Digital Commons @ University of South Florida

  • USF Research
  • USF Libraries

Digital Commons @ USF > Muma College of Business > Marketing > Theses and Dissertations

Marketing Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

How Feeling Like a Minority Affects Preferences for Autonomous Digital Interfaces , Ye Seul Kim

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Spillover Effects in Product Customization , Samuel Babu Sekar

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

External and Internal Factors of Sports Sponsorship Selling Cycles in North American Professional Sports , Dan Kaufmann

Increasing Personal and Product Influence Through Background Auditory and Visual Cues , Zhihao Yu

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

The Effects of Product Recalls on Competitors’ Market Value and Recalling Firm’s Reputation , Dong Liu

Corporate Brand Impact on Sales / Revenue Per Share , Brad A. Puckey

Competition in Upstream Humanitarian Supply Chain: Investigation of Food Banks , Iana Shaheen

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

How Digital versus Non-Digital Modes of Food Ordering Influence Menu Healthfulness Perceptions and Food Choices , Annika Abell

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

The Impact of Digital Marketing Decisions on Market Outcomes in Residential Real Estate , Denise Hunter Gravatt

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

Hate is a Strong Word: The Influence of Hate-Acknowledging Advertising on Brand Outcomes , Lisa Monahan

The Effects of Loneliness on Consumers’ Digital Engagement with Social Media Ads , Yu Qin

Product Shadows and Ad Evaluations , Nazuk Sharma

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

Understanding the Complexity of Product Returns Management: A Complex Adaptive Systems Theory Perspective , Jennifer Anne Espinosa

Branding Implications of Co-Created Social Responsibility , Alexander J. Kull

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

How You Categorize Influences How Helpful You Are: The Effect of Categorization Mindset on Consumers’ Social Decisions , Hsiao-Ching Kuo

Theses/Dissertations from 2014 2014

Taken for Granted or Taken with Gratitude? An Examination of the Differential Effects of Donations of Time and Money on Consumers' Evaluation of Corporate Philanthropy , Ryan Langan

Essays on Consumer's Psychological and Behavioral Responses toward Social Coupons , Chinintorn Nakhata

Muscling Consumers to Optimal Option Differentiation: The Influence of Incidental Muscular Sensations on Option Differentiation , Courtney Szocs

Theses/Dissertations from 2012 2012

Essays on Mental Accounting and Consumers' Decision Making , Ali Besharat

Perceived Firm Transparency: Scale and Model Development , Jennifer Dapko

Theses/Dissertations from 2010 2010

Antecedents and Consequences of Channel Alienation: An Empirical Investigation within Franchised Channels of Distribution , Ivan Lapuka

Theses/Dissertations from 2009 2009

An Empirical Examination of the Dark Side of Relationship Marketing within a Business to Business Context , Brent L. Baker

Developing the Nomological Network of Perceived Corporate Affinity for Technology: A Three Essay Dissertation , David Earl Fleming

Theses/Dissertations from 2008 2008

Self-Directed Learning: Measures and Models for Salesperson Training and Development , Stefanie Leigh Boyer

Emotional Exhaustion and Its Role in Service Sabotage among Boundary Spanners , Diane R. Edmondson

Theses/Dissertations from 2007 2007

Essays on multiple identities and motivated consumption: Exploring the role of identity centrality on self-brand connections , Tracy R. Harmon

The impact of organizational climate variables of perceived organizational support, workplace isolation, and ethical climate on salesperson psychological and behavioral work outcomes , Robert J. Riggle

Theses/Dissertations from 2005 2005

The Effect of Perceived Entitativity on Implicit Image Transfer in Multiple Sponsorships , FrancoÌ?is Anthony Carrillat

Theses/Dissertations from 2004 2004

Relationship Advertising: Investigating the Strategic Appeal of Intimacy (Disclosure) in Services Marketing , Andrea Diahann Gaye Scott

Advanced Search

  • Email Notifications and RSS
  • All Collections
  • USF Faculty Publications
  • Open Access Journals
  • Conferences and Events
  • Theses and Dissertations
  • Textbooks Collection

Useful Links

  • Rights Information
  • SelectedWorks
  • Submit Research

Home | About | Help | My Account | Accessibility Statement | Language and Diversity Statements

Privacy Copyright

Grad Coach

Research Topics & Ideas: Marketing

50+ Marketing Research Topic Ideas To Fast-Track Your Project

Marketing and advertising-based research topics

Finding and choosing a strong research topic is the critical first step when it comes to crafting a high-quality dissertation, thesis or research project. If you’ve landed on this post, chances are you’re looking for a marketing-related research topic , but aren’t sure where to start. If so, you’ve come to the right place.

Here, we’ll explore a variety of marketing-related research ideas and topic thought-starters, covering both traditional marketing (offline media) and digital marketing (including social media marketing, content marketing and the like). We’ll also look at actual dissertations and theses from marketing students to give you a view of what a well-defined research topic looks like.

NB – This is just the start…

The topic ideation and evaluation process has multiple steps . In this post, we’ll kickstart the process by sharing some research topic ideas within the marketing domain. This is the starting point, but to develop a well-defined research topic, you’ll need to identify a clear and convincing research gap , along with a well-justified plan of action to fill that gap.

If you’re new to the oftentimes perplexing world of research, or if this is your first time undertaking a formal academic research project, be sure to check out our free dissertation mini-course. In it, we cover the process of writing a dissertation or thesis from start to end. Be sure to also sign up for our free webinar that explores how to find a high-quality research topic. 

Overview: Marketing-Related Topics

  • How to find a research topic (video)
  • Traditional (offline) marketing topics/ideas
  • Digital (online) marketing topics/ideas
  • Examples of actual dissertation topics
  • Free Webinar : Topic Ideation 101
  • Where to get extra help

How To Find A Research Topic

Before we look at specific research ideas and topics, it’s useful to first understand what the topic ideation process entails and how to go about finding and refining viable topic ideas. In the video below, we cover exactly that. So, if you’re a first-time researcher, be sure to watch this tutorial before jumping into the collection of marketing research topics we present below. 

Research topic idea mega list

Now that you’ve got a big-picture view of the topic ideation process, we can dive into a few research ideas to get your creative juices flowing. Please note that these research topic ideas are intentionally broad and generic, so you will need to refine them a fair deal using the techniques we discussed in the video above.

To make life a little easier for you, we’ve grouped the topic ideas based on two main categories – traditional marketing and digital / online marketing . For the latter, we’ve divided it up into a few subcategories, including social media marketing, content marketing and search marketing. That said, there is naturally some overlap between topics, so keep this in mind.

Research Ideas: Traditional Marketing

  • The perceived effectiveness of different types of direct mail campaigns (e.g., postcards, catalogues, brochures) among small business owners in New York
  • The perception and use of traditional marketing in creating and nurturing customer loyalty and retention among UK Financial Firms.
  • The impact of demographic targeting on traditional marketing performance among green businesses
  • The perception of different types of sales promotion (e.g., discounts, coupons, contests) among GenZ consumers
  • The continued use of celebrity endorsements in traditional marketing campaigns, post-2020.
  • Exploring factors related to outdoor advertising recall in India
  • Measuring the ROI of traditional marketing efforts: a review of current methods
  • Comparing the effectiveness of different traditional media channels (e.g., television, radio, print) in driving engagement and conversions among established brands
  • The use of public relations in traditional marketing campaigns among large insurance companies
  • The role of event marketing in building brand awareness and engagement: perceptions among marketing professionals in the UK

Free Webinar: How To Find A Dissertation Research Topic

Research Ideas: Digital/Online Marketing

Social media marketing

  • The use of artificial intelligence in social media marketing among online fashion companies in Sweden
  • The impact of social media on public relations and media relations: a Case Study of Nandos
  • The role of Twitter in crisis communication and reputation management: a discourse analysis
  • The impact of social media influencer presence on brand loyalty and customer retention among Gen X.
  • The use of social media for market research and consumer insights among SMEs in Kenya
  • The impact of social media on consumer buying behaviour of fast food in Italy
  • The challenges and opportunities of social media in global and multicultural marketing: perceptions of marketing departments in large corporations
  • The relationship between social media engagement and website traffic: an analysis of fitness brands
  • The effectiveness of influencer marketing on social media platforms for household cleaning products in the UK
  • The perceptions and understanding of paid vs organic social media advertising among Gen Z consumers in San Francisco

Content marketing

  • The use and understanding of micro-moments in creating personalized content experiences among content creators in the USA
  • Comparing the effectiveness of methods of personalization of content marketing: an evaluation of best practice
  • The experiences and use of SEO in content marketing strategy among small online businesses
  • The use of social media influencers in content marketing campaigns: a Case Study of Hello Fresh
  • Comparing different content distribution channels for different types of content: perceptions of best practices among content marketing experts
  • The use of user-generated content in building brand trust and engagement among green companies in the UK
  • Measuring the ROI of content marketing efforts among luxury brands
  • The perception and use of Chat GPT in content creation among small online businesses
  • The perceptions of interactive and immersive content formats (e.g., virtual reality, augmented reality) in marketing among consumers: an experimental study
  • Comparing image and text-based content formats in driving engagement and conversions on social media: a multi-case study of NGOs

Research topic evaluator

Search engine marketing

  • The effectiveness of different ad formats (e.g., text ads, shopping ads, video ads) in Search Engine Marketing for tourist destinations
  • The impact of search engine algorithm updates on Search Engine Marketing performance – who are the winners and losers?
  • The perception and use of AI and machine learning in Search Engine Marketing strategy and bidding optimization within a UK marketing agency
  • The use of voice search and its impact on Search Engine Marketing among food retailers in Switzerland
  • The role of local SEO in driving brick-and-mortar sales: a case study of a local fashion outlet in France
  • The impact of mobile optimization on Search Engine Marketing performance and conversion rates in Nigeria
  • Comparing analytical tools for measuring ROI of Search Engine Marketing campaigns
  • The effectiveness of different types of keywords and search queries in driving traffic towards restaurants in Italy
  • The use of remarketing and retargeting in search engine marketing campaigns among marketers
  • The understanding and use of schema markup and structured data in improving Search engine marketing performance among Start-Ups

Research Topic Kickstarter - Need Help Finding A Research Topic?

Email marketing

  • The perception and use of AI and machine learning in email marketing among NGOs: a focus on personalized content and dynamic segmentation
  • The effectiveness of email subject line strategies in driving open and click-through rates: an experimental study
  • Comparing A/B testing and multivariate testing in improving email marketing performance: a case study
  • The use of personalization on email marketing performance among craft bloggers
  • The impact of automated email marketing among local online retailers on customer loyalty and retention
  • The use of automation and triggered emails in increasing engagement and conversion rates for online courses
  • The perception and understanding of GDPR and other data privacy regulations on email marketing among SMEs
  • The role of mobile optimization in email marketing targeting Gen Z consumers
  • The challenges of measuring the ROI of email marketing campaigns: perceptions of SMEs
  • The effectiveness of different email formats (e.g., text-based, HTML, interactive) in driving engagement: A/B testing for a small online retailer

Marketing-Related Dissertations & Theses

While the ideas we’ve presented above are a decent starting point for finding marketing-related research topic, they are fairly generic and non-specific. So, it helps to look at actual dissertations and theses to see how this all comes together.

Below, we’ve included a selection of research projects from various marketing-related degree programs to help refine your thinking. These are actual dissertations and theses, written as part of Master’s and PhD-level programs, so they can provide some useful insight as to what a research topic looks like in practice.

  • The Influences of Brand Personality, Culture, and Social Media on Iconic Brand Preferences (Whelan, 2021)
  • Customer Success and the Transformation of Customer Relationships (Raines, 2022)
  • The Effects of Online Incentivized Reviews on Organic Review Ratings (Jeong, 2020)
  • Are You For Real? The Consumption-Driven Self-Authentication Process And Its Effects On Perceived Brand Authenticity (Kuchmaner, 2020)
  • You Are What You Eat: How Food Texture And Packaging Influence Consumer Well-Being (Ning, 2020)
  • Social Dialogic Listening: Connecting Marketing Activity To Strategy (Collins, 2020)
  • Millennials’ Attitudes Towards Influencer Marketing And Purchase Intentions (Yu, 2019)
  • Cannibalization between Two Mercedes-Benz Models and Consumer Behavior (Ma, 2020)
  • Selling and Buying Aspects of Used Products That Are Brand Anthropomorphized (Kim, 2019)
  • Global Identity: Conceptualization, Measurement, And Implications For Marketing Strategy (Yoruk, 2022)
  • The Intersection of Organizational Frontline Marketing and a High-Tech World (Krotz, 2021)
  • The Unexplored Impacts of Communication Elements in Marketing (Trinh, 2022)
  • Founder Social Identity As A Predictor Of Customer And Competitor Orientation In Small And Medium-Sized Enterprises (Rutherford, 2021)

Looking at these titles, you can probably pick up that the research topics here are far more specific and narrowly-focused , compared to the generic ones presented earlier. This is an important thing to keep in mind as you develop your own research topic. That is to say, to create a top-notch research topic, you must be precise and target a specific context with specific variables of interest . In other words, you need to identify a clear, well-justified research gap.

Fast-Track Your Research Topic

If you’re still feeling a bit unsure about how to find a research topic for your marketing dissertation or thesis, check out our 1-on-1 private coaching services below.

You Might Also Like:

Business/management/MBA research topics

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Print Friendly

Cause-related marketing: a systematic review of the literature

  • Original Article
  • Open access
  • Published: 08 January 2022
  • Volume 20 , pages 25–64, ( 2023 )

Cite this article

You have full access to this open access article

  • Hina Yaqub Bhatti   ORCID: orcid.org/0000-0003-2157-7418 1 , 2 ,
  • M. Mercedes Galan-Ladero 1 &
  • Clementina Galera-Casquet 1  

13k Accesses

20 Citations

1 Altmetric

Explore all metrics

Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is one of the most versatile activities among the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Though CRM is extensively researched, however, only a few authors have performed systematic literature reviews on CRM. Therefore, more systematic reviews of CRM are still needed to complete and bring together the more contributions, advances, and different existing research lines. Thus, this paper provides a comprehensive overview of the existing literature in CRM from the two keywords: “Cause-Related Marketing” and “Cause Marketing”, and the time period ranges from 1988 to 2020. In this study, rigorous protocol is used in synthesizing 344 English articles drawing upon e-journal database searches. These articles were categorized by time-wise development, country-wise development, methodological development, cross-cultural analysis, the role of journals. This study also carried out the Bibliometric Analyses. The review highlights that the concept of CRM has evolved from being considered a marketing mix tool (a promotion tool), to being considered as a CSR initiative, with a more strategic character. Our findings revealed that only a few journals published articles on CRM. Geographically, the CRM study was initiated in North America, followed by Europe and Oceania, and Asian and Sub-Saharan African countries. From the third decade, there was more collaboration in cross-cultural studies and the use of mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative studies) approach. Lastly, this study shows the most manifest research gaps in CRM that opens avenue for future research.

Similar content being viewed by others

research thesis related to marketing

Rethinking the boundaries of cause-related marketing: Addressing the need for a new definition

Shruti Gupta & Meenakshi Handa

research thesis related to marketing

Theoretical Background: Introduction to Cause-Related Marketing

research thesis related to marketing

Factors affecting attitude and purchase intention towards cause-related marketing: a systematic literature review using TCCM approach

Prasant Kumar Pandey, Naval Bajpai & Abhijeet V. Tiwari

Avoid common mistakes on your manuscript.

1 Introduction

Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is a versatile and growing activity in the marketing field. It provides opportunities to profit and non-profit organizations, and consumers, to participate in a social cause (Varadarajan & Menon, 1988 ). Since 1988, CRM initiatives have gradually increased for more than three decades. CRM allows to achieve the societal and financial corporate establishment’s goals, as well as provide the opportunity to consumers to participate in an altruistic act.

Formally, the first CRM campaign named in this way was carried out by American Express (AMEX) in 1983, in the United States. The purpose of this program was to increase the usage of the AMEX credit card, but also collect money to be donated for the renovation of the Statue of Liberty. This project was developed from September to December, and the donation was $1.7 million (Varadarajan & Menon, 1988 ). Since then, and according to the IEG Sponsorship Report, cause sponsorship spending in North America has grown continuously Footnote 1 from $120 million in 1990 until $2.23 billion in 2019, as shown in Fig.  1 . In 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. sponsorship value was $10 Billion (annually), which approximately increased 38% (IEG, 2020 ).

figure 1

IEG Sponsorship Report from 2002 to 2019. Note: We only include data since 2002, because previous data are not available on the IEG Sponsorship Report. Source: IEG (2020)

Consequently, the practice of CRM has also increased for the last three decades because more profit organizations have engaged in CRM activities (Adomaviciute et al., 2016 ), non-profit organizations have maintained environmental protection, health, and other worthy causes (Grolleau et al., 2016 ), and when consumers purchase the CRM products for support the cause, they have a prosocial behavior (Chang & Chu, 2020 ) and feel happy (Jeong & Kim, 2020 ; Vrontis et al., 2020 ).

During this time, CRM has become a topic of considerable debate in both managerial and academic circles worldwide. Although some systematic literature has been presented on this topic (see, for example, Guerreiro et al., 2016 ; Lafferty et al., 2016 ; Natarajan et al., 2016 ; or Thomas et al., 2020 ), an updated systematic literature review is required. Thus, we present a new systematic literature review: (1) To complete the review of the academic research articles in the area of CRM, from 1988 to 2020, with the perspective of profit organizations, non-profit organizations, and consumers over the last three decades; (2) To include cross- cultural studies; (3) To include studies carried out in developed and developing countries; (4) To include studies executed in different societies (e.g. Muslim societies, Western societies with Christian traditions, etc.); and (5) To conduct a bibliometric analysis using VOSViewer Software.

Thus, the main objective of this paper is to provide a systematic literature review of the existing research in the field of Cause-Related Marketing. More specifically, our aim is to find influential papers that have shaped this field and provide the overview of historical development in the field of research, focusing first on previously analyzed criteria: Time-Wise Development of CRM Literature, Country-Wise Development of CRM Literature, Methodological development in CRM Literature, and Role of Journal in Development of CRM literature. But also, this study carries out a systematic review with a bibliometric analysis. On the one hand, the systematic review helps the researchers to improve the rigor of prior reviewing literature. On the other hand, bibliometric analysis helps to analyze divergent views and examine the development of the CRM field.

Hence, this paper has followed two steps in the systematic literature review on CRM: (1) to select the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and (2) to analyze the evolution of CRM in seven different categories.

First step : Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria.

This research only included published papers in journals, from 1988 to 2020 (data sources such as working papers, reports, newspapers, textbooks, conference papers, or theses / dissertations, were not included).

Two keywords, “Cause-Related Marketing” and “Cause Marketing”, were used to search the databases (SAGE Publications, JSTOR, Emerald Full Text, Springer, John Wiley Publications, Elsevier, Taylor and Francis, and Google Scholar).

This research also used conceptual review and empirical studies of different countries.

This research only included papers written in English (i.e., non-English language research articles were excluded).

This study considered the date of publication of the journal as the date of the research articles.

Second step : Academic researchers have used qualitative and quantitative methods for literature review to organize and provide the above underlying findings on CRM. And according to Liu et al., ( 2015 ), Bibliometric Analysis is a tool to examine literature review. Thus, this study has also provided a static and systematic picture of the research (Aria & Cuccurullo, 2017 ). This study relies on bibliometric techniques such as author-citation analysis, or co-words or co-occurrence analysis, and co-citation analysis of authors through VOSviewer software (version 1.6.5). Following Thomas et al. ( 2020 ), we selected Time-Wise Development of CRM Literature, Country-Wise Development of CRM Literature, and Methodological Development in CRM Literature. And we added other analysis such as Role of Journal in Development of CRM literature, author-citation analysis, and Co-words or Co-occurrence analysis, proposed by Poje & Groff ( 2021 ). We also considered adding a new category that had not been considered in previous studies: cross-cultural analysis.

Therefore, the structure of this paper is organized as follow: firstly, we show the CRM theoretical background (with a previous introduction to CSR, to link it with CRM, because CRM is generally considered under the umbrella of CSR – e.g., Kotler and Lee, 2005 ; Galan-Ladero, 2012 ); secondly, we offer the results of our literature analysis in the CRM field; later, we discuss these results; and finally, we offer the main conclusions, also considering the main limitations of this study and further research.

2 Background

Since the inauguration of the third millennium, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has become a globally hot issue by the rapid change of the environment. A large number of organizations, from developed and developing countries, have focused on CSR.

CSR, defined as “a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis ” (European Commission, 2001), has a wide range of history: it started in Western countries, but later, it spread all over the world. Antecedents of CSR can be found at 18th and 19th Centuries, with the creation of welfare schemes adopted with a paternalistic approach, to protect companies and retain employees with improved life quality (Carroll 2008 ). But it is in the twentieth Century, and specifically after World War II, when scholars and practitioners discussed about the social responsibilities, and successful businesses also adopted such responsibilities (Heald, 1970 ).

Thus, CSR started to be established and, in the last seven decades, it has played different roles:

The 1950s was the first era that established the current CSR. Successful business leaders and board of directors moved towards the ethics of society. Bowen, the first who coined the term, introduced the concept, and provided the initial definition of CSR, described as “ the obligations of businessmen to pursue those policies, to make those decisions, or to follow those lines of action which are desirable the objectives and values of our society ” (Bowen, 1953 , p. 6). In this area, Heald ( 1957 ), discussed that businesses do not only serve on economic performance work, but they also serve on humane and constructive social policies.

The 1960s : Many of the definitions of CSR are formalized. Walton ( 1967 ) was a prime thinker who addresses the different aspects of CSR: “ In short, the new concept of social responsibility recognizes the intimacy of the relationships between the corporation and society and realizes that such relationships must be kept in mind by top managers as the corporation and the related groups pursue their respective goals ( Walton, 1967 , p. 18)”.

The 1970s : Friedman described that the social responsibility of business is to enhance profits and maximize shareholder value. Therefore, Carroll ( 1979 ) came in this decade with the new concept of CSR, defined as “ the social responsibility of business encompasses the economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary expectations that society has of organizations at a given point in time ”.

The 1980s : the notions of stakeholder management and business ethics had become the main integral part of the business (Carroll, 2008 ). In 1980, Jones proposed that CSR is a process, not the outcome, and CSR, when engaged in as a process of decision making, should constitute CSR behavior by the corporation (Jones, 1980 ). Also, Aupperle et al., ( 1983 ) suggested that four aspects include CSR: economic, legal, ethical, and voluntary or philanthropic responsibilities.

The 1990s : Carroll ( 1991 ) revised the concept of CSR and introduced the “Pyramid of Corporate Social Responsibility”. He described four main responsibilities of the company: economic responsibility (“be profitable”), legal responsibility (“obey the laws and regulations”), ethical responsibility (“do what is just and fair”), and philanthropic responsibility (“be a corporate citizen”). During this decade, Elkington ( 2001 ) introduced another concept of CSR, the “Triple Bottom Line”, which focuses on three issues: social responsibility (“people”), environmental responsibility (“planet”), and economic responsibility (“profit”).

In the first decade of the twenty-first century (The 2000s), CSR extends to emerging markets. After the collapse of Enron, Footnote 2 many organizations and corporations focused on establishing CSR departments, hiring CSR consultants and CSR managers. On the other hand, in 2002, ISO Committee on Consumer Policy play an important role in ISO 26000, an international standard that present a guideline on Corporate Social Responsibility. Footnote 3

In the second decade of the twenty-first century (The 2010s), Kramer and Porter ( 2011 ) introduced the concept of “creating shared value”, which becomes the core objective of business strategies. 2015 is an important year because the “2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”, with the “Sustainable Development Goals” (SDGs), was launched. SDGs covered a wide range of global areas, such as fighting against climate change, removing poverty and hunger, as well as promoting sustainable consumption, among others.

Therefore, different theories have been created and adapted during all this time. The most important theories are Carroll’s CSR Pyramid Theory, Footnote 4 Triple Bottom Line Theory, Footnote 5 Stakeholder Theory, Footnote 6 and Corporate Citizenship Theory. Footnote 7

On the other hand, CSR initiatives, formed as a part of the core business activities, provide long-term financial security and growth for stakeholders but also increase the market position (Bhattacharyya et al., 2008 ). Under the big umbrella of CSR, different initiatives have appeared, and they have become growing popular among profit organizations worldwide. Kotler et al., ( 2012 ) explained six different types of CSR initiatives (see Table  1 ), which included cause promotion, cause-related marketing, corporate social marketing, corporate philanthropy, community volunteering, and socially responsible business practices.

According to Thomas et al., ( 2011 ), CSR has received significant attention in both academic and business societies. CRM, as one of these initiatives, has progressed in social responsibility and allows firms to link their philanthropic activities and strategic marketing goals. On the other hand, CRM activities also have been an increasing part of the corporate marketing plans (Gupta & Pirsch, 2006a ). Therefore, this study especially focuses on this CSR initiative: Cause-Related Marketing (CRM).

The first definition of Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) was introduced by Varadarajan and Menon ( 1988 , p. 60), as “ the process of formulating and implementing marketing activities that are characterized by an offer from the firm to contribute a specified amount to a designated cause when consumers engage in revenue-providing exchanges that satisfy organizational and individual objectives”. This definition provides two main streams: to support the charitable cause and to satisfy organizational and individual objectives.

On the other hand, the most essential and significant benefit of the CRM is shown as a win-win-win situation (for the profit organizations, non-profit organizations, and consumers - Adkins,  1999 ). CRM campaigns increase the number of sales for the organization, as well as enhance the number of donations to the non-profit organizations (Deb & Amawate, 2019 ). CRM campaigns also give the best chance to profit organizations to attract the customers towards organization and enhance customer loyalty (Galan-Ladero et al., 2013b ), as well as they create or enhance emotional engagement with target customers, build a strong relationship with them (Cone et al., 2003 ; Docherty & Hibbert, 2003 ), and also maintain the company’s goodwill (Chang & Chu, 2020 ). Consequently:

The for-profit organizations use CRM as a strategic tool to build a strong brand image in the customer’s mind (Ahluwalia & Bedi, 2015 ). And the internal benefit of the for-profit organization is to help increase the employee’s self-esteem, commitment, and loyalty (Cone et al., 2003 ; Polonsky & Wood, 2001 ).

The non-profit organizations try to increase awareness about the cause, educate the customers, and support the charitable cause (Nowak and Clarke, 2003 ). On the other hand, CRM in non-profit organizations increases the number of donors (Docherty & Hibbert, 2003 ; Polonsky & Wood, 2001 ).

For consumers , charitable causes, linked to their purchases, boost their feeling of happiness and inner satisfaction (Chaabane & Parguel, 2016 ), and they also feel good when helping others (Imas, 2014

3 Analysis and Main results

Due to an increasing number of CRM research papers that identify the most essential and main contributions in the field, and to objectify the outcomes, then bibliometric analysis is introduced. Zupic and Čater ( 2015 ) explained the five main bibliographic methods, which consists of citation analysis, co-citation analysis, bibliographic coupling, co-author analysis and co-word analysis. In this study, we apply Co-words or Co-occurrence analysis, Co-citation analysis, and cited journals analysis. These analyses were run on VOS-software.

3.1 Analysis of the different definitions of CRM

A wide variety of definitions of CRM have been contributed since 1988 (see Appendix 1, Table  7 ). In Table  2 , we summarize the main CRM definitions, from 1988 to 2020, according to the main keywords included in them: CRM as an activity (a marketing activity and/or a CSR activity), as a strategy, as a marketing mix tool, and as an alliance (between profit and nonprofit organizations). Thus, we can observe that there is not a general, unanimous agreement about its definition yet. However, the concept of CRM has evolved from being considered a short-term marketing mix tool (a promotion tool), to being considered a CSR initiative, with a more strategic character.

3.2 Time-wise development of CRM literature

However, in this study, we start from the time-wise development of Cause-Related Marketing. First, we identify the number of research articles into three time periods (decades): 1988–2000, 2001–2010, and 2011–2020 (previous systematic literature did not classify them into decades). With the growing body of Cause-Related Marketing, it is better to organize it in three decades because differences are appreciated, depending on the time.

Varadarajan and Menon introduced the CRM term in academia in 1988, and the following three decades witnessed gradual growth in CRM literature. Table  3 shows the annual evolution of this figure from 1988 to 2020.

Thus, we can classify the three decades based on CRM literature progression:

Introductory decade (1988–2000). The field of CRM was introduced in this period with a limited number of published articles (13). However, these articles were very innovative and aroused interest in this new solidarity initiative.

Emerging decade (2001–2010). The CRM field grabbed the attention of researchers in this second decade, with a notable increase in the published literature, especially in the last two years of this decade. The number of published articles reached 74. Consequently, CRM became an interesting and novel research topic, broadening its scope.

Most thriving decade (2011–2020). CRM literature witnessed a boom in the third decade, especially in the last two years of this decade. Thus, 257 articles related to the field of CRM were published in different journals only in this third decade.

In summary, we can indicate that CRM publications have grown significantly over the three decades analyzed, because more and more research papers have been published on this topic.

3.3 Author-based citation analysis

Author-based studies have long been one of the most important aspects of bibliometric analysis. This analysis includes the ranking of authors by the number of researches carried out, the citations of their research articles, their evolutions, or the analysis of co-authors’ collaborations. Table  4 shows the five most cited authors (and their specific works) from first decade (1988–2000), second decade (2001–2010), and third decade (2011–2020).

In this analysis, the most cited authors (and their corresponding works) for each decade have been the following:

From the first decade, the most cited authors are: Varadarajan ( 1988 ), with 734 citations; followed by Webb ( 1998 ), with 498; Smith ( 1991 ), with 121; File ( 1998 ), with 110; and Ross (1992), with 15 citations.

In the second decade, Barone (2007) is the most quoted, with 243 citations; followed by Gupta ( 2006a ), with 189; Lafferty ( 2005 ), with 187; Cui ( 2003 ), with 152; and Berglind ( 2005 ), with 103 citations.

During the third decade, Christofi (2020a) has been cited 176 times; Robinson (2012) has 150; Bae (2020), 149; Priporas (2020), 135; and Koschate-Fischer (2012), 129 citations.

In summary, we can highlight that Varadarajan ( 1988 ) is the most cited author of all time, with the first academic paper published on CRM, and serves as a reference for researchers around the world. And by far the next most cited authors are Webb ( 1998 ) and Barone (2007).

3.4 Co-words or co-occurrence analysis

A co-word analysis may be described as “ a content analysis technique that uses patterns of co-occurrence of pairs of items… in a corpus of texts to identify the relationships between ideas within the subject areas ” (He, 1999 , p. 134). Thus, co-words or co-occurrence analysis is a content analysis that connects words in the title of the research paper or abstract. The main idea of the co-word analysis is to connect any identified patterns into a map of contextual space. We also applied this analysis to each decade.

3.4.1 First phase (period 1988–2000)

For the 13 articles published from 1988 to 2000, the co-word analysis identifies four clusters consisting of the following words (with the minimum number of occurrences of keywords defined as 1; out of 26 keywords in this period, 26 met the threshold).

The first cluster includes consumer attitude, market segmentation, marketing strategy, profitability, and social responsibility (as shown in Fig.  2 , red color).

The second cluster deals with cause-related marketing, consumer perceptions, and philanthropy (as shown in Fig. 2 , green color).

The third cluster consists of charitable organizations and crm (as shown in Fig. 2 , blue color).

The last cluster relates to corporate philanthropy (as shown in Fig. 2 , yellow color).

figure 2

Co-Word analysis for the period 1988 to 2000

In summary, the co-word analysis shows that, for the period from 1988 to 2000, the focused keyword is Cause-Related Marketing . Other important keywords are philanthropy and consumer perception .

3.4.2 Second phase (period 2001–2010)

Based on the selection of 74 articles for the period 2001–2010, the co-word analysis shows a more precise picture than it does in the introductory decade (to narrow down the result, the minimum number of the occurrence of keywords was defined as 2; out of 160 keywords, and 27 meet the reduction criteria).

A notable cluster derived by the co-word analysis (Fig.  3 , red color) consists of the words brand alliances, cause-related marketing, corporate philanthropy, corporate social responsibility, donations, reputation, social responsibility, sponsorship, and work .

A second cluster (Fig. 3 , green color) comprises brand, company, consumer, framework, impact, information, price, responses, and skepticism.

The third cluster (Fig. 3 , blue color) is related to advertising, brand, cause marketing, consumer behavior, marketing, and purchase intention .

The fourth cluster (Fig. 3 , yellow color) consists of choice, corporate images, and purchase intention.

figure 3

Co-word analysis for the period 2001 to 2010

In summary, the co-word analysis shows that, from 2001 to 2010, the Cause-Related Marketing keyword related to the other striking keywords, such as corporate social responsibility, reputation, corporate image , and purchase intention .

3.4.3 Third phase (period 2011–2020)

Based on the selection of 257 articles for the period 2011–2020, the co-word analysis shows a more precise picture than it does in the previous two decades. To narrow down the result, the minimum number of the occurrence of keywords was defined as 5 (out of 825 keywords, and 40 meet the reduction criteria). The most notable clusters derived from the co-word analysis are:

First cluster (Fig. 4 , red color): it consists of the words attitude, attitudes, brand, choice, consumer responses, credibility, fit, impact, knowledge, motivation, responses, social-responsibility, sponsorship, and sustainability.

figure 4

Co-word analysis for the period 2011 to 2020

The second cluster (Fig. 4 , green color) comprises altruism, cause marketing, cause-related marketing, co-branding, consumer behavior, purchase intention, and skepticism.

The third cluster (Fig. 4 , blue color) comprises  altruism, behavior, charity, consumer choice, corporate social responsibility, mediating role, and s trategy .

The fourth cluster (Fig. 4 , yellow color) comprises consumption behavior, corporate strategy, ethics, marketing, millennials, and social media.

The fifth cluster (Fig. 4 , purple color) comprises brand-cause fit, corporate social responsibility, and perceptio n.

In summary, the co-word analysis shows that, also for the period from 2011 to 2020, the most focused keyword is Cause-Related Marketing . Other significant keywords are ethics , purchase intention , consumer behavior , and attitudes .

Consequently, the whole co-word analysis shows that all around the world, the researchers are focused on the one keyword that is “ Cause-Related Marketing ”, and the other most emphasis keywords are philanthropy and consumer perception , in the first decade; to evolve toward CSR, reputation, corporate image , and purchase intention , in the second decade; and finally focused on ethics, purchase intention, consumer behavior , and attitudes , in the third decade.

3.5 Co-citation analysis

A co-citation analysis is described as “ the scholarly contributions of authors who are frequently co-cited are likely to embody similar or related concepts ” (Nerur et al., 2008 , p. 321). Co-citation analysis can explain how referential frameworks of the Cause-Related Marketing field at different stages of its development affected evolutions in its general construction.

3.5.1 First phase for the period 1988–2000

Based on the co-citation analysis, for the period 1988-2000 (Fig. 5 ), it has been seen that there is predominately one cluster with a total 58 authors distributed in one cluster namely cluster – 1 with red color (minimum of the documents for an author should 1 and minimum citation of an author should be 1).

figure 5

Co-citation analysis of authors for the period 1988–2000

There is a wide variety of authors cited in the papers on CRM in the first decade (but only once). Schurr is the only author who receives 2 citations in this decade.

3.5.2 Second phase for the period 2001–2010

According to co-citation analysis for the period 2001-2010 (Fig. 6 ), it has been noted that there are predominately two clusters with a total 1502 authors (minimum citation of an author should be 10 and the maximum citation of the author should be 24).

figure 6

Co-citation analysis of authors for the period 2001–2010

In this analysis, we selected five top co-authors who have a high citation, such as Mohr (34 citations), Webb (32 citations), Menon (30 citations), Miyazaki (24 citations), and Varadarajan (21 citations).

3.5.3 Third phase for the period 2011–2020

According to co-citation analysis for the period 2011-2020 (Fig. 7 ), it has been noted that there are predominately four clusters, with a total of 10,108 authors and 193 thresholds (minimum of the documents for an author should be 20 and minimum citation of an author should be 5; the maximum citation of the author should be 200).

figure 7

Co-citation analysis of authors for the period 2011–2020

In this analysis, we selected the five top co-authors who had the highest citation, such as Lafferty (200 citations), Mohr (176 citations), Webb (167 citations), Barone (136 citations), and Bhattacharya (136 citations).

In summary, the co-citation analysis shows that Lafferty is the most co-cited author in all time. And the next most co-cited authors are Mohr and Webb.

3.6 Cross-cultural analysis

Cultural norms and beliefs have a significant impact on shaping people’s perceptions, attitudes, and behavior (Steenkamp, 2001 ). Lavack and Kropp ( 2003 ) identified the research gap of cross-cultural studies in the field of CRM. Hence, they conducted the first cross-cultural research in the field of CRM by including four countries from different regions such as Australia (Oceania), Canada (North America), Korea (East Asia) and Norway (Europe), and investigated the consumers’ role values towards the CRM. Since the third decade, more researchers have been participating and collaborating in cross-cultural studies. Table  5 details transversal research that has studied CRM comparing different countries.

According to the cross-sectional analysis, the nation has a different background of consumer and corporate cultures that varies from country to country. Sekaran ( 1983 , p. 68) defined it as “ Culturally normed behavior and patterns of socialization could often stem from a mix of religious beliefs, economic and political exigencies and so on. Sorting these out in a clear-cut fashion would be extremely difficult, if not totally impossible ”. Therefore, the scholars are taking more consideration in cross-cultural CRM study from the second decade. In this study, Table 5 shows that researchers from USA (i.e., North America) and South Korea (i.e., East Asia) studied together two times on culture analysis, one times with India (i.e., South Asia), and one time with Poland (i.e., Europe), one times with Philippines (i.e., East Asia) as well as China (i.e., East Asia). In addition, Italian researchers (i.e., Europe) studied one time on culture analysis with Japan (i.e., East Asia) and one time with Brazil (i.e., South America). Furthermore, India (i.e., South Asia) collaborated with Philippines (i.e., East Asia). Cross-cultural analysis in Table 5 shows that the researchers worked on four different cultures analysis rather than two cultures (i.e., Lavack & Kropp, 2003 ; and Schyvinck & Willem, 2019 ).

3.7 Country-wise development of CRM literature

Figure  8 reports regional (i.e., country-wise) participation of different researchers in the development of CRM literature. As this concept was introduced in the USA (Varadarajan and Menon, 1988 ), the studies from the first and second decades usually belonged to this geographical region. Thus, most of the research in CRM literature was published by researchers from US Universities: 92% of the contributions in the first decade (i.e., 12 research articles), and 40% (i.e., 30 research articles) in the second decade. However, some British researchers also contributed to CRM literature in the second decade, with 11% (i.e., 8 research articles) share of total CRM publications. Nevertheless, in the third decade, most of the CRM literature was published by Asian researchers. Hence, Indian researchers, with 9% (i.e., 24 research articles), and Taiwanese scholars, with 5% (i.e., 12 research articles), jointly published almost 14% of the articles in that decade. Although the American contributions fell to 33% (but only in relative terms, since in absolute terms they reached 85 research articles), their overall contribution remains the highest of all countries. And participation of British scholars was 6% (i.e., 15 research articles) in the third decade. In this Fig.  8 , we observed that the USA research publications from every decade are very extensive, in comparison to other countries.

figure 8

List of cited Country-Wise Development of CRM Literature. Source: Own Elaboration

3.8 Methodological development in CRM literature

Methodological development in CRM literature is graphically shown in Fig.  9 . It is observed that most research work is employed by experimental design. In the first decade (1988–2000), researchers focused on qualitative or quantitative research in the field of CRM; whereas a mixed-method approach has been used in the second (2001–2010) and third decade (2011–2020). In this analysis, we observe that, in general, quantitative studies significantly outnumber qualitative studies, especially in the third decade.

figure 9

Methodological development in CRM Literature. Source: Own Elaboration

3.9 Role of journal in development of CRM literature

Although a total of 141 journals have published articles explaining the concept of CRM from different perspectives (see Appendix 2, Table  8 ), only six journals published more than ten CRM papers. These journals are International Marketing Review (26), International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing (20), Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing (17), International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing (15), Journal of Business Ethics (13), and Journal of Business Research (10). In the field of CRM, almost 100 journals have been published only a single article since its conceptualization in 1988 (they are also shown in Appendix 2, Table 8 ).

There are two indicators to measure the scientific influence of scholarly journals, such as Journal Citation Reports and Scimago Journal & Country Rank. This study only considers the Scimago Journal & Country Rank because there are more research articles in this rank, which divides the set of journals into four quartiles (i.e., Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4). According to Scimago Journal & Country Rank (SJR), we observed that 51 journals publishing about CRM are Q1, 36 are Q2, 16 are Q3, and 5 are Q4. On the other hand, 8 journals are not included yet in any Quartil. and 25 journals are not in this index.

According to Persson et al. ( 2009 ), for the bibliographical data, we used BibExcel, which presents co-occurrence of references in the bibliographic of research articles. Therefore, in this study we find that five most cited journals by each decade, from the first decade (1988–2000), are: Journal of Marketing (1 document; cited in 734 articles), Journal of Public Policy & Marketing (1 document; cited in 498 articles), Journal of Consumer Marketing (1 document; cited in 121 articles), Journal of Business Ethics (1 document; cited in 110 articles), and Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science (2 document; cited in 51 articles). From the second decade (2001–2010): Journal of Consumer Marketing (3 documents; cited in 369 articles), Journal of Business Research (3 documents; cited in 280 articles), Journal of Retailing (1 document; cited in 243 articles), Journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing (11 documents; cited in 215 articles), and Journal of Advertising (5 documents; cited in 172 articles). And from the third decade (2011–2020): Journal of Marketing Review (25 documents; cited in 842 articles), Journal of Business Ethics (11 documents; cited in 458 articles), International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing (9 documents; cited in 407 articles), International Journal of Advertising (8 documents; cited in 347 articles), and Journal of Marketing (2 documents; cited in 244 articles).

For this analysis, we observed that the percentage of the most cited paper, published in the Journal of Marketing , dropped due to the introduction of different journals, such as Journal of Marketing Review , International Journal of Advertising , or International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing . But, on the other hand, the Journal of Business Ethics has increased the citations.

4 Discussion

This research provides an inclusive review of the systematic literature with respect to three decades: the introductory decade (1988–2000), the emerging decade (2001–2010), and the thriving decade (2011–2020).

In this study, we observed that North American researchers are more involved in Cause-Related Marketing. This may be due to the importance that CRM has had in the USA since its inception, and the acceptance that CRM has had among American companies and consumers. Such as Cone ( 2010 ) showed, 88% of the American consumers supported the cause, 85% of the consumers had a good image of the company or product supporting a noble cause and cared about it, and 90% of the consumers demanded companies to find the right cause to support. More recently, another research also studied that 87% of American consumers would purchase a CRM product if the company supported the charitable cause (business2community, 2020 ).

The graphical presentation of the Time-Wise Development (see Fig. 1 ) shows 13 articles published until 2000 (first decade), 74 articles from 2001 to 2010 (second decade), and 257 articles from 2011 to 2020 (third decade). Natarajan et al. ( 2016 , p. 248) and Thomas et al. ( 2020 , p. 5) verified almost similar findings of the time-wise development from 1988 to 2016. But after that, the research on Cause-Related Marketing has abruptly increased in the last two years (2019–2020). We noticed that, in 2020, the researchers are more actively involved in the CRM field than the previous years to publish the research articles.

As observed in Fig. 8 , the academicians and researchers from 37 different countries have significantly contributed to CRM studies. A large portion of CRM studies are conducted in two regions (i.e., North America and Europe). Thomas et al. ( 2020 ) shows similar results. Asian (i.e., Indian and Taiwanese) researchers have taken more interest in CRM and they have been publishing more and more articles since the third decade. On the other hand, we also noticed that the CRM topic was first introduced in Western societies (with Christian tradition). But after the first decade and during the second decade, CRM studies were also introduced in Muslim countries, such as Pakistan (1 research article) and Oman (1 research article). From the third decade, the researchers also explored other Muslim countries, such as Malaysia (5 research articles), Iran (4 research articles), Egypt (4 research articles), Turkey (3 research articles), Pakistan (3 research articles), Jordan (1 research article), Indonesia (1 research article), and Bangladesh (1 research article). So, in summary, we can highlight that researchers have been exploring the Muslim world in the field of CRM after the second decade.

And about the methodological development in CRM literature (see Fig. 9 ), the researchers have used more quantitative studies, compared to qualitative studies. Thomas et al. ( 2020 , p. 7) also found a similar result. Thus, the trend seems to be for quantitative studies to continue to predominate over qualitative ones in the coming years, although mixed methods are experiencing slight growth. However, the combination of both types of studies, qualitative and quantitative, could offer more complete studies on CRM.

Lastly, Table 6 presents the journals involvement to publish CRM research articles. In our study, the key publications journals are International Marketing Review, and International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing. Our results have been slightly different from Thomas et al. ( 2020 )‘s and Natarajan et al. ( 2016 )‘s. These researchers found that the Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing was the one that had published more research articles on this topic. But probably this difference is because they only considered up to 2016.

Our research also discovered different results from previous studies with respect to databases, partly due to the number of databases considered and the greater number of years analyzed in our study.

5 Conclusion

Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is considered as an initiative that involves a donation to a specific cause, at a specific period of time, usually with a limited donation amount, and which depends on product sales and consumer behavior.

Therefore, the main objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive systematic review of the literature on CRM, categorizing each article by time-wise development, country-wise development, methodological development, and role of journals. Cross-cultural analysis and bibliometric analysis were also included, as a new contribution of this research, in comparison to previous studies.

The main studies have been classified in three decades, which present significant differences. In the introductory decade (1990–2000), the field of CRM was introduced with limited published articles with the role of CRM in two different regions, such as North America, and Oceania.

First three Journals such as International Marketing Review, International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, or Journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing, play a starring role to publish CRM research papers. In the emerging decade (2001–2010), researchers explored more regions, such as East Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East. In this time frame, mix approach studies and cross-cultural studies were introduced for the first time in the field of CRM. And in the most thriving decade (2011–2020), scholars analyzed CRM in two more regions, such as North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. In this era, more scholars were interested in collaborating with other geographical regions such as North America and Europe. The number of published papers on CRM grew significantly.

However, this current study has some limitations. First, this research considered only two keywords: “Cause-Related Marketing” and “Cause Marketing”. Thus, other terms might be also considered, such as “Social Cause” or “Cause–brand alliance”. Secondly, the selection of the studies was limited only to the peer-reviewed journal research articles published in English. Maybe research articles in other languages could be also interesting. Thirdly, this current study just focuses on the full-text journal papers. Abstracts, theses, working papers, and conference proceedings were ignored. Fourthly, this study has used a limited number of databases to find the research articles: SAGE Journals, JSTOR, Emerald Insight, Springer, Wiley Online Library, Elsevier, Taylor & Francis Online, and Google Scholar. Other databases, such as EBSCO and ABI/INFORM, could have been also considered.

Anyway, we also found different gaps in CRM research, so further research could be developed in these aspects. First, most academic scholars have largely focused on the developed countries, such as the USA and the UK, and less in developing countries (especially in the first and second decades). Although studies about CRM in developing countries increased in the third decade, the gap still exists. More studies are needed about developing countries because the researchers may find different results. In addition, more studies are also required to compare developed and developing countries, because researchers could find different interesting outcomes about CRM campaigns.

Secondly, the growing popularity of the internet and social media could be more considered by the companies, which could focus on digital marketing. Therefore, consumers could be more involved in a digital CRM campaign (Handa & Gupta, 2020 ). Only few studies have been conducted in this area, so the gap still exists, both in developing and developed countries.

Thirdly, various studies are conducted on the cross-culture context. But more research is needed to investigate the cross-cultural context, comparing developing and developed countries, and also Western and Eastern countries. Causes and consumer preferences or attitudes could be different from one country to another country.

Fourthly, few studies have been conducted in the mix approach (including qualitative and quantitative studies). More research is required for a better understanding of the mixed methodological approach in CRM. The most common and well-known approaches to mixing methods are Triangulation Design, Embedded Design, the Explanatory Design, and the Exploratory Design. These methodologies could be discussed in CRM programs.

Fifthly, profit and non-profit organizations depend on each other in CRM campaigns. When both organizations develop CRM strategies, they can acquire risk. Few studies have been conducted on profit and non-profit organizations with CRM programs; therefore, this also needs to be discussed.

Finally, and according to Chéron et al. ( 2012 ), consumers positively view those CRM campaigns that take place for extended periods of time, and they might be disappointed with short duration campaigns. Thus, time frame of the CRM campaign can have a significant impact on the consumers’ perception. Consequently, the campaign’s time duration is another factor that is needed to be more discussed by researchers.

Except in 2009, the only year with a slight decrease compared to the previous year (− 0.3%) but recovered in the following year.

In 2000, Enron was the seventh-largest corporation by growth revenue in the gas and utility market in the United States territory. At the end of 2001, Enron started to face financial strategy manipulation. Consequently, on 2nd December 2001, Enron declared bankruptcy because of the fraudulent activity of corporate governance.

The ISO standard also consists of the ISO 14001 (Environmental Management System) and ISO 9001 (Quality Management System).

Carroll ( 1979 ) presented the “Carroll’s CSR Pyramid Theory”, which consisted of the economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic lines.

Elkington (1994) presented the “Triple Bottom Line Theory”, which explained the economic, social, and environmental lines.

Freeman (1984) introduced the “Stakeholder Theory”, which described the role and participation of stakeholders to enchance CSR.

Matten and Crane (2005) described “the role of the corporation in administering citizenship rights for individuals”.

Adkins, S. (1999). Cause-related marketing: Who cares wins . Boston, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Google Scholar  

Adkins, S. (2007). Cause related marketing : Routledge.

Adomaviciute, K., Bzikadze, G., Cherian, J., & Urbonavicius, S. (2016). Cause-related marketing as a commercially and socially oriented activity: What factors influence and moderate the purchasing? Engineering Economics, 27 (5), 578–585.

Article   Google Scholar  

Ahluwalia, A., & Bedi, M. (2015). Cause related marketing: A win-win approach (a conceptual framework). Asia Pacific Journal of Research, 1 (XV), 177–185.

Aria, M., & Cuccurullo, C. (2017). Bibliometrix: An R-tool for comprehensive science mapping analysis. Journal of Informetrics, 11 (4), 959–975.

Aupperle, K., Hatfield, J. D., & Carroll, A. B. (1983). Instrument development and application in corporate social responsibility. Paper presented at the academy of management proceedings.

Bae, M. (2017). Matching cause-related marketing campaign to culture. Asian Journal of Communication, 27 (4), 415–432.

Barnes, N. G. (1998). Partners in profits: Small businesses move slowly into cause-related marketing. Journal of Small Business Strategy, 9 (1), 47–55.

Basil, D. Z., & Herr, P. M. (2003). Dangerous donations? The effects of cause-related marketing on charity attitude. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 11 (1), 59–76.

Bautista Jr., R., Jeong, L. S., & Pandey, S. (2020). Will cause-related marketing affect the American and Filipino college Students' purchase intention? Asia-Pacific Social Science Review, 20 (4).

Beise-Zee, R. (2013). Cause-related marketing. Encyclopedia of Corporate Social Responsibility, 321–326.

Bennett, R. (2002). Corporate perspectives on cause related marketing. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 10 (1), 41–59.

Bergkvist, L., & Taylor, C. R. (2016). Leveraged marketing communications: A framework for explaining the effects of secondary brand associations. AMS review, 6 (3), 157–175.

Berglind, M., & Nakata, C. (2005). Cause-related marketing: More buck than bang? Business Horizons, 48 (5), 443–453.

Bhattacharyya, S. S., Sahay, A., Arora, A. P., & Chaturvedi, A. (2008). A toolkit for designing firm level strategic corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Social Responsibility Journal.

Bloom, P. N., Hoeffler, S., Keller, K. L., & Meza, C. E. B. (2006). How social-cause marketing affects consumer perceptions. MIT Sloan Management Review, 47 (2), 49.

Boenigk, S., & Schuchardt, V. (2013). Cause-related marketing campaigns with luxury firms: An experimental study of campaign characteristics, attitudes, and donations. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, 18 (2), 101–121.

Bowen, H. (1953). Bowen, HR,(1953), Social Responsibilities of the Businessman: New York: Harper & Row.

Business2community (2020), “The Rise of Cause Marketing”, available at: https://www.business2community.com/social-business/the-rise-of-cause-marketing-02286159 (accessed January 4, 2021).

Carringer, P. T. (1994). Not just a worthy cause: Cause-related marketing delivers the goods and the good. American Advertising, 10 (1), 16–19.

Carroll, A. B. (1979). A three-dimensional conceptual model of corporate performance. Academy of Management Review, 4 (4), 497–505.

Carroll, A. B. (1991). The pyramid of corporate social responsibility: Toward the moral management of organizational stakeholders. Business Horizons, 34 (4), 39–48.

Carroll, A. B. (2008). A history of corporate social responsibility: Concepts and practices. The Oxford handbook of corporate social responsibility, 1.

Chaabane, A. M., & Parguel, B. (2016). The double-edge effect of retailers’ cause-related marketing: When scepticism cools the warm-glow effect. International Journal Retail & Distribution Management .

Chang, C.-T. (2012). Missing ingredients in cause-related advertising: The right formula of execution style and cause framing. International Journal of Advertising, 31 (2), 231–256.

Chang, C.-T., & Chu, X.-Y. M. (2020). The give and take of cause-related marketing: Purchasing cause-related products licenses consumer indulgence. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 48 (2), 203–221.

Chéron, E., Kohlbacher, F., & Kusuma, K. (2012). The effects of brand-cause fit and campaign duration on consumer perception of cause-related marketing in Japan. Journal of consumer marketing .

Choi, S., Lee, S., & Friske, W. (2018). The effects of featured advertising and package labeling on sustainability of cause-related marketing (CRM) products. Sustainability, 10 (9), 3011.

Christofi, M., Kaufmann, H. R., Vrontis, D., & Leonidou, E. (2013). Cause-related marketing and strategic agility: An integrated framework for gaining the competitive advantage. World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, 9 (4), 518–542.

Christofi, M., Leonidou, E., & Vrontis, D. (2015). Cause–related marketing, product innovation and extraordinary sustainable leadership: The root towards sustainability. Global Business and Economics Review, 17 (1), 93–111.

Cone, C. L., Feldman, M. A., & DaSilva, A. T. (2003). Causes and effects. Harvard Business Review, 81 (7), 95–101.

Cone (2010). “2010 Cause Evolution Study”, available at https://www.conecomm.com/research-blog/2010-cause-evolution-study (accessed January 4, 2021).

Cosgrave, D., & O'Dwyer, M. (2020). Ethical standards and perceptions of CRM among millennial consumers. International Marketing Review .

Cui, Y., Trent, E. S., Sullivan, P. M., & Matiru, G. N. (2003). Cause-related marketing: How generation Y responds. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management .

Deb, M., & Amawate, V. (2019). Extending the knowledge on cause-related marketing (CrM) campaign with focus on skepticism. VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems.

Docherty, S., & Hibbert, S. (2003). Examining company experiences of a UK cause-related marketing campaign. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, 8 (4), 378–389.

Du, L., Hou, J., & Huang, Y. (2008). Mechanisms of power and action for cause-related marketing. Baltic Journal of Management .

Elkington, J. (2001). The triple bottom line for 21st century business. The Earthscan reader in business and sustainable development, 20–43.

Endacott, R. W. J. (2004). Consumers and CRM: A national and global perspective. Journal of consumer marketing .

Engage for food (2021): Official website. Retrieved from https://engageforgood.com/iegs-growth-cause-marketing/ (25 th July 2021)

Ferraris, A., Del Giudice, M., Grandhi, B., & Cillo, V. (2019). Refining the relation between cause-related marketing and consumers purchase intentions: A cross-country analysis. International Marketing Review.

File, K. M., & Prince, R. A. (1998). Cause related marketing and corporate philanthropy in the privately held enterprise. Journal of Business Ethics, 17 (14), 1529–1539.

Fromherz, K. (2006). Cause-related marketing. American Nurseryman, 203 (6), 46.

Galan-Ladero, M. M. (2012). Variables that influence attitude toward cause-related marketing and determinants of satisfaction and loyalty in the ‘solidarity purchase’. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, 9 (2), 199–200.

Galan-Ladero, M. M., Galera-Casquet, C., Valero-Amaro, V., & Barroso-Mendez, M. J. (2013a). Sustainable, socially responsible business: The cause-related marketing case. A review of the conceptual framework. Journal of Security and Sustainability Issues, 2 (4), 35–46.

Galan-Ladero, M. M., Galera-Casquet, C., & Wymer, W. (2013b). Attitudes towards cause-related marketing: Determinants of satisfaction and loyalty. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, 10 (3), 253–269.

Gregory, G., Ngo, L., & Miller, R. (2019). Branding for non-profits: Explaining new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Journal of Product & Brand Management .

Grolleau, G., Ibanez, L., & Lavoie, N. (2016). Cause-related marketing of products with a negative externality. Journal of Business Research, 69 (10), 4321–4330.

Guerreiro, J., Rita, P., & Trigueiros, D. (2016). A text mining-based review of cause-related marketing literature. Journal of Business Ethics, 139 (1), 111–128.

Gupta, S., & Pirsch, J. (2006a). The company-cause-customer fit decision in cause-related marketing. Journal of Consumer Marketing.

Gupta, S., & Pirsch, J. (2006b). A taxonomy of cause-related marketing research: Current findings and future research directions. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 15 (1–2), 25–43.

Hajjat, M. M. (2003). Effect of cause-related marketing on attitudes and purchase intentions: The moderating role of cause involvement and donation size. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 11 (1), 93–109.

Handa, M., & Gupta, S. (2020). Digital cause-related marketing campaigns: Relationship between brand-cause fit and behavioural intentions. Journal of Indian Business Research, 12 (1), 63–78.

Hawkens, G., & Stead, J. (1996). Who chooses? The family and their buying decisions. The influence of partnership between companies and charities on family purchasing decisions . NCH Action for Children.

Hawkins, R. (2015). Shifting conceptualizations of ethical consumption: Cause-related marketing in India and the USA. Geoforum, 67 , 172–182.

He. (1999). Knowledge discovery through co-word analysis.

He, H., Chao, M. M., & Zhu, W. (2019). Cause-related marketing and employee engagement: The roles of admiration, implicit morality beliefs, and moral identity. Journal of Business Research, 95 , 83–92.

Heald, M. (1957). Management's responsibility to society: The growth of an idea. The Business History Review, 375–384.

Heald, M. (1970). The social responsibilities of business: Company and community 1900–1960 . Transaction Publishers.

Heidarian, E. (2019). The impact of trust propensity on consumers’ cause-related marketing purchase intentions and the moderating role of culture and gender. Journal of International Consumer Marketing, 31 (4), 345–362.

IEG (2018). “Cause Sponsorship Spending To Total $2.14 Billion In 2018”, available at: https://www.sponsorship.com/Latest-Thinking/Sponsorship-Infographics/Cause-Sponsorship-Spending-To-Total-$2-14-Billion.aspx (accessed July 26, 2021).

IEG (2019). “Sponsorship spending of causes to grow 4.6% in 2019”, available at: https://www.sponsorship.com/Latest-Thinking/Sponsorship-Infographics/Sponsorship-Spending-of-Causes-to-Grow-4-6%2D%2Din-201.aspx (accessed January 4, 2021).

IEG (2020). “ Executive Summary” , available at: https://www.sponsorship.com/Latest-Thinking/Sponsorship-Infographics/Executive-Summary-page.aspx (accessed July 26, 2021).

Imas, A. (2014). Working for the “warm glow”: On the benefits and limits of prosocial incentives. Journal of Public Economics, 114 , 14–18.

Jahdi, K. (2014). Cause-related marketing (CaRM) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Social Responsibility Journal.

Jeong, H. J., & Kim, J. (2020). Benefits of cause-related marketing for companies and nonprofits: Focusing on the roles of self-corporate congruency and issue involvement. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, 17 , 317–330.

Jones, T. M. (1980). Corporate social responsibility revisited, redefined. California Management Review, 22 (3), 59–67.

Jung, M. J., Naughton, J. P., Tahoun, A., & Wang, C. (2018). Do firms strategically disseminate? Evidence from corporate use of social media. The Accounting Review, 93 (4), 225–252.

Kim, Y. J., & Lee, W. N. (2009). Overcoming consumer skepticism in cause-related marketing: The effects of corporate social responsibility and donation size claim objectivity. Journal of Promotion Management, 15 (4), 465–483.

Kim, J.-E., & Johnson, K. K. (2013). The impact of moral emotions on cause-related marketing campaigns: A cross-cultural examination. Journal of Business Ethics, 112 (1), 79–90.

Kotler, P., Hessekiel, D., & Lee, N. (2012). Good works!: Marketing and corporate initiatives that build a better world... And the bottom line . John Wiley & Sons.

Book   Google Scholar  

Kotler, P., & Lee, N. (2005). Corporate social responsibility - doing the most good for your company “, John Wiley & Sons. INC, New Jersey.

Kramer, M. R., & Porter, M. (2011). Creating shared value (Vol. 17).

Kumar, P., Singh, S. K., Pereira, V., & Leonidou, E. (2020). Cause-related marketing and service innovation in emerging country healthcare. International Marketing Review.

La Ferle, C., Kuber, G., & Edwards, S. M. (2013). Factors impacting responses to cause-related marketing in India and the United States: Novelty, altruistic motives, and company origin. Journal of Business Research, 66 (3), 364–373.

Lafferty, B. A., & Goldsmith, R. E. (2005). Cause–brand alliances: Does the cause help the brand or does the brand help the cause? Journal of Business Research, 58 (4), 423–429.

Lafferty, B. A., Lueth, A. K., & McCafferty, R. (2016). An evolutionary process model of cause-related marketing and systematic review of the empirical literature. Psychology & Marketing, 33 (11), 951–970.

Lantos, G. P. (2001). The boundaries of strategic corporate social responsibility. Journal of consumer marketing.

Larson, B. V., Flaherty, K. E., Zablah, A. R., Brown, T. J., & Wiener, J. L. (2008). Linking cause-related marketing to sales force responses and performance in a direct selling context. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 36 (2), 271–277.

Lavack, A. M., & Kropp, F. (2003). A cross-cultural comparison of consumer attitudes toward cause-related marketing. Social Marketing Quarterly, 9 (2), 3–16.

Lee Thomas, M., Mullen, L. G., & Fraedrich, J. (2011). Increased word-of-mouth via strategic cause-related marketing. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, 16 (1), 36–49.

Liston-Heyes, C., & Liu, G. (2010). Cause-related marketing in the retail and finance sectors: An exploratory study of the determinants of cause selection and nonprofit alliances. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 39 (1), 77–101.

Liston-Heyes, C., & Liu, G. (2013). A study of non-profit organisations in cause-related marketing. European Journal of Marketing.

Liu, G. (2013). Impacts of instrumental versus relational centered logic on cause-related marketing decision making. Journal of Business Ethics, 113 (2), 243–263.

Liu, G., & Ko, W.-W. (2011). An analysis of cause-related marketing implementation strategies through social alliance: Partnership conditions and strategic objectives. Journal of Business Ethics, 100 (2), 253–281.

Liu, G., & Ko, W. W. (2014). An integrated model of cause-related marketing strategy development. AMS review, 4 (3–4), 78–95.

Liu, Z., Yin, Y., Liu, W., & Dunford, M. (2015). Visualizing the intellectual structure and evolution of innovation systems research: A bibliometric analysis. Scientometrics, 103 (1), 135–158.

Manojkumar, S. S., & Sharma, D. M. S. (2018). An empirical study to measure the effect of brand loyalty and skepticism on purchase intention with reference to cause related Marketing in Ahmedabad City. Journal of Management , 5(2).

Mullen, J. (1997). Performance-based corporate philanthropy: How" giving smart" can further corporate goals. Public Relations Quarterly, 42 (2), 42.

Natarajan, T., Balasubramaniam, S. A., & Jublee, D. I. (2016). A journey of cause related marketing from 1988 to 2016. International Journal of Business and Management, 11 (11), 247–263.

Nerur, S. P., Rasheed, A. A., & Natarajan, V. (2008). The intellectual structure of the strategic management field: An author co-citation analysis. Strategic Management Journal, 29 (3), 319–336.

Nowak, L. I., & Clarke, T. K. (2003). Cause-related marketing: Keys to successful relationships with corporate sponsors and their customers. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 11 (1), 137–149.

Persson, O., Danell, R., & Schneider, J. W. (2009). How to use Bibexcel for various types of bibliometric analysis. Celebrating scholarly communication studies: A Festschrift for Olle Persson at his 60th birthday, 5 , 9-24.

Poje, T., & Groff, M. Z. (2021). Mapping ethics education in accounting research: A bibliometric analysis. Journal of Business Ethics, 1–22.

Polonsky, M. J., & Macdonald, E. K. (2000). Exploring the link between cause-related marketing and brand building. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, 5 (1), 46–57.

Polonsky, M. J., & Speed, R. (2001). Linking sponsorship and cause related marketing. European Journal of Marketing.

Polonsky, M. J., & Wood, G. (2001). Can the overcommercialization of cause-related marketing harm society? Journal of Macromarketing, 21 (1), 8–22.

Pracejus, J. W., Olsen, G. D., & Brown, N. R. (2003). On the prevalence and impact of vague quantifiers in the advertising of cause-related marketing (CRM). Journal of Advertising, 32 (4), 19–28.

Pringle, H., & Thompson, M. (1999). Brand spirit: how cause-related marketing builds brands . Chichester: John Wiley and Sons.

Pringle, H., & Thompson, M. (2001). How cause-related marketing builds brands. Chichester, New York: Weinheim, Brisbane, Singapore and Toronto: John Wiley & Sons.

Ptacek, J. J., & Salazar, G. (1997). Enlightened self-interest: Selling business on the benefits of cause-related marketing. Nonprofit World, 15 , 9–9.

Royd-Taylor, L. (2007). Cause-related marketing: A new perspective on achieving campaign objectives amongst fast moving consumer goods. Strategic Change, 16 (1–2), 79–86.

Runté, M., Basil, D. Z., & Deshpande, S. (2009). Cause-related marketing from the nonprofit's perspective: Classifying goals and experienced outcomes. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 21 (3), 255–270.

Sabri, O. (2018). The detrimental effect of cause-related marketing parodies. Journal of Business Ethics, 151 (2), 517–537.

Samu, S., & Wymer Jr., W. W. (2001). Nonprofit-business alliance model: Formation and outcomes. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 9 (1–2), 45–61.

Santoro, G., Bresciani, S., Bertoldi, B., & Liu, Y. (2019). Cause-related marketing, brand loyalty and corporate social responsibility: A cross-country analysis of Italian and Japanese consumers. International Marketing Review.

Schyvinck, C., & Willem, A. (2019). From cause-related marketing strategy to implementation in professional basketball organizations: A matter of alignment. European Sport Management Quarterly, 19 (1), 58–79.

Sekaran, U. (1983). Methodological and theoretical issues and advancements in cross-cultural research. Journal of International Business Studies, 14 (2), 61–73.

Smith, S. M., & Alcorn, D. S. (1991). Cause marketing: A new direction in the marketing of corporate responsibility. Journal of consumer marketing.

Srivastava, R. (2020). For brand alliance social or cause related marketing which one is better? A study in emerging markets. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, 25 (2), e1656.

Steenkamp, J. B. E. (2001). The role of national culture in international marketing research. International Marketing Review.

Stumpf, M., & Teufl, I. (2014). Empirische Untersuchung des Einsatzes von cause related marketing cause related marketing (pp. 97–115). Springer.

Svensson, G., & Wood, G. (2007). Cause related marketing? Commercialism or altruism: Finding the balance? International Journal of Electronic Customer Relationship Management, 1 (3), 231–241.

Svensson, G., & Wood, G. (2011). A model of cause-related marketing for “profit-driven” and “non-profit” organizations. European Business Review.

Tangari, A. H., Folse, J. A. G., Burton, S., & Kees, J. (2010). The moderating influence of consumers' temporal orientation on the framing of societal needs and corporate responses in cause-related marketing campaigns. Journal of Advertising, 39 (2), 35–50.

Thamaraiselvan, N., Arasu, B. S., & Inbaraj, J. D. (2017). Role of celebrity in cause related marketing. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, 14 (3), 341–357.

Thomas, M. L., Fraedrich, J. P., & Mullen, L. G. (2011). Successful cause-related marketing partnering as a means to aligning corporate and philanthropic goals: An empirical study. Academy of Marketing Studies Journal, 15 (2), 113.

Thomas, S., Kureshi, S., & Vatavwala, S. (2020). Cause-related marketing research (1988–2016): An academic review and classification. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing, 32 (5), 488–516.

Till, B. D., & Nowak, L. I. (2000). Toward effective use of cause-related marketing alliances. Journal of Product & Brand Management.

Vaidyanathan, R., Aggarwal, P., & Kozłowski, W. (2013). Interdependent self-construal in collectivist cultures: Effects on compliance in a cause-related marketing context. Journal of Marketing Communications, 19 (1), 44–57.

Van den Brink, D., Odekerken-Schröder, G., & Pauwels, P. (2006). The effect of strategic and tactical cause-related marketing on consumers' brand loyalty. Journal of consumer marketing.

Varadarajan, P. R., & Menon, A. (1988). Cause-related marketing: A coalignment of marketing strategy and corporate philanthropy. Journal of Marketing, 52 (3), 58–74.

Vrontis, D., Thrassou, A., Christofi, M., Shams, R., & Czinkota, M. R. (2020). Cause-related marketing in international business: What works and what does not? International Marketing Review.

Walton, C. C. (1967). Corporate social responsibilities . Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Wang, Y. (2014). Individualism/collectivism, charitable giving, and cause-related marketing: A comparison of Chinese and Americans. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, 19 (1), 40–51.

Webb, D. J., & Mohr, L. A. (1998). A typology of consumer responses to cause-related marketing: From skeptics to socially concerned. Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, 17 (2), 226–238.

Woo, H., Kim, S., & Childs, M. L. (2019). Is this for our sake or their sake? Cross-cultural effects of message focus in cause-related marketing. International Marketing Review.

Woodroof, P. J., Deitz, G. D., Howie, K. M., & Evans, R. D. (2019). The effect of cause-related marketing on firm value: A look at Fortune’s most admired all-stars. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 47 (5), 899–918.

Yun, J. T., Duff, B. R., Vargas, P., Himelboim, I., & Sundaram, H. (2019). Can we find the right balance in cause-related marketing? Analyzing the boundaries of balance theory in evaluating brand-cause partnerships. Psychology & Marketing, 36 (11), 989–1002.

Zupic, I., & Čater, T. (2015). Bibliometric methods in management and organization. Organizational Research Methods, 18 (3), 429–472.

Download references

Open Access funding provided thanks to the CRUE-CSIC agreement with Springer Nature.

Author information

Authors and affiliations.

University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain

Hina Yaqub Bhatti, M. Mercedes Galan-Ladero & Clementina Galera-Casquet

Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan

Hina Yaqub Bhatti

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

Corresponding author

Correspondence to M. Mercedes Galan-Ladero .

Additional information

Publisher’s note.

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ .

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Bhatti, H.Y., Galan-Ladero, M.M. & Galera-Casquet, C. Cause-related marketing: a systematic review of the literature. Int Rev Public Nonprofit Mark 20 , 25–64 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12208-021-00326-y

Download citation

Received : 30 March 2021

Accepted : 21 November 2021

Published : 08 January 2022

Issue Date : March 2023

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/s12208-021-00326-y

Share this article

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

  • Cause-Related Marketing (CRM)
  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)
  • Systematic Literature Review (SLR)
  • Bibliometric Analysis
  • Find a journal
  • Publish with us
  • Track your research
  • How it works

Useful Links

How much will your dissertation cost?

Have an expert academic write your dissertation paper!

Dissertation Services

Dissertation Services

Get unlimited topic ideas and a dissertation plan for just £45.00

Order topics and plan

Order topics and plan

Get 1 free topic in your area of study with aim and justification

Yes I want the free topic

Yes I want the free topic

Marketing Dissertation Topics

Published by Jamie Walker at January 11th, 2023 , Revised On August 18, 2023

Marketing is a business-focused subject, so you’ll be exposed to much more than just creativity. You’ll learn how to set budgets, find new customers, enter international markets, and decide on prices or profits.

As a marketing student, you will be required to complete a marketing dissertation to complete your degree programme. Your dissertation topic can relate to branding, relationship marketing, online/digital marketing, marketing ethics, and any other field of marketing.

To help you get started with brainstorming for marketing topic ideas, we have developed a list of the latest topics that can be used for writing your marketing dissertation.

These topics have been developed by PhD-qualified writers of our team , so you can trust to use these topics for drafting your dissertation.

Review the step-by-step guide on how to write your dissertation here.

You may also want to start your dissertation by requesting  a brief research proposal  from our writers on any of these topics, which includes an  introduction  to the topic,  research question , aim and objectives,  literature review , and the proposed research methodology conducted.  Let us know  if you need any help in getting started.

Check our  dissertation example to get an idea of  how to structure your dissertation .

You can review step by step guide on how to write your dissertation here .

Review Our Best Dissertation Topics 2021 complete list.

2022 Marketing Dissertation Topics

Topic 1: assessing the role of communication strategies in fashion marketing- a case study of uk.

Research Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of communication strategies in the world of   UK fashion marketing. This will also give us an understanding of how new fashion remanufacturing should be communicated to the consumers. Focusing on how information and messages about the brands or products should be labelled to attract the audience.

Topic 2: How Influential are Retail Stores and Fast Fashion on each other? A case study of Zara

Research Aim: Fast fashion is an idea in which retailers target their business strategies, reducing the time it takes to get products into the store, using an in-season purchasing strategy to keep the products in the market updated during the season. This study aims to find the impact or influence of fast fashion and retail stores on each other, focusing on Zara as it is considered as the famous brand among consumers. It will look at what happens to fast fashion when it is delivered to retail outlets, as well as the adaption of fast fashion in the retail sector and how it is communicated to customers.

Topic 3: Assessing the Key Ethical Issues in the marketing of Pharmaceutical Products in the UK.

Research Aim: Pharmacists may occasionally be led to unethical behaviours during contact; that’s why it is important to understand these behaviours. Pharmaceutical products are sensitive to advertising, and minor misconduct can lead to loss of public trust in the industry. The current study will examine the challenges faced and the key ethical issues that occur during the marketing of pharmaceuticals products focusing on the UK pharmaceutical industry; through quantitative research analysis.

Topic 4: Brand Marketing to a Global World and its impact on local cultural beliefs and attitudes- A literature review.

Research Aim: Different cultures in different countries act as challenges to global marketing. The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of how brand marketing in a global world has a huge impact on the cultural beliefs and attitudes of people. It will provide an experience of international and local consumer cultures and their mutual influence on many consumer behaviours and their effect on their decision-making process.

Topic 5: E-sports marketing- Investigating purpose and scope in current times.

Research Aim: This study aims to find the emerging trend of esports marketing and its scope in current times. It will also explore the collaborative efforts of gaming companies, players and different online communities and how they play an important role in maintaining and enriching the value of Esports consumption.   of   It will provide a societal impact of esports and by applying different strategies

Marketing Dissertation Topics for 2021

Topic 1: impact of product packaging on organisational sales: a case study of the uk retail sector.

Research Aim: Due to intense competition in the UK retail sector, product packaging has gained significant importance concerning consumer purchase decisions. This research will focus on how product packaging (colour, shape, and other attributes) influences consumer purchase behaviour which in return increases or decreases the sales of the organisation.

Topic 2: Impact of E-marketing on consumer purchase decisions: Case of the UK luxury industry

Research Aim: The main purpose of the research is to analyze the impact of electronic marketing on consumer purchase decisions. Different modes of e-marketing will be assessed, and based on the results of each e-marketing channel, the dissertation will be concluded. The focus of this research will be the UK luxury industry.

Topic 3: Analysing the customer-centric marketing strategies in attaining competitive advantage for the firm and sustaining business success

Research Aim: In today’s competitive corporate world, organizations are formulating and implementing customer-centric marketing strategies. These strategies are devised, keeping in mind customer behaviour, customer pattern, customer preferences, customer trends, etc. Considering all these and many other customer-related aspects, companies assess what is successful for their business. This research will discuss the different characteristics of customers that should be studied and how formulating related strategies will help the company gain a competitive advantage and generate profits.

Topic 4: The role of information technology in revolutionizing marketers' approach towards manipulative advertisement

Research Aim: The digital media or the digital world has provided a very effective and large platform for marketers to market and advertise their products. However, this platform can also be used to manipulate customers through deceptive marketing techniques. The main purpose of the research is to analyse the role of information technology in revolutionizing marketers’ approach towards manipulative advertisements. In addition to this, the research will also talk about how marketers use digital media channels to deceive customers who also harm the company’s reputation.

Topic 5: Assessing the impact of integrated marketing communication on consumer impulsive buying behaviour

Research Aim: Consumer impulsive buying behaviour has become an important phenomenon in today’s global world. Companies have been able to acquire a high market share through the impulsive buying behaviour of the consumer. Therefore, this research focuses on analyzing the impact of integrated marketing communication on consumer impulsive buying behaviour.

Topic 6: The Impact of digital marketing on businesses throughout the world

Research Aim: Digital Marketing has changed the face of marketing in today’s world. More and more companies are now adopting this new technique to gain a competitive edge over traditional marketing methods. This research will address the impact of different digital marketing channels on businesses and how each channel can help companies earn more.

Topic 7: Traditional vs Digital Marketing: A comparative study of the last ten years

Research Aim: With the emergence of digital marketing in the global world today, more and more companies are abandoning traditional marketing techniques. This research will compare traditional and digital marketing methods and present data over the past ten years. Through this data, a conclusive analysis will be conducted to determine which marketing is more successful in today’s times.

Topic 8: Studying customers’ responses to automated interactions in the services industry: How does it impact the business?

Research Aim: Many companies have now completely automated their business operations. They have streamlined standard responses given to customers. This research will mainly assess the impact of automated responses on customers, whether or not they impact them in terms of generating and converting leads, and ultimately how it impacts the business overall.

Topic 9: Capturing and analyzing the Voice of Customer (VOC) through Artificial Intelligence: How effective is the technology?

Research Aim: Voice of Customer (VOC) is not a new concept. Companies have been working and collecting data on it for the past several years. It is a method to gather customers’ feedback about their expectations and experiences with respect to your product or service. This research will study how companies gather, assess, and analyse this data through artificial intelligence and how effective it is for businesses. The research will utilise quantitative analysis to conclude whether or not this new technology and strategy is successful.

Topic 10: Online search queries – Can businesses benefit from them and better market their products and services?

Research Aim: Keyword targeting, search engine optimization (SEO), click trend, search trend, etc., are all ways to find how consumers search for a particular product, brand or website online. With more business being done online and with companies focusing more on online marketing, understanding online search queries have become crucial for the business’s success. This research will focus on the different ways through which companies can assess online search queries and whether or not they can benefit from them. Data from past years will be fetched and included to conduct authentic research and conclude accurately.

Also read: Management Dissertation Topics

“Our expert dissertation writers can help you with all stages of the dissertation writing process including topic research and selection, dissertation plan, dissertation proposal, methodology, statistical analysis, primary and secondary research, findings and analysis and complete dissertation writing”. Learn more here .

Relationship Marketing Dissertation Topics

Relationship marketing is a form of marketing that focuses on long-term goals such as building customer loyalty and increasing customer retention. In relationship marketing, products are provided based on relationships and not traditional marketing. This type of marketing helps firms acquire more customers and build loyalty. The more loyal and satisfied a customer is, the more likely they are to make a purchase.

Under relationship marketing, the purchasing pattern, the contact details, and the entire profile of customers are maintained. Normally, firms assign executives to one or more major customers to maintain relationships and satisfy their needs. It is a very useful marketing tool and also an excellent topic to research on. You can choose a topic for your relationship marketing dissertation topic from any of the topics listed below:

Topic 11:Customer loyalty – Behaviour or an attitude? A mixed-method analysis

Research Aim: This research will analyse how customer loyalty is determined, whether it is an attitude or behaviour. A comparative analysis, comparing different elements of attitudes and behaviours, will be conducted.

Topic 12: The usefulness of relationship marketing in the UK fashion industry: To what extent have organisations incorporated club-style membership schemes for their customer and their impact on businesses?

Research Aim: This research will focus on one important aspect of relationship marketing – memberships. The research will revolve around the UK fashion industry, and the impact memberships have on customers and business organisations.

Topic 13: The impact of relationship marketing on customer loyalty: An analysis of Honda Motors

Research Aim: This dissertation will assess how customer loyalty is impacted by relationship marketing. The main focus of this study will be Honda Motors, how the company maintains customer relationships.

Topic 14: Loyalty schemes and customer satisfaction: Do they really have an impact?

Research Aim: This research will analyse whether or not loyalty schemes impact customer satisfaction. If yes, then the various means will be explored.

Topic 15: The interrelationship between switching costs and consumers' resistance to switching brands' loyalty

Research Aim: The relationship between costs and brand loyalty will be assessed in this research. This research will discuss circumstances under which customers decide to switch brand loyalty.

Topic 16:Loyalty schemes and their relationship with sales: An exploratory analysis of the UK retail industry.

Research Aim: This dissertation will conduct an exploratory analysis to conclude whether or not there is a relationship between loyalty schemes and sales of companies.

Topic 17:Maintaining customer relations through relationship marketing. A case of ASDA

Research Aim: The main focus of this research will be to study how ASDA maintains customer relations and whether they prove to be successful for the business or not.

Topic 18:Exploring the effectiveness of online marketing – Does digital marketing help companies build customer loyalty?

Research Aim: This dissertation will analyse how effective online marketing is for companies to help build and maintain customer loyalty. And whether online marketing can be used to build customer loyalty.

Topic 19: Assessing customer satisfaction in the UK tourism and hospitality industry

Research Aim: The UK tourism and hospitality industry will be assessed in this study for customer satisfaction. The dissertation will conclude to answer how the UK tourism and hospitality industry has maintained customer satisfaction.

Topic 20:Technology driven customer engagement – Does it lead to better customer satisfaction as compared to traditional engagement methods?

Research Aim: This dissertation will discuss how technology has impacted customer engagement. Furthermore, it will analyze how effective technology has been in driving customer engagement compared to traditional methods.

Branding Dissertation Topics

Branding involves creating a unique image and name for a product in the minds of the customers. This is done through creative advertising using a brand theme used consistently in all the advertisements. Branding also entails creating a unique logo and name for a distinguished product.

Some consumers compare prices before purchasing a product, but mostly a purchase is made by focusing on the quality of goods and brand loyalty. There is a misconception that branding is the same as marketing, but it can be distinguished based on the former being one of marketing strategy fundamentals.

For successful branding, there should be truthfulness and clarity in every phase through interaction with customers, which will help improve the value and brand perception of a company.

Branding provides companies with a competitive edge over other organizations and has become a very popular topic for research among undergraduate and postgraduate students. When looking to work on a branding related dissertation, you can choose from the dissertation topics below:

Topic 21:Maintaining brand equity through innovation: A case study of Apple Inc.

Research Aim: Innovation has a huge impact on brand equity. The same will be discussed in this research, with Apple Inc. as the main focus.

Topic 22:Building brand equity through celebrity endorsement: Analysis of the fashion industry

Research Aim: Celebrity endorsement is an excellent way to build brand equity. In this dissertation, the same will be discussed concerning the UK fashion industry or another country of your choice.

Topic 23:Brand attitudes and advertisements: Evidence from the past five years

Research Aim: This study will talk about how advertisements shape brand attitudes. Evidence from the past five years will be presented to conclude whether advertisements impact the brand attitude or not.

Topic 24: Packaging as a brand marketing strategy: Assessing its effectiveness in the retail sector

Research Aim: The success of a brand marketing strategy depends on several factors. This dissertation will assess how important packaging is in a brand marketing strategy.

Topic 25:Effect of branding on consumers of Coca Cola and Pepsi: A comparative analysis

Research Aim: Branding has a huge impact on consumers. Competitors utilise this strategy to build customer loyalty. This research will compare two big rivals – Coca-Cola and Pepsi concerning branding.

Topic 26:Branding strategies: Impact and application

Research Aim:  The different types of branding strategies and their implementation process will be discussed in this study.

Topic 27:Analysis of the consumer: Comparative analysis between good quality products and brand loyalty.

Research Aim: This study will discuss how good quality products impact consumers and how it helps companies build brand loyalty.

Topic 28:Building, retaining and maintaining the brand image in the market – Studying MNCs in the UK industry

Research Aim: Brand image and reputation are something that companies should pay close attention to. This research will talk about leading MNCs and how they should build and retain the brand image.

Topic 29:Importance of brand and reliability in the automotive industry – Case of Toyota Motors

Research Aim: Reliability is a huge factor in building a brand. With a specific focus on Toyota, this study will discuss how reliability impacts the brand.

Topic 30:Building brand awareness and equity through online marketing – Assessing its effectiveness

Research Aim: This research will assess the effectiveness of online marketing in building brand awareness and equity.

Topic 31:International brand building in the digital age: The role of digital marketing

Research Aim: Building a brand with the help of digital marketing will be discussed in this research.

Topic 32:Corporate social responsibility and brand management: A case of Nestle

Research Aim: Giving back to the community creates a positive image of the company. This research will discuss how fulfilling corporate social responsibility helps the company maintain its brand.

Also Read:   Chanel’s Brand Identity and Personality

Direct Marketing Dissertation Topics

Direct marketing is a marketing phenomenon that involves direct selling to customers. This includes telephone selling, email selling, direct mail selling, etc. No retailer is involved in the process. The product/service flow includes only two parties, the company and the consumer.

Direct marketing allows businesses and non-profit organizations to communicate with customers directly. It relies on advertisements on the internet, television, or radio.

There are different types and forms of direct marketing, with internet marketing being the most popular. Online marketing helps companies to interact directly with their customers without any middleman. In this manner, companies can gain insight into customers, expectations, and feedback on the product/service.

Below is a list of topics that you can base your dissertation on under the direct marketing theme.

Topic 33:Loyalty schemes and direct selling – Does it help businesses to market directly to customers?

Research Aim: Loyalty schemes are an old but extremely effective marketing tool. This research will discuss and analyze whether direct marketing can be done through these schemes or not.

Topic 34:How customers can protect themselves from deceitful direct marketing techniques?

Research Aim: This study will highlight the unlawful and unethical ways companies adapt through digital marketing and how customers can protect themselves.

Topic 35:Direct Marketing: Effects and implications

Research Aim: The main concept, theory, and framework of direct marketing will be discussed and analysed in this research. The effects and implications of direct marketing will be the main focus of this study.

Topic 36:Do customers respond differently to direct and digital marketing?

Research Aim: Direct and digital marketing will be compared and analysed in this research. Their responses will then be evaluated as to which one is the most effective.

Topic 37:The relationship between the duration of a voice message and the success of Tele-marketing? A case of mobile Industry.

Research Aim: Telemarketing is a successful marketing tool. This research will study the relationship between the duration of a voice message and its success for companies operating in the mobile industry.

Topic 38:Developing a marketing information system for direct marketing: Analysing its effectiveness

Research Aim: A marketing information system is extremely essential for companies today. This research will discuss how a marketing information system can be developed and how effective it is for direct marketing.

Topic 39:The role of business and artificial intelligence in direct marketing – How can companies gain advantage?

Research Aim: Artificial Intelligence is the big thing in the marketing industry these days. Incorporating it into your business for marketing will help you achieve a competitive advantage. The same will be studied and evaluated in this research.

Topic 40:Internet marketing as a direct marketing technique – Assessing its effectiveness and profitability

Research Aim: Internet marketing can be used a direct marketing technique. This research will assess how effective and profitable this technique can be for businesses.

Topic 41:Protecting consumer data and privacy in direct marketing techniques – Evaluating its importance.

Research Aim: Companies do not pay much attention to customer privacy. This research will discuss how direct marketing can help companies protect customer data and privacy.

Marketing Across Cultures Dissertation Topics

Every culture is different. Thus, what is acceptable in one, may not be acceptable in the other. This is why firms must adopt different techniques while operating in different cultures. Before introducing any product, companies need to analyse the cultural aspect of the market.

This has become a very important and deciding factor for the successful operation of a business. Cultures have a deep impact on consumer behaviour, and it plays a key role in shaping the buying behaviour and the attitude of the customer.

There is no doubt that this marketing aspect is worth some research. Some intriguing and current dissertation topics in the field of cultures and marketing are given below:

Topic 42:Impact of culture on the trading Market: A case of general motors through an analysis of the imports and exports.

Research Aim: Marketing is based on different cultures. This research will discuss the impact of culture on the trading market, focusing on general motors’ imports and exports.

Topic 43: Does language impact the identity of a brand? A case of Coca-Cola

Research Aim: Language is an important element of a culture. This study will research and analyze whether or not the language impacts a brand and will utilize Coca-Cola as its main focus.

Topic 44: Amalgamating and assessing the regional differences within the national culture of marketing

Research Aim: This research will study the various regional differences that exist in the marketing culture and how they impact businesses.

Topic 45: The impact of collectivism and individualism on purchasing smartphones

Research Aim: Different cultures have a different impact on society. This research will conduct a cross-cultural analysis to understand how culture impacts marketing strategies

Topic 46:Cross-cultural marketing and how it impacts a business – A specific focus on the FMCG sector

Research Aim: Cross-cultural marketing is utilised by companies operating in different cultures. This research will talk about how cross-cultural marketing is formulated, devised, and implemented in the FMCG Sector and whether it is successful for the company or not.

Topic 47:Belief, religion and values: Do they have an impact on businesses across the world

Research Aim: There can be many cultures in one market. Thus, it becomes challenging for companies to market their product according to cultures. This research will assess this issue by focusing on two different cultures.

Topic 48: Application of marketing mix in a culturally diverse society: Assessing two different cultures

Topic 49: same marketing tact in different markets: how it leads to business failures.

Research Aim: Companies cannot utilise similar marketing techniques for different cultures. This research will assess how this act can lead to the failure of businesses.

Topic 50:Cultural differences and the subsequent effect on supermarkets across the United Kingdom

Research Aim: This research will talk about how various cultural differences impact supermarkets operating in the United Kingdom.

Also Read :   Fashion and Culture Dissertation Topics

Online Marketing Dissertation Topics

When marketing evolved from traditional to online or digital marketing, it was observed that all the rules that traditional marketing followed were no longer useful. The needs and demands of the market had changed, thus online marketing emerged. Digital marketing has been a game-changer in the field of marketing.

New tools, new rules, and new methods have set the marketing game field. Every player entering the business world needs to be well versed with all these new aspects or else it can go out of business quickly.

Online marketing helps business organisations to understand and evaluate customers’ responses to a particular marketing strategy very efficiently. So businesses are now aware of their customer behaviour, trends, what they look for in a product, what are they interested in, etc.

However, while collecting and storing all this customer information, organisations need to ensure the privacy of their consumers to avoid losing their trust. Companies are now in an era where they can efficiently interact and engage their consumers.

Based on their responses, they can devise subsequent marketing strategies. Online marketing is now a powerful marketing tool as it allows organizations to develop specific strategies to suit the needs of their consumers.

The field of digital marketing is worth the research. You can spend hours learning about this facet of marketing, and still will be left with the urge to learn more. Some interesting topic suggestions are given below if you want to base your dissertation on online marketing.

Topic 51:How online marketing impacts the retail sector during the Covid-19 pandemic? - Entering the field of internet marketing

Research aim: This research will aim to discover the impact of the covid-19 pandemic on the performance of the retail sector in any country of your choice. How did the retail stores move to online marketing to overcome the losses?

Topic 52: Organisations and their use of personalised products: How do companies decide who to market?

Research Aim: There are times when companies launch personalised services or products for a specific group of customers. To identify this need, traditional research is not useful. Customers do not want to give out this type of information. With online marketing and its various tools, companies can now gather this data. This research will delve deep into how that happens.

Visit our topics database to view 100s of dissertation topics in your research area.

Topic 53:The role of online marketing in driving sales: Studying the retail sector

Research Aim: The main focus of this research will be to understand how the retail sector is impacted through online marketing and its role.

Topic 54:Implications and application of online marketing

Research Aim: Online marketing tools are extremely powerful. Various tools will be discussed and analysed in this research to conclude how well they perform.

Topic 55:How can companies overcome the hate speech of unhappy customers?

Research Aim: With the ease of gathering data, online marketing and tools can also lead to hate speech from customers. This research will evaluate different ways through which companies can overcome this issue.

Topic 56:What attributes are preferred by customers for online search, purchasing and comparison?

Research Aim: The different types of research, search, purchasing, and comparing attributes undertaken by customers will be assessed in this study. Moreover, their impact on business will be studied.

Topic 57:The power of online marketing tools – Assessing their effectiveness with respect to sales

Research Aim: Different marketing tools will be analysed and studied in this research. They will be assessed based on their effectiveness concerning sales.

Topic 58:Analysis of change in behaviour of customers in offline and online marketing

Research Aim: Online and offline marketing are extremely different. This research will analyse how customers behave differently in an online marketing setting as compared to an offline marketing setting.

Topic 59:Impact of appearance and visual effects for the effectiveness of online marketing

Research Aim: Online marketing utilises different appearance and visual effects to attract customers. This research will analyze how effective these techniques are for the company.

Topic 60:Websites and E-commerce – Do they influence customer behaviour? A case study of the UK fashion industry

Research Aim: With online marketing, it is essential that you have a website and an online store if you’re selling products. The impact of both website and e-commerce on marketing in the UK fashion industry will be assessed.

The 4Ps (Price, Product, Promotion, Place) of Marketing Mix Dissertation Topics

Price, product, promotion, and place are also known as the four pillars of marketing. Referred to as the marketing mix, these four components help companies decide on a product and/or marketing strategy.

These four factors (4Ps) are the key ingredients of a successful marketing strategy since they allow for an in-depth analysis of the market and marketing strategies concerning any particular product. The companies analyse the culture, the product itself, and the pricing of other similar products to gain a competitive edge for their business and production processes.

To understand more about these components and how they impact businesses, you can research this area. Some relevant topics in this area of marketing are listed below for you to base your dissertation on:

Topic 61:Understanding the importance of location for customers Starbucks USA vs Starbucks UAE

Research Aim: Location has a great impact on the company’s sales and marketing efforts. This research will assess how impactful location is for customers by comparing Starbucks located in the US and the UAE.

Topic 62: Pricing war between competitors: Analysing the case of Coca-Cola and Pepsi

Research Aim: Companies usually price their product to competitors to stay relevant and to help their products succeed. This research will analyze how competitors price their products by assessing the pricing strategies of Coca-Cola and Pepsi.

Topic 63:Impact of point-of-purchase promotion on sales: A case study of ZARA

Research Aim: Promotions are an effective way of selling products. This research will study the point of purchase promotion and its impact by focusing on ZARA.

Topic 64: Product packaging and its impact on buying decision – An exploratory analysis

Research Aim: The packaging of a product has a huge impact on the buying and purchasing decisions of customers. This research will conduct an exploratory analysis to understand this impact.

Topic 65:International pricing strategies and their Impact on the brand image: A case study of iTunes

Research Aim: Pricing strategies may or may not differ in different locations. This research will analyze whether iTunes has gained or not by its pricing strategies in different locations.

Topic 66: Impact of price adjustment strategies in online and offline setting

Research Aim: Prices vary in different settings. This research will study the price strategy adjustment in online and offline marketing.

Topic 67:Should Online Reviews and Word of Mouth be a New Component in the Marketing Mix?

Research Aim: Word of mouth and online reviews have proved to be extremely effective marketing tools in recent times. These components concerning the marketing mix will be studied in this research.

Topic 68:Difference between Online and Offline Promotions – How do They Impact Brand Image

Research Aim: A variety of marketing promotion techniques exist. This research will talk about the different online and offline promotional tools and how they impact brand image.

Topic 69:Impact of Traditional Promotions vs Social Media Promotions – Analyzing Burberry’s Promotional Campaigns

Research Aim: Social media promotional campaigns gain a lot of traction. With a specific focus on Burberry’s promotional campaigns, this research will analyse traditional and social media campaigns.

Topic 70:Effect of Premium Pricing Strategies on Consumers. A case of Apple Products

Research Aim: Of different pricing strategies, premium pricing strategies are adopted for luxury products. The effect of this type of pricing strategy on luxury products (Apple products) will be analyzed in this study.

Topic 71:Impact of Cultural Values in Promotional Activities

Research Aim: Culture has a huge impact on the marketing efforts of a company. This research will talk about the various cultural values and how they impact the promotional activities of businesses.

Topic 72:Placing Products in a Central Location and Ease of Access: Assessing its Impact on Customers

Research Aim: Location affects the sales of products and services. This research will assess the impact of customers when products are placed in a central location and when they are offered ease of access.

Topic 73:Influence of celebrity endorsement on sale: A comparative analysis of Nike and Rebook

Research Aim: Celebrity endorsement is a highly effective way to increase sales. A comparative analysis between celebrity endorsement done by Nike and Reebok will be evaluated in this research.

Topic 74:Impact of promotions upon customer’s perception

Research Aim: Customers may or may not change their perception after marketing promotion efforts. This research will discuss whether promotions can change perceptions or not.

Topic 75: Analysing the impact of cartoon characters on children

Research Aim: Products marketed towards children are tricky to market. This research will study whether including a cartoon character to attract children helps businesses or not.

Marketing and Consumer Psychology Dissertation Topics

Marketing is fundamentally based on consumer behaviour. Studying consumer behaviour helps businesses understand the customer in a better manner. Not only this, but it also helps them improve their marketing strategies by understanding the problems of a consumer with a specific focus on their perception of products. It is very important to understand the psychology of consumers and the various influences that the environment may have on their psychology. Studying these behaviours and patterns helps companies know how they should target their customers and what aspects they should focus on.

Consumer psychology comes in very handy for online marketing. When marketing digitally, companies have little or no information regarding their consumers. Thus, understanding their way of thinking, behaviour, buying patterns, trends, etc., helps businesses understand what the customer expects.

The study of consumer behaviour is very interesting and therefore provides an ideal topic for dissertations.

Topic 76:An investigation of consumer psychology and perceptions and their impact on marketing fashion products

Research Aim: Consumer psychology and their perceptions will be evaluated in this research. These two factors concerning the marketing of fashion products will be assessed.

Topic 77:How does consumer knowledge affect the purchase of products and their buying decision

Research Aim: Consumer knowledge influences their buying or purchasing decision. This research will talk about how this knowledge and its impacts the marketing decisions of a company.

Topic 78:The impact of negative publicity on consumer behavior

Research Aim: Consumers cannot be tricked. They are aware of when companies utilize techniques or tools to create a negative image of other companies. This research will talk about such techniques and their impact on consumers.

Topic 79:Consumer attitude towards in-store shopping and online shopping in Wall-Mart

Research Aim: This research will investigate the attitude of customers shopping in-store (physical stores) versus customers shopping online (digital stores). Walmart’s customers will be the focus.

Topic 80:Understanding consumer psychology to devise effective marketing strategies

Research Aim: Customer psychology will first be discussed in this research. Then, the research will talk about how effective marketing strategies will be devised.

Topic 81:Assessing the consumer behaviour and perceptions in relation to luxury

Research Aim: This research will discuss consumer behaviour when customers opt for luxury products, i.e. what drives them to purchase high-priced products.

Topic 82:Measuring consumer response to new products launched by Nestle

Research Aim: Companies should always measure consumer response to assess their marketing activities. This research will discuss different ways through which customer response to new products launched by nestle is assessed.

Topic 83:Consumer perceptions related to discounts and promotions when purchasing products

Research Aim: Every customer likes to purchase products at discounted prices. This research will discuss consumer perceptions concerning discounts, sales, and promotions when purchasing products.

Topic 84:Creating profitable relationships with consumers

Research Aim: This research will analyse the various ways through which companies can create profitable relationships with customers.

Topic 85:Switching costs – Do consumers think about it when abandoning a brand?

Research Aim: There are different reasons for switching a brand or abandoning it completely. These reasons will be the main focus of this research, and customer perceptions will also be studied.

Marketing and Social Networks Dissertation Topics

Social networks (Facebook, Linked In, and Twitter) have played a decisive role in using the internet and purchasing online. Companies need to understand these social networks and tools from a marketing perspective in today’s business world. Businesses that do not make use of the different social media platforms are entirely out of the race.

This is the power of social networks in today’s corporate world. Not only is it competitive, but these networks also help companies interact with their customers and gain feedback in real-time.

This means that they can launch a product, post and market it on social networks, and assess customer reaction. Companies have done well by utilizing these platforms, and all businesses must have a social media presence and interact with customers.

However, it should be noted that organisations face various challenges using social media as a tool to market their products and services. Social media can make or break things for businesses.

If done right and if the accounts are handled appropriately, nothing can stop the business from achieving success. However, one small mistake can cause a lot of trouble for the company. The backlash on social media is extreme, and the company will have to spend months to bring back its reputation.

Thus, considering the challenging nature of these platforms, it is interesting to conduct researches and studies around various related topics. The following is a list of topics that can be undertaken as a part of social networks and marketing dissertation:

Topic 86:The role of Facebook as a marketing tool

Research Aim: The research will explore the various events in Indian film history that have allowed it to become a global sensation. The paper will analyse its market-driven triumph against Hollywood imports starting from the 1930s. The paper will also examine the nationalist social views of films produced in Bollywood during the 1950s.

Topic 87:Social media marketing vs. traditional marketing evaluating the success rate

Research Aim: Social media marketing is the new trend. But does it really reap results? This will be the main focus of this research, and the results of online marketing and traditional marketing methods will be compared.

Topic 88:Building relationships with customers through social media.

Research Aim: Social media not only helps in networking and connecting people but also enables companies to get in touch with their customers. This research will talk about companies use it as a medium to build relationships with their customers.

Topic 89:How social media influences consumers’ buying preferences

Research Aim: Social media trends are followed by everyone. This research will discuss how these trends are shaped and how it influences the buying and purchasing decision of customers.

Topic 90:How businesses gather Information from social media: A deep insight into customer privacy concerns

Research Aim: A lot is argued about the loss of privacy and data for online customers. This research will investigate the various ways data is collected online and whether or not there are data security breaches.

Topic 91:Consumer perception of social media marketing and its impact on brand image

Research Aim: Consumer perception regarding social media marketing will be assessed in this research. Moreover, the impact of this perception on the brand image will be evaluated.

Topic 92:Is Banner advertisement a good idea in social media marketing? A global comparative analysis

Research Aim: Online Banner advertisements are utilised by almost all companies in the market. This research will discuss various banner advertisement campaigns and their effectiveness.

Topic 93:The role of online stores in the traditional marketing mix

Research Aim: The traditional marketing mix does not take into consideration online marketing. This research will talk about the importance of online and social media marketing in the corporate world today and the role of online stores in the marketing mix.

Topic 94:Why is there more focus on the use of Facebook for marketing rather than other platforms for social media marketing?

Research Aim: Facebook advertising is considered the most powerful amongst all other social media marketing tools. There are various reasons due to which Facebook is considered a powerful tool. All these will be discussed, analyzed, and evaluated in this research.

Also Read:   How to Use Social Networks for your Dissertation

Marketing Ethics Dissertation Topics

Marketing Ethics Dissertation Topics Marketing ethics is a thought-provoking issue in the field of marketing. Where marketers are making efforts to run effective and profitable marketing campaigns for their companies, they should also consider marketing ethics.

The continuous evolution of customers’ attitudes customers over media has a significant impact on businesses worldwide. People nowadays are more concerned about the company’s ethical behaviour and the use of ethics employed by their marketing experts.

They are more concerned about their corporate social responsibility programs and the values of society. Companies must run various social corporate responsibility campaigns, through which they not only create a good reputation but also give back to the community.

These campaigns indeed help businesses to build a reputation and become a preferred brand for consumers. Acts such as animal cruelty and the use of prohibited products hit hard, and a company can lose its long-built strong reputation in a matter of minutes.

There are various ethical concerns that organisations must abide by to have a successful operating and marketing campaign. A dissertation on marketing ethics can be based on any of the following topics:

Topic 95:Ethics and consumer perception: What do consumers really expect from companies?

Research Aim: Corporate and marketing ethics are extremely important for companies. This research will talk about what customers expect from the company regarding ethics and how it shapes their perceptions.

Topic 96:Impact of unethical behaviour of an organisation on sales: Studying unsuccessful marketing campaigns

Research Aim: Unethical organizational behaviour leads to unsuccessful marketing campaigns. The main focus of this research will be the unethical behaviours undertaken by companies and how it adversely affects their sales.

Topic 97:How firms mislead people to enhance product sales and the effect this has on their business

Research Aim: A number of companies mislead their consumers only to enhance their sales. This research will discuss the different ways through which companies mislead people and the impact it has on their business.

Topic 98:How country laws shape business and marketing

Research Aim: When operating in a country, companies have to abide by the laws, rules, and regulations set out by the government. This research will talk about how these laws and regulations shape the business environment.

Topic 99:Ethical considerations and brand loyalty

Research Aim: This research will discuss whether or not ethical business operations have an impact on brand loyalty or do consumers continue to buy from companies who operate unethically.

Topic 100:Spam laws and online marketing – A critical analysis

Research Aim: Online marketing has its own rules. Companies have to abide by spam laws, or else they will be blacklisted. These rules and how companies should abide by them will be analyzed in this study.

Topic 101:Exploring the relationship between marketing ethics and corporate social responsibility

Research Aim: Companies have a responsibility to fulfill. They have to give back to the community, thus operate with corporate social responsibility. This research will discuss whether or not marketing ethics are directly related to corporate social responsibility.

Topic 102: Building company reputation and brand equity through various corporate social responsibility initiatives

Research Aim: The main focus of this research will be to explore whether or not corporate social responsibility initiatives build company reputation or brand equity.

Topic 103: Do cause-related marketing campaigns impact consumer purchase decisions?

Research Aim: This research will explore whether cause-related marketing has an impact on consumer purchase decisions or not.

Topic 104: Public relations and consumer boycotts: Learning lessons from Shell and Nestle

Research Aim: Consumers can boycott a company based on a variety of reasons. This research will discuss the different reasons why consumers boycott and how it impacts public relations, with a special focus on Shell and Nestle.

Important Notes:

As a student of marketing looking to get good grades, it is essential to develop new ideas and experiment on existing marketing theories – i.e., to add value and interest in the topic of your research.

The field of marketing is vast and interrelated to so many other academic disciplines like civil engineering ,  construction ,  law , engineering management , healthcare , mental health , artificial intelligence , tourism , physiotherapy , sociology , management , and nursing . That is why it is imperative to create a project management dissertation topic that is articular, sound, and actually solves a practical problem that may be rampant in the field.

We can’t stress how important it is to develop a logical research topic; it is the basis of your entire research. There are several significant downfalls to getting your topic wrong; your supervisor may not be interested in working on it, the topic has no academic creditability, the research may not make logical sense, there is a possibility that the study is not viable.

This impacts your time and efforts in  writing your dissertation  as you may end up in the cycle of rejection at the very initial stage of the dissertation. That is why we recommend reviewing existing research to develop a topic, taking advice from your supervisor, and even asking for help in this particular stage of your dissertation.

While developing a research topic, keeping our advice in mind will allow you to pick one of the best marketing dissertation topics that fulfill your requirement of writing a research paper and add to the body of knowledge.

Therefore, it is recommended that when finalizing your dissertation topic, you read recently published literature to identify gaps in the research that you may help fill.

Remember- dissertation topics need to be unique, solve an identified problem, be logical, and can also be practically implemented. Take a look at some of our sample marketing dissertation topics to get an idea for your own dissertation.

How to Structure your Marketing Dissertation

A well-structured   dissertation can help students   to achieve a high overall academic grade.

  • A Title Page
  • Acknowledgments
  • Declaration
  • Abstract: A summary of the research completed
  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction : This chapter includes the project rationale, research background, key research aims and objectives, and the research problems to be addressed. An outline of the structure of a dissertation  can also be added to this chapter.
  • Literature Review :  This chapter presents relevant theories and frameworks by analysing published and unpublished literature available on the chosen research topic, in light of  research questions  to be addressed. The purpose is to highlight and discuss the relative weaknesses and strengths of the selected research area whilst identifying any research gaps. Break down of the topic, and key terms can have a positive impact on your dissertation and your tutor.
  • Methodology:  The  data collection  and  analysis  methods and techniques employed by the researcher are presented in the Methodology chapter which usually includes  research design, research philosophy, research limitations, code of conduct, ethical consideration, data collection methods, and  data analysis strategy .
  • Findings and Analysis:  Findings of the research are analysed in detail under the Findings and Analysis chapter. All key findings/results are outlined in this chapter without interpreting the data or drawing any conclusions. It can be useful to include  graphs ,  charts, and  tables in this chapter to identify meaningful trends and relationships.
  • Discussion  and  Conclusion: The researcher presents his interpretation of results in this chapter, and states whether the research hypothesis has been verified or not. An essential aspect of this section of the paper is to draw a linkage between the results and evidence from the literature. Recommendations with regards to implications of the findings and directions for the future may also be provided. Finally, a summary of the overall research, along with final judgments, opinions, and comments, must be included in the form of suggestions for improvement.
  • References:  This should be completed in accordance with your University’s requirements
  • Bibliography
  • Appendices:  Any additional information, diagrams, graphs that were used to  complete the  dissertation  but not part of the dissertation should be included in the Appendices chapter. Essentially, the purpose is to expand the information/data.

About ResearchProspect Ltd

ResearchProspect is a  UK-based academic writing service that provides help with  Dissertation Proposal Writing ,  Ph.D. Proposal Writing ,  Dissertation Writing ,  Dissertation Editing and Improvement .

For further assistance with your dissertation, take a look at our full dissertation writing service .

Our team of writers is highly qualified. Our writers are experts in their respective fields. They have been working in the industry for a long time. Thus, they are aware of the issues and the trends of the industry they are working in.

Free Dissertation Topic

Phone Number

Academic Level Select Academic Level Undergraduate Graduate PHD

Academic Subject

Area of Research

Frequently Asked Questions

How to find dissertation topics about marketing.

For marketing dissertation topics:

  • Study recent industry trends.
  • Explore consumer behavior shifts.
  • Investigate digital marketing innovations.
  • Analyze branding or market strategies.
  • Consider social and ethical aspects.
  • Select a topic resonating with your passion and research goals.

You May Also Like

If you are writing a research paper on criminal psychology, you can discuss any relevant topic. Do psychopaths have an innate or developed nature? Is there a way to help criminals get better?

It is a famous saying by henry ford that the only foundation of a business is service. It is very true and is followed by businesses of all scales.

USEFUL LINKS

LEARNING RESOURCES

DMCA.com Protection Status

COMPANY DETAILS

Research-Prospect-Writing-Service

  • How It Works
  • How It Works
  • PhD thesis writing
  • Master thesis writing
  • Bachelor thesis writing
  • Dissertation writing service
  • Dissertation abstract writing
  • Thesis proposal writing
  • Thesis editing service
  • Thesis proofreading service
  • Thesis formatting service
  • Coursework writing service
  • Research paper writing service
  • Architecture thesis writing
  • Computer science thesis writing
  • Engineering thesis writing
  • History thesis writing
  • MBA thesis writing
  • Nursing dissertation writing
  • Psychology dissertation writing
  • Sociology thesis writing
  • Statistics dissertation writing
  • Buy dissertation online
  • Write my dissertation
  • Cheap thesis
  • Cheap dissertation
  • Custom dissertation
  • Dissertation help
  • Pay for thesis
  • Pay for dissertation
  • Senior thesis
  • Write my thesis

233 Marketing Research Topics To Come Up With An Impressive Paper

Marketing Research Topics

Marketing is everywhere nowadays – from TV adverts to the pop-up ads that appear on our web browsers. No matter how much you may try to ignore it, marketing knocks still knocks at your door.

Despite all these, however, many students still struggle to develop top-notch marketing research paper topics. You might say, how is that even possible? Well, my friend, let me bring it to your attention that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of post-graduate students struggling to find such writing ideas.

But this where we draw the battle lines.

Marketing Topics For Research Paper: What You Need To Know

To be certain of a top grade in any field of study, you have to go the extra mile. Marketing is one of those flooded fields with stiff competition. Therefore, you have to come up with something fresh and original to convince your reader.

  • Create interest in the reader’s mind of a particular offering
  • Be precise and to the point
  • Not repeat what is already out there
  • Not offer the reader what is not there

Unlike any other topic, these are unique because they intend to sell a product or service to potential buyers. Thus, it would help if you handled it with a lot of care.

What To Avoid When Writing Marketing Paper Topics

Below are crucial points to consider for your marketing research topic:

  • Do not be too wordy
  • Avoid using words that are uncommon among the famous market
  • Beware of being sensational

When writing your research paper’s marketing topics, the end goal should be to sell the product and build a reputable brand for yourself.

Explore these writing ideas for your inspiration:

Marketing Research Topics For College Students

  • Marketing strategies for integrating new products into segmented markets
  • The impact of coronavirus on marketing communication strategies
  • How can companies best advertise their products overseas?
  • Pitfalls to avoid when crafting marketing messages for children and other minors in the society
  • Factors that determine client satisfaction in new markets
  • Discuss the effectiveness of using discounts and loyalty cards in the marketing of products
  • The impact of using black Friday offers in the wake of the Black lives matter movement
  • Is it practical to contact clients via email subscriptions and newsletters?
  • The role of conducting marketing research before attempting to bring a new product on board
  • Define market segmentation and the essential pointers that segment various markets
  • Compare and contrast marketing strategies in developing countries versus developed countries
  • How do multinational companies carry out marketing as compared to local enterprises?
  • The role of technology in marketing: A case study of simulations and virtual reality
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of consumer education and awareness in marketing
  • How does the marketing of food items vary from other products in the market?
  • Discuss the effectiveness of various marketing channels and strategies
  • Emerging opportunities and challenges in the field of marketing
  • Modern tactics and paradigms used in business and consumer marketing
  • Why it is essential to understand the culture of a market before venturing into it
  • The role of academic papers of marketing in the business world

Professional List of Marketing Research Topics

  • How CSRs help companies to make inroads into communities
  • The impact of brand manipulation on the company’s reputation
  • The role of social media in marketing: A case study of Twitter marketing
  • How the fashion industry markets its product to potential clients
  • The impact of gender and stereotypes in creating marketing and promotional messages
  • How global marketing varies from local and national marketing strategies
  • The role of political campaigns in impacting marketing and sale of products
  • Techniques used by the gaming industry to attract teenagers and youths
  • Analyzing successful business enterprises: A case study of Apple industry
  • Adverse impacts of advertising alcoholic related products to children
  • What makes a brand stay in the market for years without losing its meaning?
  • Has technology replaced traditional marketing tools and strategies?
  • The role of smartphone advertising in reaching the digital natives and tech-savvies
  • The impact of radio and TV marketing on getting middle and working-class
  • Compare and contrast new market entry strategies versus traditional ones
  • How companies take advantage of impulsive or exorbitant buyers
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of in-store branding
  • Discuss the advertising strategies used by hotels and restaurants in attracting potential clients
  • The impact of social class on preparing marketing and promotional messages
  • How centralized marketing affects global brands and products

Sport Marketing Research Topics

  • The role of sports hubs in the management of sports organizations
  • Facilities and services that help save costs on sports
  • Sourcing of funding for sporting activities in developing countries
  • The part of the World Cup and Olympic games on marketing strategies and promotional messages
  • Marketing strategies that work best for football fans
  • The effect of sports celebrities on marketing and promotions
  • How effective is branding on sportswear as a marketing strategy?
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of Adidas advertising in the Olympic Games 2008 in China
  • The role of marketing and modern challenges in advertising decisions in the sports industry nowadays
  • Consumer buying behavior with brand loyalty and types of sports buying behavior.
  • Factors that cause people to buy certain sports products: A case of Nike
  • Explore the historical overview of the exciting development of Nike in providing athletes with equipment for their sports.
  • Analyze the interior structure of a sports company and how this affects its marketing strategies
  • Specific characteristics of companies that have excelled through sports branding and marketing
  • The impact of the orientation of sports heritage, performance, and style in marketing
  • Critically analyze the impact of using Chelsea as a brand name in product advertising
  • The production and replacement of goods and services: A case of sportswear
  • How sports brands operate effectively and competitively in international markets
  • Creating the relevant skills for sports advertising and branding
  • The impact of practical knowledge about innovative techniques of production in sports marketing

Best-Rated Research Papers Topics in Marketing

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of online shops as compared to the physical ones
  • How multinational companies compete in the markets by creating an international marketing orientation
  • Discuss how certain companies gain a competitive advantage in comparison to other companies
  • Analyze the importance of concentrating on the needs of consumers when composing marketing messages
  • The essence of feedback from clients in a marketing strategy
  • How have giant companies remained and strengthened their leading position in the European sports industry?
  • Discuss the underlying aspects of modern advertising
  • The effectiveness of poster advertising on bus stations before the launch of a product
  • Slogans’ role in marketing: A case study of Adidas’ saying: ‘Impossible is nothing.’
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of commercials with sports personalities: A case of David Beckham
  • How companies adapt cultural incidents and attention to individualistic attractions in marketing messages
  • Ways of determining the budget for a marketing campaign
  • Assess the workability of creating an innovative and creative marketing message
  • Discuss how companies strike a balance between making profits and effective marketing strategies
  • Should modern marketing messages be informative or persuasive?
  • The impact of comparative marketing messages on the behavior of a product in the market
  • Why an evaluation of the company’s strength and weaknesses is essential in developing its marketing plan
  • The role of integrated marketing information of an organization on its marketing plans
  • How to discover management trends in market segments
  • Why companies need to build units for marketing information that are concerned with trends and developments within the marketplace

Research Topics in Real Estate Marketing

  • Why finance is a critical consideration in real estate marketing
  • Reasons for the fluctuating financial system in real estate
  • The impact of coronavirus and recession on the real estate industry
  • Is the curriculum on real estate marketing effective in producing talented minds?
  • The effects of property finance marketing on the modern society
  • The role of business investors in helping people own homes
  • Owning a Home and the Effect of Credit Unions
  • Challenges and benefits of mortgages and loans on the real estate industry
  • Explain how real estate companies can cope with business financial loans
  • Give a detailed analysis of potential customers in real estate marketing messages
  • Discuss the various property financing versions in the USA
  • Evaluate the importance of studying Geography and finance in real estate marketing
  • Discuss the slow rate of growth of real estate industries in developing countries
  • Why have real estate marketing messages been greeted with a cold shoulder?
  • Discuss the unexploited possibilities and opportunities in rural areas
  • How to maintain equity and still control debt funding in real estate industries
  • The role of investors together with institutional traders in managing the real-estate companies
  • Technologies advances in real estate that are transforming the industry
  • How the fiscal sector is affecting property market developments
  • Assess how real estate companies are coping with the changing market demands

Sample Marketing Research Project Ideas

  • Distinguish between brand loyalty as a behavior and as an attitude in marketing
  • The importance of rankings concerning the popularity of brands
  • Discuss marketing strategies that create a higher self-confidence in buying decisions
  • Analyze the higher level of risk in purchasing decisions
  • Why some customers are more store loyal than others
  • The role of global brands in creating a marketing ecosystem
  • Discuss the history of world commerce and how marketing strategies have evolved over time
  • How has the internationalization of finance and business affected marketing?
  • The importance of geographical extension among marketers
  • Why do customers pay keen attention to the price of products
  • The role of mass production in determining the marketing strategies
  • How to balance between demand and supply when creating marketing messages
  • How to create a suitable image for a brand, product, or service
  • The impact of global brands communicating in worldwide sports events
  • A primary investigation of what motivates people to buy certain products over others
  • How virtual communities help marketers communicate their messages
  • An exploration of using cinematic media to promote food products
  • The impact of personal styles and preferences on marketing messages
  • What effect do personal statements from celebrities have on marketing strategies?
  • An analysis of sponsorship based on marketing

High-Quality Marketing Thesis Topics

  • The implications of social media marketing on cost and speed of delivery
  • An investigation of the relationship between marketing messages and customer emotions
  • Examine the relationship sources of income and buying behaviors
  • Research into the causes of the decline of newspaper advertising
  • Are marketing messages overrated?
  • The impact of brand ambassadors on user-generated branding programs
  • Explore the effects of integrating relationship marketing strategies
  • Effects of increased commercialization
  • How often should a promotional notice be posted in a day?
  • Do global warming and its consequences have anything to do with marketing?
  • How to create an emotional appeal in marketing messages
  • Analysis of strategic success factors in the internalization of marketing messages
  • The impact of repetitive advertising upon consumers
  • International business management strategies that work well for start-ups
  • The effect of marketing messages on the physically disabled
  • Evaluate how marketing messages have been used to spread sexual messages
  • Discuss the legal and ethical implications of marketing
  • How to craft compelling marketing messages that do not discriminate against race
  • What causes the relevant authorities to ban particular marketing messages?
  • The impact of creating controversial sports messages

Motivating Marketing Research Questions

  • Opportunities and threats to marketing products and services overseas
  • How long have you been a customer, and what has kept you going back?
  • How can companies attract their target audience more often?
  • Factors that necessitate one company to stand out from another
  • How to improve your product and service delivery
  • Practical ways of better serving your clients
  • Discuss how big is your potential market
  • Will this market segment grow or shrink in the future?
  • What other products and services out there are similar to the ones we are offering?
  • Who are our top competitors, and what are they doing differently from us?
  • What portion of the market share do our competitors own?
  • What part is available for you to own or take?
  • What is the educational level of the people you are writing the promotional message to?
  • What is the household income of your potential market?
  • What is the impact of the household size on the kind of marketing strategy to compose?
  • What are the hobbies and interests of your potential clientele?
  • What are the most significant challenges you are likely to encounter when marketing?
  • What is your preference when it comes to making purchases?
  • What determines the shop or boutique where you buy your products?
  • How will the product fit the needs of the potential clients?

Must-Have Marketing Research Topics For College Students

  • Latest marketing strategies in the light of the changing mobile customer experience
  • How country relations impact the marketing communication messages used at the cross-border level
  • The new way to boost sales through conversational strategies
  • The impact of marketing conferences and conventions on the practice
  • Why most companies slash marketing budgets at the expense of profits
  • The role of marketing automation in reaching out to more clients
  • The importance of social networking in developing contacts for marketing
  • Discuss the effectiveness of content marketing for the entertainment industry
  • The essence of tag lines in creating memorable marketing messages
  • Why should a company have customer evangelists?
  • How to incorporate value prepositions in marketing messages
  • The impact of marketing messages on millennial and Generation X
  • How companies are using blogs and YouTube to market their products
  • Discuss the effectiveness of online marketing among the youth
  • Should nonprofit organizations prepare marketing messages?
  • The importance of web analytics in determining the performance of a marketing message
  • Do companies follow procedure when it comes to permission email marketing?
  • Explore the various challenges of email campaigns
  • Discuss the effectiveness of word-of-mouth marketing strategy
  • Why the voice of the consumer is necessary for a marketing campaign

Hot Topics in Marketing

  • Analyze the developments made in B2B marketing
  • Discuss the qualities of a top-notch advertisement copy
  • What is the importance of benchmarking in business marketing?
  • The role of brand management in keeping it afloat
  • Discuss the effectiveness of corporate blogging
  • Evaluate marketing strategies that consider customer engagement
  • How to retain customer through marketing campaigns
  • How to market products amid economic crisis
  • The impact of 5G on high-tech marketing
  • How does hiring outside resources affect marketing?
  • The essence of keywords in online marketing
  • The rise of personal branding on Instagram and YouTube
  • How to collaborate marketing operations in different localities
  • Analyzing the consumer buying behavior of apple laptops
  • The impact of family orientation on the consumer behavior
  • Features that clients look for when purchasing online products
  • Why companies should understand customer perceptions of their products
  • Discuss the relationship between corporate social responsibility and sales
  • Evaluate the acceptance of direct marketing from people
  • The impact of click baits on marketing strategies: Are they ethical?

Marketing Class Project Ideas

  • The impact of sentiments from brand ambassadors on the performance of products
  • Consider the behavior of consumer purchases online and offline
  • What makes a person refer his/her to a particular product?
  • Why products go viral
  • The emotional value of marketing messages
  • Significance of a cashless society
  • Augmented reality and marketing
  • Understanding car buyers
  • How humor affects advertising
  • Triggers to impulsive buying behavior
  • Customer satisfaction among young adults
  • Male and female marketing techniques
  • Impact of customer perceptions
  • Political marketing in the USA
  • Brand management
  • Market targeting
  • Market forecasting
  • Purchasing management
  • Product positioning
  • Nonprofit marketing

Digital Marketing Research Topics

  • Social media marketing
  • Telemarketing
  • Smartphones and relationship marketing
  • Pitfalls of e-marketing
  • Marketing timing across social media platforms
  • Digital market segments
  • Customer privacy
  • Confidentiality
  • Black Fridays
  • Snapchat marketing
  • Virtual reality technology

We hope that the over 200 marketing topics were able to meet your needs. If not, we offer affordable thesis help online for college students.

Try it today and get to enjoy cheap but quality thesis help!

125 Project Management Research Topics

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment * Error message

Name * Error message

Email * Error message

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

As Putin continues killing civilians, bombing kindergartens, and threatening WWIII, Ukraine fights for the world's peaceful future.

Ukraine Live Updates

  • 18+ Risks and Disadvantages of Technology

How to Build Your Business Identity on a Tight Budget

  • Best Green Tea Brands in the world in 2020: What makes them the best?
  • Global Milk brands in 2020 – What makes them successful?
  • What is a Triple Net Lease? Its Advantages and Disadvantages
  • Adaptation Level Phenomenon – understanding its importance
  • Risk Matrix – Factors of a risk matrix and how to implement it
  • Prioritization Matrix – Different types and how to use a prioritization matrix

Advergize

71+ Research Paper Topics & Ideas for Marketing Students  

research thesis related to marketing

As a marketing student, you probably have access to a plethora of resources such as your college library and of course, the internet, to come up with great research paper topics.

However, the thought of writing your research paper can be daunting, especially if you’re still brainstorming and don’t know what to write about.

Just like any other piece of writing, start by keeping your audience in mind. Then, make a list of research paper topics that are more relevant to your interests, or a new under-developed field (for example; augmented reality, or people sentiments towards Artificial Intelligence), or a unique research topic that intrigues your audience.

But if you’re still struggling to pin down one out of the many research paper topics for your program, we’ll suggest a number of them for you to either choose from; or for you to take inspiration from and come up with your own.

Table of Contents

How to Choose the Best Research Paper Topics

Before we dive into the details, you’ll have to familiarize yourself with the basics. For starters, pick up a pen and paper and brainstorm different topics that you’d like to write about.

While personal interest is definitely important, we also suggest you opt for a topic that will intrigue your readers.  Here are a couple of factors you ought to keep in mind while selecting a topic:

Keeping your personal interest in mind

You probably won’t be able to write a stellar research paper if you’re not interested in the topic. Sit down with your peers and advisors to discuss possible ideas. It will be easier for you to discuss different themes once you’ve written down all your ideas in one place. If you’ve decided on a specific keyword for instance “consumer behaviour”, you can look for similar research papers on the internet.

A research paper isn’t a descriptive essay which you can drag aimlessly. Your research paper needs to be based on factual data and that’s only possible if you’ve conducted thorough research. While jotting down points for your first draft, ensure your statements are supported with references or examples citing credible academicals and research work.

Don’t leave it till the last day

A lot of students tend to undermine the writing process and leave for the last few days. Bear in mind that you can’t possibly write your entire research paper overnight. In order to succeed, you’ll have to devote sufficient amount of time to research.

Also, be prepared to schedule meetings with your advisor on a regular basis as you’re bound to require help along the way. At this point, make sure you only rely on credible sources that will support your dissertation.

Examples & List of Research Paper Topics

If you’re still unable to decide a topic of your interest, here is a list of 70 unique marketing research topics that you can use as marketing project topics for your MBA, or any other marketing course:

  • How do organizations use CSR ( corporate social responsibility ) to reinforce brand equity?
  • What manipulation tactics do brands use to get more customers?
  • How can brand image be communicated via social media marketing?
  • How can social media impact the buying choices of shoppers?
  • Are consumers equipped to shield themselves from direct marketing strategies?
  • Determine and analyze consumer buying behavior for [product name]
  • How does advertising impact consumer behaviour?
  • How does family orientation impact marketing communications?
  • What characteristics do buyers look for when purchasing a product online?
  • How does global marketing incorporate standardization?
  • What attributes do consumers look for when comparing products online?
  • How do financial institutions differentiate their goods and services on the basis of social class?
  • Is direct marketing really the most effective form of marketing?
  • What internet marketing trends can be expected for the future?
  • How to marketing strategies differ across different cultures?
  • Can brand advertising impact political campaigns?
  • How do brands exploit impulsive buying?
  • How does loyalty cards encourage sales and boost customer loyalty?
  • Can well-marketed brands get away with selling substandard quality products?
  • How is globalization having on impact on consumer behaviour?
  • Impact of brand image on customer loyalty
  • Brand attributes that lead to an increase in customer loyalty
  • Successful marketing approaches that helped break through strong market monopoly
  • Impact of cause marketing on brand affinity with young mothers
  • Effect of consumer promotions and discount offerings on brand equity
  • The outcomes of advertising in a recession
  • Influence on Social Media advertising on consumer behaviour
  • Effect of TV advertising on top of mind awareness
  • Understanding customer perceptions around event sponsorships
  • Does corporate social responsibility translate into sales?
  • Canadians perspective on being targeted with mobile ads based on their browser history
  • Is direct marketing welcomed by people?
  • Are customers able to differentiate between various mortgage offering by competing banks?
  • Does social media influence buying behaviour
  • Do people like being click baited into sponsored posts?
  • Understanding the impact of celebrity endorsements on ROI for CPG brands
  • Women’s sentiments around comparison advertising
  • How effective is comparison advertising to build brand equity?
  • Do consumers prefer purchasing routine grocery products online?
  • Is earned media perceived to be as important as it appears to be?
  • What makes people want to share content to their friends?
  • Understanding why content goes viral
  • Marketing challenges around the evolving family structures
  • Are we losing the emotional value and significance of money being in a cashless society?
  • Is centralized global marketing a good idea for brand health in local markets?
  • How is augmented reality going to enhance marketing experiences?
  • How will artificial intelligence support in making better marketing decisions?
  • Is immersion marketing through virtual reality technology going to be accepted?
  • What does the luxury auto buyer look for in a car?
  • How to instill a desire to purchase for customers in the luxury category
  • Harmful effects of advertising to kids
  • Impact of in-store branding on brand salience
  • Effect marketing strategies for restaurant businesses
  • Habit formation and ways to integrate new products in consumer lifestyles
  • Is display advertising going to die?
  • Can Snapchat help small business grow?
  • How do customers perceive the brand who advertise on Instagram?
  • The impact of humour in advertising
  • Do customers pay attention to nutrition labels?
  • What triggers impulse buying behaviour
  • Essentials to sky rocket a new brand to heights of awareness
  • The factors that lead to customer satisfaction in young adults
  • Elements that help build an emotional connection with your audience
  • How do males and females differ in their buying behaviour of mobile phones
  • Does language targeting help in ethnic advertising?
  • Customer Perceptions: Are well known brands good in quality?
  • Is radio still an effective method of advertising?
  • Rural vs Urban marketing challenges to be mindful of
  • Impact of internal branding on employee retention and turnover
  • An in-depth analysis of political marketing in Canada

More Categories of Research Topics

Still in need of some inspiration? Here are a few research paper areas that you can explore:

  • Distribution
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Relationship Marketing
  • Brand Management
  • Nonprofit Marketing
  • Market Segmentation & Targeting
  • Internet Marketing
  • Marketing Planning & Forecasting
  • Product Design & Positioning
  • Direct Marketing
  • Advertising
  • Purchasing & Materials Management

Hopefully, these marketing thesis topics will help you come up with a few topics of your own. If you’re still confused about which area, you’d like to work with, we suggest you consult your advisor for some additional help. Good luck!

' src=

135+ Rumi Quotes on Love, Beauty & Happiness

Group-Polarization

Explanation of Group Polarization with Real Life Examples

Related posts.

non-existent-brand-name

Dell Marketing Strategy – Details of the multi-million-dollar monopoly

Difference between Marketing and Advertising

Difference between Marketing and Advertising: What’s confusing?

Write a comment cancel reply.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

  • ADVERTISING
  • SOCIAL MEDIA
  • ENTREPRENEURSHIP
  • WEB DEVELOPMENT
  • MAKE MONEY WITHOUT PAYING ANYTHING
  • HOW TO MAKE QUICK MONEY
  • WAYS TO MAKE MONEY BLOGGING
  • BIGGEST SLOGANS GUIDE
  • DIFFERENT TYPES OF MARKETING
  • MARKETING MIX EXPLANATION
  • TYPES OF DISTRIBUTION STRATEGIES
  • AFFILIATE MARKETING FOR BEGINNERS
  • LEARN TO MAKE A BLOG
  • FREE PRINTABLE CALENDARS 2019
  • DMCA Notice
  • Privacy Policy

Type above and press Enter to search. Press Esc to cancel.

Marketing Dissertation Topics

Marketing is a broad and exciting field of study that intertwines with related subjects such as Psychology, Sociology, Business, and even Anthropology.

The field of marketing is always evolving, so there are plenty of ‘gaps’ in the literature to be filed by budding marketing students – whether you’re an undergrad or postgrad!

To help in the preparation of your marketing dissertation, this article suggests marketing dissertation topics that you could base your research on. These subject areas include relationship marketing, branding, direct marketing, international marketing (including influencer marketing), social listening, consumer psychology, online marketing, mobile marketing, marketing mix, social networks and marketing ethics.

Relationship Marketing Dissertation Topics

Branding dissertation topics, direct marketing dissertation topics, cultures and marketing dissertation topics, consumer psychology and marketing dissertation topics, online marketing dissertation topics, mobile marketing dissertation topics, the 4ps (price, product, promotion, place) of marketing mix.

  • Social Networks and Marketing Dissertation Topics

Ethics in Marketing Dissertation Topics

Relationship marketing refers to the use of relationships rather than purely transactional means, while focusing on long term customer engagement. This lets companies acquire customers, while also maintaining customer loyalty that results in repeat custom for the firm. It is an important area for modern businesses, and a topical area on which to base your marketing dissertation with highly diverse topics:

  • Digital relationship marketing in the age of COVID-19: Analysing the importance of personalisation and customisation.
  • Generating customer loyalty through high-value content creation – a case study of UK fitness brands.
  • What are the challenges for Tesco’s loyalty card scheme in today’s competitive business environment?
  • Are switching costs effective barriers to customer retention in the airline industry?
  • How can Amazon.com charge a premium price by using its diverse set of services and products?
  • What are the motivations and expectations behind loyalty schemes for businesses to attract customers in the long run?
  • To what extent does Café Nero’s app foster customer loyalty?
  • How and why can relationship marketing be used to attract new customers through social media?
  • How does product quality affect customer loyalty among high and low contact products?
  • Can luxury goods retailers prevent barriers to switching by locking in customers through a unique set of services and products?
  • How do retailers cope with polygamous behaviour among consumers?
  • How does customer loyalty at Waterstone’s change when customers shop at their online store rather than in the high street as compared to customers of Amazon.com?
  • In what ways does Waterstone’s improve its customer loyalty through its online store and smartphone apps?
  • How can companies adopt social media for successful development of relationship marketing with customers?
  • What are the challenges for small companies when adopting social media for increasing customer loyalty?
  • Using smartphone apps to attract and retain new customers: Advantages and challenges for MNCs.
  • Exploring the efficacy of customer service chatbots – helpful or frustrating?
  • Exploring the effectiveness of online consumer tribes: A case-study of Tarot reading and personal development industries.

Branding is the promise of a company to its customers. Branding is an umbrella term to refer to a wide body of literature examining how businesses can use their brands to achieve a competitive advantage, through building brand equity, launching brand extensions, managing global brands, and so forth. Marketing dissertations on branding could be based on the following topics:

  • An examination of the relationship between perceived risk and brand equity: A comparison of supermarket retailers in the UK.
  • How does innovation impact consumer brand resonance? A case study of hospitality brands who were forced to innovate as result of COVID-19.
  • Do consumers really understand a company’s brand values? The case of Starbucks vs McDonalds.
  • How does the relative importance of tangible and intangible brand values vary across product types?
  • Using digital methods to increase brand salience – a case study approach.
  • Do leading brands need to have the products which attract a large number of customer segments?
  • How is brand image affected by product availability for SME?
  • Can the brand image be transferred between sectors? The case of Virgin Cola in the UK.
  • How does unethical behaviour affect the brand image? The cases of Shell, Nike and Starbucks.
  • How do firms use corporate social responsibility to build brand equity? The case of Body Shop.
  • How can innovations sustain brands through the use of social media marketing?
  • Can brand equity be transferred to a supermarket’s own branded products in the low-price segments?
  • Using social media marketing to attract customers to brands of small companies.
  • How can companies use smartphone apps to improve brand equity? The case of Starbucks and Café Nero.
  • Targeting customers in ethnic markets: The case of Indian food customers in the UK supermarket sector.

The world of direct marketing is changing rapidly, as new technologies and social media allows companies to connect directly with the customer. This involves a wide range of tools and techniques that can be used to target consumers in a predominantly transactional manner. Direct marketers rely on information and a series of direct marketing media such as direct mail, magazines, newspapers, TV/radio, co-ops, telemarketing/teleservices and increasingly social media to disseminate their messages and acquire new customers. We have provided some suggested topics on direct marketing based on current trends, which you could use for your marketing dissertation:

  • How do Tesco and Body Shop use their loyalty schemes to sell directly to the customer?
  • How does the importance of factors that influence online selling vary according to product type in the services industry in the UK?
  • Do customers respond differently to short and long-term offers in a competitive online environment? The case of online book sales.
  • In what ways do free online chat rooms influence consumers’ response to direct sales promotions in social media environments?
  • Assessing the effectiveness of beauty brands’ direct marketing via YouTube.
  • How does the nationality (accent) of telemarketers influence customer response in an increasingly diverse international selling environment?
  • Do consumers know how to protect themselves from unscrupulous direct marketing tactics used by social media marketing companies?
  • How does message length affect the success of direct marketing messages? A comparison of online and offline mediums.
  • Can direct online and social media marketing be used to build customer relationships or is it simply a transactional medium to acquire new customers in the short run?
  • Can online marketing be as effective as a group-orientated tool as it is an individual-orientated one?
  • How do prospecting methods differ in an online and offline environment? The case of the airline industry in the UK.
  • Using SMS and email to connect with customers: Advantages and limitations of direct marketing.
  • Social media marketing as a tool to target luxury customers: Advantages and issues for small companies.
  • Using social media to reduce the cost of direct marketing: The case of small companies in the UK.

For some products and services, cultural considerations can play an important role in how marketers interact with consumers. With the increasing globalisation of business, firms have to pay greater attention to how national culture impacts upon consumer behaviour and customers’ reactions towards different types of marketing communication. Marketing across cultures is becoming more prominent in business, as more and more businesses are expanding throughout the world. This creates an ideal area to base your marketing dissertation on.

  • How does innovation and culture influence the market performance of SMEs in China?
  • Native advertising: Exploring its effectiveness in the UK, China, and the US.
  • What are the effects of social media on organisational culture in the UK’s fashion industry?
  • How is globalisation affecting the organisational culture of Toyota’s global operations?
  • How does language impact upon brand identity? The case of Coca-Cola in the People’s Republic of China.
  • How does culture affect the marketing of automotives? The Case of Toyota in China.
  • What effect does culture have on marketing communications? The case of Coca Cola in India.
  • How do marketers take into account regional differences in “national” culture? The case of banks in the Basque country and Catalonia, Spain.
  • Can automotive vendors afford to treat consumers as a homogenous mass? The case of the North-South divide in Sweden.
  • How does individualism-collectivism influence the sales of mobile phones? The case of the People’s Republic of China.
  • How do supermarket chains overcome language differences in Switzerland?
  • How can banks use pricing strategy to boost customer satisfaction and profitability?
  • How can national culture explain the prominence of Scottish whiskey sales in the global whiskey market?
  • How can countries use national culture to help them promote major exports? The case of the Champagne region, France.

Marketing is fundamentally underpinned by consumer behaviour, which can largely be explained by examining consumer psychology. This highlights how consumers behave in each stage of the buying process and why they react as they do. On this basis, marketers can design and implement communication strategies that target specific customer groups based on their psychological profiles. Some suggestions to base your marketing dissertation within the area of marketing and consumer psychology are as below:

  • What motivates consumers to purchase products from Amazon?
  • What are the uses and gratifications associated with consumer online reviewing?
  • How does marketing intelligence and planning affect sports marketing?
  • How can organisations make effective use of Big Data to gain an understanding of their customers’ psychology?
  • What are customers’ perceptions towards green marketing?
  • What are customers’ attitudes towards digital marketing activities of Burberry?
  • What are the antecedents of word-of-mouth communications? The case of blockbuster marketing.
  • What are the effects of negative word-of-mouth communications on organisational performance?
  • How does gender effect information processing among consumers of luxury goods?
  • What role does motivation play in buying behaviour? An examination of the mobile ringtone market in the UK.
  • How does gender effect selective distortion among luxury goods buyers?
  • What role does learning play among functional online advertisements?
  • Does the importance of beliefs and attitudes vary across low and high involvement products?
  • How does gender influence online purchase behaviour of luxury goods?
  • How is social media affecting the buying behaviour of luxury goods in the fashion industry?

When marketing moves online the traditional rules are either broken or extended. Such extensions include the need to take into account privacy, security, the greater ability to customise and personalise user experiences, the changing nature of consumer behaviour and the interaction of online and offline mediums. Online marketing has become essential for organisations in gaining competitive advantages and enhancing their business performance. Online marketing is a useful and current area of market research. Some suggestions to base your dissertation on online marketing are as below:

  • How can firms customise their products? The case of Apple.
  • What are the effects of a successful digital marketing campaign on Dior’s brand performance?
  • What are the benefits and challenges of using social media to market luxury goods?
  • How does using web analytics for digital marketing enhance brand performance?
  • What is the impact of digital marketing innovation on Apple’s performance?
  • What are the benefits and challenges faced by Burberry in using digital marketing?
  • How can firms personalise their products? The case of Nike.
  • An assessment of the value of assortment to customers: The case of Dell Computers.
  • How does a consumer’s perception of control affect their choice of brand? The case of buying computers online.
  • How does visual constituency affect site identity and product attitude?
  • How does gender affect online consumption behaviour?
  • How can firms successfully combine online and offline shopping features? The case of Amazon.com/Toys-R-Us.
  • What product attributes are most valued by consumers in search, comparison and purchase decision-making online?
  • How do consumers react to brand alliances online? The case of Amazon.com and Wal-Mart.
  • An investigation of the antecedents of consumer behaviour in online auctions? The case of eBay.

Mobile marketing has become the latest marketing communications medium which enables large brands such as Coca-Cola, Nintendo, MTV, New Labour, Lastminute.com, and others to attract new customers and retain existing ones in both traditional and non-traditional ways. With the lowering of mobile phone tariffs and the increased levels of Internet browsing using mobile phones, this medium has become increasingly important to marketers. Below are suggestions for dissertation topics in the area of mobile marketing:

  • How does permission-based marketing impact mobile marketers when developing and implementing international marketing campaigns?
  • How can brand image be conveyed in a mobile marketing environment?
  • Can a strong brand image be built through mobile marketing techniques?
  • What do customers want from mobile marketing messages?
  • How does location influence mobile marketing communications?
  • What role does timeliness play in mobile marketing communications?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of push and pull mobile marketing strategies?
  • How can mobile marketing be used as a viral marketing tool?
  • How can mobile payment services increase revenue for mobile marketers? The case of Vodafone.
  • How can customer relationship management (CRM) be applied in a mobile marketing environment to improve customer loyalty?
  • How can marketing managers drive consumer acceptance of mobile marketing?
  • What impact does brand personality have on purchase intentions in the context of mobile marketing?
  • What are the diffusion and success factors of mobile marketing?

The 4Ps concept represents the cornerstone of marketing is widely used by marketing managers when trying to influence consumer decision-making processes. Below are suggestions for dissertation topics in the area of the Marketing mix:

  • How do price adjustment strategies vary in online and offline environments? The case of music sales.
  • Can an overt international pricing strategy negatively affect the brand image? The case of iTunes.
  • How effective are public relations campaigns following brand failures? The cases of Nike, Shell, and Marks and Spencer.
  • The impact of firms varying the frequency of their advertisements in online and offline environments on customers’ purchase intentions? The case of Waterstone’s.
  • The impact of product information availability and persuasive advertising on consumer behaviour.
  • Differences between comparison and non-comparison advertising and the impact on customers’ purchase intentions? The case of the alcoholic drinks industry in the US.
  • Advantages and disadvantages of online advertising in international marketing.
  • Can point-of-purchase promotions be as effective in an online environment as they are offline?
  • How important is location to customer choice in the UK’s airline industry?
  • How has the Internet helped unsought goods build brand awareness? The case of comparison websites.
  • Is word-of-mouth (i.e. online customer reviews) the new element of the Marketing mix?
  • How important is the Marketing mix for non-profit organisations?
  • The effect of brand awareness on consumers’ purchase intentions. The case of low and high involvement product categories.

Social Media Marketing Dissertation Topics

Social media networks (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn) are not only changing the consumers’ attitudes and behaviours, but they are also presenting marketing practitioners with new challenges when trying to reach and acquire customers online. As social media networks become more popular, a marketing dissertation in this area will be timely and in line with current marketing research trends.

  • What uses and gratifications are provided by beauty brands’ social media content?
  • A content analysis of Food brands Instagram posts.
  • An examination of the positive, neutral and negative user comments on Facebook and their impact on future participation in discussions.
  • Why have functional applications on Facebook achieved so little success compared with their fun counterparts?
  • How do applications of Facebook turn users into sales? The relationship between total installs, daily active users, and application valuation.
  • A comparison of the effectiveness of banner advertising on different social media networks? The cases of Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.
  • What impact does newsfeed restriction have on consumers’ attitudes and behaviours towards using Facebook?
  • Is electronic word-of-mouth more persuasive than traditional word-of-mouth? An investigation into online customer reviews.
  • Does traditional customer loyalty apply to consumer behaviour in social media networks?
  • How do non-profit organisations execute marketing campaigns on social media networks such as Facebook?
  • Can firms measure the ROI of their social media marketing?
  • An investigation of the impact of brand post popularity on Facebook brand fan pages on social media marketing.
  • Usage, barriers and measurement of social media marketing: Implications for marketing managers.
  • The impact of social media marketing on brand loyalty.
  • How do firms use social media marketing to encourage customers’ purchase behaviours?
  • How do vegan brands use social listening to enhance their marketing strategy?
  • Instagram, influencer marking and trust – a critical investigation.
  • Partnering with YouTube content creators and influences – an effective marketing strategy for fitness brands?

The power of the media in changing consumer attitudes has a significant impact on how firms are expected to behave, as well as how they should integrate ethics into their marketing campaigns. As a consequence, marketing ethics is concerned with a range of issues from ethical business practices, to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programmes and cause-related marketing. Below are suggestions for dissertation topics in the area of marketing ethics and CSR:

  • The role of EasyJet’s low fare online pricing strategy on changing customer demand trends?
  • Exploring Patagonia’s marketing strategy – Green or Greenwashing?
  • The impact of FairTrade labels on consumers’ purchase behaviours?
  • Vegan vs cruelty-free: the politics of labelling and why it matters.
  • What impact do published codes of conduct have on customer buying behaviour? The cases of The Body Shop, Levi Strauss, and Marks and Spencer.
  • How do ethical purchase intentions and ethical awareness affect purchasing behaviour? A comparison between the sales of battery and free-range chickens.
  • What impact do cause-related marketing campaigns have on consumer buying behaviour? The case of Starbucks’ Raise a cup to a good cause campaign.
  • Why do some controversial marketing communications work whilst others fail? The case of PETA – People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.
  • How have spam laws improved marketing ethics online?
  • What factors distinguish a consumer’s choice of most and least socially responsible firms?
  • How do firms use public relations to recover from consumer boycotts? The case of Shell and Nestle.
  • The role of gender differences in the impact of CSR perceptions on corporate marketing outcomes.
  • The relationship between marketing ethics and corporate social responsibility: Serving stakeholders and the common good.
  • The role of trust in building company reputation and brand equity through CSR initiatives.
  • Firm performance and corporate social responsibility. An investigation into the role of marketing competence and market environment.

You may also like

Forensic Science Dissertation Topics

To read this content please select one of the options below:

Please note you do not have access to teaching notes, master’s thesis research in social marketing (1971-2015).

Journal of Social Marketing

ISSN : 2042-6763

Article publication date: 11 September 2017

Issue publication date: 2 January 2018

Limited attention has been given to the study of social marketing at the graduate level. Such a study not only reveals research interests and trends, but also provides insights into the level of academic evolution or maturity of the social marketing field. This paper aims to examine social marketing as the subject of master’s theses.

Design/methodology/approach

A search strategy found 266 social marketing-focused master’s theses completed from 1971 to 2015. These theses were analysed by host countries, institutions, disciplinary contexts and degree programmes for which they were submitted.

Only four theses were submitted from 1971-1980 and eight completed in 1981-1990. The number of theses increased to 35 in 1991-2000, 118 between 2001 and 2010 and 101 in the past five years (2011-2015). The USA was the leading producer of social marketing master’s theses, followed by Canada, Sweden, China, South Africa, the UK and Kenya. A majority of theses were housed in the disciplines of business, health and communication, and none of them was submitted for a Master of Social Marketing degree.

Originality/value

This is the first study that investigates master’s theses with an exclusive focus on social marketing. Implications for the evolution, learning and teaching of social marketing are provided.

  • Social marketing
  • Behaviour change
  • Dissertation
  • Master’s thesis
  • Degree programmes

Truong, V.D. and Dietrich, T. (2018), "Master’s thesis research in social marketing (1971-2015)", Journal of Social Marketing , Vol. 8 No. 1, pp. 58-98. https://doi.org/10.1108/JSOCM-11-2016-0072

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited

Related articles

We’re listening — tell us what you think, something didn’t work….

Report bugs here

All feedback is valuable

Please share your general feedback

Join us on our journey

Platform update page.

Visit emeraldpublishing.com/platformupdate to discover the latest news and updates

Questions & More Information

Answers to the most commonly asked questions here

  • Write my thesis
  • Thesis writers
  • Buy thesis papers
  • Bachelor thesis
  • Master's thesis
  • Thesis editing services
  • Thesis proofreading services
  • Buy a thesis online
  • Write my dissertation
  • Dissertation proposal help
  • Pay for dissertation
  • Custom dissertation
  • Dissertation help online
  • Buy dissertation online
  • Cheap dissertation
  • Dissertation editing services
  • Write my research paper
  • Buy research paper online
  • Pay for research paper
  • Research paper help
  • Order research paper
  • Custom research paper
  • Cheap research paper
  • Research papers for sale
  • Thesis subjects
  • How It Works

Top 120 Marketing Topics For Your Paper

marketing topics

Marketing is an essential sphere of the modern world and is, therefore, subject to intense research. The good news for researchers is that with this flood of data, writing a research paper should be easier. The bad news, however, is that with so much data, decision-making may not be so straightforward. Therefore, you have to choose the right marketing topics among this many options.

Best Marketing Research Paper Topics

Social media marketing topics, sports marketing topics, international marketing topics, content marketing topics, controversial marketing topics, digital marketing topics, marketing topics for presentation, marketing plan topics, trending marketing topics, interesting marketing dissertation topics, marketing topics ideas for essay.

Choosing marketing topics for your research may put you in a somewhat confusing situation. Although they are difficult to find, they needn’t be! Hence, this article focuses on hot marketing topics to write about. With our list of hot topics in marketing, you’ll not doubt as to where to focus and what topics to choose.

From marketing paper topics to marketing blog topics, we have got you covered! Here are 120 marketing topics just for you!

Are you into any kind of marketing research, or do you need some marketing essay topics for a college assignment? Then relax! We refuse to leave you out in the dark. With our marketing topics for research, you’ll be on top of your game. No bluffing – these marketing topics for research paper spans all forms of education. What do I mean? These marketing topics cover some marketing thesis topics, marketing dissertation topics, and marketing research topics for college students! Also, you can easily get qualified marketing thesis help from our experts. Are you ready for the list of marketing research topics? Let’s delve right in!

  • Evaluation of the best distribution strategies for new companies.
  • Mistakes to avoid when choosing marketing distribution channels.
  • The influence and opportunities of online shopping in China.
  • How social media impact the German Christmas market.
  • How consumer purchase decision influences e-marketing.
  • How Internet Marketing Affects Pharmaceutical Marketing And Ethics.
  • Gender And Its Effect On Buying Decision.
  • Factors That Influence Impulsive Buying And How Brands Exploit Them
  • How the Brand Extension Affects Brand Personality.
  • Black Friday Sales: How Companies Use And Benefit From These Sales.
  • Direct Marketing Strategies: Are Consumers Immune To Its Effect?

Social media marketing is no longer a new marketing concept. Many companies now use diverse social media platforms for marketing their brands and influencing people into getting hooked on their products or services. Here are some social media marketing topics that many companies will find interesting.

  • Social media and the survival of a business.
  • The best social media to use for baby products.
  • How to apply marketing mix on Facebook.
  • Facebook vs. Instagram, which is the best marketing platform?
  • Can Facebook help your business to grow?
  • How To Pick The Right Social Media Platforms For Your Business.
  • Effective Communication Of Brand Image Via Social Media Marketing.
  • Snapchat: Can This Platform Help Small Businesses Grow?
  • Instagram: How Customers Perceive Brands Who Advertise On This Platform.
  • What Makes People Want To Share Content With Their Friends?
  • How Does Social Media Advertising Impact Consumer Behavior?

Sports marketing is a trendy type of marketing. Here are some sports marketing research topics you should consider.

  • A Critical Analysis Of The Effect Of Traditional Advertising On Ticket Purchases.
  • A Study Of How Football Teams Use Social Media Platforms (Twitter) To Gain The Loyalty Of Their Fans.
  • Olympics: A Comparative Study Of The Trends In The Market Of The Host Country, And Growth Ratio.
  • Women In Sports: The Effect Of Female Athletes On The Brand Loyalty Of Sports Goods Consumers?
  • A Study On How Small And Medium Enterprises (SMEs) Can Support Sports Marketing.
  • The trending opportunities in sports marketing and how to make use of them.
  • The best way you can use to make use of wearable markets
  • Should seniors be permitted to participate in sports games?
  • How can intelligent sports chat boards help sports teams to strengthen their loyalty?
  • Should more women and children get into sports?

Marketing is one of the strings that hold the modern world together. Here are some international marketing topics that will dig deeper into global marketing and interest most readers.

  • Comparative Analysis Of International And Local Brands
  • How Companies Create Brand Awareness Via International Event Marketing.
  • How Manufacturers Can Market Their Products Internationally.
  • A Critical Acritical Of The Steps To Magnificent Multilingual Marketing Campaign.
  • A Study On How Businesses Can Be Successful At Localization.
  • How does globalization impact consumer behavior?
  • International brands vs. local brands, which one has an advantage?
  • How to create brand awareness through global event marketing.
  • Ways you can use to market your products on an international level.
  • How to utilize global event marketing when creating brand awareness.

Although most brands use content marketing, many are not good at it because it makes your business vulnerable. Marketers put their thoughts and ideas on the line hoping to see a good response. Here are some content marketing topics to help you study brands that got their content marketing right!

  • Why Coca-Cola’s “Share A Coke” Campaign Was A Huge Success.
  • A Study Of The Make-a-wish Batkid Campaign.
  • The Idea Behind Hootsuite’s Game Of Social Thrones Video.
  • How Velcro Made The Boring Fascinating.
  • How To Companies Like Okay Use Influence To Spread Powerful Messages.
  • Tips when creating content on Pinterest.
  • Guide on how to create content that your audience will want to share.
  • Five biggest graphic design mistakes that companies make when they are marketing their pieces.
  • Ways you can use to generate more leads and close sales using content marketing.
  • 10 steps to create a compelling marketing campaign.

Controversial marketing puts brands in the spotlight. These ads do pay off! Here are some controversial marketing topics for brands that made famous controversial marketing ads.

  • A Study On How Nike’s “Believe In Something” Ad Increased Their Stocks Prices.
  • Why Burger King’s “Whopper Neutrality” Got Millions Of Views.
  • Why Weight Watchers’ Partnership With DJ Khaled Increased Their Success.
  • Why Gillette’s “We Believe: The Best Men Can Be” Was A Controversial Ad.
  • How The Timing Of The Anheuser-Busch’s “Born The Hard Way” Ad Made It Controversial.
  • The truth about Google giving preferential treatment to big brands.
  • Is it true that social media affects SEO rankings?
  • TV ads and YouTube videos: which ones are more engaging?
  • Is the building of the email list an effective way to sell?
  • Will immersion technology through VR technology be accepted?

Digital marketing is rapidly growing, influencing millions of people across the world. Here are five digital marketing topics and digital marketing blog topics you should consider.

  • Search Engine Marketing: Critical Analysis Of Visual Keyword Tools.
  • Traditional Marketing Versus Digital Marketing: An Analytical Comparison.
  • ROI For Various Digital Marketing Strategies
  • Targeted Marketing: Facebook Analytics.
  • Coupon Code: Customer Preferences On These Promotional Activities.
  • What are the differences between paid search engines and organic search?
  • Tips that you can use to help you grow your paid ROAS.
  • Top 10 reasons you should follow your competitors on social media.
  • What are the dos and don’ts when you are using social media marketing?
  • Top SEO tactics that you should avoid.

Need to give a presentation on marketing? These five marketing presentation topics will enthrall your listeners!

  • How To Use The Blue Ocean Strategy
  • Fundamentals Of Marketing Management.
  • Digital And Social Media Marketing.
  • How To Effectively Manage Customer Service.
  • Essential Creative Thinking Skills All Marketing Managers Should Have.
  • What does in-house SEO entail?
  • What is the path to gaining and building your customers’ trust?
  • Which is better, brand awareness or ROI?
  • How to effectively personalize client’s communication
  • What are the best SEO strategies that increase site traffic?

Starting a business without a marketing plan could be suicidal. These marketing plan topics will help you preach the importance and place of marketing plans in the business world.

  • Why a Marketing Plan is a Crucial Aspect When Launching Your Business or Product.
  • Why you should have a strong marketing plan before launching your business.
  • How to build a tactical marketing plan
  • Marketing Strategy versus marketing plan: The differences.
  • Why do businesses lack proper marketing plans?
  • Ways you can use to build a tactical marketing plan
  • Is there a difference between a marketing plan and a marketing strategy?
  • What are the vital parts when you are writing a marketing plan?
  • What part does a marketing plan play in the success of a business or product launch?

Trends! Trends! Trends! Here are some trending marketing topics that almost everyone will find interesting!

  • The Era of Fake News: Why and How Marketing leaders should protect their brands.
  • How to Improve Your Martech Stack Effectiveness.
  • Why you should redesign your Websites to do what customers want.
  • Why we should pay attention to artificial intelligence.
  • What are the marketing strategies that airline companies in the US employ?
  • Why should you do a competitor analysis when creating a marketing strategy for your brand?
  • How do clients perceive businesses that use Facebook to market their business?
  • Is it possible for a business to grow simply by using Facebook marketing?
  • How to handle online marketing and deal with internet security.

Though there are several marketing strategies, they differ in the way that marketers employ them. If you are looking for interesting marketing strategies that you will use to impress your lecturer, here is a list of options to use.

  • What is the marketing strategy that is employed by the fashion industry?
  • Does gender have any impact on the family purchase decision?
  • Analyze how Apple was successful in global marketing.
  • Ways that companies differentiate their services based on social class.
  • Political campaign and brand marketing.
  • Is there a harmful impact of advertising on children?
  • What are the best marketing strategies for hotel businesses?
  • How do companies use smartphones to tap into the thinking of their clients?
  • Uber and Netflix: Compare the new market entry strategies used by these two companies.

Choosing a marketing topic idea for an essay can be overwhelming. However, to help you out, here are some ideas you can use to impress your lecturer.

  • What is the most effective form of marketing?
  • What form of marketing trends do you expect in the future?
  • What attributes can brands have that will help to increase brand loyalty?
  • Ways to rebuild trust in influencer marketing.
  • What causes a lack of personal branding, brand image, and professional reputation?
  • Is it possible for businesses to survive without marketing?
  • Top ten frustrating problems that are caused by inbound marketing.
  • A look at seven video content myths you must discard.
  • 20 social media campaign ideas for big brands.
  • Five effective ways you can use to increase traffic to your website.

So here we are! 120 marketing topics! Make your pick of the marketing topics you find workable or check out our business topics . Good luck with your work!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Custom Essay, Term Paper & Research paper writing services

  • testimonials

Toll Free: +1 (888) 354-4744

Email: [email protected]

Writing custom essays & research papers since 2008

100 best marketing research topics for all.

marketing research topics

Because of the many aspects of marketing, choosing marketing topics to write about may put one in a dicey situation. This article provides some hot topics in marketing that will help you select an area of focus and select relevant topics from that niche. From marketing research topics for college students to social issues in marketing, we have got you covered! So sit down and relax as we take you through the list of marketing research topics our professional writers prepared just for you!

Marketing Thesis Topics

Are you in need of well-thought-out marketing thesis topics and marketing dissertation topics? Then you’re in the right place! This list of marketing paper topics presented will give you a distinct thesis/dissertation.

  • Analysis and determination of consumer buying behavior for Coca-Cola
  • A study on famous well-marketed brands that got away with selling substandard quality products
  • A study showing the impact of advertising on consumer behavior
  • Brand advertising and political campaigns: a possible interwoven impact?
  • A review of the outcomes of advertising in a recession
  • Exhaustive research on how brands exploit impulsive buying
  • A study of how celebrity endorsements on ROI affect CPG brands
  • A survey of the impact of augmented reality on marketing experiences
  • Critical research on how AI will help make better marketing decisions
  • A study of the perspective and reception of Americans to targeted ads based on their browser history

Current Marketing Issues

There are numerous marketing issues around the world today. These global marketing issues threaten the survival of many businesses and the economy at large. Here is a list of current marketing issues!

  • A decline in organic reach on social media platforms
  • Difficulty in building a well-recognized brand name
  • Getting readers to see content
  • Understanding marketing results
  • Marketing budgets included by BREXIT
  • Optimizing business for voice search
  • Bridging the technology gap
  • Ensuring compliance with GDPR
  • Overdependence of potential customers on amazon
  • The effect of COVID-19 on the global economy

Marketing Research Topics

Getting marketing topics for research has been made considerably more comfortable with this list of marketing research paper topics. Ready to explore the marketing research topics we have, let’s delve right in!

  • Exploring how organizations use corporate social responsibility (CSR) to reinforce brand equity
  • The effect of social media on buying choices
  • Online purchasing: a study of the product characteristics buyers look for
  • An exploration of the differences in marketing strategies across cultures
  • Manipulation tactics: how brands can get more customers
  • A study of how customer loyalty is affected by brand image
  • Analyzing how TV advertising affects the top of mind awareness
  • Do people appreciate being click baited into sponsored posts?
  • A study on how to make customers purchase goods and services in the luxury category

Digital Marketing Blog Topics

Digital marketing remains a very important aspect of marketing in the world today. Here are some very juicy digital marketing topics you can write a great blog on!

  • 10 insightful differences between paid search and organic search
  • Tips for promoting content on Pinterest
  • SEO tactics to avoid like the plague
  • How to increase your followers on social media
  • Best tips to help you grow your paid social ROAS
  • Why should you follow your competitors on social media?
  • Dos and don’ts of social media marketing
  • How to create content your audience will be eager to share

Marketing Essay Topics

  • What is the most effective form of marketing?
  • Internet marketing trends to expect in the future
  • What important brand attributes lead to an increase in customer loyalty?
  • A look into marketing approaches that broke through strong market monopoly
  • The impact of social media on consumer buying behavior
  • Comparison of advertising versus building brand equity
  • Rebuilding trust in influencer marketing
  • How to generate leads effectively

Content Marketing Topics

  • 10 biggest graphic design mistakes companies make in their marketing pieces
  • How to create captivating e-newsletters that people will pay attention to
  • Repurposing marketing content for small businesses
  • Working more micro-content into marketing efforts
  • Multi-step versus one-step content marketing campaigns
  • The five Cs when creating content marketing copy
  • Creating compelling content marketing campaigns in 10 steps
  • Content marketing: how to generate more leads and close sales

Strategic Marketing Problems

There are many marketing problems in companies and businesses that threaten to cripple the advancement of the industry. Here is a list of some marketing problems you may be willing to proffer solutions to.

  • Inability to explain products or services delivered
  • Not clearly defining a company’s market segment
  • Lack of innovating commercial department
  • Lack of business visibility
  • Missing links between sales and marketing departments
  • Lack of marketing plan
  • Lack of personal branding, brand image, and professional reputation
  • Thinking the company or business can survive without marketing

Marketing Blog Topics

  • Facebook advertising: pros and cons
  • 10 benefits of inbound marketing
  • The most frustrating problems faced in inbound marketing
  • How to generate subscribers for your blog faster than ever!
  • 10 benefits of content marketing lead magnets
  • Five video content marketing myths you must discard
  • 30 social media campaign ideas from big brands

Controversial Marketing Topics

  • Does google give preferential treatment to big brands?
  • Does social media affect SEO ranking?
  • Are grey SEO techniques safe?
  • Are YouTube videos more engaging than TV ads?
  • Are building e-mail lists still one of the best ways to sell?
  • Will immersion marketing through VR technology to be accepted?

Sport Marketing Research Topics

Sports marketing continues to remain a significant source of revenue. Hence, research in this area will continue to stay relevant. Here are some sport marketing topics you could consider working on.

  • How the extraordinary content offered by intelligent chatbots can help sports teams strengthen fan loyalty
  • Emerging opportunities in sports marketing and how to capitalize on them
  • How to effectively capitalize on the wearables market
  • Should more women and children get into sports?
  • Should seniors be allowed to participate in some games?

Marketing Presentation Topics

  • Mastering in-house SEO
  • The path to gaining and building customers trust
  • Brand awareness versus ROI
  • Effectively personalizing customer communications
  • The best SEO strategies that increase site traffic

International Marketing Topics

Marketing connects the global world, and this is why it is essential to marketing development. Here are some international marketing topics to consider!

  • The effect of globalization on consumer behavior
  • How do international brands compare to local brands?
  • Do international brands always have advantages over a local brand?
  • Creating brand awareness by utilizing global event marketing
  • How to market products on an international level

Marketing Plan Topics

  • The importance of a marketing plan to the success of a business or product launch
  • Building a tactical marketing plan
  • How is a marketing strategy different from a marketing plan?
  • Indispensable parts in writing a marketing plan

Ethical Issues In Marketing

  • Targeted Ads based on browser history
  • Immersion marketing through virtual reality
  • The exploitation of impulsive buying
  • Click baiting into sponsored posts

Affiliate Marketing Topics

  • How to find profitable niches in affiliate marketing
  • How to get readers interested in what you market
  • How to build a personal website: the ultimate guide

Congratulations! We hope you have been able to guide you in choosing your desired topic in marketing successfully. Alo, you can check out our business topics. We wish you the best in your research!

management topics

Top 5 Ranking

U.S. News & World Report ’s 2024 Best Online Master’s in Business Programs ranking places the Broad College at No. 2 among U.S. public schools. See the numbers .

Areas of Research

At the Eli Broad College of Business, students in the marketing Ph.D. program have the opportunity to work and publish with some of the most prolific researchers in marketing. Faculty-student collaboration is a significant part of the doctoral experience, and it leads to results. Doctoral students work with faculty to research the most compelling issues facing businesses today, and Broad provides the resources to get it done.

Focused on marketing strategy, Broad’s faculty has developed four areas of research excellence:

  • Marketing strategy
  • Product and brand management
  • Relationship marketing
  • International marketing

Research Prestige

Research in marketing.

The available marketing doctoral coursework covers a broad range of topics, including marketing strategy, modeling marketing problems, consumer behavior and statistics. Ph.D. students are expected to be in residence on a full-time basis during the program. While in the coursework stage of the program, doctoral students are also assigned as teaching and/or research assistants. Upon completion of coursework, students are required to pass a comprehensive exam in marketing and then complete a dissertation that demonstrates their ability to conduct an original research project.

The program curriculum is designed with a focus on research mentorship and training and includes several writing requirements to ensure our students are prepared for the job market and ready to succeed as assistant professors. The Ph.D. handbook provides details on the program requirements, and the curriculum schedule is presented below.

Centers of Research Excellence

Marketing strategy.

The anchor for this focus is our strong reputation and core faculty studying marketing strategy. Among notable faculty in this center of research excellence are Tomas Hult, Roger Calantone, Ahmet Kirca and Irina Kozlenkova.

Product and Brand Management

The Eli Broad College of Business has long been recognized for its excellence in product and brand management. In a study by Pianpain Yang and Lei Tao, MSU ranked #3 among universities for innovation management and #1 in the Big Ten. Scholarship in this area has been a long-standing strength at Broad, and its faculty has won numerous awards in this center of research excellence.

As a doctoral student, you will have the opportunity to collaborate with renowned scholars in product and brand management. The Broad faculty continually works with doctoral students in this area. Among notable faculty in this center of research excellence is Roger Calantone, who has been ranked the world’s #2 scholar in innovation management and the tenth most-cited marketing researcher worldwide. In addition to these accomplishments, he is a University Distinguished Professor, has chaired many dissertations, and has published numerous articles with doctoral students. Calantone and other faculty in this area – such as Cornelia Droge, Ahmet Kirca and Hang Nguyen – enjoy working with doctoral students and providing tutelage on research.

Relationship Marketing and Sales

Relationship marketing and sales is one of the hottest areas of marketing research today. At Broad, you’ll have access to some of the top faculty in the field. With multiple publications in leading journals, the college’s relationship marketing and sales center of research excellence is becoming one of the best in the nation. Here is but a brief list of awards in this center of research excellence:

  • AMA’s Emerging Service Scholar Award
  • AMA Sales SIG Excellence in Research Award
  • Winner of the 2011, 2012 and 2015 Industry Relevance Awards granted by the Cornell Center for Hospitality Research

Doctoral students who focus on relationship marketing and sales have access to some of the best faculty in the field. Among notable faculty in this center of research excellence is Douglas Hughes. Hughes is the incoming editor of the  Journal of Personal Selling & Sales Management  and an area editor for the  Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science . His research focuses on sales force management issues and has appeared in the  Journal of Marketing , the  Journal of Marketing Research  and the  Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science . In addition, a number of other faculty work in this area, including Roger Calantone, Tomas Hult, Irina Kozlenkova and Stephanie Mangus.

International Marketing

The Broad College of Business has been ranked #1 in international business research. Doctoral students who choose to focus on international marketing will have access to resources such as MSU-CIBER and to faculty who are thought leaders in the field. The Broad faculty regularly collaborates with doctoral students in this area and have served as committee members and chairs of several dissertations.

Among notable faculty in this center of research excellence is Tomas Hult, director of the International Business Center (MSU-CIBER), former editor of the  Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science , and one of the 50 most cited researchers in marketing. During his time at MSU, Hult has co-authored several books on international business, has chaired multiple dissertation committees, and has collaborated with doctoral students on numerous publications. In addition, Roger Calantone, Ahmet Kirca and Irina Kozlenkova also conduct research in this area.

Publications

Recent publications in each of the four core areas of research are listed below.

Katsikeas, Constantine S., Neil A. Morgan, Leonidas C. Leonidou, and G. Tomas M. Hult (2016), “Assessing Performance Outcomes in Marketing,” Journal of Marketing , 80 (2), In Press. Bamiatzi, Vassiliki, Konstantinos Bozos, S. Tamer Cavusgil, and G. Tomas M. Hult (2016), “Revisiting the Firm, Industry and Country Effects on Profitability under Recessionary and Expansion Periods: A Multi-level Analysis,” Strategic Management Journal , In Press. Ozkaya, Erkan, Cornelia Droge, G. Tomas M. Hult, Roger Calantone , and Elif Ozkaya (2015), “Market Orientation, Knowledge Competence, and Innovation,” International Journal of Research in Marketing , 32 (3), 309-318. Arrfelt, Mathias, Robert M. Wiseman, Gerry McNamara, and G. Tomas M. Hult (2015), “Examining a Key Corporate Role: The Influence of Capital Allocation Competency on Business Unit Performance,” Strategic Management Journal , 36 (7), 1017-1034. Lee, J. –Y., Kozlenkova, I. V. , and Palmatier R. W., “Structural Marketing: Using Organizational Structure to Achieve Marketing Objectives,” (forthcoming),  Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.
Dean, Tereza, David A. Griffith, Roger J. Calantone , “New Product Creativity: Understanding Contract Specificity in New Product Introductions,”Forthcoming, Journal of Marketing. Sarangee, K., J. Schmidt, and R. J. Calantone (2015), “Does the Future Impact the Present during New Product Development?”  Journal of Product and Innovation Management . Vickery, S., Y. Bolumole, M. Castel, and R. J. Calantone (2015), “The Effects of Product Modularity on Launch Speed,”  International Journal of Production Research , Vol. 53, Iss. 17. Vickery, S., X. Koufteros, C. Dröge, and R. J. Calantone (2015), “Product Modularity, Process Modularity and New Product Introduction Performance: Does Complexity Matter?”  Production and Operations Management , p1-20. Bolumole, Y., R. Calantone , C. A. Di Benedetto, and S. A. Melnyk (2015), “New Product Development in New Ventures: The Quest for Resources,”  International Journal of Production Research , Vol. 53, Iss. 8, p2506-2523. Chauduri, M., R. Calantone , and P. Randhawa (2015), “New Wine from Old Grapes: Innovation in the Eco-Friendly B2C Space,”  Journal of International Consumer Marketing , Vol. 27, Iss. 2, p99-122. Ozkaya, H. E., C. Dröge, G. T. M. Hult, R. Calantone , and E. Ozkaya (2015), “Market Orientation, Knowledge Competence, and Innovation,”  International Journal of Research in Marketing .
Bolander, Willy, Cinthia Santornino, Douglas E. Hughes , and Gerald R. Ferris (2015), “Social Networks within Sales Organizations: Their Development and Importance for Salesperson Performance,”  Journal of Marketing . Kozlenkova, Irina, G. Tomas M. Hult, Donald Lund, Jeannette A. Mena, and Pinar Kekec (2015), “The Role of Marketing Channels in Supply Chain Management: A Review of the Literature and Takeaways for Future Research,”  Journal of Retailing , 91 (4), 586-609. Miao, C. Fred, Douglas E. Hughes , Keith A. Richards, and Frank Q. Fu (2015), “Understanding the Interactive Effects of Service Climate and Transactional Sales Climate on Service Quality and Sales Performance,”  Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science . Baldus, B., C. Voorhees, and R. J. Calantone (2015), “Online Brand Community Engagement: Scale Development and Validation,”  Journal of Business Research , Vol. 68, Iss. 5, p978-85.
Kostova, Tatiana and G. Tomas M. Hult (2016), “Meyer and Peng’s 2005 Article as a Foundation for an Expanded and Refined International Business Research Agenda: Context, Organizations, and Theories,”  Journal of International Business Studies , 47 (1), In Press.

Marketing @ Broad

Close up football nestled on field.

From The Conversation

Featuring ayalla ruvio forrest morgeson, from ap news, featuring forrest morgeson, get connected with broad:.

  • Business College Complex
  • 632 Bogue St
  • East Lansing, MI 48824

Benjamin Glaser

Doctoral Researchers Shine in 3MT Championship

  • Share on Facebook (opens in new window)
  • Share on Twitter (opens in new window)
  • Share on LinkedIn (opens in new window)
  • Print this page
  • Share by email

Nine doctoral students explained their complex research and its importance in under three minutes during the championship round of Carnegie Mellon University's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, held Thursday, March 14 in Tepper School of Business’s Simmons Auditorium A.

First place was awarded to Benjamin Glaser from Materials Science & Engineering (opens in new window) . Second place was awarded to Sampada Acharya, who is studying mechanical engineering (opens in new window) . Acharya also received both the People’s Choice Award — selected by the audience in the theater — and the Alumni Choice Award, chosen by online votes from alumni watching the livestream. Third place went to Nicole C. Auvil, who is studying chemistry (opens in new window) in the Mellon College of Science.

The event, which is in its ninth year at Carnegie Mellon, started at the University of Queensland in 2008 and has been adopted by over 900 universities across more than 85 countries worldwide. Helen and Henry Posner, Jr. Dean of the University Libraries Keith Webster (opens in new window) , who brought the competition to CMU, served as host of Thursday’s finals.

Benjamin Glaser on stage in front of seated audience with large screen presentation behind him

Glaser, a doctoral student in the College of Engineering (opens in new window) , was excited to tackle the challenge that 3MT presents. He first tried to summarize his research informally for a group of friends after watching last year’s competition — and found that it was even more challenging than he expected.

“I thought it was a very interesting problem, to distill what takes us years just to understand, but then also conveying the importance and magnitude and methods to a general audience in such a short time,” he remembered. “This year when the registration came around I worked very hard to be able to make that connection successfully.”

In his research, Glaser is exploring an advanced material discovery model to create new aluminum alloys with high temperature strength and stability, and low cost and emissions.

“It’s a difficult problem that we need to be able to approach holistically, but I want people to understand that it is feasible,” he said. “In my presentation, I showed something actionable, not just simulations. I’ve already begun to get exciting results.”

Sampada Acharya on stage

Acharya, also from the College of Engineering, said she made such an impact on both in-person and livestream audiences due to the universality of her topic. Her research focuses on creating a device that can collect pathogens from surfaces, with the goal of making infectious places like hospitals less dangerous to visit.

“People don’t want to go to hospitals and then feel sicker — you go there in order to feel better and make others feel better as well,” she explained. “So my research, which addresses this huge gap that no one has really talked about in hundreds of years, spoke to everyone — especially in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, which really left its mark on people.”

To be truly successful, Acharya’s research requires collaboration from a variety of fields, and that’s why sharing her work with a campus-wide audience like the one assembled for 3MT was so important to her.

“This is an issue that everyone needs to work together to address — from computer scientists to mechanical engineers to roboticists to people working with artificial intelligence and beyond — and I hope that’s a takeaway from my presentation,” Acharya said. “This interdisciplinary audience is the thing that I really love about CMU. I can inspire them to think about how they can bring their work and their knowledge to try and address this gap.”

Nicole C. Auvil on stage presenting

Auvil credits her successful presentation in part to her artistic slide design.

“I always try to put a lot of effort into the art side of science communication, which I feel is not given enough attention by a lot of scientists,” she explained. “Graphics and art can draw in people who wouldn’t normally be interested in science, and also help them understand it in a way that words just can’t. Visuals are a universal language; they can convey things that you’ll never be able to convey with words.”

She works with a chemical analysis instrument known as a mass spectrometer, which is essential for everything from testing environmental samples to crime scenes to historic artifacts — but it’s time intensive and expensive, and sometimes even damages samples. Her research has already yielded a new scientific device that attaches to a mass spectrometer to improve this process, which she named the “Super Sniffer” due to the way it detects chemicals emanating from samples, similar to the way a nose can detect chemicals in the air.

“I love the point I’m at now, where we can work on fun applications,” Auvil said. “Every time I talk to people about my work they suggest new ideas — even here at 3MT, today — and that’s why I love opportunities like this. Everyone has their own background that can inform what sort of applications would be important in their life, and not all of those are things that me or my advisor would think about on our own.”

group photo of finalists on stage

— Related Content —

automated-scientific-research-900x600-min.jpeg

Students' Ingenuity Automates Scientific Research

Zhangyu "Sharey" Cheng demonstrates ExMicroVR, an immersive virtual reality environment that allows scientists to collaborate and virtually explore biological data.

Researchers Zoom in on New Ways To View Biomolecules in Pathogens

asu-cmu-900x600.jpg

Universities Partner To Make Chemistry More Equitable

  • The Piper: Campus & Community News (opens in new window)
  • Official Events Calendar (opens in new window)

U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official. Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.

The site is secure. The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

  • Publications
  • Account settings

Preview improvements coming to the PMC website in October 2024. Learn More or Try it out now .

  • Advanced Search
  • Journal List
  • Springer Nature - PMC COVID-19 Collection

Logo of phenaturepg

Cause-related marketing: a systematic review of the literature

Hina yaqub bhatti.

1 University of Extremadura, Badajoz, Spain

2 Riphah International University, Lahore, Pakistan

M. Mercedes Galan-Ladero

Clementina galera-casquet.

Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is one of the most versatile activities among the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Though CRM is extensively researched, however, only a few authors have performed systematic literature reviews on CRM. Therefore, more systematic reviews of CRM are still needed to complete and bring together the more contributions, advances, and different existing research lines. Thus, this paper provides a comprehensive overview of the existing literature in CRM from the two keywords: “Cause-Related Marketing” and “Cause Marketing”, and the time period ranges from 1988 to 2020. In this study, rigorous protocol is used in synthesizing 344 English articles drawing upon e-journal database searches. These articles were categorized by time-wise development, country-wise development, methodological development, cross-cultural analysis, the role of journals. This study also carried out the Bibliometric Analyses. The review highlights that the concept of CRM has evolved from being considered a marketing mix tool (a promotion tool), to being considered as a CSR initiative, with a more strategic character. Our findings revealed that only a few journals published articles on CRM. Geographically, the CRM study was initiated in North America, followed by Europe and Oceania, and Asian and Sub-Saharan African countries. From the third decade, there was more collaboration in cross-cultural studies and the use of mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative studies) approach. Lastly, this study shows the most manifest research gaps in CRM that opens avenue for future research.

Introduction

Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is a versatile and growing activity in the marketing field. It provides opportunities to profit and non-profit organizations, and consumers, to participate in a social cause (Varadarajan & Menon, 1988 ). Since 1988, CRM initiatives have gradually increased for more than three decades. CRM allows to achieve the societal and financial corporate establishment’s goals, as well as provide the opportunity to consumers to participate in an altruistic act.

Formally, the first CRM campaign named in this way was carried out by American Express (AMEX) in 1983, in the United States. The purpose of this program was to increase the usage of the AMEX credit card, but also collect money to be donated for the renovation of the Statue of Liberty. This project was developed from September to December, and the donation was $1.7 million (Varadarajan & Menon, 1988 ). Since then, and according to the IEG Sponsorship Report, cause sponsorship spending in North America has grown continuously 1 from $120 million in 1990 until $2.23 billion in 2019, as shown in Fig.  1 . In 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. sponsorship value was $10 Billion (annually), which approximately increased 38% (IEG, 2020 ).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig1_HTML.jpg

IEG Sponsorship Report from 2002 to 2019. Note: We only include data since 2002, because previous data are not available on the IEG Sponsorship Report. Source: IEG (2020)

Consequently, the practice of CRM has also increased for the last three decades because more profit organizations have engaged in CRM activities (Adomaviciute et al., 2016 ), non-profit organizations have maintained environmental protection, health, and other worthy causes (Grolleau et al., 2016 ), and when consumers purchase the CRM products for support the cause, they have a prosocial behavior (Chang & Chu, 2020 ) and feel happy (Jeong & Kim, 2020 ; Vrontis et al., 2020 ).

During this time, CRM has become a topic of considerable debate in both managerial and academic circles worldwide. Although some systematic literature has been presented on this topic (see, for example, Guerreiro et al., 2016 ; Lafferty et al., 2016 ; Natarajan et al., 2016 ; or Thomas et al., 2020 ), an updated systematic literature review is required. Thus, we present a new systematic literature review: (1) To complete the review of the academic research articles in the area of CRM, from 1988 to 2020, with the perspective of profit organizations, non-profit organizations, and consumers over the last three decades; (2) To include cross- cultural studies; (3) To include studies carried out in developed and developing countries; (4) To include studies executed in different societies (e.g. Muslim societies, Western societies with Christian traditions, etc.); and (5) To conduct a bibliometric analysis using VOSViewer Software.

Thus, the main objective of this paper is to provide a systematic literature review of the existing research in the field of Cause-Related Marketing. More specifically, our aim is to find influential papers that have shaped this field and provide the overview of historical development in the field of research, focusing first on previously analyzed criteria: Time-Wise Development of CRM Literature, Country-Wise Development of CRM Literature, Methodological development in CRM Literature, and Role of Journal in Development of CRM literature. But also, this study carries out a systematic review with a bibliometric analysis. On the one hand, the systematic review helps the researchers to improve the rigor of prior reviewing literature. On the other hand, bibliometric analysis helps to analyze divergent views and examine the development of the CRM field.

Hence, this paper has followed two steps in the systematic literature review on CRM: (1) to select the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and (2) to analyze the evolution of CRM in seven different categories.

First step : Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria.

  • This research only included published papers in journals, from 1988 to 2020 (data sources such as working papers, reports, newspapers, textbooks, conference papers, or theses / dissertations, were not included).
  • Two keywords, “Cause-Related Marketing” and “Cause Marketing”, were used to search the databases (SAGE Publications, JSTOR, Emerald Full Text, Springer, John Wiley Publications, Elsevier, Taylor and Francis, and Google Scholar).
  • This research also used conceptual review and empirical studies of different countries.
  • This research only included papers written in English (i.e., non-English language research articles were excluded).
  • This study considered the date of publication of the journal as the date of the research articles.

Second step : Academic researchers have used qualitative and quantitative methods for literature review to organize and provide the above underlying findings on CRM. And according to Liu et al., ( 2015 ), Bibliometric Analysis is a tool to examine literature review. Thus, this study has also provided a static and systematic picture of the research (Aria & Cuccurullo, 2017 ). This study relies on bibliometric techniques such as author-citation analysis, or co-words or co-occurrence analysis, and co-citation analysis of authors through VOSviewer software (version 1.6.5). Following Thomas et al. ( 2020 ), we selected Time-Wise Development of CRM Literature, Country-Wise Development of CRM Literature, and Methodological Development in CRM Literature. And we added other analysis such as Role of Journal in Development of CRM literature, author-citation analysis, and Co-words or Co-occurrence analysis, proposed by Poje & Groff ( 2021 ). We also considered adding a new category that had not been considered in previous studies: cross-cultural analysis.

Therefore, the structure of this paper is organized as follow: firstly, we show the CRM theoretical background (with a previous introduction to CSR, to link it with CRM, because CRM is generally considered under the umbrella of CSR – e.g., Kotler and Lee, 2005 ; Galan-Ladero, 2012 ); secondly, we offer the results of our literature analysis in the CRM field; later, we discuss these results; and finally, we offer the main conclusions, also considering the main limitations of this study and further research.

Since the inauguration of the third millennium, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has become a globally hot issue by the rapid change of the environment. A large number of organizations, from developed and developing countries, have focused on CSR.

CSR, defined as “a concept whereby companies integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis ” (European Commission, 2001), has a wide range of history: it started in Western countries, but later, it spread all over the world. Antecedents of CSR can be found at 18th and 19th Centuries, with the creation of welfare schemes adopted with a paternalistic approach, to protect companies and retain employees with improved life quality (Carroll 2008 ). But it is in the twentieth Century, and specifically after World War II, when scholars and practitioners discussed about the social responsibilities, and successful businesses also adopted such responsibilities (Heald, 1970 ).

Thus, CSR started to be established and, in the last seven decades, it has played different roles:

  • The 1950s was the first era that established the current CSR. Successful business leaders and board of directors moved towards the ethics of society. Bowen, the first who coined the term, introduced the concept, and provided the initial definition of CSR, described as “ the obligations of businessmen to pursue those policies, to make those decisions, or to follow those lines of action which are desirable the objectives and values of our society ” (Bowen, 1953 , p. 6). In this area, Heald ( 1957 ), discussed that businesses do not only serve on economic performance work, but they also serve on humane and constructive social policies.
  • The 1960s : Many of the definitions of CSR are formalized. Walton ( 1967 ) was a prime thinker who addresses the different aspects of CSR: “ In short, the new concept of social responsibility recognizes the intimacy of the relationships between the corporation and society and realizes that such relationships must be kept in mind by top managers as the corporation and the related groups pursue their respective goals ( Walton, 1967 , p. 18)”.
  • The 1970s : Friedman described that the social responsibility of business is to enhance profits and maximize shareholder value. Therefore, Carroll ( 1979 ) came in this decade with the new concept of CSR, defined as “ the social responsibility of business encompasses the economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary expectations that society has of organizations at a given point in time ”.
  • The 1980s : the notions of stakeholder management and business ethics had become the main integral part of the business (Carroll, 2008 ). In 1980, Jones proposed that CSR is a process, not the outcome, and CSR, when engaged in as a process of decision making, should constitute CSR behavior by the corporation (Jones, 1980 ). Also, Aupperle et al., ( 1983 ) suggested that four aspects include CSR: economic, legal, ethical, and voluntary or philanthropic responsibilities.
  • The 1990s : Carroll ( 1991 ) revised the concept of CSR and introduced the “Pyramid of Corporate Social Responsibility”. He described four main responsibilities of the company: economic responsibility (“be profitable”), legal responsibility (“obey the laws and regulations”), ethical responsibility (“do what is just and fair”), and philanthropic responsibility (“be a corporate citizen”). During this decade, Elkington ( 2001 ) introduced another concept of CSR, the “Triple Bottom Line”, which focuses on three issues: social responsibility (“people”), environmental responsibility (“planet”), and economic responsibility (“profit”).
  • In the first decade of the twenty-first century (The 2000s), CSR extends to emerging markets. After the collapse of Enron, 2 many organizations and corporations focused on establishing CSR departments, hiring CSR consultants and CSR managers. On the other hand, in 2002, ISO Committee on Consumer Policy play an important role in ISO 26000, an international standard that present a guideline on Corporate Social Responsibility. 3
  • In the second decade of the twenty-first century (The 2010s), Kramer and Porter ( 2011 ) introduced the concept of “creating shared value”, which becomes the core objective of business strategies. 2015 is an important year because the “2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”, with the “Sustainable Development Goals” (SDGs), was launched. SDGs covered a wide range of global areas, such as fighting against climate change, removing poverty and hunger, as well as promoting sustainable consumption, among others.

Therefore, different theories have been created and adapted during all this time. The most important theories are Carroll’s CSR Pyramid Theory, 4 Triple Bottom Line Theory, 5 Stakeholder Theory, 6 and Corporate Citizenship Theory. 7

On the other hand, CSR initiatives, formed as a part of the core business activities, provide long-term financial security and growth for stakeholders but also increase the market position (Bhattacharyya et al., 2008 ). Under the big umbrella of CSR, different initiatives have appeared, and they have become growing popular among profit organizations worldwide. Kotler et al., ( 2012 ) explained six different types of CSR initiatives (see Table  1 ), which included cause promotion, cause-related marketing, corporate social marketing, corporate philanthropy, community volunteering, and socially responsible business practices.

Main CSR Initiatives

Source: Adapted from Kotler and Lee ( 2005 ), and Kotler et al. ( 2012 )

According to Thomas et al., ( 2011 ), CSR has received significant attention in both academic and business societies. CRM, as one of these initiatives, has progressed in social responsibility and allows firms to link their philanthropic activities and strategic marketing goals. On the other hand, CRM activities also have been an increasing part of the corporate marketing plans (Gupta & Pirsch, 2006a ). Therefore, this study especially focuses on this CSR initiative: Cause-Related Marketing (CRM).

The first definition of Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) was introduced by Varadarajan and Menon ( 1988 , p. 60), as “ the process of formulating and implementing marketing activities that are characterized by an offer from the firm to contribute a specified amount to a designated cause when consumers engage in revenue-providing exchanges that satisfy organizational and individual objectives”. This definition provides two main streams: to support the charitable cause and to satisfy organizational and individual objectives.

On the other hand, the most essential and significant benefit of the CRM is shown as a win-win-win situation (for the profit organizations, non-profit organizations, and consumers - Adkins,  1999 ). CRM campaigns increase the number of sales for the organization, as well as enhance the number of donations to the non-profit organizations (Deb & Amawate, 2019 ). CRM campaigns also give the best chance to profit organizations to attract the customers towards organization and enhance customer loyalty (Galan-Ladero et al., 2013b ), as well as they create or enhance emotional engagement with target customers, build a strong relationship with them (Cone et al., 2003 ; Docherty & Hibbert, 2003 ), and also maintain the company’s goodwill (Chang & Chu, 2020 ). Consequently:

  • The for-profit organizations use CRM as a strategic tool to build a strong brand image in the customer’s mind (Ahluwalia & Bedi, 2015 ). And the internal benefit of the for-profit organization is to help increase the employee’s self-esteem, commitment, and loyalty (Cone et al., 2003 ; Polonsky & Wood, 2001 ).
  • The non-profit organizations try to increase awareness about the cause, educate the customers, and support the charitable cause (Nowak and Clarke, 2003 ). On the other hand, CRM in non-profit organizations increases the number of donors (Docherty & Hibbert, 2003 ; Polonsky & Wood, 2001 ).
  • For consumers , charitable causes, linked to their purchases, boost their feeling of happiness and inner satisfaction (Chaabane & Parguel, 2016 ), and they also feel good when helping others (Imas, 2014

Analysis and Main results

Due to an increasing number of CRM research papers that identify the most essential and main contributions in the field, and to objectify the outcomes, then bibliometric analysis is introduced. Zupic and Čater ( 2015 ) explained the five main bibliographic methods, which consists of citation analysis, co-citation analysis, bibliographic coupling, co-author analysis and co-word analysis. In this study, we apply Co-words or Co-occurrence analysis, Co-citation analysis, and cited journals analysis. These analyses were run on VOS-software.

Analysis of the different definitions of CRM

A wide variety of definitions of CRM have been contributed since 1988 (see Appendix 1, Table  7 ). In Table  2 , we summarize the main CRM definitions, from 1988 to 2020, according to the main keywords included in them: CRM as an activity (a marketing activity and/or a CSR activity), as a strategy, as a marketing mix tool, and as an alliance (between profit and nonprofit organizations). Thus, we can observe that there is not a general, unanimous agreement about its definition yet. However, the concept of CRM has evolved from being considered a short-term marketing mix tool (a promotion tool), to being considered a CSR initiative, with a more strategic character.

Main Keywords in CRM definitions

Source: Own Elaboration, based on Galan-Ladero et al. ( 2013a , b )

Definitions of Cause-Related Marketing

Time-wise development of CRM literature

However, in this study, we start from the time-wise development of Cause-Related Marketing. First, we identify the number of research articles into three time periods (decades): 1988–2000, 2001–2010, and 2011–2020 (previous systematic literature did not classify them into decades). With the growing body of Cause-Related Marketing, it is better to organize it in three decades because differences are appreciated, depending on the time.

Varadarajan and Menon introduced the CRM term in academia in 1988, and the following three decades witnessed gradual growth in CRM literature. Table  3 shows the annual evolution of this figure from 1988 to 2020.

The list of Time-Wise Development of CRM Literature

Source: Own Elaboration

Thus, we can classify the three decades based on CRM literature progression:

  • i. Introductory decade (1988–2000). The field of CRM was introduced in this period with a limited number of published articles (13). However, these articles were very innovative and aroused interest in this new solidarity initiative.
  • ii. Emerging decade (2001–2010). The CRM field grabbed the attention of researchers in this second decade, with a notable increase in the published literature, especially in the last two years of this decade. The number of published articles reached 74. Consequently, CRM became an interesting and novel research topic, broadening its scope.
  • iii. Most thriving decade (2011–2020). CRM literature witnessed a boom in the third decade, especially in the last two years of this decade. Thus, 257 articles related to the field of CRM were published in different journals only in this third decade.

In summary, we can indicate that CRM publications have grown significantly over the three decades analyzed, because more and more research papers have been published on this topic.

Author-based citation analysis

Author-based studies have long been one of the most important aspects of bibliometric analysis. This analysis includes the ranking of authors by the number of researches carried out, the citations of their research articles, their evolutions, or the analysis of co-authors’ collaborations. Table  4 shows the five most cited authors (and their specific works) from first decade (1988–2000), second decade (2001–2010), and third decade (2011–2020).

The list of five most cited authors (and their specific works) from each decade

In this analysis, the most cited authors (and their corresponding works) for each decade have been the following:

  • From the first decade, the most cited authors are: Varadarajan ( 1988 ), with 734 citations; followed by Webb ( 1998 ), with 498; Smith ( 1991 ), with 121; File ( 1998 ), with 110; and Ross (1992), with 15 citations.
  • In the second decade, Barone (2007) is the most quoted, with 243 citations; followed by Gupta ( 2006a ), with 189; Lafferty ( 2005 ), with 187; Cui ( 2003 ), with 152; and Berglind ( 2005 ), with 103 citations.
  • During the third decade, Christofi (2020a) has been cited 176 times; Robinson (2012) has 150; Bae (2020), 149; Priporas (2020), 135; and Koschate-Fischer (2012), 129 citations.

In summary, we can highlight that Varadarajan ( 1988 ) is the most cited author of all time, with the first academic paper published on CRM, and serves as a reference for researchers around the world. And by far the next most cited authors are Webb ( 1998 ) and Barone (2007).

Co-words or co-occurrence analysis

A co-word analysis may be described as “ a content analysis technique that uses patterns of co-occurrence of pairs of items… in a corpus of texts to identify the relationships between ideas within the subject areas ” (He, 1999 , p. 134). Thus, co-words or co-occurrence analysis is a content analysis that connects words in the title of the research paper or abstract. The main idea of the co-word analysis is to connect any identified patterns into a map of contextual space. We also applied this analysis to each decade.

First phase (period 1988–2000)

For the 13 articles published from 1988 to 2000, the co-word analysis identifies four clusters consisting of the following words (with the minimum number of occurrences of keywords defined as 1; out of 26 keywords in this period, 26 met the threshold).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig2_HTML.jpg

Co-Word analysis for the period 1988 to 2000

  • The second cluster deals with cause-related marketing, consumer perceptions, and philanthropy (as shown in Fig. ​ Fig.2, 2 , green color).
  • The third cluster consists of charitable organizations and crm (as shown in Fig. ​ Fig.2, 2 , blue color).
  • The last cluster relates to corporate philanthropy (as shown in Fig. ​ Fig.2, 2 , yellow color).

In summary, the co-word analysis shows that, for the period from 1988 to 2000, the focused keyword is Cause-Related Marketing . Other important keywords are philanthropy and consumer perception .

Second phase (period 2001–2010)

Based on the selection of 74 articles for the period 2001–2010, the co-word analysis shows a more precise picture than it does in the introductory decade (to narrow down the result, the minimum number of the occurrence of keywords was defined as 2; out of 160 keywords, and 27 meet the reduction criteria).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig3_HTML.jpg

Co-word analysis for the period 2001 to 2010

  • A second cluster (Fig. ​ (Fig.3, 3 , green color) comprises brand, company, consumer, framework, impact, information, price, responses, and skepticism.
  • The third cluster (Fig. 3 , blue color) is related to advertising, brand, cause marketing, consumer behavior, marketing, and purchase intention .
  • The fourth cluster (Fig. 3 , yellow color) consists of choice, corporate images, and purchase intention.

In summary, the co-word analysis shows that, from 2001 to 2010, the Cause-Related Marketing keyword related to the other striking keywords, such as corporate social responsibility, reputation, corporate image , and purchase intention .

Third phase (period 2011–2020)

Based on the selection of 257 articles for the period 2011–2020, the co-word analysis shows a more precise picture than it does in the previous two decades. To narrow down the result, the minimum number of the occurrence of keywords was defined as 5 (out of 825 keywords, and 40 meet the reduction criteria). The most notable clusters derived from the co-word analysis are:

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig4_HTML.jpg

Co-word analysis for the period 2011 to 2020

  • The second cluster (Fig. ​ (Fig.4, 4 , green color) comprises altruism, cause marketing, cause-related marketing, co-branding, consumer behavior, purchase intention, and skepticism.
  • The third cluster (Fig. 4 , blue color) comprises  altruism, behavior, charity, consumer choice, corporate social responsibility, mediating role, and s trategy .
  • The fourth cluster (Fig. ​ (Fig.4, 4 , yellow color) comprises consumption behavior, corporate strategy, ethics, marketing, millennials, and social media.
  • The fifth cluster (Fig. ​ (Fig.4, 4 , purple color) comprises brand-cause fit, corporate social responsibility, and perceptio n.

In summary, the co-word analysis shows that, also for the period from 2011 to 2020, the most focused keyword is Cause-Related Marketing . Other significant keywords are ethics , purchase intention , consumer behavior , and attitudes .

Consequently, the whole co-word analysis shows that all around the world, the researchers are focused on the one keyword that is “ Cause-Related Marketing ”, and the other most emphasis keywords are philanthropy and consumer perception , in the first decade; to evolve toward CSR, reputation, corporate image , and purchase intention , in the second decade; and finally focused on ethics, purchase intention, consumer behavior , and attitudes , in the third decade.

Co-citation analysis

A co-citation analysis is described as “ the scholarly contributions of authors who are frequently co-cited are likely to embody similar or related concepts ” (Nerur et al., 2008 , p. 321). Co-citation analysis can explain how referential frameworks of the Cause-Related Marketing field at different stages of its development affected evolutions in its general construction.

First phase for the period 1988–2000

Based on the co-citation analysis, for the period 1988-2000 (Fig. 5 ), it has been seen that there is predominately one cluster with a total 58 authors distributed in one cluster namely cluster – 1 with red color (minimum of the documents for an author should 1 and minimum citation of an author should be 1).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig5_HTML.jpg

Co-citation analysis of authors for the period 1988–2000

There is a wide variety of authors cited in the papers on CRM in the first decade (but only once). Schurr is the only author who receives 2 citations in this decade.

Second phase for the period 2001–2010

According to co-citation analysis for the period 2001-2010 (Fig. 6 ), it has been noted that there are predominately two clusters with a total 1502 authors (minimum citation of an author should be 10 and the maximum citation of the author should be 24).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig6_HTML.jpg

Co-citation analysis of authors for the period 2001–2010

In this analysis, we selected five top co-authors who have a high citation, such as Mohr (34 citations), Webb (32 citations), Menon (30 citations), Miyazaki (24 citations), and Varadarajan (21 citations).

Third phase for the period 2011–2020

According to co-citation analysis for the period 2011-2020 (Fig. ​ (Fig.7), 7 ), it has been noted that there are predominately four clusters, with a total of 10,108 authors and 193 thresholds (minimum of the documents for an author should be 20 and minimum citation of an author should be 5; the maximum citation of the author should be 200).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig7_HTML.jpg

Co-citation analysis of authors for the period 2011–2020

In this analysis, we selected the five top co-authors who had the highest citation, such as Lafferty (200 citations), Mohr (176 citations), Webb (167 citations), Barone (136 citations), and Bhattacharya (136 citations).

In summary, the co-citation analysis shows that Lafferty is the most co-cited author in all time. And the next most co-cited authors are Mohr and Webb.

Cross-cultural analysis

Cultural norms and beliefs have a significant impact on shaping people’s perceptions, attitudes, and behavior (Steenkamp, 2001 ). Lavack and Kropp ( 2003 ) identified the research gap of cross-cultural studies in the field of CRM. Hence, they conducted the first cross-cultural research in the field of CRM by including four countries from different regions such as Australia (Oceania), Canada (North America), Korea (East Asia) and Norway (Europe), and investigated the consumers’ role values towards the CRM. Since the third decade, more researchers have been participating and collaborating in cross-cultural studies. Table  5 details transversal research that has studied CRM comparing different countries.

Cross-Culture Analysis

According to the cross-sectional analysis, the nation has a different background of consumer and corporate cultures that varies from country to country. Sekaran ( 1983 , p. 68) defined it as “ Culturally normed behavior and patterns of socialization could often stem from a mix of religious beliefs, economic and political exigencies and so on. Sorting these out in a clear-cut fashion would be extremely difficult, if not totally impossible ”. Therefore, the scholars are taking more consideration in cross-cultural CRM study from the second decade. In this study, Table ​ Table5 5 shows that researchers from USA (i.e., North America) and South Korea (i.e., East Asia) studied together two times on culture analysis, one times with India (i.e., South Asia), and one time with Poland (i.e., Europe), one times with Philippines (i.e., East Asia) as well as China (i.e., East Asia). In addition, Italian researchers (i.e., Europe) studied one time on culture analysis with Japan (i.e., East Asia) and one time with Brazil (i.e., South America). Furthermore, India (i.e., South Asia) collaborated with Philippines (i.e., East Asia). Cross-cultural analysis in Table ​ Table5 5 shows that the researchers worked on four different cultures analysis rather than two cultures (i.e., Lavack & Kropp, 2003 ; and Schyvinck & Willem, 2019 ).

Country-wise development of CRM literature

Figure  8 reports regional (i.e., country-wise) participation of different researchers in the development of CRM literature. As this concept was introduced in the USA (Varadarajan and Menon, 1988 ), the studies from the first and second decades usually belonged to this geographical region. Thus, most of the research in CRM literature was published by researchers from US Universities: 92% of the contributions in the first decade (i.e., 12 research articles), and 40% (i.e., 30 research articles) in the second decade. However, some British researchers also contributed to CRM literature in the second decade, with 11% (i.e., 8 research articles) share of total CRM publications. Nevertheless, in the third decade, most of the CRM literature was published by Asian researchers. Hence, Indian researchers, with 9% (i.e., 24 research articles), and Taiwanese scholars, with 5% (i.e., 12 research articles), jointly published almost 14% of the articles in that decade. Although the American contributions fell to 33% (but only in relative terms, since in absolute terms they reached 85 research articles), their overall contribution remains the highest of all countries. And participation of British scholars was 6% (i.e., 15 research articles) in the third decade. In this Fig.  8 , we observed that the USA research publications from every decade are very extensive, in comparison to other countries.

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig8_HTML.jpg

List of cited Country-Wise Development of CRM Literature. Source: Own Elaboration

Methodological development in CRM literature

Methodological development in CRM literature is graphically shown in Fig.  9 . It is observed that most research work is employed by experimental design. In the first decade (1988–2000), researchers focused on qualitative or quantitative research in the field of CRM; whereas a mixed-method approach has been used in the second (2001–2010) and third decade (2011–2020). In this analysis, we observe that, in general, quantitative studies significantly outnumber qualitative studies, especially in the third decade.

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is 12208_2021_326_Fig9_HTML.jpg

Methodological development in CRM Literature. Source: Own Elaboration

Role of journal in development of CRM literature

Although a total of 141 journals have published articles explaining the concept of CRM from different perspectives (see Appendix 2, Table  8 ), only six journals published more than ten CRM papers. These journals are International Marketing Review (26), International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing (20), Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing (17), International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing (15), Journal of Business Ethics (13), and Journal of Business Research (10). In the field of CRM, almost 100 journals have been published only a single article since its conceptualization in 1988 (they are also shown in Appendix 2, Table ​ Table8 8 ).

Role of Journal in Development of CRM literature (Journal ranking with according to ICI Journals)

There are two indicators to measure the scientific influence of scholarly journals, such as Journal Citation Reports and Scimago Journal & Country Rank. This study only considers the Scimago Journal & Country Rank because there are more research articles in this rank, which divides the set of journals into four quartiles (i.e., Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4). According to Scimago Journal & Country Rank (SJR), we observed that 51 journals publishing about CRM are Q1, 36 are Q2, 16 are Q3, and 5 are Q4. On the other hand, 8 journals are not included yet in any Quartil. and 25 journals are not in this index.

According to Persson et al. ( 2009 ), for the bibliographical data, we used BibExcel, which presents co-occurrence of references in the bibliographic of research articles. Therefore, in this study we find that five most cited journals by each decade, from the first decade (1988–2000), are: Journal of Marketing (1 document; cited in 734 articles), Journal of Public Policy & Marketing (1 document; cited in 498 articles), Journal of Consumer Marketing (1 document; cited in 121 articles), Journal of Business Ethics (1 document; cited in 110 articles), and Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science (2 document; cited in 51 articles). From the second decade (2001–2010): Journal of Consumer Marketing (3 documents; cited in 369 articles), Journal of Business Research (3 documents; cited in 280 articles), Journal of Retailing (1 document; cited in 243 articles), Journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing (11 documents; cited in 215 articles), and Journal of Advertising (5 documents; cited in 172 articles). And from the third decade (2011–2020): Journal of Marketing Review (25 documents; cited in 842 articles), Journal of Business Ethics (11 documents; cited in 458 articles), International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing (9 documents; cited in 407 articles), International Journal of Advertising (8 documents; cited in 347 articles), and Journal of Marketing (2 documents; cited in 244 articles).

For this analysis, we observed that the percentage of the most cited paper, published in the Journal of Marketing , dropped due to the introduction of different journals, such as Journal of Marketing Review , International Journal of Advertising , or International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing . But, on the other hand, the Journal of Business Ethics has increased the citations.

This research provides an inclusive review of the systematic literature with respect to three decades: the introductory decade (1988–2000), the emerging decade (2001–2010), and the thriving decade (2011–2020).

In this study, we observed that North American researchers are more involved in Cause-Related Marketing. This may be due to the importance that CRM has had in the USA since its inception, and the acceptance that CRM has had among American companies and consumers. Such as Cone ( 2010 ) showed, 88% of the American consumers supported the cause, 85% of the consumers had a good image of the company or product supporting a noble cause and cared about it, and 90% of the consumers demanded companies to find the right cause to support. More recently, another research also studied that 87% of American consumers would purchase a CRM product if the company supported the charitable cause (business2community, 2020 ).

The graphical presentation of the Time-Wise Development (see Fig. ​ Fig.1) 1 ) shows 13 articles published until 2000 (first decade), 74 articles from 2001 to 2010 (second decade), and 257 articles from 2011 to 2020 (third decade). Natarajan et al. ( 2016 , p. 248) and Thomas et al. ( 2020 , p. 5) verified almost similar findings of the time-wise development from 1988 to 2016. But after that, the research on Cause-Related Marketing has abruptly increased in the last two years (2019–2020). We noticed that, in 2020, the researchers are more actively involved in the CRM field than the previous years to publish the research articles.

As observed in Fig. ​ Fig.8, 8 , the academicians and researchers from 37 different countries have significantly contributed to CRM studies. A large portion of CRM studies are conducted in two regions (i.e., North America and Europe). Thomas et al. ( 2020 ) shows similar results. Asian (i.e., Indian and Taiwanese) researchers have taken more interest in CRM and they have been publishing more and more articles since the third decade. On the other hand, we also noticed that the CRM topic was first introduced in Western societies (with Christian tradition). But after the first decade and during the second decade, CRM studies were also introduced in Muslim countries, such as Pakistan (1 research article) and Oman (1 research article). From the third decade, the researchers also explored other Muslim countries, such as Malaysia (5 research articles), Iran (4 research articles), Egypt (4 research articles), Turkey (3 research articles), Pakistan (3 research articles), Jordan (1 research article), Indonesia (1 research article), and Bangladesh (1 research article). So, in summary, we can highlight that researchers have been exploring the Muslim world in the field of CRM after the second decade.

And about the methodological development in CRM literature (see Fig. ​ Fig.9), 9 ), the researchers have used more quantitative studies, compared to qualitative studies. Thomas et al. ( 2020 , p. 7) also found a similar result. Thus, the trend seems to be for quantitative studies to continue to predominate over qualitative ones in the coming years, although mixed methods are experiencing slight growth. However, the combination of both types of studies, qualitative and quantitative, could offer more complete studies on CRM.

Lastly, Table ​ Table6 6 presents the journals involvement to publish CRM research articles. In our study, the key publications journals are International Marketing Review, and International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing. Our results have been slightly different from Thomas et al. ( 2020 )‘s and Natarajan et al. ( 2016 )‘s. These researchers found that the Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing was the one that had published more research articles on this topic. But probably this difference is because they only considered up to 2016.

The list of five most cited journals from each decade

Our research also discovered different results from previous studies with respect to databases, partly due to the number of databases considered and the greater number of years analyzed in our study.

Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is considered as an initiative that involves a donation to a specific cause, at a specific period of time, usually with a limited donation amount, and which depends on product sales and consumer behavior.

Therefore, the main objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive systematic review of the literature on CRM, categorizing each article by time-wise development, country-wise development, methodological development, and role of journals. Cross-cultural analysis and bibliometric analysis were also included, as a new contribution of this research, in comparison to previous studies.

The main studies have been classified in three decades, which present significant differences. In the introductory decade (1990–2000), the field of CRM was introduced with limited published articles with the role of CRM in two different regions, such as North America, and Oceania.

First three Journals such as International Marketing Review, International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, or Journal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing, play a starring role to publish CRM research papers. In the emerging decade (2001–2010), researchers explored more regions, such as East Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East. In this time frame, mix approach studies and cross-cultural studies were introduced for the first time in the field of CRM. And in the most thriving decade (2011–2020), scholars analyzed CRM in two more regions, such as North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. In this era, more scholars were interested in collaborating with other geographical regions such as North America and Europe. The number of published papers on CRM grew significantly.

However, this current study has some limitations. First, this research considered only two keywords: “Cause-Related Marketing” and “Cause Marketing”. Thus, other terms might be also considered, such as “Social Cause” or “Cause–brand alliance”. Secondly, the selection of the studies was limited only to the peer-reviewed journal research articles published in English. Maybe research articles in other languages could be also interesting. Thirdly, this current study just focuses on the full-text journal papers. Abstracts, theses, working papers, and conference proceedings were ignored. Fourthly, this study has used a limited number of databases to find the research articles: SAGE Journals, JSTOR, Emerald Insight, Springer, Wiley Online Library, Elsevier, Taylor & Francis Online, and Google Scholar. Other databases, such as EBSCO and ABI/INFORM, could have been also considered.

Anyway, we also found different gaps in CRM research, so further research could be developed in these aspects. First, most academic scholars have largely focused on the developed countries, such as the USA and the UK, and less in developing countries (especially in the first and second decades). Although studies about CRM in developing countries increased in the third decade, the gap still exists. More studies are needed about developing countries because the researchers may find different results. In addition, more studies are also required to compare developed and developing countries, because researchers could find different interesting outcomes about CRM campaigns.

Secondly, the growing popularity of the internet and social media could be more considered by the companies, which could focus on digital marketing. Therefore, consumers could be more involved in a digital CRM campaign (Handa & Gupta, 2020 ). Only few studies have been conducted in this area, so the gap still exists, both in developing and developed countries.

Thirdly, various studies are conducted on the cross-culture context. But more research is needed to investigate the cross-cultural context, comparing developing and developed countries, and also Western and Eastern countries. Causes and consumer preferences or attitudes could be different from one country to another country.

Fourthly, few studies have been conducted in the mix approach (including qualitative and quantitative studies). More research is required for a better understanding of the mixed methodological approach in CRM. The most common and well-known approaches to mixing methods are Triangulation Design, Embedded Design, the Explanatory Design, and the Exploratory Design. These methodologies could be discussed in CRM programs.

Fifthly, profit and non-profit organizations depend on each other in CRM campaigns. When both organizations develop CRM strategies, they can acquire risk. Few studies have been conducted on profit and non-profit organizations with CRM programs; therefore, this also needs to be discussed.

Finally, and according to Chéron et al. ( 2012 ), consumers positively view those CRM campaigns that take place for extended periods of time, and they might be disappointed with short duration campaigns. Thus, time frame of the CRM campaign can have a significant impact on the consumers’ perception. Consequently, the campaign’s time duration is another factor that is needed to be more discussed by researchers.

Open Access funding provided thanks to the CRUE-CSIC agreement with Springer Nature.

1 Except in 2009, the only year with a slight decrease compared to the previous year (− 0.3%) but recovered in the following year.

2 In 2000, Enron was the seventh-largest corporation by growth revenue in the gas and utility market in the United States territory. At the end of 2001, Enron started to face financial strategy manipulation. Consequently, on 2nd December 2001, Enron declared bankruptcy because of the fraudulent activity of corporate governance.

3 The ISO standard also consists of the ISO 14001 (Environmental Management System) and ISO 9001 (Quality Management System).

4 Carroll ( 1979 ) presented the “Carroll’s CSR Pyramid Theory”, which consisted of the economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic lines.

5 Elkington (1994) presented the “Triple Bottom Line Theory”, which explained the economic, social, and environmental lines.

6 Freeman (1984) introduced the “Stakeholder Theory”, which described the role and participation of stakeholders to enchance CSR.

7 Matten and Crane (2005) described “the role of the corporation in administering citizenship rights for individuals”.

Publisher’s note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Contributor Information

Hina Yaqub Bhatti, Email: se.xenu.sonmula@hbbuqayh .

M. Mercedes Galan-Ladero, Email: se.xenu@nalagm .

Clementina Galera-Casquet, Email: se.xenu@arelagc .

  • Adkins S. Cause-related marketing: Who cares wins. Boston, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann; 1999. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Adkins, S. (2007). Cause related marketing : Routledge.
  • Adomaviciute K, Bzikadze G, Cherian J, Urbonavicius S. Cause-related marketing as a commercially and socially oriented activity: What factors influence and moderate the purchasing? Engineering Economics. 2016; 27 (5):578–585. doi: 10.5755/j01.ee.27.5.15166. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Ahluwalia A, Bedi M. Cause related marketing: A win-win approach (a conceptual framework) Asia Pacific Journal of Research. 2015; 1 (XV):177–185. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Aria M, Cuccurullo C. Bibliometrix: An R-tool for comprehensive science mapping analysis. Journal of Informetrics. 2017; 11 (4):959–975. doi: 10.1016/j.joi.2017.08.007. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Aupperle, K., Hatfield, J. D., & Carroll, A. B. (1983). Instrument development and application in corporate social responsibility. Paper presented at the academy of management proceedings.
  • Bae M. Matching cause-related marketing campaign to culture. Asian Journal of Communication. 2017; 27 (4):415–432. doi: 10.1080/01292986.2017.1280064. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Barnes NG. Partners in profits: Small businesses move slowly into cause-related marketing. Journal of Small Business Strategy. 1998; 9 (1):47–55. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Basil DZ, Herr PM. Dangerous donations? The effects of cause-related marketing on charity attitude. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2003; 11 (1):59–76. doi: 10.1300/J054v11n01_05. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Bautista Jr., R., Jeong, L. S., & Pandey, S. (2020). Will cause-related marketing affect the American and Filipino college Students' purchase intention? Asia-Pacific Social Science Review, 20 (4).
  • Beise-Zee, R. (2013). Cause-related marketing. Encyclopedia of Corporate Social Responsibility, 321–326.
  • Bennett R. Corporate perspectives on cause related marketing. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2002; 10 (1):41–59. doi: 10.1300/J054v10n01_04. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Bergkvist L, Taylor CR. Leveraged marketing communications: A framework for explaining the effects of secondary brand associations. AMS review. 2016; 6 (3):157–175. doi: 10.1007/s13162-016-0081-4. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Berglind M, Nakata C. Cause-related marketing: More buck than bang? Business Horizons. 2005; 48 (5):443–453. doi: 10.1016/j.bushor.2005.04.008. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Bhattacharyya, S. S., Sahay, A., Arora, A. P., & Chaturvedi, A. (2008). A toolkit for designing firm level strategic corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Social Responsibility Journal.
  • Bloom PN, Hoeffler S, Keller KL, Meza CEB. How social-cause marketing affects consumer perceptions. MIT Sloan Management Review. 2006; 47 (2):49. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Boenigk S, Schuchardt V. Cause-related marketing campaigns with luxury firms: An experimental study of campaign characteristics, attitudes, and donations. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 2013; 18 (2):101–121. doi: 10.1002/nvsm.1452. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Bowen, H. (1953). Bowen, HR,(1953), Social Responsibilities of the Businessman: New York: Harper & Row.
  • Business2community (2020), “The Rise of Cause Marketing”, available at: https://www.business2community.com/social-business/the-rise-of-cause-marketing-02286159 (accessed January 4, 2021).
  • Carringer PT. Not just a worthy cause: Cause-related marketing delivers the goods and the good. American Advertising. 1994; 10 (1):16–19. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Carroll AB. A three-dimensional conceptual model of corporate performance. Academy of Management Review. 1979; 4 (4):497–505. doi: 10.2307/257850. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Carroll AB. The pyramid of corporate social responsibility: Toward the moral management of organizational stakeholders. Business Horizons. 1991; 34 (4):39–48. doi: 10.1016/0007-6813(91)90005-G. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Carroll, A. B. (2008). A history of corporate social responsibility: Concepts and practices. The Oxford handbook of corporate social responsibility, 1.
  • Chaabane, A. M., & Parguel, B. (2016). The double-edge effect of retailers’ cause-related marketing: When scepticism cools the warm-glow effect. International Journal Retail & Distribution Management .
  • Chang C-T. Missing ingredients in cause-related advertising: The right formula of execution style and cause framing. International Journal of Advertising. 2012; 31 (2):231–256. doi: 10.2501/IJA-31-2-231-256. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Chang C-T, Chu X-YM. The give and take of cause-related marketing: Purchasing cause-related products licenses consumer indulgence. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science. 2020; 48 (2):203–221. doi: 10.1007/s11747-019-00675-5. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Chéron, E., Kohlbacher, F., & Kusuma, K. (2012). The effects of brand-cause fit and campaign duration on consumer perception of cause-related marketing in Japan. Journal of consumer marketing .
  • Choi S, Lee S, Friske W. The effects of featured advertising and package labeling on sustainability of cause-related marketing (CRM) products. Sustainability. 2018; 10 (9):3011. doi: 10.3390/su10093011. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Christofi M, Kaufmann HR, Vrontis D, Leonidou E. Cause-related marketing and strategic agility: An integrated framework for gaining the competitive advantage. World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development. 2013; 9 (4):518–542. doi: 10.1504/WREMSD.2013.056758. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Christofi M, Leonidou E, Vrontis D. Cause–related marketing, product innovation and extraordinary sustainable leadership: The root towards sustainability. Global Business and Economics Review. 2015; 17 (1):93–111. doi: 10.1504/GBER.2015.066533. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Cone CL, Feldman MA, DaSilva AT. Causes and effects. Harvard Business Review. 2003; 81 (7):95–101. [ PubMed ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Cone (2010). “2010 Cause Evolution Study”, available at https://www.conecomm.com/research-blog/2010-cause-evolution-study (accessed January 4, 2021).
  • Cosgrave, D., & O'Dwyer, M. (2020). Ethical standards and perceptions of CRM among millennial consumers. International Marketing Review .
  • Cui, Y., Trent, E. S., Sullivan, P. M., & Matiru, G. N. (2003). Cause-related marketing: How generation Y responds. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management .
  • Deb, M., & Amawate, V. (2019). Extending the knowledge on cause-related marketing (CrM) campaign with focus on skepticism. VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems.
  • Docherty S, Hibbert S. Examining company experiences of a UK cause-related marketing campaign. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 2003; 8 (4):378–389. doi: 10.1002/nvsm.227. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Du, L., Hou, J., & Huang, Y. (2008). Mechanisms of power and action for cause-related marketing. Baltic Journal of Management .
  • Elkington, J. (2001). The triple bottom line for 21st century business. The Earthscan reader in business and sustainable development, 20–43.
  • Endacott, R. W. J. (2004). Consumers and CRM: A national and global perspective. Journal of consumer marketing .
  • Engage for food (2021): Official website. Retrieved from https://engageforgood.com/iegs-growth-cause-marketing/ (25 th July 2021)
  • Ferraris, A., Del Giudice, M., Grandhi, B., & Cillo, V. (2019). Refining the relation between cause-related marketing and consumers purchase intentions: A cross-country analysis. International Marketing Review.
  • File KM, Prince RA. Cause related marketing and corporate philanthropy in the privately held enterprise. Journal of Business Ethics. 1998; 17 (14):1529–1539. doi: 10.1023/A:1005869418526. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Fromherz K. Cause-related marketing. American Nurseryman. 2006; 203 (6):46. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Galan-Ladero MM. Variables that influence attitude toward cause-related marketing and determinants of satisfaction and loyalty in the ‘solidarity purchase’ International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing. 2012; 9 (2):199–200. doi: 10.1007/s12208-011-0080-y. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Galan-Ladero MM, Galera-Casquet C, Valero-Amaro V, Barroso-Mendez MJ. Sustainable, socially responsible business: The cause-related marketing case. A review of the conceptual framework. Journal of Security and Sustainability Issues. 2013; 2 (4):35–46. doi: 10.9770/jssi.2013.2.4(4). [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Galan-Ladero MM, Galera-Casquet C, Wymer W. Attitudes towards cause-related marketing: Determinants of satisfaction and loyalty. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing. 2013; 10 (3):253–269. doi: 10.1007/s12208-013-0103-y. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Gregory, G., Ngo, L., & Miller, R. (2019). Branding for non-profits: Explaining new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Journal of Product & Brand Management .
  • Grolleau G, Ibanez L, Lavoie N. Cause-related marketing of products with a negative externality. Journal of Business Research. 2016; 69 (10):4321–4330. doi: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2016.04.006. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Guerreiro J, Rita P, Trigueiros D. A text mining-based review of cause-related marketing literature. Journal of Business Ethics. 2016; 139 (1):111–128. doi: 10.1007/s10551-015-2622-4. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Gupta, S., & Pirsch, J. (2006a). The company-cause-customer fit decision in cause-related marketing. Journal of Consumer Marketing.
  • Gupta S, Pirsch J. A taxonomy of cause-related marketing research: Current findings and future research directions. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2006; 15 (1–2):25–43. doi: 10.1300/J054v15n01_02. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Hajjat MM. Effect of cause-related marketing on attitudes and purchase intentions: The moderating role of cause involvement and donation size. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2003; 11 (1):93–109. doi: 10.1300/J054v11n01_07. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Handa M, Gupta S. Digital cause-related marketing campaigns: Relationship between brand-cause fit and behavioural intentions. Journal of Indian Business Research. 2020; 12 (1):63–78. doi: 10.1108/JIBR-09-2019-0285. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Hawkens G, Stead J. Who chooses? The family and their buying decisions. The influence of partnership between companies and charities on family purchasing decisions. NCH Action for Children; 1996. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Hawkins R. Shifting conceptualizations of ethical consumption: Cause-related marketing in India and the USA. Geoforum. 2015; 67 :172–182. doi: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2015.05.007. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • He. (1999). Knowledge discovery through co-word analysis.
  • He H, Chao MM, Zhu W. Cause-related marketing and employee engagement: The roles of admiration, implicit morality beliefs, and moral identity. Journal of Business Research. 2019; 95 :83–92. doi: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2018.10.013. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Heald, M. (1957). Management's responsibility to society: The growth of an idea. The Business History Review, 375–384.
  • Heald M. The social responsibilities of business: Company and community 1900–1960. Transaction Publishers; 1970. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Heidarian E. The impact of trust propensity on consumers’ cause-related marketing purchase intentions and the moderating role of culture and gender. Journal of International Consumer Marketing. 2019; 31 (4):345–362. doi: 10.1080/08961530.2019.1575316. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • IEG (2018). “Cause Sponsorship Spending To Total $2.14 Billion In 2018”, available at: https://www.sponsorship.com/Latest-Thinking/Sponsorship-Infographics/Cause-Sponsorship-Spending-To-Total-$2-14-Billion.aspx (accessed July 26, 2021).
  • IEG (2019). “Sponsorship spending of causes to grow 4.6% in 2019”, available at: https://www.sponsorship.com/Latest-Thinking/Sponsorship-Infographics/Sponsorship-Spending-of-Causes-to-Grow-4-6%2D%2Din-201.aspx (accessed January 4, 2021).
  • IEG (2020). “ Executive Summary” , available at: https://www.sponsorship.com/Latest-Thinking/Sponsorship-Infographics/Executive-Summary-page.aspx (accessed July 26, 2021).
  • Imas A. Working for the “warm glow”: On the benefits and limits of prosocial incentives. Journal of Public Economics. 2014; 114 :14–18. doi: 10.1016/j.jpubeco.2013.11.006. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Jahdi, K. (2014). Cause-related marketing (CaRM) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Social Responsibility Journal.
  • Jeong HJ, Kim J. Benefits of cause-related marketing for companies and nonprofits: Focusing on the roles of self-corporate congruency and issue involvement. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing. 2020; 17 :317–330. doi: 10.1007/s12208-020-00247-2. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Jones TM. Corporate social responsibility revisited, redefined. California Management Review. 1980; 22 (3):59–67. doi: 10.2307/41164877. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Jung MJ, Naughton JP, Tahoun A, Wang C. Do firms strategically disseminate? Evidence from corporate use of social media. The Accounting Review. 2018; 93 (4):225–252. doi: 10.2308/accr-51906. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Kim YJ, Lee WN. Overcoming consumer skepticism in cause-related marketing: The effects of corporate social responsibility and donation size claim objectivity. Journal of Promotion Management. 2009; 15 (4):465–483. doi: 10.1080/10496490903270232. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Kim, J.-E., & Johnson, K. K. (2013). The impact of moral emotions on cause-related marketing campaigns: A cross-cultural examination. Journal of Business Ethics, 112 (1), 79–90.
  • Kotler P, Hessekiel D, Lee N. Good works!: Marketing and corporate initiatives that build a better world... And the bottom line. John Wiley & Sons; 2012. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Kotler, P., & Lee, N. (2005). Corporate social responsibility - doing the most good for your company “, John Wiley & Sons. INC, New Jersey.
  • Kramer, M. R., & Porter, M. (2011). Creating shared value (Vol. 17).
  • Kumar, P., Singh, S. K., Pereira, V., & Leonidou, E. (2020). Cause-related marketing and service innovation in emerging country healthcare. International Marketing Review.
  • La Ferle C, Kuber G, Edwards SM. Factors impacting responses to cause-related marketing in India and the United States: Novelty, altruistic motives, and company origin. Journal of Business Research. 2013; 66 (3):364–373. doi: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2011.08.017. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Lafferty BA, Goldsmith RE. Cause–brand alliances: Does the cause help the brand or does the brand help the cause? Journal of Business Research. 2005; 58 (4):423–429. doi: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2003.07.001. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Lafferty BA, Lueth AK, McCafferty R. An evolutionary process model of cause-related marketing and systematic review of the empirical literature. Psychology & Marketing. 2016; 33 (11):951–970. doi: 10.1002/mar.20930. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Lantos, G. P. (2001). The boundaries of strategic corporate social responsibility. Journal of consumer marketing.
  • Larson BV, Flaherty KE, Zablah AR, Brown TJ, Wiener JL. Linking cause-related marketing to sales force responses and performance in a direct selling context. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science. 2008; 36 (2):271–277. doi: 10.1007/s11747-007-0056-y. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Lavack AM, Kropp F. A cross-cultural comparison of consumer attitudes toward cause-related marketing. Social Marketing Quarterly. 2003; 9 (2):3–16. doi: 10.1080/15245000309103. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Lee Thomas M, Mullen LG, Fraedrich J. Increased word-of-mouth via strategic cause-related marketing. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 2011; 16 (1):36–49. doi: 10.1002/nvsm.393. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Liston-Heyes C, Liu G. Cause-related marketing in the retail and finance sectors: An exploratory study of the determinants of cause selection and nonprofit alliances. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly. 2010; 39 (1):77–101. doi: 10.1177/0899764008326680. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Liston-Heyes, C., & Liu, G. (2013). A study of non-profit organisations in cause-related marketing. European Journal of Marketing.
  • Liu G. Impacts of instrumental versus relational centered logic on cause-related marketing decision making. Journal of Business Ethics. 2013; 113 (2):243–263. doi: 10.1007/s10551-012-1292-8. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Liu G, Ko W-W. An analysis of cause-related marketing implementation strategies through social alliance: Partnership conditions and strategic objectives. Journal of Business Ethics. 2011; 100 (2):253–281. doi: 10.1007/s10551-010-0679-7. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Liu G, Ko WW. An integrated model of cause-related marketing strategy development. AMS review. 2014; 4 (3–4):78–95. doi: 10.1007/s13162-014-0061-5. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Liu Z, Yin Y, Liu W, Dunford M. Visualizing the intellectual structure and evolution of innovation systems research: A bibliometric analysis. Scientometrics. 2015; 103 (1):135–158. doi: 10.1007/s11192-014-1517-y. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Manojkumar, S. S., & Sharma, D. M. S. (2018). An empirical study to measure the effect of brand loyalty and skepticism on purchase intention with reference to cause related Marketing in Ahmedabad City. Journal of Management , 5(2).
  • Mullen J. Performance-based corporate philanthropy: How" giving smart" can further corporate goals. Public Relations Quarterly. 1997; 42 (2):42. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Natarajan T, Balasubramaniam SA, Jublee DI. A journey of cause related marketing from 1988 to 2016. International Journal of Business and Management. 2016; 11 (11):247–263. doi: 10.5539/ijbm.v11n11p247. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Nerur SP, Rasheed AA, Natarajan V. The intellectual structure of the strategic management field: An author co-citation analysis. Strategic Management Journal. 2008; 29 (3):319–336. doi: 10.1002/smj.659. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Nowak LI, Clarke TK. Cause-related marketing: Keys to successful relationships with corporate sponsors and their customers. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2003; 11 (1):137–149. doi: 10.1300/J054v11n01_09. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Persson, O., Danell, R., & Schneider, J. W. (2009). How to use Bibexcel for various types of bibliometric analysis. Celebrating scholarly communication studies: A Festschrift for Olle Persson at his 60th birthday, 5 , 9-24.
  • Poje, T., & Groff, M. Z. (2021). Mapping ethics education in accounting research: A bibliometric analysis. Journal of Business Ethics, 1–22. [ PMC free article ] [ PubMed ]
  • Polonsky MJ, Macdonald EK. Exploring the link between cause-related marketing and brand building. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 2000; 5 (1):46–57. doi: 10.1002/nvsm.96. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Polonsky, M. J., & Speed, R. (2001). Linking sponsorship and cause related marketing. European Journal of Marketing.
  • Polonsky MJ, Wood G. Can the overcommercialization of cause-related marketing harm society? Journal of Macromarketing. 2001; 21 (1):8–22. doi: 10.1177/0276146701211002. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Pracejus JW, Olsen GD, Brown NR. On the prevalence and impact of vague quantifiers in the advertising of cause-related marketing (CRM) Journal of Advertising. 2003; 32 (4):19–28. doi: 10.1080/00913367.2003.10639146. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Pringle H, Thompson M. Brand spirit: how cause-related marketing builds brands. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons; 1999. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Pringle, H., & Thompson, M. (2001). How cause-related marketing builds brands. Chichester, New York: Weinheim, Brisbane, Singapore and Toronto: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Ptacek JJ, Salazar G. Enlightened self-interest: Selling business on the benefits of cause-related marketing. Nonprofit World. 1997; 15 :9–9. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Royd-Taylor L. Cause-related marketing: A new perspective on achieving campaign objectives amongst fast moving consumer goods. Strategic Change. 2007; 16 (1–2):79–86. doi: 10.1002/jsc.778. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Runté M, Basil DZ, Deshpande S. Cause-related marketing from the nonprofit's perspective: Classifying goals and experienced outcomes. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2009; 21 (3):255–270. doi: 10.1080/10495140802644505. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Sabri O. The detrimental effect of cause-related marketing parodies. Journal of Business Ethics. 2018; 151 (2):517–537. doi: 10.1007/s10551-016-3232-5. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Samu S, Wymer WW., Jr Nonprofit-business alliance model: Formation and outcomes. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2001; 9 (1–2):45–61. doi: 10.1300/J054v09n01_04. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Santoro, G., Bresciani, S., Bertoldi, B., & Liu, Y. (2019). Cause-related marketing, brand loyalty and corporate social responsibility: A cross-country analysis of Italian and Japanese consumers. International Marketing Review.
  • Schyvinck C, Willem A. From cause-related marketing strategy to implementation in professional basketball organizations: A matter of alignment. European Sport Management Quarterly. 2019; 19 (1):58–79. doi: 10.1080/16184742.2018.1563625. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Sekaran U. Methodological and theoretical issues and advancements in cross-cultural research. Journal of International Business Studies. 1983; 14 (2):61–73. doi: 10.1057/palgrave.jibs.8490519. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Smith, S. M., & Alcorn, D. S. (1991). Cause marketing: A new direction in the marketing of corporate responsibility. Journal of consumer marketing.
  • Srivastava R. For brand alliance social or cause related marketing which one is better? A study in emerging markets. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 2020; 25 (2):e1656. doi: 10.1002/nvsm.1656. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Steenkamp, J. B. E. (2001). The role of national culture in international marketing research. International Marketing Review.
  • Stumpf M, Teufl I. Empirische Untersuchung des Einsatzes von cause related marketing cause related marketing . Springer; 2014. pp. 97–115. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Svensson G, Wood G. Cause related marketing? Commercialism or altruism: Finding the balance? International Journal of Electronic Customer Relationship Management. 2007; 1 (3):231–241. doi: 10.1504/IJECRM.2007.017793. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Svensson, G., & Wood, G. (2011). A model of cause-related marketing for “profit-driven” and “non-profit” organizations. European Business Review.
  • Tangari AH, Folse JAG, Burton S, Kees J. The moderating influence of consumers' temporal orientation on the framing of societal needs and corporate responses in cause-related marketing campaigns. Journal of Advertising. 2010; 39 (2):35–50. doi: 10.2753/JOA0091-3367390203. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Thamaraiselvan N, Arasu BS, Inbaraj JD. Role of celebrity in cause related marketing. International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing. 2017; 14 (3):341–357. doi: 10.1007/s12208-017-0176-0. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Thomas ML, Fraedrich JP, Mullen LG. Successful cause-related marketing partnering as a means to aligning corporate and philanthropic goals: An empirical study. Academy of Marketing Studies Journal. 2011; 15 (2):113. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Thomas S, Kureshi S, Vatavwala S. Cause-related marketing research (1988–2016): An academic review and classification. Journal of Nonprofit & Public Sector Marketing. 2020; 32 (5):488–516. doi: 10.1080/10495142.2019.1606757. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Till, B. D., & Nowak, L. I. (2000). Toward effective use of cause-related marketing alliances. Journal of Product & Brand Management.
  • Vaidyanathan R, Aggarwal P, Kozłowski W. Interdependent self-construal in collectivist cultures: Effects on compliance in a cause-related marketing context. Journal of Marketing Communications. 2013; 19 (1):44–57. doi: 10.1080/13527266.2011.551833. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Van den Brink, D., Odekerken-Schröder, G., & Pauwels, P. (2006). The effect of strategic and tactical cause-related marketing on consumers' brand loyalty. Journal of consumer marketing.
  • Varadarajan PR, Menon A. Cause-related marketing: A coalignment of marketing strategy and corporate philanthropy. Journal of Marketing. 1988; 52 (3):58–74. doi: 10.1177/002224298805200306. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Vrontis, D., Thrassou, A., Christofi, M., Shams, R., & Czinkota, M. R. (2020). Cause-related marketing in international business: What works and what does not? International Marketing Review.
  • Walton CC. Corporate social responsibilities. Wadsworth Publishing Company; 1967. [ Google Scholar ]
  • Wang Y. Individualism/collectivism, charitable giving, and cause-related marketing: A comparison of Chinese and Americans. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 2014; 19 (1):40–51. doi: 10.1002/nvsm.1486. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Webb DJ, Mohr LA. A typology of consumer responses to cause-related marketing: From skeptics to socially concerned. Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. 1998; 17 (2):226–238. doi: 10.1177/074391569801700207. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Woo, H., Kim, S., & Childs, M. L. (2019). Is this for our sake or their sake? Cross-cultural effects of message focus in cause-related marketing. International Marketing Review.
  • Woodroof PJ, Deitz GD, Howie KM, Evans RD. The effect of cause-related marketing on firm value: A look at Fortune’s most admired all-stars. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science. 2019; 47 (5):899–918. doi: 10.1007/s11747-019-00660-y. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Yun JT, Duff BR, Vargas P, Himelboim I, Sundaram H. Can we find the right balance in cause-related marketing? Analyzing the boundaries of balance theory in evaluating brand-cause partnerships. Psychology & Marketing. 2019; 36 (11):989–1002. doi: 10.1002/mar.21250. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]
  • Zupic I, Čater T. Bibliometric methods in management and organization. Organizational Research Methods. 2015; 18 (3):429–472. doi: 10.1177/1094428114562629. [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ]

IMAGES

  1. Best Marketing Thesis Topics by Marketing Dissertation

    research thesis related to marketing

  2. (DOC) Marketing Thesis Sample

    research thesis related to marketing

  3. Calaméo

    research thesis related to marketing

  4. Marketing Thesis Topics for MBA by MBA Diss

    research thesis related to marketing

  5. Marketing Thesis Free Sample

    research thesis related to marketing

  6. 10+ Marketing Research Proposal Templates & Examples

    research thesis related to marketing

VIDEO

  1. What is research

  2. Choosing a Research Topic

  3. Research Methodology For Business Research

  4. The Academic Research Process

  5. Introduction to Research

  6. Tips on how to develop an interesting research topic for graduate students

COMMENTS

  1. Marketing Theses and Dissertations

    Theses/Dissertations from 2009. An Empirical Examination of the Dark Side of Relationship Marketing within a Business to Business Context, Brent L. Baker. Developing the Nomological Network of Perceived Corporate Affinity for Technology: A Three Essay Dissertation, David Earl Fleming.

  2. PDF Marketing: Selected Doctoral Theses

    generated content. Traditionally, market research relies on interviews and focus groups to identify customer needs. User-generated content (UGC), such as online reviews, social media, and call-center data, provides an opportunity to identify customer needs more efficiently. Established methods are not well-suited for large UGC

  3. (PDF) Research in Marketing Strategy

    Abstract. Marketing strategy is a construct that lies at the conceptual heart of the field of strategic marketing and is central to the practice of marketing. It is also the area within which many ...

  4. Research Topics In Marketing (+ Free Webinar)

    Finding and choosing a strong research topic is the critical first step when it comes to crafting a high-quality dissertation, thesis or research project. If you've landed on this post, chances are you're looking for a marketing-related research topic, but aren't sure where to start. If so, you've come to the right place.

  5. 25 Marketing Management Dissertation Topics

    Luckily, we've done the work for you. Here is a list of the latest marketing management dissertation topics to help you out. Using financial products in the UK retail banking sector. A study of how service quality and customer satisfaction affect brand equity. A study of the antecedents and consequences of a firm's reputation.

  6. (PDF) The effectiveness of marketing strategy making processes: A

    Using well-established theories from the sociological perspective of the organisational behaviour literature, this work proposes relevant questions for future research in this field.Journal of ...

  7. A Scoping Review of the Effect of Content Marketing on Online Consumer

    While not a mature field yet, the body of knowledge of content marketing has grown over the last 12 years since the first scholarly paper about content marketing by Rowley (2008).Although some confusion about content marketing remains, more recent studies across different disciplines have focused on how content marketing influences online consumer behavior and the mechanisms used to achieve ...

  8. Social media in marketing research: Theoretical bases, methodological

    1 INTRODUCTION. The exponential growth of social media during the last decade has drastically changed the dynamics of firm-customer interactions and transformed the marketing environment in many profound ways.1 For example, marketing communications are shifting from one to many to one to one, as customers are changing from being passive observers to being proactive collaborators, enabled by ...

  9. Research in marketing strategy

    Marketing strategy is a construct that lies at the conceptual heart of the field of strategic marketing and is central to the practice of marketing. It is also the area within which many of the most pressing current challenges identified by marketers and CMOs arise. We develop a new conceptualization of the domain and sub-domains of marketing strategy and use this lens to assess the current ...

  10. Cause-related marketing: a systematic review of the literature

    Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is one of the most versatile activities among the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Though CRM is extensively researched, however, only a few authors have performed systematic literature reviews on CRM. Therefore, more systematic reviews of CRM are still needed to complete and bring together the more contributions, advances, and different existing ...

  11. PDF Marketing Strategies and Customer Satisfaction: a Case Study of The

    the continuous support of my Masters research, for his patience, motivation, and immense knowledge. His guidance helped me during the time of research and writing of this thesis. I could not have imagined having a better advisor and mentor for my study. Besides my advisor, I would also like to thank Mr. Chumo for patiently guiding me in the

  12. 86715 PDFs

    Explore the latest full-text research PDFs, articles, conference papers, preprints and more on MARKETING RESEARCH. Find methods information, sources, references or conduct a literature review on ...

  13. PDF Assessing the Effect of Marketing Strategy on Market Performance: the

    A THESIS SUBMITTED TO ST.MARY'S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ... answers, several fundamental questions guide this research. Marketing strategy determines the choice of segments, target market, positioning, marketing mix, and

  14. Effective Marketing Strategies of Profitable Small Businesses

    organization's marketing capability is an effective strategic choice to create points of. difference from the competition (Ju, Jin, & Zhou, 2018). Agents and small business owners should target and adapt competitive strategies. such as building relationships with customers to gain a competitive edge. Agents.

  15. Browsing HBS Theses and Dissertations by Keyword "Business

    Essays on the Social Consumer: Peer Influence in the Adoption and Engagement of Digital Goods . Davin, Joseph (2015-05-26) In this dissertation, I study how consumers influence each other in the adoption and engagement of digital goods. In the first essay, I study peer influence in mobile game adoption. Although peer effects are expected to ...

  16. PDF IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOR

    Master's thesis Date September 2020 Language of publication: English Number of pages 54 ... marketing; to determine the impacts of social media marketing on consumer attitudes; to ... because they are most closely related to this research. 2.2 Theoretical Review 2.2.1 Psychological Ownership Theory Asatryan and Oh (2008) applied this model ...

  17. Marketing Dissertation Topics

    Topic 1: Assessing the role of Communication Strategies in Fashion Marketing- a case study of UK. Research Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of communication strategies in the world of UK fashion marketing. This will also give us an understanding of how new fashion remanufacturing should be communicated to the consumers.

  18. 233 Marketing Research Topics You Never Knew Existed

    Sport Marketing Research Topics. The role of sports hubs in the management of sports organizations. Facilities and services that help save costs on sports. Sourcing of funding for sporting activities in developing countries. The part of the World Cup and Olympic games on marketing strategies and promotional messages.

  19. 71+ Research Paper Topics & Ideas for Marketing Students

    Product Design & Positioning. Direct Marketing. Advertising. Purchasing & Materials Management. Hopefully, these marketing thesis topics will help you come up with a few topics of your own. If you're still confused about which area, you'd like to work with, we suggest you consult your advisor for some additional help.

  20. Marketing Dissertation Topics for FREE

    Firm performance and corporate social responsibility. An investigation into the role of marketing competence and market environment. Marketing Dissertation Topics - over 100 free, excellent Master & Bachelor dissertation topics will help you get started with your proposal or dissertation.

  21. Master's thesis research in social marketing (1971-2015)

    Findings. Only four theses were submitted from 1971-1980 and eight completed in 1981-1990. The number of theses increased to 35 in 1991-2000, 118 between 2001 and 2010 and 101 in the past five years (2011-2015). The USA was the leading producer of social marketing master's theses, followed by Canada, Sweden, China, South Africa, the UK and Kenya.

  22. 120+ Marketing Research Paper Topics To Impress Everyone

    Sports marketing is a trendy type of marketing. Here are some sports marketing research topics you should consider. A Critical Analysis Of The Effect Of Traditional Advertising On Ticket Purchases. A Study Of How Football Teams Use Social Media Platforms (Twitter) To Gain The Loyalty Of Their Fans.

  23. PDF SUSTAINABLE MARKETING

    3.1 Related marketing concepts 15 3.2 Sustainable marketing defined 17 3.3 Sustainable consumer behaviour 19 3.4 Sustainable marketing strategy 22 ... Therefore, this thesis uses qualitative research me is research was collected from both primary and se ical part books, articles and the internet were used a

  24. Top 100 Marketing Research Topics For Your Paper

    The effect of social media on buying choices. Online purchasing: a study of the product characteristics buyers look for. An exploration of the differences in marketing strategies across cultures. Manipulation tactics: how brands can get more customers. A study of how customer loyalty is affected by brand image.

  25. Ph.D. in Marketing Areas of Research

    Areas of Research. At the Eli Broad College of Business, students in the marketing Ph.D. program have the opportunity to work and publish with some of the most prolific researchers in marketing. Faculty-student collaboration is a significant part of the doctoral experience, and it leads to results. Doctoral students work with faculty to ...

  26. Theses and Dissertations (Marketing Management)

    Establishing the antecedents and outcomes of service climate. Kotze, Theuns G. (University of Pretoria, 2021-07) The aim of this article-based thesis was to develop and test four structural models of the antecedents and outcomes of service climate on data collected from frontline employees, store managers, and customers nested in 70 ...

  27. Doctoral Researchers Shine in 3MT Championship

    Nine doctoral students explained their complex research and its importance in under three minutes during the championship round of Carnegie Mellon University's Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, held Thursday, March 14 in Tepper School of Business's Simmons Auditorium A. The event, which is in ...

  28. Cause-related marketing: a systematic review of the literature

    Cause-Related Marketing (CRM) is a versatile and growing activity in the marketing field. It provides opportunities to profit and non-profit organizations, and consumers, to participate in a social cause (Varadarajan & Menon, 1988 ). Since 1988, CRM initiatives have gradually increased for more than three decades.