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Music Theory Worksheets–50+ Free Printables

The Ultimate Music Theory Worksheet Guide

Welcome to the Ultimate Music Theory Worksheet Guide

The definitive handbook for the effective use of theory worksheets–with engaging companion activities and over 50 free printables that make learning theory fun.

How to get started:

1. Click play to see a quick overview of the resources in the guide.

2. Scroll down to read the Ultimate Guide. To print any of the 50+ worksheets for free, just click on an image.

3. Apply the active learning ideas. Double the effectiveness of each printable by utilizing the fun companion activities described below.

View a specific category by clicking on any of the quick links below:

  • Circle of Fifths
  • Scales and Chords
  • Music Symbols
  • Music Alphabet

The Ultimate Music Theory Worksheet Guide

1. note names.

Pirate Note Name Worksheet

Help your new beginners master the notes as quickly as possible, and you’ll see that kids learn new pieces easier and with less frustration. This increases their satisfaction with your instruction and boosts their confidence. It’s true that time is a precious commodity during a lesson, but reserving time for note reading is worth every second! Read on for fun free music theory printables and ideas for applied learning activities that teach note identification.

Spot the Note--a note name worksheet

2. Use the printable to play a game . Give your students a copy of the worksheet and a handful of small candies like M&M’s. Call out a note name and ask your students to place a candy over the correct note. At the end of the game, students get to eat all the candies. This game works well both as a group game or in a private lesson.

3. You can also use this printout to give kids extra practice with the stem rules . Hand them the worksheet and ask them to add stems to all the notes. Turn it into a fun manipulative exercise by giving your students yarn or pretzel sticks that they can use to add the stems. I guarantee they’ll have a ball with this easy activity for your hands-on learners.

bubble_note_name_worksheet

I designed Bubble Notes with new beginners in mind. When you’re working with students who are just being introduced to the notes on the staff, you’ll want to give them extra note identification practice, but they’ll feel overwhelmed if you hand them a standard note name worksheet . This worksheet only has treble notes middle C through G and the top notes of the bass staff , which are typically the first notes a beginner pianist learns in her method books. This worksheet has a fun them that’s appealing to young kids and they enjoy writing their answers inside the bubbles.

Black and white note identification worksheet

Remember that it is important to give your music students many frequent opportunities to practice note names . Practice note identification at every lesson with new beginners. If you have any students who are far along, but seem to struggle with some notes, I encourage you to pause and make time for reviewing note names. You’ll see dramatic improvement in their abilities and in their attitude towards music lessons. I’ve created quite a few note name activities, and I encourage you to utilize them to help kids master the notes as soon as possible. Their music studies will be much easier as soon as they do!

Try it today:

  • Print Polka Dot Notes and play the fun hands on activity described above that helps kids learn note names.
  • Give your young beginners a copy of Bubble Notes. See how many notes they correctly identify and then give them extra practice with problem notes.

2. Music Intervals

Music interval stars

I made Music Interval Stars for kids who are just getting introduced to music intervals. Keep in mind that you can start introducing intervals even to very young students. We sometimes think we need to wait, but it’s really not necessary. I’ve seen five year old kids quickly become proficient, and it puts them on a super fast track for reading music.

Here’s how I like to introduce intervals. I first show simple examples–the Music Interval Stars worksheet works great. We learn how to count the lines and spaces to give the interval a name. We’ll practice this for several weeks until I feel like the kids have a sound understanding of how intervals are classified by size. Then we’ll started working on rapid identification by sight (without counting lines and spaces).

Music_Intervals_Worksheet

Now let me share with you a great interval activity that will help your students with ear training and help them better understand how music works: Print out one of these worksheets and have your student identify all the intervals. Then highlight three or four of them and ask your student to play the notes and describe the sounds . First play the notes melodically and then harmonically. Ask leading questions to help your student get really specific in describing the characteristics of the sound. Does it sound happy or sad? Calm or tense? Do you think these notes could be used to end a song, or does it sound like the notes need resolution?

Here’s one more activity that will help your students really internalize these intervals. Ask your students to go home and compose a short song that contains all of the intervals you highlighted and discussed on the worksheet. Before turning them loose, you might help them analyze which of the intervals could be used for an interesting introduction, and which would give their piece a good conclusion. This simple activity will get you big results, and I encourage you to print out one of the worksheets today and try it with your students. You’ll be impressed by their creations and their retention of the material.

  • Print Music Interval Stars for your young students and Music Intervals for kids who are more advanced. Help students identify all the intervals on the page.
  • Highlight a few intervals from the worksheet. Play them and discuss the characteristics of the sound. Then invite students to create a song using these intervals.

3. The Circle of Fifths

Music theory worksheet for the circle of fifths

This particular printable is one of the most popular music theory worksheets on my website . It’s also one of my personal favorites because music students get to practice two important concepts that go hand in hand. To complete the worksheet, students first go around the circle and write the name of each key . Then students can go back through and practice writing the sharps and flats to complete each key signature. You can remind them to pay special attention to the correct placement of the sharps and flats . Give your students a new copy of this worksheet about every other month and before long they’ll be pros at using the circle of fifths and key signatures.

Circle of fifths worksheet for grayscale printing

Once completed, either of these printables can be used to play a game called “Dizzy Keynote Frenzy” . Sit near the piano and all you need is the printout, a marker, a die, and a token for each player. Place all tokens on the same wedge and player 1 rolls the die and moves that number of spaces around the circle. The student then has 30 seconds to play the keynote that corresponds to that section of the circle. If she answers correctly, she gets to write her initials in the space. The next player then takes a turn to roll the die. If his token lands on a space that already has initials, he looses that turn. Play continues until every wedge has a set of initials. The player who initialed the most sections of the circle of fifths wins.

I created a couple more variations on these activities so that you can find the one that best fits your goals for teaching your students. There are black and white copies for teachers who have a large class and can’t afford colored printing. There are music worksheets that focus on treble clef key signatures and others that focus on bass clef key signatures so that you can help your students become proficient with both clefs–especially when it comes to writing the sharps and flats on the correct line or space. To see these printables, visit circle of fifths worksheets .

  • Review two critical concepts at once with the colored circle of fifths worksheet above. Students get to identify each key and also practice writing sharps and flats to complete a key signature.
  • Use the completed worksheet to play the game “Dizzy Keynote Frenzy” (see instructions above).

4. Rhythm Worksheets

Best shot rhythm worksheet

Grab the printed worksheet, a basket and three beanbags or small balls. Hand your student the worksheet and ask him to give it his best shot and see if he can get a perfect score. Tell him that if he gets a perfect score, he’ll get to try his hand at scoring points with a real basket.

This music worksheet covers these rhythm topics:

  • Writing the counts beneath the notes in a measure
  • Adding barlines where needed to give each measure the correct number of beats

If the student misses an answer or two, help him understand how to get the correct answers and then let him have a turn tossing the beanbags or balls into the basket. Your student will have a blast and will probably remember this rhythm lesson years later!

Rhythm Worksheet: Time Signature Cookies

Each cookie displays a time signature that matches one of the example measures. You can have your students draw a line from the cookie to the correct measure, or you can ask them to write in the time signature for each measure. I usually prefer to have them write it in, just because I think it’s good practice for students.

If you have any students who miss several answers, go through the assignment with them and help them write the counts beneath each note or rest . I had one student who kept missing these until I finally discovered wasn’t giving the rests any beats.

Missing Bar Lines Printable

Turn this worksheet into a fun manipulative activity by giving your students pull-apart licorice or pretzel sticks. They can use the snacks to add the bar lines. They’ll be extra motivated to do their best if you tell them that they get to eat the snacks after they’ve correctly completed the exercise!

  • Grab a basket and a small ball and let kids “give it their best shot” after completing the worksheet.
  • Give kids a snack as they work on Missing Bar Lines. Pretzel sticks or licorice can be used for bar lines and your students will love it!

5. Piano Worksheets

Piano worksheet for learning names of piano keys

Fun Ideas for Active Learning: After completing the worksheet, ask kids to find and play each note on the piano. Or give the child a handful of blue, green, and orange beads and ask him to place a bead on the piano key that matches the highlighted keys on the printable. Have him name the key each time he places a bead.

Piano worksheets to learn finger numbers

Fun Ideas for Active Learning: Point to a number on the worksheet and ask your student to play a white key with that finger. Then point to another number and ask the child to play a black key with the correct finger. There are a lot of variations if you ask for right hand or left hand, or if your students know the names of the keys and you call out a finger number and the letter name of a key. For more music theory printables that are specific to the piano, see piano worksheets

  • Use Howdy, Partner to drill the names of the piano keys. Practice finding and playing each key on the physical piano after completing the worksheet.
  • Reinforce finger numbers with young kids by utilizing the finger numbers printout.

6. Scales and Chords

Music theory worksheet for learning the whole and half step pattern in major scales

Scale Detective lets kids imagine that they are detectives searching for the clue to how scales are formed. I love that the worksheet includes a keyboard diagram above the notes of the scale. This diagram is especially helpful for beginners who may not yet be able to quickly identify whole and half steps while viewing music notation. But when you relate those notes to the keyboard, it’s easy as pie to see where the half steps are.

Music theory worksheets to teach the whole and half step pattern in major scales

Scales help us understand how one note relates to another within a key, so I encourage you to have your student practice playing scales and know the theory behind how they are formed with half steps and whole steps. Click on the image to the right to print the older student version of the major scales activity.

Music-Theory-Worksheet-4-Major-Chords

Chords are also a super easy way to harmonize a melody when kids make up their own songs or want to embellish a simple piece. Teach kids the formula for building chords, and they’ll be able to play any chord they need. The worksheet featured here helps kids master the formula for building major chords. The half step formula is listed at the top of the page and students just color in the keys needed to complete each chord. This is one of my favorite music theory worksheets to use with older beginners. I like to help them learn their chords as quickly as possible so that they can start having fun with piano improv . And the older students really appreciate this–they’re excited to be able to start making their own impressive music after only a few lessons.

  • Help students figure out the whole half pattern in major scales with Scale Detective. They’ll better retain the information because they discovered it with their own brainpower.
  • Also use these worksheets to teach that each key has a tonal center called a tonic. Students can practice identifying the tonic for each scale on the printout.

7. Drawing Music Symbols

worksheet_for_drawing_music_symbols

This worksheet will help your students pay attention to the details of the symbols and learn how to draw them correctly. Students first trace and then draw the brace, double bar line, bass clef, and treble clef. I’ve found that student are much more confident when then first get to trace the element. Then when they immediately draw it free hand much more accurately.

But don’t get me wrong! The first time students draw a brace or a clef it will look wacky. But with practice they’ll get better. And as your students begin composing their own songs or writing down a little ditty that they’ve improvised, they’ll be able to do so because you took the time to teach them how to draw these symbols.

Drawing_Monster_Rests_Music_Symbols_Worksheet

The biggest monster for most students, however, is the quarter rest. That little squiggly line can cause a lot of frustration for kids. I like to have my students trace it, and then when they freehand I tell them that it looks kind of like a “Z” with a tail. These instructions seem to help and it’s fun to see kids improve as they continue to practice drawing music symbols.

8. Identifying Half Steps and Whole Steps

Music Theory Worksheet for teaching half steps and whole steps

You might go one step further and ask your students to play the notes on the keyboard. Kids who are kinesthetic learners will especially benefit from playing and vocalizing the steps they see.

I recommend that you begin with the keyboard worksheet and then introduce this worksheet that has notes on the staff. This worksheet can be used to build a foundation before delving into the identification of music intervals by type.

Help kids complete this worksheet by having them sit at the keyboard and play the notes. With time, students will be able to identify the steps without sitting at the piano, but this is a great way to help them visualize the distance between the notes.

  • Use the keyboard worksheet to introduce whole and half steps. Then have your student play whole and half steps on the piano.
  • Help students become proficient at classifying whole and half steps on the staff with the second worksheet from this section.

9. Treble Clef Notes and Bass Clef Notes

Free printable treble clef worksheet with alien theme

The most common issue I see is kids that are great with the right hand notes, but really struggle to identify bass clef notes. For whatever reason, kids always seem to need extra practice with those left hand notes, so you’ll want to visit eartrainingandimprov.com often to print bass clef worksheets like the one you see here. You can view all bass clef worksheets by clicking bass clef worksheets

Bass Clef Notes Worksheet

Click on an image to the left to print in black and white.

  • Consider each student. Do any of them struggle with treble or bass clef notes?
  • Print a worksheet for each student that has difficulties. The activities in this section allow you to give special attention to a student’s particular weakness in note reading.

10. Rhythm Worksheets for New Beginners

Rhythm worksheets you can print for free

Do you have really young students who need extra reinforcement with rhythm basics? I created Playing With Rhythm especially for those little ones.

First review with your students what half notes and quarter notes look like. I usually point to a quarter note first and ask the kids to describe what it looks like. We conclude that it’s a black oval with a stem. Then I point to a half note and ask them to tell me what makes this note different from the first note. We conclude that it looks the same, except that it is “empty”.

Then play! Give kids this worksheet and ask them to “run around the playground” looking for all the half notes. Young kids think it’s fun to wander their pencil around this 2D playground and circle the half notes. And after they’ve identified over a dozen, they’ll confidently identify these rhythm notes next time they sit down with their method books.

Early Bird's Bed Head Rhythm Notes

  • Ask your young beginners to circle all the half notes on the Playing With Rhythm printout.
  • Invite students to give Early Bird a crazy hairdo by drawing lines to connect each note with its numeric value. Students will love this silly activity!

11. Music Alphabet

Music Alphabet  Worksheet

This first worksheet is for introducing the music alphabet. You can show them the print out and explain that the music alphabet is just like the regular alphabet, only easier because it has just 7 letters. Invite your student to point to each letter while you recite the music alphabet. Next, hand the child a pencil and ask her to copy the music alphabet onto the lines.

At the next few lessons, continue reviewing the music alphabet by asking the student to verbalize it with you and also write it down. When you think she’s got a good understanding, you’re ready to try this next worksheet.

Music Alphabet What's Next Worksheet

Either of this worksheets can be used with manipulatives. You can use alphabet letter tiles or beads and ask the student to place a bead of the correct letter on the black space. Adding this kind of variety to your lessons will help your students stay excited about piano.

  • Do you have any brand new beginners? Print the music alphabet worksheet and try the activity described above.
  • Use the What’s Next worksheet to evaluate whether your students fully understand that the music alphabet has only 7 letters and then it repeats.

12. Holiday Music Theory Worksheets

Music rhythmic dictation worksheet for Halloween

I’ve created lots of printables with holiday themes and will continue to add to more, so be sure to check back each time a holiday is approaching.

Frankenstems_Halloween_Stem_Rules_Music_Worksheet

Did you enjoy the resources and teaching ideas in this music theory worksheet guide? Here’s what you can do next:

First, leave a comment– we all benefit when we work together and share ideas..

The Ultimate Music Theory Worksheet Guide

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April 7, 2014 at 5:35 am

Thank you for this! My younger kids love doing worksheets with lots of bright colours like this!

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March 17, 2020 at 9:18 pm

Dear Kristen,

An SF Bay Area Piano Studio attempt to survive this Coronavirus Quarantine. Thanks for these worksheets during this time. These worksheets will complement my temporary online instruction for K12 after-school lessons.

Gregory Smith

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May 7, 2023 at 1:09 pm

I REALLY LEARNT A LOT FROM YOUR WORKS SO FAR. INFACT WITH THIS EVERY CHILD WILL BE ABLE TO APPRECIATE THE LESSONS IN MUSIC

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April 7, 2014 at 6:05 am

I’ve seen lots of students who are good at treble clef notes, but really struggle with the bass clef. I’ve tried asking parents to do flashcards at home, but it hasn’t really worked that well. I’m looking forward to trying your worksheets and these fun activities. Thank you!

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April 7, 2014 at 2:10 pm

Have I told you you’re awesome today? I think its fantastic how you create or find all these resources just to hook kids into music. As a public educator with very little resources, I love the free worksheets and activity ideas. Thank you!!!

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April 9, 2014 at 4:33 am

Thanks Beth, Jenny and Heather. I’m glad you like the worksheets!

I know what you mean, Teri. Families are busy and aren’t always able to help their students get in the extra practice they need. We just do the best we can during lessons and that’s why quick activities like these are perfect!

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April 7, 2014 at 10:34 pm

Wow what a useful fun set of resources – thank you!

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April 10, 2014 at 9:21 pm

Wow, wow, WOW! Thank you so much! I have a new 5 year old starting tomorrow. Will laminate and use these. YOu made my day!!

April 11, 2014 at 2:46 am

You’re welcome, Kelly. I’m so glad you’ll be able to use these worksheets and activities with your new student.

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April 22, 2014 at 4:41 pm

Thanks so much! So cute and great tools for teaching!

April 24, 2014 at 5:09 am

Thanks, Diane. I’m glad you visited my little website and that you like the worksheets.

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April 24, 2014 at 9:48 pm

Thank you, Kristin, for a terrific site. I look forward to using these worksheets with my students. I think note names in general are hard for some students.

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July 29, 2014 at 2:50 pm

This is an awesome resource. I teach K-2 music and I can certainly utilize this information.

July 30, 2014 at 4:02 am

Thanks, Bobby! I hope you’ll get lots of use out of these activities!

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July 31, 2014 at 10:55 am

Thanks so much for sharing these learning activities! I know several of my students who will love the cute pictures that somehow make worksheets more fun!

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August 12, 2014 at 12:51 pm

Thank you very much Kristin. They are very appreciated and my students will enjoy them. You are very kind!

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August 14, 2014 at 4:43 am

This is awesome! Thank you so much for selflessly sharing these learning activities. Absolutely a helpful and fun way to learn music theories. Love it :)

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August 14, 2014 at 2:36 pm

Note reading will be the best ones. for me. Thank you for your generosity!

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August 26, 2014 at 7:12 pm

My students are going to love these colorful worksheets with fun graphics! Thank you!

August 27, 2014 at 8:14 pm

You’re very welcome, Regina. Thanks for being so kind. Hope your students have a lot of fun!

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October 17, 2014 at 6:17 am

Thank you so much for these fabulous worksheets!! It makes music theory cool to teach and learn. Your hard work is appreciated!

October 17, 2014 at 6:26 am

Thanks, Roberta! It really has been a lot of work, but it’s worth it when I hear that these resources are helping you make music theory fun to learn. I hope you’ll keep in touch!

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October 20, 2014 at 7:03 am

wow, Im 57, has been teaching since 22! You think like I do! MUSIC HAS TO BE FUN!!! Not many music teachers in South Africa shares this attitude! I hope I can get these downloaded! BC…..Before Computer!

Kind regards

South Africa

October 21, 2014 at 5:22 am

Ilse, how wonderful that these worksheets are being used all the way in South Africa. It’s so fun that we can share ideas and help each other. Great job keeping the right frame of mind during so many years of teaching. You’re right, when music is fun, kids respond so much better. Your students are lucky to have you!

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November 12, 2014 at 10:31 pm

Thank you Kristin! So kind and generous of you to make these worksheets and activities available to all. I can only imagine the time and effort you have put into all this! With appreciation, Peter

December 17, 2014 at 6:30 am

Thanks, Peter! It has been a lot of effort to make these, but worth it when they help kids make more progress and help other teachers save time on lesson prep. Thanks for your kind comment.

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January 6, 2015 at 2:12 am

very very nice… Thank you

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January 13, 2015 at 12:22 am

I loved it! I share all the comments about music theory being fun fun fun! As a cultural & Arts teacher I try to find ways to make Culture, Arts & Music a fun experience for my students. Music theory can be very challenging. Thank you for these awesome Ideas! My musical & warm greetings from sunny Happy Island Of Aruba!

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March 4, 2015 at 8:36 am

Hi, I was struggling hard to teach my son (6yo) the music notes as I am not music trained. This site was an answered prayer! Thank You for your generous sharing for the spread of music education!! I teach mainly Visual Arts. Am very encouraged and inspired by blogs like yours and strive to give freely as well. Lots of Gratitude from the heart!

March 5, 2015 at 8:13 am

Angie, what a sweet comment. I’m so glad that these will help. And I’m super impressed that you’re teaching the notes to your son. Keep up your great work–giving your son a music education will enrich his life in so many ways and he’ll be so grateful for all the time and effort you’re investing to help him grow. What a wonderful mother you are!

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March 24, 2015 at 9:54 am

I super love it. THANKS for the great help :)))))

March 25, 2015 at 4:15 am

Thanks Kesha! You’re super too–keep up your great work!

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April 17, 2015 at 1:38 pm

Thank you so much for these worksheets! My son has autism, visual processing disorder and dyslexia and has been taking piano lessons for almost one year. He has been making steady progress, but we are still having trouble learning the note names. Also each time a new concept is introduced, it is difficult for him to master it. These worksheets are a answer to prayer for us. They are visually spaced so well it is easy for him to see what he is supposed to be learning without the “extra fluff”! We are making more progress since we found them than we had before. He is truly enjoying learning the piano and this has given him such a much needed confidence boost. Thank you! Thank you!

April 17, 2015 at 4:33 pm

Allison, thank you for taking the time to share your son’s progress. That is wonderful! It warms my heart to hear that something I created has played a small role in helping your son with his musical education. You’re a great mom for being so involved in his lessons and for giving him the gift of music.

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January 19, 2017 at 3:26 pm

Thank you for helping kids learn music. The are I live in doesn’t focus on music like when I was young. My kids are missing out on band and basics. This makes it easier for me to teach them to read music and appreciate it.

January 24, 2017 at 4:07 am

So glad these are helpful, Laura. You’re a great mom for filling in the gaps in your children’s education.

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April 19, 2017 at 9:29 am

These resources are very useful. i’m very excited to use all of these in our workshop. It’s really a great help. Thank you very much Kristin for your very creative mind and generous heart to share all of your ideas with us. May God bless you always for thinking others.

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April 21, 2017 at 2:38 pm

Hi Kristin!

I love your site, and I use A LOT of your free printables for my students! I was wondering if you had any more worksheets on note values than listed here? Maybe some with time signatures or adding up the note values or creating rhythms. Thanks!

April 23, 2017 at 3:27 pm

So glad that these worksheets are helpful! You’re right, I do need to get more rhythm worksheets uploaded. There are some scattered throughout the holidays, so anytime that you’re approaching a holiday, you can use those for the worksheets. But I’ll definitely need to add some more general use worksheets.

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June 13, 2017 at 2:04 am

Thank you for making all of these great resources available! I will be starting to teach lessons this summer after a hiatus. I am excited to try these ideas with my new students!

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July 20, 2017 at 11:17 pm

Love your ideas. look forward to using more, just got a new 6yr old student

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August 2, 2017 at 4:41 am

Terima kasih (Thank u) from Indonesia. This is my first year being a music teacher in a formal school. These worksheets help me a lot

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January 31, 2018 at 5:52 pm

Question. Do you have the answer keys to these worksheets? My kids take piano, but I don’t play. Their teacher wants them to practice note identification and I love these….but I have no idea if they are correct or not. Thank yo!!!

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February 15, 2018 at 1:36 pm

Thanks so much for these free printables!! I have a Life Skills music student who is moving to the far, far north of Canada where there is no school past Grade 8 (age 13 or so). He loves music and has perfect pitch, so I’m glad I was able to print some music worksheets for him to take along when he moves.

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March 10, 2018 at 7:29 pm

Thanks so much! You have really encouraged me to start a group pre-piano class. I have some fun games and ideas to get it going. I also do a lot with movement since I am a retired general music teacher so I feel confident I have enough to get started!

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April 24, 2018 at 10:32 pm

I am looking for a printable that I saw online yesterday. (But can’t find today!) it was a picture of an elephant with a bird on its head and a fly on the bird’s head. It was a fun way of illustrating the e,b,and f lines on the treble clef. Was this one on your printables?

April 25, 2018 at 3:09 am

Hi Debbie! Yes, a link to the printable can be found on the Treble Clef Worksheets page. Best wishes for you and your students!

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September 12, 2018 at 2:15 am

Thank you so much for these worksheets! I’m glad that there are a variety of resources that I can use to make the lesson more interesting and meaningful for my younger students. I’ve only taught piano lessons for one year so things like this have really helped me get started and know how to teach my students.

September 12, 2018 at 4:41 pm

Thanks for your kind comment! I’m so glad these are helpful and wish you and your students a great year.

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October 9, 2018 at 2:34 am

Just found your website tonight while looking for resources to teach my children Music Theory for our homeschool. Thank you so much for developing and sharing all these pro tables and taking the time to explain how to use them! We will be using this resource a lot, and I will share it with others.

October 9, 2018 at 7:53 pm

So glad these help! Good luck with your homeschooling!

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December 31, 2018 at 2:25 am

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January 20, 2019 at 4:48 pm

These music sheets will really help me on my test

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March 26, 2019 at 12:14 am

Thank you so much! What a resource!

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March 28, 2019 at 8:28 am

I was pleasantly surprised when I found these helpful, colourful and creative worksheets. Thank you so much!

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April 28, 2019 at 7:56 pm

Your site has great ideas for my special education students in middle school. They have just the right amount of examples to accommodate middle school students in my LIMMS classes! I loved them all! I only copied a few right now but perfect for my intervals, and scales lessons! Thank you so much! The students will love them. I can also leave these for a sub to use as well!

April 30, 2019 at 5:15 am

Jean, your kind comment made my day. I’m so happy to hear that these worksheets are helping your students. Keep up your great work!

May 14, 2019 at 1:46 pm

These are fabulous. I teach chorus in a k-12 and i find them really helpful in my classes as well! great job on your website too!

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August 21, 2019 at 9:05 pm

You made these sheets right around when my baby was born and now she is 5 and using them. It’s amazing how your effort is still helping parents after many years and will continue to help. Thank you for this!

October 10, 2019 at 6:14 pm

Oh how wonderful! Your comment made me smile, and I’m so happy that your daughter is enjoying these theory worksheets.

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August 28, 2019 at 11:11 pm

These worksheets are really great! I was asked to teach the little kids this year, and I didn’t have much fun stuff for them, so this is a wonderful find. I know it took a lot of work and time to put these together. Thank you so much!

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September 18, 2019 at 6:20 am

Wow! Thank you so much, these worksheets and tips are amazing and so helpful when still finding your teaching feet.

October 10, 2019 at 6:11 pm

So glad these ideas are helpful! I wish you big success!

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October 1, 2019 at 5:55 am

I teach grades 1-9 and have found your worksheets extremely useful. They are set out very logically and the instructions are clear. Thank you for your hard work – it is truly appreciated.

October 10, 2019 at 6:02 pm

Thanks Tessa! Keep up your great work with those students–they’re so lucky to have you!

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November 14, 2019 at 4:49 pm

I have been looking for something to add a little fun to my studio! This looks like just what I need!!!

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November 23, 2019 at 7:18 am

thanks for the information

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November 24, 2019 at 1:03 am

I teach piano from 6-13. Your data is wonderful. Thanks to you I think I can have a fun class with my children. Thank for the data

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February 26, 2020 at 11:47 pm

Thank you fo these sheets!

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February 27, 2020 at 10:50 am

Thank you so much for these wonderful worksheets which you offer for free on your website. I give piano lessons and they are very useful and also fun to help improve students’ music theory. I really appreciate your generosity! May God bless you and reward you for all the hard work you put into making them! Greetings from Romania!

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February 28, 2020 at 5:10 pm

These are a lifesaver. Thank you.

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March 20, 2020 at 2:14 am

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March 27, 2020 at 9:28 pm

Thanks alot – I was looking for things to give my students to print at home during coronavirus lockdown and a couple of these were perfect – the ball bouncing one is great cause it gives them something non-computer oriented to do.

Thanks so much!

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March 28, 2020 at 3:17 pm

Good info. Lucky me I recently found your website by chance (stumbleupon). I have saved as a favorite for later!

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April 1, 2020 at 9:47 pm

Thank you so much for all the worksheets. Like most of the world, we are going though the COVID19 (corona virus) social distancing. In a time like this, I am thankful for your dedication to music, as we are unable to have our regular, face-to-face private piano lessons. These worksheets will really keep my students thinking, practicing, and enjoying music! Thanks again!

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June 5, 2020 at 4:50 pm

This is a great resource for a mom who is unversed in piano herself but still trying to encourage her child’s interest and supplement the piano instruction at home. The activities are attractive and well thought out. We all benefit from your years of on-hand experience with youngsters and older students alike. Thank you very much for organizing it so well and for making it free! This mom and 6 year old are very grateful.

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September 5, 2020 at 4:30 am

Thank you very much for the worksheets! I complied them and will put it in binder for my kids. Its a very big help especially during this pandemic! I love the cartoons too! Thank you again!

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September 20, 2020 at 7:56 pm

Thank you! I am doing assessments to start the year and was looking for ways to do this with my online lessons. Your wonderful worksheets fit the bill perfectly! I have downloaded almost all of them listed here. The students will love it – much more fun than just showing them flashcards and having them name notes, intervals, etc.

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October 13, 2020 at 3:53 pm

So grateful for what you have done here! This is a God-send! Blessings to you!

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January 12, 2021 at 4:23 pm

These are so creative! Thank you!

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February 18, 2021 at 8:09 pm

Your worksheets are fun and engaging! Thank you so much for providing some much needed resources for my Annual “Piano Practice Challenge” where students complete theory pages to reach their goal line.

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May 7, 2021 at 12:10 pm

I just found your website while looking for ideas to help a young student. Your worksheets and ideas, including the group activities, are amazing!!! Thank you SO much for sharing!!

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June 6, 2021 at 7:36 pm

Thank you for sharing all of this material. Very nice Work!

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December 2, 2021 at 9:06 am

Thank you so much for these :) I teach piano to younger students and some of these sheets will be their Christmas ‘homework’! Thanks again

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September 14, 2022 at 12:43 am

Thank you so much for these neat worksheets! I have some very young beginner pianists, & I need a little extra time & material to cover with them. I really appreciate your help!

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July 12, 2023 at 11:36 am

Thank you so much for all these cute and colorful worksheets! I am a special needs kids’ teacher, and I am also teaching music to them. All these worksheets are very easy for them to understand. I really appreciate you made it all free and share it with everyone! God bless!

July 19, 2023 at 6:40 am

Thanks Jillian—that was so kind of you. I’m so glad these resources are helping the special needs kids you teach.

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July 14, 2023 at 2:52 pm

Thanks for sharing all these fun activity and ideas. Do you have the formula sheet for minor chords like you do for the major chords? I am also be interested in formula sheet for diminished and augmented chords. I’m willing to pay for them.

July 19, 2023 at 6:51 am

Thanks Janet for your kind comment and your question. I don’t have those worksheets right now, but I’m glad you told me it’s something that would be helpful for you. I’m hoping to have some time to create new resources after my kids resume school. I’ll notify everyone on the newsletter when new resources are available :)

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  • Music theory games

https://www.dacapoalcoda.com

The first seven letters of the alphabet are used to name the music notes: A B C D E F G

Music notes positions on a piano keyboard

Music notes are placed like this on a piano keyboard:

notes names on a piano keyboard

And on a three octaves piano keyboard:

notes names on a piano keyboard

So all other music notes will be placed like this:

Notes positions in treble clef

Funny tricks to recognize music note positions with a treble clef

In treble clef, the music notes on lines are E G B D F and you can remember them with the phrase E very G ood B oy D oes F ine

Every Good Boy Does Fine

In treble clef, the music notes in space are F A C E and you can remember them with the word FACE

FACE

Funny tricks to recognize music note positions with a bass clef

In bass clef, the music notes on lines are G B D F A and you can remember them with the phrase G ood B oys D o F ine A lways

Good Boys Do Fine Always

In bass clef, the music notes in space are A C G E and you can remember them with the phrase A ll C ars E at G as

All Cars Eat Gas

Note names with other clefs

note names with soprano clef

Accidentals and note names

Accidentals and note names

Notes names in other languages and countries

Note those differences between English and German notation: B note in English is H in German B♭ note in English is B in German

differences between English and German music notes notation

Neo-Latin music notes notation comes from Hymnus in Ioannem also named Ut queant laxis , a Latin hymn: Ut queant laxis Re sonare fibris Mi ra gestorum Fa muli tuorum Sol ve polluti La bii reatum S ancte I ohannes Ut was replaced by Do for pronunciation reasons.

Ut Queant Laxis

Music sight-reading exercises in treble or bass clef

Octave naming and pitch notation.

To differentiate a low C note from a high C note, different notations are used.

Scientific pitch notation

The Scientific Pitch Notation (SPN) is also known as American Standard Pitch Notation (ASPN). Numbers are added to the note names to identify the pitch's octave. Here is the Scientific pitch notation:

Scientific pitch notation

Helmholtz pitch notation

The Helmholtz Pitch Notation is another notation to identify the pitch's octave, and prime symbol ( ′ ), double prime symbol ( ″ ), triple prime symbol ( ‴ ), are added to the note names to identify the pitch's octave. Here is the Helmholtz pitch notation:

Helmholtz pitch notation

English pitch notation

The English Pitch Notation is another notation that repeat note's letters to identify the pitch's octave. Here is the English pitch notation:

English pitch notation

French pitch notation

The French Pitch Notation is another notation that use numbers to identify the pitch's octave. Here is the French pitch notation:

French pitch notation

Comparative of pitch notations

Here is a comparative of pitch notations:

Comparative of pitch notations

Other articles

Every Good Boy Does Fine

Every Good Boy Does Fine The mnemonic Good Boys Do Fine Always can help you to you memorize the following series of music notes : G B D F A

A music note

A music note The note A in music. Learn to recognize the A note in all clefs, and learn all about this music note.

B music note

B music note The note B in music. Learn to recognize the B note in all clefs, and learn all about this music note.

C music note

C music note The note C in music. Learn to recognize the C note in all clefs, and learn all about this music note.

D music note

D music note The note D in music. Learn to recognize the D note in all clefs, and learn all about this music note.

E music note

E music note The note E in music. Learn to recognize the E note in all clefs, and learn all about this music note.

F music note

F music note The note F in music. Learn to recognize the F note in all clefs, and learn all about this music note.

G music note

G music note The note G in music. Learn to recognize the G note in all clefs, and learn all about this music note.

External links : 1 - https://www.dolmetsch.com/musictheory1.htm 2 - https://musicterms.artopium.com/n/Note.htm 3 - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_note

Dear Sir, I found your website and maybe you can help me with chords. As you can see at Attachment I marked in red chords that I do not know how to build. I looked through different sources but did find any information. Please show how looks these chords. Also,if you have a link to read theory about them. Waiting for your response via my e-mail: [email protected] Best regards, Mark.

Hello Strange...I've no idea what D1 and D2 means...sorry. But if you've founded the answer, don't hesitate to tell us .

The numbers that are on the top index of your piece, are usually on the bottom in the scores that I've seen. So B^2 on your score just means B2. That's a chord with B as the lowest note, and then it also contains c, d and f. It would clash a lot with the C# though so I'm not sure if that's what the writer intended to be played. Dm2 is similar: D as the root note, and also e, f and a. B1 I'm not sure about.

pseudo

Your comment:

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Copy this code please (needed)

note name homework

Mom's Printables

Printables for Busy Moms & Creative Kids

  • Organization

Free Printable Music Notes Worksheets

Free Printable Music Notes Worksheet PDF | Free Printable Music Notes Worksheets | Free Printable Music Notes Chart

If you’ve been helping your kids learn their notes (here’s our FREE PRINTABLE MUSIC NOTES CHART !), you’ll want some music notes worksheets to help with that!

Start with this one to learn the notes. ⬇️

The download links for these worksheets for practice naming the notes after you’ve learned them are below.

Free Printable Music Notes Worksheet PDF | Free Printable Music Notes Worksheets | Free Printable Music Notes Chart

I made 3 different music notes worksheets levels:

LEVEL 1 looks just like the study sheet, except the note names are removed.

LEVEL 2 has each row mixed up a little, but space notes and line notes are still kept separate.

LEVEL 3 mixes up space and line notes for the treble clef and then the bass clef.

Another way to use these worksheets is for the parent or teacher to take a blank worksheet and point to the notes completely out of order – check your student’s response time and take mental note of what note takes them more time to identify than others, then work a little extra on those troublesome notes.

:: DOWNLOAD BUTTONS ::

note name homework

Check out these new note identification worksheets we have that spell words!

Free Note Identification Worksheet | Note Spelling worksheets

Let me know in the comments below what other kinds of music worksheets you are interested in seeing here on Moms Printables!

:: PIN FOR LATER ::

Free Printable Music Notes Worksheet PDF | Free Printable Music Notes Worksheets | Free Printable Music Notes Chart

These clef tracing worksheets are fun, too!

Treble Clef Tracing Worksheet PDF | Bass Clef Tracing Worksheet PDF | How to draw a treble clef worksheet | How to draw a bass clef worksheet | Free PDF on Moms Printables blog!

Thank you so much for these free worksheets! I’m so happy I found them. I teach 30 private lessons per week, and these are perfect for some of my young piano students. Just wondering….. Do you have notation work sheets where the notes make words?

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I’m so glad to hear that these are helpful! I have notespeller pages on my to-do list, so I will bump that up to the top. ?? Check back in a week or so…..

New post is live! 🙂

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OrchestraTeacher.net

  • Music Theory / Teaching Strategies / Websites

Online Level-Based Note Naming Flash Cards

by Charles Laux · August 14, 2013

We all know that music reading takes practice and simple memorization of what each note looks like on the staff.  But what holds many students back is the speed that they can recognize and play notes.

There are some great software programs out there, but one of my favorites for many years has been the wonderful website, MusicTheory.net .  The site is full of free lessons and exercises from very simple, to complex. Ricci Adams, author of the site, has spent countless hours creating and updating this exceptional (and did I mention free ?) music theory site.  The exercises portion of the site allow teachers to create customized exercises for many different types of music theory exercises such as note name reading, key signature identification, and more.  The customization allows you to choose clef, range, and other parameters.  Once you have your settings the way you want, it provides a custom URL to use/share.  You can find the exercise customizer here .  The website’s FAQ page even includes instructions on how to assign exercises as homework , and allows students to print out a customized sheet with their scores.

I’ve created a few handy exercises for beginning orchestra students and have created three sequential levels.  The bronze level are notes in the D Major scale, and the silver level adds the notes on the G string (A string for double bass), and the gold level are all notes on all strings in first position.  All clefs are available, so what a great way to create exercises for your advanced cellists to learn their tenor clef note names!?

Below are the exercises I’ve created.  Feel free to steal/share!

Bronze Level (Notes in the D Major Scale)

You should be able to complete at least 50 in a row with no mistakes before going on to the silver level.

VIOLIN  |  VIOLA  |  CELLO & BASS

Silver Level (Notes in the D Major Scale plus G string notes)

You should be able to complete at least 75 in a row with no mistakes before going on to the gold level.

VIOLIN  |  VIOLA  |  CELLO  |  BASS  – D major scale plus A string notes

Gold Level (Notes on all four strings!)

You should be able to complete at least 100 in a row with no mistakes before calling yourself a note naming wiz!

VIOLIN  |  VIOLA  |  CELLO  |  BASS

Titanium Level (Notes in upper position)

VIOLIN | VIOLA| CELLO | BASS

Violas Only! (Learn to read notes in treble clef!!)

TREBLE CLEF EXERCISES for VIOLA

Cellos Only! (Learn to read notes in tenor clef!)

TENOR CLEF EXERCISES for CELLO

Exercises can even be embedded into your website/blog using the the <iframe> tag.  Directions are available here .

You can also download a text file that contains the HTML to the above exercises .  Just download and copy/paste into the HTML editor of your choice.

Finally, if you are using and iOS device, the author of MusicTheory.net has created an app called Tenuto .   It is a great bargain and also very powerful.  You can find it, along with a list of some of my other favorite music education apps here .

Best of luck creating new exercises!  If you have any you’d like to share, please leave them in the comments below!

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Tags: customization music theory note names website

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Dr. Charles Laux is the Director of Orchestras at Lassiter High School in the Cobb County School District, located just north of Atlanta, Georgia. He also serves as Essential Elements clinician, consultant, and contributor for the Hal Leonard Corporation.  Dr. Laux holds degrees in music education from Ohio University, the University of Nevada – Las Vegas, and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. A string educator in his 27th year, Dr. Laux has worked with diverse student populations from elementary school through the collegiate level.  He taught at Alpharetta High School in Fulton County, Georgia from 2016-2022 where his duties include directing five levels of orchestra, including the nationally recognized AHS Symphony Orchestra. Dr. Laux served as Assistant Professor of String Music Education at Kennesaw State University from 2012-2016 where he taught string techniques and pedagogy, music education technology integration, supervised student teachers, conducted the KSU Philharmonic and coordinated string outreach activities, including serving as founding director of the KSU String Project.  Under his leadership, Kennesaw State University became the largest string education program in Georgia and the KSU String Project grew to serve nearly 110 elementary school students. Previously Dr. Laux directed award-winning school orchestra programs in Nevada, Florida, and Ohio.  Under his direction, the Winter Park High School Philharmonic Orchestra was selected to perform at the 60th annual Midwest Clinic in 2006 and the Alpharetta High School Symphony Strings were selected in 2018. Endorsed as an artist-educator by D’Addario Orchestral and Eastman Stringed Instruments, Dr. Laux has presented over 150 educational sessions for organizations such as the Midwest Clinic, American String Teachers Association, Technology Institute for Music Education, Association for Technology in Music Instruction, and at music conferences spanning 23 states. He regularly presents professional development in-services for school districts across the country and has presented internationally at Colegio Menor San Francisco near Quito, Ecuador. His performing experience includes seasons with the Las Vegas Philharmonic, the Nevada Chamber Symphony, the Columbus String Quartet, and a collaborative solo-performance with several members of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. Dr. Laux remains in frequent demand across the nation as an orchestra clinician, conductor, and adjudicator. He enjoys giving back to the string and orchestra community through “The Orchestra Teacher” website, YouTube channel, and podcast.

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Music | All-Star Orchestra

Course: music | all-star orchestra   >   unit 1, lesson 1: staff, names of notes, treble clef.

  • Lesson 2: Ledger lines and the octave
  • Lesson 3: Bass clef, grand staff and the octave
  • Lesson 4: Reading music in treble clef and the C Major scale
  • Lesson 5: C Major scale in bass clef and reading in bass clef
  • Lesson 6: Alto and tenor clefs.
  • Lesson 7: Accidentals
  • Lesson 8: Natural sign, more on accidentals and key signature
  • Lesson 9: More on sharps and flats
  • Lesson 10: Chromatic scales and the half step
  • Glossary of musical terms
  • • Current transcript segment: 0:01 - [Tutor] In our section on Note Values,
  • • 0:03 we discussed whole notes, half notes, quarter notes,
  • • 0:06 eighth notes, sixteenth notes, sometimes with dots,
  • • 0:10 all different note values.
  • • 0:13 Now let's place these notes, so they can represent a pitch,
  • • 0:19 a pitch is a sound determined by the speed of a vibration
  • • 0:23 from the source of the sound,
  • • 0:25 a source means in our case, musical instrument
  • • 0:28 and these vibrations create a pitch,
  • • 0:31 the thinner the vibration,
  • • 0:33 the faster the vibration, the higher the pitch,
  • • 0:36 the slower the vibration, the lower the pitch.
  • • 0:40 We begin with a staff or a stave,
  • • 0:43 which has five parallel lines,
  • • 0:46 any one of our notes can be placed
  • • 0:49 on one of these five lines or four spaces.
  • • 0:53 Let's work with a whole note.
  • • 0:56 Now, the next element to identifying a pitch is added,
  • • 1:01 that's called a clef, there are many clefs,
  • • 1:05 but let's start working with the treble clef,
  • • 1:09 each note placed on the treble clef has a name,
  • • 1:12 corresponding to the first seven letters of the alphabet,
  • • 1:16 starting with A and ending with G,
  • • 1:20 these seven note names are repeated indefinitely.
  • • 1:24 On the staff with a treble clef, A is on the second space,
  • • 1:30 continuing up, the next note is B,
  • • 1:33 that'll be on the third line,
  • • 1:36 then the third space is C,
  • • 1:38 the fourth line is D,
  • • 1:41 the fourth space, E,
  • • 1:43 the fifth line, F
  • • 1:45 and above the staff, a G.
  • • 1:49 Now we can see the succession of notes
  • • 1:51 from A to G on the treble clef staff.
  • • 1:55 If we place a note below or lower
  • • 1:58 than the second space A on the second line, it is a G,
  • • 2:03 remember the alphabet goes from A to G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G,
  • • 2:09 and if we go down, we reverse the alphabet,
  • • 2:12 so that line, second line becomes a G,
  • • 2:16 the first space, an F,
  • • 2:18 the lowest line an E
  • • 2:21 and below the staff a D.
  • • 2:24 As the notes ascend, the pitch becomes higher,
  • • 2:29 when the notes descend, the pitch becomes lower,
  • • 2:35 this is true of all traditional music notation.
  • • 2:40 The treble clef is sometimes called a G clef,
  • • 2:43 because it circles the G on the second line,
  • • 2:47 this clef is used for treble instruments and voices
  • • 2:50 or the highest pitched instruments and voices,
  • • 2:53 the soprano voice and instruments like flute,
  • • 2:57 oboe, clarinet,
  • • 3:00 trumpet, horn, violin
  • • 3:03 and the upper part of the piano,
  • • 3:05 often played with the right hand.

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Music Theory: Notes name basics

Hi, In this article, we will talk about notes names, clef, staff...

I strongly recommend that you play every single example on your instrument (and on a piano if your main instrument isn't the piano)

But first, let's clarify some notations. (if you want to, you can skip this section, and come back to it later if something seems unclear)

We will (almost) always use what is called "common notation" : it includes, mainly : a staff (or two, or more staves) and a clef. (each staff has a clef).

  • A staff is made with 5 horizontal lines.
  • A clef is a good-looking musical symbol ! (you will mainly use treble and bass clefs)

staff

We place notes on or between those lines. Once the note is placed on the staff, you can tell the note name thanks to two elements :

  • the vertical position of the note (on which line, or between which lines)

If you change one or the other, the note name changes.

Notes names

Natural notes (white keys).

First, have a look at this image : it represents a piano keyboard, a bass clef and a treble clef (weird symboles on the left),staves (horizontal lines) ,and the name of the notes, with the correspondance between notated notes and piano keyboard. For the moment, we are only talking about the white keys (also known as natural notes).

C scale

If you want to, you can have a look at this score.

Altered notes (black keys)

Now, let's take a step further and talk about the black keys. Each black key has two names (in fact even the white keys have several names, but we will discuss that later)

First, let's have a look at the "sharp names"

sharp keys

The corresponding score.

You may have noticed that this symbol : ♮ (called "natural") appears on the score. It means "whatever happened before, play this note as a natural note". For example, the first D in this score is in fact a D♭ : the next one is a natural D, that is why we use the ♮ (called "natural"). If you don't put ♮ on the second D, it would be played D♭. Accidentals (sharps, flats and naturals) apply within the measure in which they appear, unless canceled by another accidental sign, or tied into a following measure.

So technically, the picture corresponding to flats only is not correct. (some naturals would be necessary) We will discuss that later in a "Notation post"

Sharps and flats : Enharmonic equivalence

enharmonic equivalents

Note names in a nutshell : check this video

In the next article, we will talk about the distance between notes .

All the best,

Join a fantastic community of 5M+ musicians!

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10 FREE Treble Clef Note Name Worksheets (2023)

treble clef note name worksheets

Learning the treble clef note names is one of the main concepts most people start teaching their music students in third grade and above. 

Doing so, provides the students a basis for reading and playing music even more later on. 

I’m a big advocate for active learning and music  making rather than worksheet practice, but let’s face it:  Sometimes it’s easiest to use worksheet for individual or small group practice. 

It shouldn’t be the bedrock of your teaching strategy, but it’s perfectly fine to use in moderation, especially if they’re engaging and well done! 

With all this in mind, I looked around and found (or made) these 10 FREE  treble clef note name worksheets. 

All worksheets made with a combination of Flat.io and Canva.

Read on for details on each page.

Download The Whole Packet at the bottom of the page:

note name homework

Save time with these 60 FREE Music Resources to use in your room right away!

Stop searching the whole internet to find good activities. I’ll help you cut to the chase with my favorite 60 FREE resources.

Table of Contents

#1 Simple Fill In the Treble Clef

This page is perfect for starting out with note names. 

All they have to do is put the note names where the different notes go. 

I use this one as a do-it-together before sending them off on their own to practice. 

#2 Create Your Own Saying

The research on mnemonics and their usefulness has been called into question lately. 

I get it to a certain extent. 

I think it doesn’t help every single student, but I think it may help enough of them to be worth the time spent doing it. 

Many of us know the common mnemonics for the treble clef: 

For the lines: 

  • Every Good Boy Does Fine
  • Elephants Go Backward Down Freeways
  • Each Girl Break Dances Friday

The Space spells FACE from bottom to top. 

I love to allow students choice and harness their creativity. 

I bet you do too! 

With this worksheet, small groups or individual students will get the chance to make their own mnemonic, and odds are, they’ll remember it for years to come. 

#3 Fill In The Missing Letters

Here is a simple but effective one. 

I like to use this one as a first independent worksheet. 

Why? Because some of the answers are filled in. 

One of the hardest parts of reading the G clef at first is how the farther down the system you go, the harder it gets to sort/place the letters. 

With key notes filled in, it allows the students a chance to reset their placement and increase their chances of success. 

#4 Write The Notes

Seeing the notes and then writing the note names may be challenging for some kids, but switching it around is even harder. 

Here’s a worksheet I only use once they have a firm grasp on labeling the written notes on the staff. 

They see a letter or note name and have to place it themselves. 

Notice how this worksheet starts with a row of notes using only the spaces, then only the lines, and then both. 

That’s a good tip for any musical concept, but especially when reading pitches. 

Isolate different ideas for practice before moving on to put them all together. 

#5 Solve The Words

I love puzzles, and I bet some or all of your students do too. 

This is the same skill as filling in the blank from before, but now it’s done in the context of completing the missing word. 

In a way, it’s also self-correcting. 

The correct note is obvious when the word makes sense. 

There are a ton of worksheets along these lines, and these make perfect sub plans for music classes. 

If your students are confident enough in their reading skills, they don’t even need a true music sub to get this done. 

Further Reading:  Music sub plans (FREE)

note name homework

Tired of searching and searching for songs that work?

I’m saving you headaches and wasted time spent looking for good activities with this eBook of my 30 favorite songs, dances, and activities for elementary music. Get back to making music right now!

#6 Mystery Songs In Treble Clef

One teaching tactic I see music teachers forget about all the time is how you need to connect the “reading” or “learning” parts of your music room with the “making music” parts of your classroom. 

In my experience, one of the simplest ways to transition out of a learning chunk and into a game or playing activity is through a Mystery Song. 

In this worksheet, students will need to write in the treble clef note names, as expected, but the twist is that each song is one I teach in class leading up to this. 

You may know them as well, and there’s a good chance you also teach them! 

Further Reading:  Music lesson plan examples for elementary music

#7 Lines Vs. Spaces

Here’s a worksheet you may want to use early on in the teaching process. 

This one isolates the lines and space notes with the treble clef and doesn’t put them together. 

I don’t always use this one; I’ll often stick it in with classes that really seem to struggle. 

Or, I’ll separate students into small groups and give the struggling students this one, while advanced groups get other ones. 

This differentiation is important, but it’s difficult to pull off when you see so many classes for such a short period of time. 

Pro-tip:  Keep class lists printed off in your room. Make quick marks by student names as you walk around and watch them work. A simple +, -, 0 systems works for me. 

I’ll give a + to students who get it right away. A – to students who do just fine or as expected. And a 0 to students who struggle. 

This way, I can quickly split them into groups in future classes and provide the help each group needs. 

#8 Secret Message In Treble Clef

I love secret messages like I love puzzles. 

One of my favorite hobbies is to figure out Cryptograms and ciphers (yes, I’m a nerd). There’s something so satisfying about figuring out a mystery. 

This worksheet plays on that with the hidden message idea while practicing the G clef or Treble Clef. 

The correct answers show themselves when the message makes sense. 

#9 Drawing Practice

The treble clef is hard to draw. 

This note worksheet provides practice and is a good way to just get into drawing the musical notes on the staff.

I let them even do the Treble Clef in different colors to mix it up a bit.  

#10 Music Vocab/ Treble Clef Note Practice

I saw one of these worksheets and thought the idea was so cool that I’d make my own. 

It’s like my Solve The Words, but the words you solve are all music vocab words. 

So in a way, you get double duty practice on this worksheet: 

  • Treble clef note names
  • Music vocab practice

Zach VanderGraaff

Zach VanderGraaff is a K-5 music teacher in Michigan with 12 years of experience. He's the President of the Michigan Kodaly Educators and founder of the Dynamic Music Room.

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Fun Ways to Teach Note Names

This post is all about fun ways to teach children the letter names of the notes.   When you play an instrument, it’s a very useful skill to know the name of the note on the staff so that you know which of the bars you should play!   To be a good sight-reader, you need instant recall.   You can’t be counting the lines and spaces on your hand staff if you want to be a fluent sight reader.   So how do we get kids to develop fluency in reading music?

There is a great staff lesson in lesson one of Musicplay 4.

The Staff: Music is written on a 5 line staff. Notes can be placed on lines or in   spaces. The lines and spaces are numbered from the bottom to the top. At the beginning of a staff, a clef is given. The treble clef circles the note G, and is used for treble, or higher notes. A high pitch is shown by placing a note high on  the staff. A low pitch is shown by placing the note lower on the staff.

Hand Staff

I like to start by introducing the lines with the hand staff.  Draw a staff on the board about the size of your hand.  Then, hold your hand up to the staff and point out that you have five fingers, just like there are five lines on the staff.

Hand Staff:  Show the students the hand staff. Hold your hand in front of you with your fingers spread apart and the thumb up. Number your fingers 1-2-3-4-5 from the bottom to the top. Tell the students that they have five fingers, just as there are five lines on the music staff. To show the spaces on the hand staff, place the index finger of your right hand between two fingers. Spaces are also numbered from the bottom to the top. Call out a line or space and have the students point to the correct one. For example:   line 3, space 4, line 1, space 2

Cookie sheet 1

Some teachers like to have the students practice naming notes on lines and spaces. Make up poems or sayings to help them remember the names of the notes. For example: The notes on the lines spell, “Every Good Boy Does Fine.” Kids can make up their own sayings.   Some of the best I’ve heard are “Elvis’s guitar broke down Friday” or “Empty Garbage Before Dad Flips.”   The notes in the space, spell “face.”

I like to move from notes on lines and notes on spaces to the full staff quickly.   They won’t be fluent readers by practicing lines only or spaces only.   When they understand that the notes go step by step from letter to letter, CDEFG, they are on their way to fluent reading.

I introduced the staff, taught the hand staff, practiced notes on my cookie sheet with a grade 3 class, then had them play the first 7 songs from Teach Music Reading with Boomwhackers.   In a 30 minute lesson, they were able to begin to read the notes and to play Jingle Bells on Boomwhackers.   The projectable for Teach Music Reading with Boomwhackers includes an introduction to the staff and the songs include a version with alpha-notes or kids notes:   the letter name is imprinted on the note AND a version with colored Boomwhacker notation.   Even so, I was very pleased that the students   were able to read simple songs in just one lesson.

Link to Teach Reading with Boomwhackers USA site         Link to Boomwhackers Canada site

floor staff game copy

1. Staff Jump An elimination game to learn the names of the lines and spaces. Have half of your students stand on line one. Call out a line for them to jump to – line three! line four! The last student to get to the correct line is eliminated. Have the other half of your students jump to the spaces. When you introduce the letter names of the lines and spaces, repeat the game using letter names.

2. Letter Names Jump Group one will jump the lines on the music staff. The teacher calls out a line note – E, G, B, D, F – and the students jump to the line that she calls. To play this as an elimination game (optional), the last child to land on the line that is called is out. The last child left after the eliminations is the winner. Group two will jump the spaces on the music staff. The teacher will call out a space note name – F, A, C, E. If groups are small, repeat the note names and jump as needed until all the children have had a turn. When the students are very confident jumping lines or spaces, have each group jump to the note name that is called using both notes that are on lines and in spaces.

3. Staff Relay Divide the class into two-four teams. On small paper plates write a letter name of a note – A B C D E F G. Each team is given a pile of notes. Teams race to place their notes on the correct line or space of the floor staff. The first team finished with ALL notes correctly placed wins.

When beginning recorder, you can introduce the notes one at a time.   This really helps the students to “get it.”   After introducing BAG, I have start having the students complete mad minutes to practice just those notes.   Isolating the notes I want them to practice helps them become fluent reading those notes.

Mad Minutes 1 file

  • apps:   Note Name Match Game, Note Name Squish
  • Solfa/Note Challenge
  • Note Name Bingo,
  • Note Name Battleship
  • Music Centers

Note Name Match

Note Name Match Game is a memory game with 10 levels – spaces, lines, staff, ledger lines – in both treble clef and bass clef.  In Note Name Smash you can choose the notes you want to practice.  Each note that’s correctly named smashes a hole in the wall.  When all notes are correctly names, the wall crumbles – fun!!!

Our new online resource, www.musicplayonline.com has several interactive ways to practice naming notes.   Musicplayonline is free to use until Aug.1 and then it will be a low cost subscription.   If you or your school has purchased the Musicplay Digital resources, you will be eligible for a pro-rated credit to use the site at no cost.   There will be an application posted on the site in August when it goes to the paid model and you can request free access.   Each situation will be different, so every application will be looked at individually.

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Kim Mulkey names Brian Kelly as reason why she’s not cooperating with WaPo ‘hit piece’

Kim Mulkey isn't letting the outside noise get to her or the LSU Fighting Tigers amid their 2024 March Madness run.

By Lior Lampert | 7:00 PM EDT

Ole Miss v LSU

A  report  surfaced on Friday night during LSU’s 70-60 victory over Rice in the first round of the 2024 NCAA Tournament that mentioned a potential story by the  Washington Post  regarding legendary women’s college basketball head coach Kim Mulkey, and she has not taken kindly to the reporting process .

That article could be released in the coming days, amid a March Madness run where the program is looking to defend its title from last season. Though Mulkey isn’t prepared to entertain outside noise and she made that evident during a press conference on Saturday when addressing the matter. 

Mulkey tells the media that the reporter working on the story of her has been doing so for two years, trying to arrange an interview as part of the chronicle and using this most recent rumor as a means of getting the attention of the Fighting Tigers head coach, which she is not thrilled about.

“Are you kidding me?” She asked. “This was a ridiculous deadline that LSU and I could not possibly meet, and the reporter knew it. It was just an attempt to prevent me from commenting and an attempt to distract us from this tournament. It ain’t going to work, buddy.”

However, she interestingly also mentioned unethical reporting tactics this reporter has used in the past on stories about Brian Kelly, LSU’s football head coach, as a reason why she isn’t cooperating with the  Washington Post  on their “hit piece.” 

Kim Mulkey names Brian Kelly amid rumors of Washington Post story

“Unfortunately, this is part of a pattern that goes back years,” Mulkey said. “I told this reporter two years ago that I didn’t appreciate the hit job he wrote on Brian Kelly, and that’s why I wasn’t going to do an interview with him,” she added.

Mulkey also mentioned that the reporter left “multiple messages” with former coaches of hers, trying to get them into thinking the story was being worked on in unison and lure them into giving information, who were caught by surprise when they found out that wasn’t the case.

Hard-pressed for time amid an NCAA Tournament run, Mulkey’s patience is razor-thin. But she made sure to call out the reporter chasing after her for what she voiced has been two years.

note name homework

There could be another ‘Hurricane Idalia’ before 2030: WMO keeps Idalia on storm name list

T ALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) - For the first time since 2014, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) will not be retiring any storm names from the rotating list used for the Atlantic Basin.

That means in 2029, the National Hurricane Center could once again use the name Idalia for a new storm.

The WMO is in charge of creating and maintaining lists of names for tropical cyclones around the globe. There is a rotating list of storm names for 10 different bodies of water, including the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.

The criteria for deciding when to retire a name from a specific list are relatively loose.

“The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO Tropical Cyclone Committees (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it.” World Meteorological Organization

Hurricane Idalia’s final estimated cost came in at $3.6 billion, according to a report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). That total takes into account damage costs from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, according to NOAA.

Hurricane Idalia claimed the lives of 12 people in five different states. Eight of these were a direct result of the storm, with the other four being labeled as “indirect,” according to the National Hurricane Center.

For more information on Hurricane Idalia, click here.

The announcement from the WMO came Wednesday afternoon in a press release highlighting the retirement of two storm names from the Eastern North Pacific list. Those storms were Otis and Dora .

Otis was retired from the list because of the number of deaths reported from the storm as well as the overall destruction it caused after making landfall in October, according to the WMO.

On the other hand, Dora was retired for a unique reason. The first reason was “because of sensitivities to the name Dora,” said the WMO. “[A]nd the indirect meteorological role it played in the devastating wildfires in Maui, Hawaii, in August 2023.”

The press releases also cited that the name Dora was retired from the Atlantic list of names back in 1964.

Otis will be replaced by Otilio and Dorra will be replaced by Debora.

Below is a list of upcoming Atlantic Basin storm names:

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Satellite imagery of Hurricane Idalia hours before landfall in Florida

News from the Columbia Climate School

Catherine McKenna on Her Life, Work and Preserving the World for Future Generations

Olga Rukovets

Woman with blonde hair against a white background

Catherine McKenna , Canada’s former Minister of Environment and Climate Change and a senior research scholar at Columbia’s Climate School, never imagined becoming a politician.

“What did I want to do when I grew up? I didn’t care about politics,” said McKenna, at a recent event at the Climate School. “I wanted to go to the Olympics [as a swimmer]. When I was 13 years old, that’s all I dreamed about.”

Woman presenting with a slide show of a young woman and Olympic swim team

You cannot plan your life out, she told the room. It’s only in retrospect that you can connect the dots and create a nice story for your CV. (And it’s safe to say McKenna’s CV is quite an impressive one.)

But first, McKenna recounted the different directions her professional path took—from working at a pub in London and teaching swimming lessons (to former U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair’s child) while studying for her master’s degree in international relations at the London School of Economics, to working for a G7 research group. McKenna then went to law school to pursue international law and human rights, and worked as a lawyer in Indonesia before becoming a senior negotiator with a U.N. peacekeeping mission in East Timor.

When she returned to Canada, McKenna co-founded a charitable organization called Canadian Lawyers Abroad, hoping to continue international humanitarian efforts. But she recalled being encouraged by one of her mentors to work on issues closer to home, including injustices faced by Canada’s Indigenous populations, rather than focusing on inequitable conditions abroad. Canadian Lawyers Abroad has since evolved into Level Justice , an organization that helps all communities in Canada play an active part in the legal system.

Despite her best efforts to effect positive change in Canada, McKenna found herself becoming disillusioned with the government in power in 2015. “The government was very against reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and it didn’t care about climate. These were things were really important to me. So that’s why I stepped up into politics,” she said, as she urged the young people in the room to consider this possibility as well. “We need good people, wherever you may live, to consider going into politics. It’s not easy, but it’s extremely important,” McKenna said.

“I did not know that I would one day be Minister of Environment and Climate Change. That was not the plan. Everyone is going to have a different journey, and I want you to feel like you can do it too—whatever it is that you want to do.”

She also entered politics as a promise to work toward a better world for the children—her own three kids as well as all the children who would grow up and inherit the many complex issues of their predecessors.

So in 2015, McKenna and her team knocked on over 100,000 doors while campaigning for a seat in Parliament, she said, showing the room a picture of just one of the many pairs of running shoes that were destroyed along the way.

Woman presenting with a slideshow image of old running shoes

From the beginning of her campaign, McKenna vowed to center people and communities in her communication and platforms. “I come from Hamilton, which is a steel town a little bit like Detroit, where you’ve got to be a real person and you can’t talk like an alien, which is actually what climate people often do,” McKenna told attendees.

All the hard work paid off. Just days after being elected, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called to ask McKenna if she would be Canada’s first Minister of the Environment and Climate Change and join COP21 in Paris a few days later (shortly after she learned that COP stood for “Conference of the Parties”).

“I did not know that I would one day be Minister of Environment and Climate Change. That was not the plan. It was amazing, but everyone is going to have a different journey, and I want you to feel like you can do it too—whatever it is that you want to do.” McKenna said.

COP21 became a historic conference—the first time the countries of the world agreed to tackle climate change with an ambitious goal of limiting global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius, and ideally 1.5 degrees—and an achievement McKenna noted was possible due in large part to the many extraordinary women at the negotiating table.

McKenna learned countless lessons at COP21—including how one wrong word (“should” versus “shall”) could sink an agreement in its final moments, or how a seemingly small player (geographically speaking) like the Marshall Islands could create a tremendous difference on the world stage by founding the High Ambition Coalition —a group that successfully pushed for a 1.5 degree temperature target. And McKenna returned to Canada more determined than ever that climate change was the critical issue to address—and that their government would need multilateral support to do so.

McKenna made “pinky promises” to the many young people she met along her journey that she would work toward a safer world for them. “I’ve left politics, but I still have those kids as a reminder of what this is all about. We have the solutions, we can scale the solutions, but we are constantly finding reasons why we can’t do things,” McKenna said.

Earlier this year, McKenna—who is also CEO of Climate and Nature Solutions and founder of Women Leading on Climate —and Laurence Tubiana, CEO of the European Climate Foundation and France’s climate change ambassador and special representative for COP21, authored an article in Time magazine about why this year must be the one for exponential climate action, distilling necessary actions into five key items:  

1. Implement the International Energy Agency net zero pathway 2. Phase out fossil fuels 3. Scale financing to the Global South 4. Align national and subnational net zero action 5. Empower people.

“Governments will break your heart sometimes,” McKenna told the Climate School attendees. “But people are real, and people believe and want action.”

Speaking directly to the audience, McKenna said, “This isn’t over. I’m still trying, but now it’s on you [to fight climate change and help build a better future]. That’s the quid-pro-quo pinky promise to me.”

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Science for the Planet: In these short video explainers, discover how scientists and scholars across the Columbia Climate School are working to understand the effects of climate change and help solve the crisis.

Get the Columbia Climate School Newsletter →

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  • This page, Department of Public Health advises consumers not to drink bottled water from Easton-based Simpson Spring due to PFAS contamination, is   offered by
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Press Release  Department of Public Health advises consumers not to drink bottled water from Easton-based Simpson Spring due to PFAS contamination

Media contact   for department of public health advises consumers not to drink bottled water from easton-based simpson spring due to pfas contamination, ann scales, director of media relations.

Boston — The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) advises consumers not to purchase or consume bottled water or fill containers from self-serve water vending machines operated or distributed by Simpson Spring Company in Easton after per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination exceeding drinking water standards was found in water bottled and distributed by the company. Consumers are urged not to consume any Simpson Spring products until further notice. 

If you have Simpson Spring water in your home or establishment: 

  • Do not consume the product. 
  • Pour the water down a drain and recycle any plastic receptacle. 
  • Do not buy or consume new products from Simpson Spring until further notice. 

PFAS are a group of manufactured chemicals used in industry and consumer products since the 1940s. Current scientific research suggests that exposure to certain PFAS may lead to adverse health outcomes.  

Since 2021, DPH has conducted surveillance sampling and testing for emerging contaminants, including PFAS, in bottled water as part of its surveillance program.

DPH’s Food Protection Program collected water samples from Simpson Spring’s Easton facility on February 21, 2024 and collected confirmatory samples on March 11. Test results found that samples exceeded the MA drinking water standard for PFAS. On March 1, Simpson Spring advised DPH that it would voluntarily cease bottling operations temporarily and disconnect its vending machines until the issue is resolved. Sanitary violations of DPH’s Good Manufacturing Practices for Food regulations ( 105 CMR 500 ) were documented during the inspections, and DPH issued a cease-and-desist order. 

DPH’s Food Protection Program will continue to monitor the situation and work with Simpson Spring to correct the violations. For more information on bottled water alternatives with no PFAS exceedances, visit  PFAS in Bottled Water Pilot Program . You can access bottled water testing data, which includes brand names through this link.   

For information related to the risks of PFAS in drinking water, visit  Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in drinking water | Mass.gov  or contact DPH at 617-624-5757. If you have any questions about this notice, call the main Food Protection Program number at 617-983-6754 or email  [email protected]

If you are a clinician, and have any questions about the health effects of PFAS, visit PFAS Information for Clinicians .

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AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 Release Notes

Fixed issues.

During Microsoft Teams meetings, the camera may intermittently display looped footage on some AMD Products, such as the AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 6650U Processor.  

GPU Acceleration may be missing/greyed out in Adobe Premiere Pro on some hybrid graphics systems. 

Known Issues

Shader caching may fail for Windows usernames containing accented characters. 

Important Notes

For users who previously installed an AMD Software insider preview driver, running AMD Cleanup Utility is recommended before installing this driver.  

Package Contents

AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 Driver Version 23.19.12 for Windows® 10 and Windows® 11 (Windows Driver Store Version 31.0.24027.1012). 

The AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 installation package can be downloaded from the following link:

By clicking the Download button, you are confirming that you have read and agreed to be bound by the terms and conditions of the  End User License Agreement  (“EULA”).  If you do not agree to the terms and conditions of these licenses, you do not have a license to any of the AMD software provided by this download.

  • AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 Driver for Windows® 10 & Windows® 11 64-bit

Installing AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition

For detailed instructions on how to correctly uninstall or install AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition, please refer to the following support resources:

  • How-To Uninstall AMD Software on a Windows® Based System
  • How-To Install AMD Software on a Windows® Based System

NOTE : This driver is not intended for use on AMD Radeon products running in Apple Boot Camp platforms. Users of these platforms should contact their system manufacturer for driver support. When installing AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 Driver for the Windows® operating system, the user must be logged on as Administrator, or have Administrator rights to complete the installation of AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 Driver. 

Radeon Product Compatibility

AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 is compatible with the following AMD Radeon products.

Mobility Radeon™ Product Compatibility

AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 is a notebook reference graphics driver with limited support for system vendor specific features. 

​​​​AMD Processors with Radeon Graphics Product Compatibility

Important note for laptop and all-in-one (aio) pcs .

AMD recommends OEM-provided drivers which are customized and validated for their system-specific features and optimizations. If you experience issues using the AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition driver package downloaded from AMD.com, please install the OEM-provided drivers for full support and compatibility. AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition does not include support for handheld gaming devices.  Users should check with the OEM for device specific drivers.

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Compatible operating systems.

AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 is designed to support the following Microsoft® Windows® platforms. Operating System support may vary depending on your specific AMD Radeon product.

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IMAGES

  1. Note Identification Worksheets

    note name homework

  2. Easy Piano Folk Songs: Note Names and Chords

    note name homework

  3. No Homework Note to Parents Template Download Printable PDF

    note name homework

  4. FREE! Printable Music Note Naming Worksheets

    note name homework

  5. Beginner Music Reading Worksheet

    note name homework

  6. Grand Staff Note Name Speed Test A 100 Notes

    note name homework

VIDEO

  1. what do you do if you see students passing notes during class ?? #youtube #teacher #school

  2. 8 3 note and homework video

  3. Maruman A5 Spiral Notebook

COMMENTS

  1. FREE! Printable Music Note Naming Worksheets

    Printable Music Note Naming Worksheets — Presto! It's Music Magic Publishing. Piano - Songs in All 15 Keys! FREE for a Limited Time! Assignment Stickers - Presto! FREE! Printable Music Note Naming Worksheets. and use only for your personal, private teaching practice, and/or classroom use.

  2. Note Identification

    If this exercise helps you, please purchase our apps to support our site.

  3. Music Theory Worksheets

    1. Note Names. The ability to quickly identify notes is critical for playing music and is a foundational skill for all future music theory studies. But learning the note names can take a long time-students are essentially learning a new language. In each lesson, dedicate time for learning note names and consider sending home assignments.

  4. Note names

    Note names with other clefs. There is not only the treble clef and the bass clef, there is also four others C-clefs and another F-clef, I'll show you the position of each note in these different clefs. The order of the note names is always the same, but the position of the notes changes depending on the clef: Position of notes with the soprano ...

  5. Free Printable Music Notes Worksheets

    I made 3 different music notes worksheets levels: LEVEL 1 looks just like the study sheet, except the note names are removed. LEVEL 2 has each row mixed up a little, but space notes and line notes are still kept separate. LEVEL 3 mixes up space and line notes for the treble clef and then the bass clef. Another way to use these worksheets is for ...

  6. PDF The note names on the piano

    So, sharp means: the note just at the right, and flat means: the note just at the left. We write C sharp as C# and D flat as Db. So the black keys actually have 2 names, the name of the white key at the left side with a sharp (#) sign, or the name of the white key at the right side with a flat (b) sign.

  7. Online Level-Based Note Naming Flash Cards

    Dr. Charles Laux is the Director of Orchestras at Lassiter High School in the Cobb County School District, located just north of Atlanta, Georgia. He also serves as Essential Elements clinician, consultant, and contributor for the Hal Leonard Corporation. Dr. Laux holds degrees in music education from Ohio University, the University of Nevada - Las Vegas, and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State ...

  8. Lesson 1: Staff, names of notes, treble clef

    0:10all different note values. 0:36the slower the vibration, the lower the pitch. 0:49on one of these five lines or four spaces. 0:53Let's work with a whole note. 1:20these seven note names are repeated indefinitely. 1:51from A to G on the treble clef staff. 2:35this is true of all traditional music notation.

  9. The Perfect Start for Piano

    Book 3. Unit 1. Unit 2. Unit 3. Unit 4. Unit 5. Unit 6. Permission has been granted to print and distribute this material in. your piano studio.

  10. Music Theory: Notes name basics

    Notations. We will (almost) always use what is called "common notation" : it includes, mainly : a staff (or two, or more staves) and a clef. (each staff has a clef). A staff is made with 5 horizontal lines. A clef is a good-looking musical symbol ! (you will mainly use treble and bass clefs) We place notes on or between those lines.

  11. 10 FREE Treble Clef Note Name Worksheets (2023)

    It shouldn't be the bedrock of your teaching strategy, but it's perfectly fine to use in moderation, especially if they're engaging and well done! With all this in mind, I looked around and found (or made) these 10 FREE treble clef note name worksheets. All worksheets made with a combination of Flat.io and Canva. Read on for details on ...

  12. Music Note Names

    Quiz your students on Music Note Names practice problems using our fun classroom quiz game Quizalize and personalize your teaching. ... assign as homework; share a link with colleagues; print as a bubble sheet; Improve student outcomes for free! Q . 1/11Score 0. Name the note. 29. Half Note. Eighth Note. Quarter Note.

  13. Note Names Teaching Resources

    by. Lindsay Jervis. 4.9. (417) $2.00. PDF. Treble Note Names Worksheets: This set of 10 worksheets is designed to help your students practice identifying and notating the pitches on the treble staff. It includes: - "I 'Mustache' you, Can you name these Lines and Spaces?" worksheets.

  14. Note Name Worksheets & Teaching Resources

    Note Name Music Worksheets - Treble Clef & Bass Clef Note Name Snippits. by. Band Directors Talk Shop. 31. $8.00. Zip. This extensive collection of note name worksheets ("snippits") provides a huge amount of practice for your student's note reading skills. Worksheets for both treble clef and bass clef are included.

  15. Music Note Name Worksheet Teaching Resources

    Browse music note name worksheet resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, a marketplace trusted by millions of teachers for original educational resources.

  16. Fun Ways to Teach Note Names

    Note Name Match Game is a memory game with 10 levels - spaces, lines, staff, ledger lines - in both treble clef and bass clef. In Note Name Smash you can choose the notes you want to practice. Each note that's correctly named smashes a hole in the wall. When all notes are correctly names, the wall crumbles - fun!!!

  17. Note Recognition Worksheets

    Bass Clef Ledger Lines Only - Note Recognition WorksheetBass Clef Only - Note Recognition WorksheetTreble and Bass Clef - Note Recognition WorksheetTreble Clef Only - Note Recognition WorksheetTreble Clef Ledger Lines Only - Note Recognition WorksheetTreble Clef With Ledger Lines - Note Recognition Worksheet.

  18. PDF Grand Staff Note Names

    PART 1: Grand Staff Note Names Directions : Write the letter name (e.g. "C," "D," etc.) of each note in the blanks. PART 2: Grand Staff Note Names - Ledger Lines

  19. Kim Mulkey names Brian Kelly as reason why she's not ...

    Kim Mulkey names Brian Kelly as reason why she's not cooperating with WaPo 'hit piece' Kim Mulkey isn't letting the outside noise get to her or the LSU Fighting Tigers amid their 2024 March ...

  20. Note Names

    Quiz your students on Note Names practice problems using our fun classroom quiz game Quizalize and personalize your teaching. ... assign as homework; share a link with colleagues; print as a bubble sheet; Improve student outcomes for free! Q . 1/3Score 0. What is the name of a note that gets four beats? 29.

  21. There could be another 'Hurricane Idalia' before 2030: WMO ...

    T ALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) - For the first time since 2014, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) will not be retiring any storm names from the rotating list used for the Atlantic Basin.

  22. Note Names

    Correct quiz answers unlock more play! Teachers, explore our epic whole class team games here. 12 questions. Show answers. Q1. What is the name of the note on the 3rd line of the treble clef staff? B. 30 s. Q2.

  23. Could April's Eclipse Impact the Power Grid? Our Energy Expert Says Not

    On April 8, a total solar eclipse will be visible across parts of North America, following a narrow track from Mexico through the U.S. and all the way to Canada.. While many eclipse chasers and casual observers are excited for this rare phenomenon, there have also been concerns about how the eclipse might impact areas that rely on solar power along the way.

  24. Trump is about to get $3 billion richer after deal is approved to take

    Investors have approved a deal on Friday to make Truth Social owner Trump Media a publicly traded company. The green light from shareholders clears the final major hurdle for a long-delayed ...

  25. Catherine McKenna on Her Life, Work and Preserving the World for Future

    Catherine McKenna. Catherine McKenna, Canada's former Minister of Environment and Climate Change and a senior research scholar at Columbia's Climate School, never imagined becoming a politician. "What did I want to do when I grew up? I didn't care about politics," said McKenna, at a recent event at the Climate School. "I wanted to go to the Olympics [as a swimmer].

  26. What we know about the Moscow concert hall attack

    He gives his name and age of 30. When asked where the weapons from the attack were dropped off, he replies, "I don't know the city, ask my friends, they know."

  27. Note Names Worksheet

    Activity. You can never have too many ways to practice note names! This worksheet pack includes 7 worksheets with answer keys. Basic note names in treble and bass clefs (both including middle C and spaces just above/below each staff). 3 worksheets for each clef -- just space notes, just line notes, and a co. Subjects:

  28. Department of Public Health advises consumers not to drink bottled

    Boston — The Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) advises consumers not to purchase or consume bottled water or fill containers from self-serve water vending machines operated or distributed by Simpson Spring Company in Easton after per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination exceeding drinking water standards was found in water bottled and distributed by the company.

  29. Note Naming Worksheet Teaching Resources

    These color-by-note name worksheets are great for use in summer camp, group lessons, with private students, or as part of a take-home packet for band, orchestra or other instrumental music students. Included are 8 kid-tested color by note name pages covering the full staff as well as line, space, and C Position variations. These worksheets pair

  30. AMD Software: Adrenalin Edition 24.3.1 Release Notes

    Fixed Issues During Microsoft Teams meetings, the camera may intermittently display looped footage on some AMD Products, such as the AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 6650U Processor. GPU Acceleration may be missing/greyed out in Adobe Premiere Pro on some hybrid graphics systems. Known Issues Shader caching may fail for Windows usernames containing accented characters.