Student Who Has Fallen Behind in School? 229. Do Parents Ever Cross a Line by Helping Too Much With Schoolwork? 230. What’s the Best Way to Discipline Children? 231. What Are Your Thoughts on ‘Snowplow Parents’? 232. Should Stay-at-Home Parents Be Paid? 233. Should Parents Bribe Their Children?

Childhood and Growing Up

234. Is It Harder to Grow Up in the 21st Century Than It Was in the Past? 235. Is Childhood Today Over-Supervised? 236. When Do You Become an Adult? 237. Who Should Decide Whether a Teenager Can Get a Tattoo or Piercing? 238. Do We Give Children Too Many Trophies? 239. What Can Older Generations Learn From Gen Z? 240. What Is the Worst Toy Ever?

Legislation and Policy

241. Should the Death Penalty Be Abolished? 242. Should Marijuana Be Legal? 243. Should the United States Decriminalize the Possession of Drugs? 244. What Is Your Reaction to the State of Abortion Rights? 245. Should the Government Cancel Student Debt? 246. Should Public Transit Be Free? 247. Should There Be More Public Restrooms? 248. Should the U.S. Be Doing More to Prevent Child Poverty? 249. Should the Government Provide a Guaranteed Income for Families With Children? 250. Should Law Enforcement Be Able to Use DNA Data From Genealogy Websites for Criminal Investigations?

Gun Violence

251. Are You Concerned About Violence in America? 252. How Should Americans Deal With the Problem of Gun Violence? 253. What Should Lawmakers Do About Guns and Gun Violence? 254. Should the U.S. Ban Military-Style Semiautomatic Weapons? 255. Should Teachers Be Armed With Guns?

Voting and Elections

256. How Much Faith Do You Have in the U.S. Political System? 257. Is the Electoral College a Problem? Does It Need to Be Fixed? 258. Does Everyone Have a Responsibility to Vote? 259. Should We All Be Able to Vote by Mail? 260. Should There Be a Minimum Voting Age? 261. Should the Voting Age Be Lowered to 16? 262. Should Ex-Felons Have the Right to Vote? 263. Are Presidential Debates Helpful to Voters? Or Should They Be Scrapped?

Freedoms and Rights

264. How Important Is Freedom of the Press? 265. Why Does the Right to Protest Matter? 266. Does the U.S. Constitution Need an Equal Rights Amendment? 267. Do You Care Who Sits on the Supreme Court? Should We Care? 268. Should You Have a Right to Be Rude? 269. Should Prisons Offer Incarcerated People Education Opportunities?

Civic Participation

270. Are You Optimistic About the State of the World? 271. If You Could Take On One Problem Facing Our World, What Would It Be? 272. If You Were Mayor, What Problems Facing Your Community Would You Tackle? 273. Do You Think Teenagers Can Make a Difference in the World? 274. Do You Think It Is Important for Teenagers to Participate in Political Activism? 275. Is Your Generation Doing Its Part to Strengthen Our Democracy? 276. How Is Your Generation Changing Politics? 277. Why Is It Important for People With Different Political Beliefs to Talk to Each Other? 278. Are We Being Bad Citizens If We Don’t Keep Up With the News? 279. Why Do Bystanders Sometimes Fail to Help When They See Someone in Danger? 280. When Is It OK to Be a Snitch? 281. Should Reporters Ever Help the People They Are Covering? 282. Should Celebrities Weigh In on Politics? 283. Should Athletes Speak Out On Social and Political Issues? 284. Should Corporations Take Political Stands? 285. What Do You Think the Role of the First Lady — or First Spouse — Should Be Today?

286. Is Animal Testing Ever Justified? 287. What Is Our Responsibility to Lab Animals? 288. What Are Your Thoughts About Hunting Animals? 289. Should We Be Concerned With Where We Get Our Pets? 290. What Do You Think of Pet Weddings? 291. Is It Wrong to Focus on Animal Welfare When Humans Are Suffering? 292. Should We Bring Back Animals From Extinction? 293. Are Zoos Immoral? 294. Do Bugs Deserve More Respect?

Environment and Science

295. What Role Should Young People Play in the Fight Against Climate Change? 296. Should We Be More Optimistic About Efforts to Combat Climate Change? 297. How Far Is Too Far in the Fight Against Climate Change? 298. Should Plastic Bags Be Banned Everywhere? 299. Is It Ethical to Create Genetically Edited Humans? 300. Should We Still Be Sending Astronauts to Space? 301. Do You Think Pluto Should Be a Planet? 302. Should We Treat Robots Like People?

Time and Seasons

303. What Is the Best Month of the Year? What Is the Worst? 304. Would Life Be Better Without Time Zones? 305. Do You Think It Is Time to Get Rid of Daylight Saving Time? 306. When Do Holiday Decorations Go From Festive to Excessive? 307. Should We Rethink Thanksgiving? 308. When Does a Halloween Costume Cross the Line? 309. Should School Be a Place to Celebrate Halloween? 310. Should the Week Be Four Days Instead of Five?

Students 13 and older in the United States and Britain, and 16 and older elsewhere, are invited to comment. All comments are moderated by the Learning Network staff, but please keep in mind that once your comment is accepted, it will be made public and may appear in print.

Find more Student Opinion questions here. Teachers, check out this guide to learn how you can incorporate these prompts into your classroom.

Natalie Proulx joined The Learning Network as a staff editor in 2017 after working as an English language arts teacher and curriculum writer. More about Natalie Proulx

Tips for Writing an Effective Application Essay

student in library on laptop

How to Write an Effective Essay

Writing an essay for college admission gives you a chance to use your authentic voice and show your personality. It's an excellent opportunity to personalize your application beyond your academic credentials, and a well-written essay can have a positive influence come decision time.

Want to know how to draft an essay for your college application ? Here are some tips to keep in mind when writing.

Tips for Essay Writing

A typical college application essay, also known as a personal statement, is 400-600 words. Although that may seem short, writing about yourself can be challenging. It's not something you want to rush or put off at the last moment. Think of it as a critical piece of the application process. Follow these tips to write an impactful essay that can work in your favor.

1. Start Early.

Few people write well under pressure. Try to complete your first draft a few weeks before you have to turn it in. Many advisers recommend starting as early as the summer before your senior year in high school. That way, you have ample time to think about the prompt and craft the best personal statement possible.

You don't have to work on your essay every day, but you'll want to give yourself time to revise and edit. You may discover that you want to change your topic or think of a better way to frame it. Either way, the sooner you start, the better.

2. Understand the Prompt and Instructions.

Before you begin the writing process, take time to understand what the college wants from you. The worst thing you can do is skim through the instructions and submit a piece that doesn't even fit the bare minimum requirements or address the essay topic. Look at the prompt, consider the required word count, and note any unique details each school wants.

3. Create a Strong Opener.

Students seeking help for their application essays often have trouble getting things started. It's a challenging writing process. Finding the right words to start can be the hardest part.

Spending more time working on your opener is always a good idea. The opening sentence sets the stage for the rest of your piece. The introductory paragraph is what piques the interest of the reader, and it can immediately set your essay apart from the others.

4. Stay on Topic.

One of the most important things to remember is to keep to the essay topic. If you're applying to 10 or more colleges, it's easy to veer off course with so many application essays.

A common mistake many students make is trying to fit previously written essays into the mold of another college's requirements. This seems like a time-saving way to avoid writing new pieces entirely, but it often backfires. The result is usually a final piece that's generic, unfocused, or confusing. Always write a new essay for every application, no matter how long it takes.

5. Think About Your Response.

Don't try to guess what the admissions officials want to read. Your essay will be easier to write─and more exciting to read─if you’re genuinely enthusiastic about your subject. Here’s an example: If all your friends are writing application essays about covid-19, it may be a good idea to avoid that topic, unless during the pandemic you had a vivid, life-changing experience you're burning to share. Whatever topic you choose, avoid canned responses. Be creative.

6. Focus on You.

Essay prompts typically give you plenty of latitude, but panel members expect you to focus on a subject that is personal (although not overly intimate) and particular to you. Admissions counselors say the best essays help them learn something about the candidate that they would never know from reading the rest of the application.

7. Stay True to Your Voice.

Use your usual vocabulary. Avoid fancy language you wouldn't use in real life. Imagine yourself reading this essay aloud to a classroom full of people who have never met you. Keep a confident tone. Be wary of words and phrases that undercut that tone.

8. Be Specific and Factual.

Capitalize on real-life experiences. Your essay may give you the time and space to explain why a particular achievement meant so much to you. But resist the urge to exaggerate and embellish. Admissions counselors read thousands of essays each year. They can easily spot a fake.

9. Edit and Proofread.

When you finish the final draft, run it through the spell checker on your computer. Then don’t read your essay for a few days. You'll be more apt to spot typos and awkward grammar when you reread it. After that, ask a teacher, parent, or college student (preferably an English or communications major) to give it a quick read. While you're at it, double-check your word count.

Writing essays for college admission can be daunting, but it doesn't have to be. A well-crafted essay could be the deciding factor─in your favor. Keep these tips in mind, and you'll have no problem creating memorable pieces for every application.

What is the format of a college application essay?

Generally, essays for college admission follow a simple format that includes an opening paragraph, a lengthier body section, and a closing paragraph. You don't need to include a title, which will only take up extra space. Keep in mind that the exact format can vary from one college application to the next. Read the instructions and prompt for more guidance.

Most online applications will include a text box for your essay. If you're attaching it as a document, however, be sure to use a standard, 12-point font and use 1.5-spaced or double-spaced lines, unless the application specifies different font and spacing.

How do you start an essay?

The goal here is to use an attention grabber. Think of it as a way to reel the reader in and interest an admissions officer in what you have to say. There's no trick on how to start a college application essay. The best way you can approach this task is to flex your creative muscles and think outside the box.

You can start with openers such as relevant quotes, exciting anecdotes, or questions. Either way, the first sentence should be unique and intrigue the reader.

What should an essay include?

Every application essay you write should include details about yourself and past experiences. It's another opportunity to make yourself look like a fantastic applicant. Leverage your experiences. Tell a riveting story that fulfills the prompt.

What shouldn’t be included in an essay?

When writing a college application essay, it's usually best to avoid overly personal details and controversial topics. Although these topics might make for an intriguing essay, they can be tricky to express well. If you’re unsure if a topic is appropriate for your essay, check with your school counselor. An essay for college admission shouldn't include a list of achievements or academic accolades either. Your essay isn’t meant to be a rehashing of information the admissions panel can find elsewhere in your application.

How can you make your essay personal and interesting?

The best way to make your essay interesting is to write about something genuinely important to you. That could be an experience that changed your life or a valuable lesson that had an enormous impact on you. Whatever the case, speak from the heart, and be honest.

Is it OK to discuss mental health in an essay?

Mental health struggles can create challenges you must overcome during your education and could be an opportunity for you to show how you’ve handled challenges and overcome obstacles. If you’re considering writing your essay for college admission on this topic, consider talking to your school counselor or with an English teacher on how to frame the essay.

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  1. 73 Essay Hook Examples (2024)

    Techniques for Good Essay Hooks. Here are a few techniques that you can use to write a good essay hook: Use a Quotation: Sometimes, a relevant quotation from a well-known author or expert can help establish the context or theme of your essay.Next time you're conducting research for an essay, keep an eye out for a really compelling quote that you could use as your hook for that essay.

  2. How to Write a Hook for An Argumentative Essay in 5 Minutes

    Here are five ways to write a hook for an argumentative essay and grab your reader's attention: 1. Use a Common Misconception. The purpose of a hook is to grab the attention of a reader instantly, and one of the best way to do that in an argumentative essay is to use a common misconception. A common misconception is a statement, event, person ...

  3. Write Great Hooks for Argumentative Essays [EXAMPLES]

    The Role of a Hook in an Argumentative Essay. In an argumentative essay, the first impression is everything. Your initial statement or question—also known as the hook—serves as the doorway inviting your reader to step into your argument. With a compelling hook, you're not just getting their attention; you're making a promise that your ...

  4. How to Write a Hook for an Essay

    Example of a hook for an argumentative essay. Again, in an argumentative essay, the best hooks are the ones that both get the reader's attention and get them to almost subconsciously take your side even before they know what that side is. ... Good essay hooks can be particularly difficult when you are writing a literary analysis (for an in ...

  5. Essay Hook Examples That Grab Attention (Formula for Better ...

    A serious argumentative essay probably shouldn't start with a joke. And a shocking statistic may not be the best way to set the stage for a narrative story. ‍Take action: Go through your list of potential hooks and cross out anything that doesn't fit the type of essay you're writing, whether it's a persuasive, argumentative or any other ...

  6. How to Write a Hook for an Essay: Guide, Tips, and Examples

    Determine the effect you wish to accomplish before selecting a hook. Choose a hook at the end of the writing process. Even though it should be the first sentence of your paper, it doesn't mean you should write your hook first. Writing an essay is a long and creative process. So, if you can't think of an effective hook at the beginning, just ...

  7. How to Write A Hook for an argumentative essay

    Good openers for an argumentative essay include using a strong and attention-grabbing hook, introducing the topic and providing background information, and stating your thesis statement clearly and concisely. Depending on the topic and purpose of your essay, you may also choose to include a brief overview of your main points or arguments.

  8. How to Write a Hook: The Definitive Guide

    Composing a good essay might seem like a backwards process. First, write the essay or outline, then determine what hook makes the most sense to open your essay. ... Many hooks also work well for persuasive essays, which work to build up the reasons the reader should take your position on the topic presented. The right anecdote, quote, ...

  9. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    Make a claim. Provide the grounds (evidence) for the claim. Explain the warrant (how the grounds support the claim) Discuss possible rebuttals to the claim, identifying the limits of the argument and showing that you have considered alternative perspectives. The Toulmin model is a common approach in academic essays.

  10. How to Write a Hook: 10 Ways to Capture Your Readers' Attention

    Writing a compelling hook takes skill. But you can use any of the following ways of writing a hook to get you started: 1. The Surprising Statistic Hook. Presenting a surprising fact or statistic is a great way to grab the attention of your audience. For example, an essay on the orphan crisis may begin with:

  11. How to Write a Hook: Top 5 Tips for Writers

    Tip 5: Don't Stop at the Hook. Some writers focus so much on nailing the opening hook that they forget to make the rest of the essay equally strong. Your reader could still stop reading on the second page, or the third, or the tenth. Make sure you use strong and engaging writing throughout the piece.

  12. How To Write A Great Essay Hook (With Examples)

    When it comes to essay hooks, you want to strike a balance between capturing your audience's attention and giving them a concise overview of what your essay is about. 7. Tweak the tone. The tone of your hook sets up the tone for the rest of your essay - so it's pretty important that you align your tone with the topic.

  13. How to Write a Hook for an Essay

    How to Write a Good Hook for an Argumentative Essay. The goal of an argumentative essay is to convince the reader that your view on an issue is correct. An effective hook for this type of essay should include some information about the main point of your essay. This can be a statement, a misconception, a question, an interesting fact ...

  14. How to Write a Good Hook for an Argumentative Essay

    Here is a step-by-step guide to help you write an effective hook: STEP 1 - Understand Your Audience: Consider your audience and what might capture their attention. Tailor your hook to appeal to their interests, values, or concerns. STEP 2 - Define the Tone: Determine the tone of your essay - whether it's serious, humorous, or thought ...

  15. How to write a good hook for an argumentative essay

    A hook in an argumentative essay is a statement or phrase that entices readers and encourages them to keep reading. It serves as an introduction to the essay's topic, giving the reader a general idea of what the essay will be about. The goal of a hook is to grab the reader's attention and make them interested in the story you are telling.

  16. How To Write a Hook That Captures Every Reader's Attention

    A good statement hook should be concise and thought-provoking, making readers want to learn more about what is being discussed to understand it fully. 7 Ways To Write A Better Hook. Whether you're writing a book, essay, article, or marketing content, a great hook is a must. With so much content out there, you need to stand out.

  17. How to Write a Powerful Hook for an Argumentative Essay

    Take the time to research and gather relevant information that supports your argument. Step 3: Choose the most appropriate hook format - Depending on the topic and purpose of your essay, choose a hook format that best fits your argument. Consider using a quote, a statistic, a question, or a personal anecdote.

  18. Types of Hook & 20+ Hook Examples to Kick-Start Your Essay

    Hook Examples In Speeches. Hook: "In the United States, people are still fighting to be free. Many are fighting for free access to resources, free speech, and even the right to marry.". Hook: "Getting revenge can easily become an obsession for many people.

  19. Good Hooks for Essays: 14 Hook Ideas with Examples

    Good essay hooks help you build an emotional connection right from the start. Think of an essay hook as bait for your readers. Our expert team has prepared numerous examples of hooks for essays. You'll find hook examples for an argumentative essay, personal story, history essay, and other types of papers.

  20. How to Write a Hook

    Types of Hooks for Essays. Your essay or research paper's hook can be in any of the five types: Anecdotal Hook. Starting with an anecdote is a good way to keep the readers interested. Ensure that the anecdote relates to your topic and makes your readers feel like they're part of the narrative. For example: "Sarah sat at the edge of the cliff.

  21. How to Write & What Is a Good Hook for an Essay

    Back up your thesis with evidence using examples for everybody paragraph. By the end of a paper, restate the thesis and write a conclusion. Look for ideas for your hook: statistic, anecdote, quotation, facts, etc. Add the hook to the beginning of the introduction, keeping in mind that it should always relate to your essay topic.

  22. 7 Tips for Writing an Attention-Grabbing Hook

    7 Tips for Writing an Attention-Grabbing Hook. How do you get a reader interested in what you have to say? One technique is to use a great hook—an opening so exciting that it convinces a reader that your story is worth reading. How do you get a reader interested in what you have to say? One technique is to use a great hook—an opening so ...

  23. 310 Prompts for Argumentative Writing

    If you enjoy these questions, know that you can find all of our argumentative writing prompts, as they publish, here. Students 13 and up from anywhere in the world are invited to comment.

  24. Tips for Writing an Effective Application Essay

    Spending more time working on your opener is always a good idea. The opening sentence sets the stage for the rest of your piece. The introductory paragraph is what piques the interest of the reader, and it can immediately set your essay apart from the others. 4. Stay on Topic. One of the most important things to remember is to keep to the essay ...