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Do you need to write a persuasive essay but aren’t sure what topic to focus on? Were you thrilled when your teacher said you could write about whatever you wanted but are now overwhelmed by the possibilities? We’re here to help!

Read on for a list of 113 top-notch persuasive essay topics, organized into ten categories. To help get you started, we also discuss what a persuasive essay is, how to choose a great topic, and what tips to keep in mind as you write your persuasive essay.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

In a persuasive essay, you attempt to convince readers to agree with your point of view on an argument. For example, an essay analyzing changes in Italian art during the Renaissance wouldn’t be a persuasive essay, because there’s no argument, but an essay where you argue that Italian art reached its peak during the Renaissance would be a persuasive essay because you’re trying to get your audience to agree with your viewpoint.

Persuasive and argumentative essays both try to convince readers to agree with the author, but the two essay types have key differences. Argumentative essays show a more balanced view of the issue and discuss both sides. Persuasive essays focus more heavily on the side the author agrees with. They also often include more of the author’s opinion than argumentative essays, which tend to use only facts and data to support their argument.

All persuasive essays have the following:

  • Introduction: Introduces the topic, explains why it’s important, and ends with the thesis.
  • Thesis: A sentence that sums up what the essay be discussing and what your stance on the issue is.
  • Reasons you believe your side of the argument: Why do you support the side you do? Typically each main point will have its own body paragraph.
  • Evidence supporting your argument: Facts or examples to back up your main points. Even though your opinion is allowed in persuasive essays more than most other essays, having concrete examples will make a stronger argument than relying on your opinion alone.
  • Conclusion: Restatement of thesis, summary of main points, and a recap of why the issue is important.

What Makes a Good Persuasive Essay Topic?

Theoretically, you could write a persuasive essay about any subject under the sun, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you should. Certain topics are easier to write a strong persuasive essay on, and below are tips to follow when deciding what you should write about.

It’s a Topic You Care About

Obviously, it’s possible to write an essay about a topic you find completely boring. You’ve probably done it! However, if possible, it’s always better to choose a topic that you care about and are interested in. When this is the case, you’ll find doing the research more enjoyable, writing the essay easier, and your writing will likely be better because you’ll be more passionate about and informed on the topic.

You Have Enough Evidence to Support Your Argument

Just being passionate about a subject isn’t enough to make it a good persuasive essay topic, though. You need to make sure your argument is complex enough to have at least two potential sides to root for, and you need to be able to back up your side with evidence and examples. Even though persuasive essays allow your opinion to feature more than many other essays, you still need concrete evidence to back up your claims, or you’ll end up with a weak essay.

For example, you may passionately believe that mint chocolate chip ice cream is the best ice cream flavor (I agree!), but could you really write an entire essay on this? What would be your reasons for believing mint chocolate chip is the best (besides the fact that it’s delicious)? How would you support your belief? Have enough studies been done on preferred ice cream flavors to support an entire essay? When choosing a persuasive essay idea, you want to find the right balance between something you care about (so you can write well on it) and something the rest of the world cares about (so you can reference evidence to strengthen your position).

It’s a Manageable Topic

Bigger isn’t always better, especially with essay topics. While it may seem like a great idea to choose a huge, complex topic to write about, you’ll likely struggle to sift through all the information and different sides of the issue and winnow them down to one streamlined essay. For example, choosing to write an essay about how WWII impacted American life more than WWI wouldn’t be a great idea because you’d need to analyze all the impacts of both the wars in numerous areas of American life. It’d be a huge undertaking. A better idea would be to choose one impact on American life the wars had (such as changes in female employment) and focus on that. Doing so will make researching and writing your persuasive essay much more feasible.

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List of 113 Good Persuasive Essay Topics

Below are over 100 persuasive essay ideas, organized into ten categories. When you find an idea that piques your interest, you’ll choose one side of it to argue for in your essay. For example, if you choose the topic, “should fracking be legal?” you’d decide whether you believe fracking should be legal or illegal, then you’d write an essay arguing all the reasons why your audience should agree with you.

Arts/Culture

  • Should students be required to learn an instrument in school?
  • Did the end of Game of Thrones fit with the rest of the series?
  • Can music be an effective way to treat mental illness?
  • With e-readers so popular, have libraries become obsolete?
  • Are the Harry Potter books more popular than they deserve to be?
  • Should music with offensive language come with a warning label?
  • What’s the best way for museums to get more people to visit?
  • Should students be able to substitute an art or music class for a PE class in school?
  • Are the Kardashians good or bad role models for young people?
  • Should people in higher income brackets pay more taxes?
  • Should all high school students be required to take a class on financial literacy?
  • Is it possible to achieve the American dream, or is it only a myth?
  • Is it better to spend a summer as an unpaid intern at a prestigious company or as a paid worker at a local store/restaurant?
  • Should the United States impose more or fewer tariffs?
  • Should college graduates have their student loans forgiven?
  • Should restaurants eliminate tipping and raise staff wages instead?
  • Should students learn cursive writing in school?
  • Which is more important: PE class or music class?
  • Is it better to have year-round school with shorter breaks throughout the year?
  • Should class rank be abolished in schools?
  • Should students be taught sex education in school?
  • Should students be able to attend public universities for free?
  • What’s the most effective way to change the behavior of school bullies?
  • Are the SAT and ACT accurate ways to measure intelligence?
  • Should students be able to learn sign language instead of a foreign language?
  • Do the benefits of Greek life at colleges outweigh the negatives?
  • Does doing homework actually help students learn more?
  • Why do students in many other countries score higher than American students on math exams?
  • Should parents/teachers be able to ban certain books from schools?
  • What’s the best way to reduce cheating in school?
  • Should colleges take a student’s race into account when making admissions decisions?
  • Should there be limits to free speech?
  • Should students be required to perform community service to graduate high school?
  • Should convicted felons who have completed their sentence be allowed to vote?
  • Should gun ownership be more tightly regulated?
  • Should recycling be made mandatory?
  • Should employers be required to offer paid leave to new parents?
  • Are there any circumstances where torture should be allowed?
  • Should children under the age of 18 be able to get plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons?
  • Should white supremacy groups be allowed to hold rallies in public places?
  • Does making abortion illegal make women more or less safe?
  • Does foreign aid actually help developing countries?
  • Are there times a person’s freedom of speech should be curtailed?
  • Should people over a certain age not be allowed to adopt children?

Government/Politics

  • Should the minimum voting age be raised/lowered/kept the same?
  • Should Puerto Rico be granted statehood?
  • Should the United States build a border wall with Mexico?
  • Who should be the next person printed on American banknotes?
  • Should the United States’ military budget be reduced?
  • Did China’s one child policy have overall positive or negative impacts on the country?
  • Should DREAMers be granted US citizenship?
  • Is national security more important than individual privacy?
  • What responsibility does the government have to help homeless people?
  • Should the electoral college be abolished?
  • Should the US increase or decrease the number of refugees it allows in each year?
  • Should privately-run prisons be abolished?
  • Who was the most/least effective US president?
  • Will Brexit end up helping or harming the UK?

body-sparkler-us-flag

  • What’s the best way to reduce the spread of Ebola?
  • Is the Keto diet a safe and effective way to lose weight?
  • Should the FDA regulate vitamins and supplements more strictly?
  • Should public schools require all students who attend to be vaccinated?
  • Is eating genetically modified food safe?
  • What’s the best way to make health insurance more affordable?
  • What’s the best way to lower the teen pregnancy rate?
  • Should recreational marijuana be legalized nationwide?
  • Should birth control pills be available without a prescription?
  • Should pregnant women be forbidden from buying cigarettes and alcohol?
  • Why has anxiety increased in adolescents?
  • Are low-carb or low-fat diets more effective for weight loss?
  • What caused the destruction of the USS Maine?
  • Was King Arthur a mythical legend or actual Dark Ages king?
  • Was the US justified in dropping atomic bombs during WWII?
  • What was the primary cause of the Rwandan genocide?
  • What happened to the settlers of the Roanoke colony?
  • Was disagreement over slavery the primary cause of the US Civil War?
  • What has caused the numerous disappearances in the Bermuda triangle?
  • Should nuclear power be banned?
  • Is scientific testing on animals necessary?
  • Do zoos help or harm animals?
  • Should scientists be allowed to clone humans?
  • Should animals in circuses be banned?
  • Should fracking be legal?
  • Should people be allowed to keep exotic animals as pets?
  • What’s the best way to reduce illegal poaching in Africa?
  • What is the best way to reduce the impact of global warming?
  • Should euthanasia be legalized?
  • Is there legitimate evidence of extraterrestrial life?
  • Should people be banned from owning aggressive dog breeds?
  • Should the United States devote more money towards space exploration?
  • Should the government subsidize renewable forms of energy?
  • Is solar energy worth the cost?
  • Should stem cells be used in medicine?
  • Is it right for the US to leave the Paris Climate Agreement?
  • Should athletes who fail a drug test receive a lifetime ban from the sport?
  • Should college athletes receive a salary?
  • Should the NFL do more to prevent concussions in players?
  • Do PE classes help students stay in shape?
  • Should horse racing be banned?
  • Should cheerleading be considered a sport?
  • Should children younger than 18 be allowed to play tackle football?
  • Are the costs of hosting an Olympic Games worth it?
  • Can online schools be as effective as traditional schools?
  • Do violent video games encourage players to be violent in real life?
  • Should facial recognition technology be banned?
  • Does excessive social media use lead to depression/anxiety?
  • Has the rise of translation technology made knowing multiple languages obsolete?
  • Was Steve Jobs a visionary or just a great marketer?
  • Should social media be banned for children younger than a certain age?
  • Which 21st-century invention has had the largest impact on society?
  • Are ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft good or bad for society?
  • Should Facebook have done more to protect the privacy of its users?
  • Will technology end up increasing or decreasing inequality worldwide?

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Tips for Writing a Strong Persuasive Essay

After you’ve chosen the perfect topic for your persuasive essay, your work isn’t over. Follow the three tips below to create a top-notch essay.

Do Your Research

Your argument will fall apart if you don’t fully understand the issue you’re discussing or you overlook an important piece of it. Readers won’t be convinced by someone who doesn’t know the subject, and you likely won’t persuade any of them to begin supporting your viewpoint. Before you begin writing a single word of your essay, research your topic thoroughly. Study different sources, learn about the different sides of the argument, ask anyone who’s an expert on the topic what their opinion is, etc. You might be tempted to start writing right away, but by doing your research, you’ll make the writing process much easier when the time comes.

Make Your Thesis Perfect

Your thesis is the most important sentence in your persuasive essay. Just by reading that single sentence, your audience should know exactly what topic you’ll be discussing and where you stand on the issue. You want your thesis to be crystal clear and to accurately set up the rest of your essay. Asking classmates or your teacher to look it over before you begin writing the rest of your essay can be a big help if you’re not entirely confident in your thesis.

Consider the Other Side

You’ll spend most of your essay focusing on your side of the argument since that’s what you want readers to come away believing. However, don’t think that means you can ignore other sides of the issue. In your essay, be sure to discuss the other side’s argument, as well as why you believe this view is weak or untrue. Researching all the different viewpoints and including them in your essay will increase the quality of your writing by making your essay more complete and nuanced.

Summary: Persuasive Essay Ideas

Good persuasive essay topics can be difficult to come up with, but in this guide we’ve created a list of 113 excellent essay topics for you to browse. The best persuasive essay ideas will be those that you are interested in, have enough evidence to support your argument, and aren’t too complicated to be summarized in an essay.

After you’ve chosen your essay topic, keep these three tips in mind when you begin writing:

  • Do your research
  • Make your thesis perfect
  • Consider the other side

What's Next?

Need ideas for a research paper topic as well? Our guide to research paper topics has over 100 topics in ten categories so you can be sure to find the perfect topic for you.

Thinking about taking an AP English class? Read our guide on AP English classes to learn whether you should take AP English Language or AP English Literature (or both!)

Deciding between the SAT or ACT? Find out for sure which you will do the best on . Also read a detailed comparison between the two tests .

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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100 Persuasive Essay Topics

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

Persuasive essays are a bit like argument essays , but they tend to be a little kinder and gentler. Argument essays require you to discuss and attack an alternate view, while persuasive essays attempt to convince the reader that you have a believable argument. In other words, you are an advocate, not an adversary.

Writing a compelling persuasive essay requires you to select a topic that ideally stirs your readers' emotions. Before settling on a subject, explore some options to find one that helps craft the strongest and most engaging argument.

Below is a list of potential persuasive essay topics to spark your brainstorming process. You can choose a topic from this list or use it as inspiration to develop an idea of your own.

Main Components of a Persuasive Essay

  • Introduction : This is the opening paragraph of your essay. It contains the hook , which is used to grab the reader's attention, and the thesis , or argument, which you'll explain in the next section.
  • Body : This is the heart of your essay, usually three to five paragraphs in length. Each paragraph examines one theme or issue used to support your thesis.
  • Conclusion : This is the final paragraph of your essay. In it, you'll sum up the main points of the body and connect them to your thesis. Persuasive essays often use the conclusion as a final appeal to the audience.

Learning how to write a persuasive essay is an essential skill people use every day in fields from business to law to media and entertainment. English students can begin writing a persuasive essay at any skill level. You'll surely find a sample topic or two from the list of 100 persuasive essays below, sorted by degree of difficulty.

Watch Now: 12 Ideas for Great Persuasive Essay Topics

Beginner topics.

  • Kids should get paid for good grades.
  • Students should have less homework.
  • Snow days are great for family time.
  • Penmanship is important.
  • Short hair is better than long hair.
  • We should all grow our own vegetables.
  • We need more holidays.
  • Aliens probably exist.
  • Gym class is more important than music class.
  • Kids should be able to vote.
  • Kids should get paid for extra activities like sports.
  • School should take place in the evenings.
  • Country life is better than city life.
  • City life is better than country life.
  • We can change the world.
  • Skateboard helmets should be mandatory.
  • We should provide food for the poor.
  • Children should be paid for doing chores.
  • We should populate the moon .
  • Dogs make better pets than cats.

Intermediate Topics

  • The government should impose household trash limits.
  • Nuclear weapons are an effective deterrent against foreign attack.
  • Teens should be required to take parenting classes.
  • We should teach etiquette in schools.
  • School uniform laws are unconstitutional.
  • All students should wear uniforms.
  • Too much money is a bad thing.
  • High schools should offer specialized degrees in arts or sciences.
  • Magazine advertisements send unhealthy signals to young women.
  • Robocalling should be outlawed.
  • Age 12 is too young to babysit.
  • Children should be required to read more.
  • All students should be allowed to study abroad.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory past age 65.
  • Cell phones should never be used while driving.
  • All schools should implement bullying awareness programs.
  • Bullies should be kicked out of school.
  • Parents of bullies should have to pay a fine.
  • The school year should be longer.
  • School days should start later.
  • Teens should be able to choose their bedtime.
  • There should be a mandatory entrance exam for high school.
  • Public transit should be privatized.
  • We should allow pets in school.
  • The voting age should be lowered to 16.
  • Beauty contests are bad for body image.
  • Every American should learn to speak Spanish.
  • Every immigrant should learn to speak English.
  • Video games can be educational.
  • College athletes should be paid for their services.
  • We need a military draft .
  • Professional sports should eliminate cheerleaders.
  • Teens should be able to start driving at 14 instead of 16.
  • Year-round school is a bad idea.
  • High school campuses should be guarded by police officers.
  • The legal drinking age should be lowered to 19.
  • Kids under 15 shouldn't have Facebook pages.
  • Standardized testing should be eliminated.
  • Teachers should be paid more.
  • There should be one world currency.

Advanced Topics

  • Domestic surveillance without a warrant should be legal.
  • Letter grades should be replaced with a pass or fail.
  • Every family should have a natural disaster survival plan.
  • Parents should talk to kids about drugs at a young age.
  • Racial slurs should be illegal.
  • Gun ownership should be tightly regulated.
  • Puerto Rico should be granted statehood.
  • People should go to jail when they abandon their pets.
  • Free speech should have limitations.
  • Members of Congress should be subject to term limits.
  • Recycling should be mandatory for everyone.
  • High-speed internet access should be regulated like a public utility.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory for the first five years after getting a license.
  • Recreational marijuana should be made legal nationwide.
  • Legal marijuana should be taxed and regulated like tobacco or alcohol.
  • Child support dodgers should go to jail.
  • Students should be allowed to pray in school.
  • All Americans have a constitutional right to health care.
  • Internet access should be free for everyone.
  • Social Security should be privatized.
  • Pregnant couples should receive parenting lessons.
  • We shouldn't use products made from animals.
  • Celebrities should have more privacy rights.
  • Professional football is too violent and should be banned.
  • We need better sex education in schools.
  • School testing is not effective.
  • The United States should build a border wall with Mexico and Canada.
  • Life is better than it was 50 years ago.
  • Eating meat is unethical.
  • A vegan diet is the only diet people should follow.
  • Medical testing on animals should be illegal.
  • The Electoral College is outdated.
  • Medical testing on animals is necessary.
  • Public safety is more important than an individual's right to privacy.
  • Single-sex colleges provide a better education.
  • Books should never be banned.
  • Violent video games can cause people to act violently in real life.
  • Freedom of religion has limitations.
  • Nuclear power should be illegal.
  • Climate change should be the president's primary political concern.

Key Takeaways

  • Persuasive essays aim to convince rather than confront, effectively making you advocate for a position or idea.
  • Choosing a compelling topic that evokes emotions is crucial for crafting a strong persuasive essay.
  • The main parts of a persuasive essay are the introduction (with a hook and thesis), body paragraphs (explaining themes supporting the thesis), and conclusion (summarizing main points and making a final appeal).

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50 Persuasive Essay Topics to Help You Ace Your Next Assignment

50 Persuasive Essay Topics to Help You Ace Your Next Assignment

  • 5-minute read
  • 19th January 2023

Welcome to your ultimate guide to persuasive essay topics! 

In this post, we’ll provide a list of 50 persuasive essay topics to help you get started on your next assignment. 

We’ll also include some tips for writing a persuasive essay to help you craft a strong and effective argument. Whether you’re a student or a professional writer, these persuasive essay topics are sure to inspire and challenge you.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

Persuasive essays are a type of argumentative essay that encourage the reader to accept a particular point of view or take a specific action.

They typically open with a question, followed by a series of arguments intended to persuade the reader to take the same side as the author.

In a persuasive essay, the author will usually appeal to the readers’ emotions in order to prove that their opinion is the correct one. But this doesn’t mean that persuasive essays ignore evidence , facts, and figures; an effective persuasive essay makes use of a combination of logical argument and emotive language to sway the audience.

A persuasive essay can cover just about anything from pop culture to politics. With that in mind, we’ve put together this list of 50 persuasive essay topics to inspire your next assignment!

Top 50 Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Should the government censor the internet?
  • Should the government regulate the sale of violent video games?
  • Should self-driving cars be banned?
  • Is facial recognition software unethical?
  • Should mental health apps collect users’ personal data?
  • Should children under 13 have cell phones?
  • Should internet access be treated as a human right?
  • Should all paperwork be digitized?

Science and the Environment

  • Should the use of plastic bags be banned?
  • Should genetically modified organisms be labeled?
  • Should we clone human beings?
  • Should animal testing be allowed?
  • Should the government fund space exploration?
  • Should the government regulate the use of pesticides in farming?
  • Should the government regulate the use of antibiotics in livestock?
  • Should the government fine people who drive gas-powered vehicles?
  • Should climate change be declared a national emergency?

Crime and Politics

  • Should the death penalty be abolished?
  • Should all American citizens have to serve a year of community service?
  • Should the US voting age be lowered to 16?
  • Should the government adopt a tougher immigration policy?
  • Should the government cut its military spending?
  • Should the government introduce a national living wage?
  • Should politicians be banned from social media?
  • Should the electoral college be abolished?

Health and Fitness

  • Should the government provide universal healthcare?
  • Should the government ban the use of certain chemicals in cosmetics?
  • Should parents be allowed to choose the gender of their unborn child?
  • Should physical exercise be mandatory at work?
  • Should employees have to disclose health conditions to their employers?
  • Should fast food commercials be banned?
  • Should herbal medicines be better regulated?
  • Should regular mental health checkups be mandatory?
  • Should schools offer fast food options like McDonald’s or Taco Bell?
  • Should students be required to wear uniforms?
  • Should the government provide free college education?
  • Should schools offer comprehensive sex education?
  • Are high school students given too much homework?
  • Should humanities and arts subjects receive more funding?
  • Should military recruiters be allowed on school grounds?
  • Is the school day too long?
  • Should every US citizen be required to learn another language?

Lifestyle and Culture

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  • Should the drinking age be lowered or raised?
  • Should the use of tobacco be banned?
  • Should marijuana be legalized?
  • Should all museums and art galleries be free?
  • Should kids be encouraged to read more?
  • Should public spaces provide unisex bathrooms?
  • Is pet ownership a human right?
  • Should extreme sports be banned?

Tips for Writing a Persuasive Essay

Once you’ve chosen your topic, it’s time to start writing your persuasive essay. Here are our tips:

Choose a Side

When you’ve picked the question you’re going to address in your essay, you also need to choose one side – or answer – that you’re going to write in favor of.

It helps if you’re passionate about the topic, as this will enable you to write from an emotional perspective.

Do Your Research

In order to write persuasively , you need to understand the topic you’re writing about. 

Make sure you know the details of your subject matter, and can provide facts and figures to back up your appeal to your readers’ emotions.

You should also read up about different points of view on the topic, so that you can bring them up in the form of counterarguments and rebuttals .

Keep Your Audience in Mind

When you’re writing your essay, think about who it is you’re trying to persuade. The way you speak to a student, for example, will be different to how you address a parent.

Consider what your potential audience will value, and how you can reach them on an emotional level. 

Outline Your Essay

Now you’ve got all the information you need, it’s time to plan and write your essay.

You should break it down into the follow sections:

  • An introduction, which sets up the question you’re going to answer and what side of the argument you are aiming to persuade the reader of.
  • The body of the essay, with a paragraph for each of the points you want to make.
  • A conclusion, where you summarize your points and main arguments.

Get It Proofread

As with any essay, your finished persuasive essay will need proofreading to make sure it’s the best it can be.

Our academic proofreading team here at Proofed can help with that. You can even get your first 500 words proofread for free !

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Persuasive Essay Writing

Persuasive Essay Topics

Cathy A.

Easy and Unique Persuasive Essay Topics with Tips

15 min read

Published on: Jan 4, 2023

Last updated on: Jan 29, 2024

persuasive essay topics

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You're staring at a blank screen, trying to come up with a topic for your persuasive essay. You know you need to pick something interesting, but you're unsure where to start. 

It's hard to get motivated when it feels like everything has already been said on the topic you're considering. You are wondering how can you make your essay stand out.

The good news is that CollegeEssay.org  is here to help. 

We have compiled a list of potential persuasive essay topics to get your creative juices flowing. Whether you are looking for something controversial, humorous, or informative – we have it all. 

Take a look at our list of persuasive essay topics below to get started.

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Unique Persuasive Essay Topics for Students

Writing a persuasive essay can be quite an interesting task for students. It allows them to showcase their research and analytic skills and present their thoughts orderly. 

Choosing the right topic is key to making the writing process more enjoyable. 

Here are some great ideas that you can use for your essay: 

Persuasive Essay Topics for Middle School 

  • Should students be required to wear uniforms in school? 
  • What are the benefits of a longer school day? 
  • How can technology help improve student engagement and learning? 
  • Is it important for all schools to have equal access to resources? 
  • Should physical education be mandatory in all schools? 
  • How can schools better prepare students for entering the job market?
  • Should a student’s grade be based solely on test performance?
  • Is it important to limit screen time, or should there not be restrictions? 
  • Should recess time be increased or decreased in school? 
  • Is it beneficial for students to take part in after-school activities?

Persuasive Essay Topics for Grade 6 

  • Should school lunch prices be lowered to make it more accessible for all students? 
  • Is there an argument for allowing cell phone usage in the classroom? 
  • Should schools offer a wider variety of electives? 
  • Is there a persuasive case for requiring physical education classes in elementary and middle schools? 
  • Should students be allowed to opt-out of standardized testing? 
  • Is the current homework load for elementary and middle school students too much? 
  • Should school provide free breakfast and lunch to all students, regardless of financial status?
  • Should sixth-grade classes have more field trips and outdoor activities? 
  • Should students have access to more technology in the classroom? 
  • Is there an argument for making recess mandatory for all grade levels? 

Persuasive Essay Topics for Grade 7

  • Should schools have a dress code? 
  • Should students be required to do community service projects to graduate? 
  • Is it necessary for all student-athletes to take mandatory drug tests? 
  • Are the current laws on gun control sufficient enough? 
  • Should same-sex marriage be legal? 
  • Should teenage drivers be allowed to have passengers in their cars? 
  • Is standardized testing an effective measure of student success?
  • Should homework be abolished in schools? 
  • Should young children be allowed to use mobile phones or tablets at school? 
  • Are video games too violent for young children?

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Persuasive Essay Topics for High School 

  • Should physical education classes be mandatory in high school?
  • Is a strict dress code necessary for student success?
  • Are standardized tests an effective measure of student achievement?
  • Does social media have a positive or negative impact on teenagers?
  • Should students be allowed to grade their teachers? 
  • Should cell phones be prohibited in the classroom?
  • Should schools offer fast food options like McDonald's or Taco Bell?
  • Is competitive sports necessary for a well-rounded education? 
  • Are after-school activities essential to a student’s development?
  • Should students be allowed to choose their classes?

Persuasive Essay Topics for College 

  • Should universities require all students to take at least one course in diversity studies? 
  • Should universities implement free speech zones on campuses? 
  • Should college athletes be paid for their performance? 
  • Is it ethical for employers to ask about an applicant’s criminal history during the hiring process? 
  • Should college students be required to take a foreign language course? 
  • Should the US government provide free tuition for all qualifying students? 
  • Is it ethical to use animals in scientific research? 
  • Are standardized tests an adequate measure of academic aptitude and ability? 
  • Should paper textbooks be replaced with e-books? 
  • Should all students be required to learn coding and computer science in school? 

Persuasive Essay Topics for University 

  • Should universities offer free tuition to all students?
  • Are special scholarships beneficial for university students?
  • Should college athletes be paid for their services?
  • Is it important for universities to provide mental health resources to their students? 
  • How can universities help prevent cheating and plagiarism among students?
  • Should universities be required to provide online courses?
  • Are university degree requirements outdated and irrelevant?
  • Is it necessary for university students to take physical education classes? 
  • Does the presence of social media in academia positively or negatively impact learning? 
  • Should universities prioritize research over teaching?

Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics from Different Fields 

When choosing essay topics, there is no shortage of interesting persuasive essay topics from different fields available.

Here are some examples of interesting persuasive essay topics from different fields:

Arts & Culture 

  • Should museums be more inclusive of diverse cultures?
  • Should the government fund public art programs?
  • Are comic books an important form of literature?
  • Does graffiti have any value as an art form?
  • Is the traditional concept of beauty outdated in today’s society? 
  • Is it important for the public to have access to art galleries and museums?
  • Do modern movies have any real artistic value?
  • Are video games a form of art?
  • Should government funding be given to the performing arts?
  • Does the music industry put too much emphasis on image rather than talent?
  • Should governments guarantee a minimum wage?
  • Should the government subsidize green energy projects?
  • Is it necessary to introduce higher taxes on wealthy people?
  • Are free trade agreements beneficial or detrimental to developing countries?
  • Can economic growth be sustained without harming the environment?
  • Is immigration beneficial or detrimental to a country’s economic growth?
  • Should governments limit the size of banks and financial institutions?
  • Is it necessary for countries to regulate their currency markets?
  • Should governments invest in renewable energy sources instead of fossil fuels?
  • Should high officials pay more taxes?
  • Should students be required to complete a certain number of community service hours to graduate?
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory for all public schools?
  • Are textbooks becoming obsolete due to technological advances?
  • Should the education system focus more on practical subjects such as coding and programming?
  • Is the current grading system in public schools fair and effective?
  • Is homeschooling a viable alternative to traditional schooling?
  • Should standardized testing be abolished from the education system?
  • Should teachers receive bonuses for good performance in the classroom?
  • Are students more likely to succeed if they attend a private school or university?
  • Should all students have access to free college tuition?
  • Is using animals in medical research ethical?
  • Should parents be allowed to choose their child’s gender?
  • Should companies be held responsible for the pollution they create? 
  • Are businesses obligated to act ethically when conducting business abroad? 
  • Is it ethical to censor content on the internet?
  • Should the government enforce stricter regulations on genetically modified food?
  • Is it ethical to use artificial intelligence in decision-making processes?
  • Should corporations be allowed to have their own private security forces? 
  • Are restrictions on freedom of speech necessary for public safety? 
  • Do companies have an ethical responsibility to pay fair wages?

Government and Politics 

  • Should the government regulate social media?
  • Should term limits be placed on members of Congress?
  • Are taxes too high in the United States?
  • Should voting be mandatory for all citizens?
  • Is the Electoral College still relevant today?
  • Does the death penalty serve as a deterrent to crime?
  • Should the US switch to a single-payer health care system?
  • Should there be limits on campaign spending?
  • Should the United States adopt a flat tax system?
  • Is it time to repeal the Second Amendment?
  • Is legalizing marijuana an ethical practice?
  • Should parents be allowed to choose the gender of their child? 
  • Is it ethical to test medicines on animals? 
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of genetic engineering? 
  • Are there any health risks associated with using digital screens too often? 
  • Should physical education be mandatory in every school? 
  • Is the healthcare system in your country adequate for your needs? 
  • Are there any benefits to eating organic food? 
  • How does mental health affect physical health? 
  • Should vaccinations be mandatory for all children? 
  • Was the Spanish Inquisition justified? 
  • Were the American Colonists justified in rebelling against Great Britain? 
  • Did Christopher Columbus’ discoveries benefit or harm indigenous populations? 
  • What effect did Genghis Khan have on world history? 
  • Did World War I significantly change the course of history? 
  • Was the Treaty of Versailles fair to Germany? 
  • Did Napoleon Bonaparte’s rule bring about positive or negative changes for France and Europe? 
  • Should the United States annexed the Philippines in 1898? 
  • How did the Great Depression shape world history? 
  • Is there any validity to the theory of a “clash of civilizations”? 
  • Should artificial intelligence be regulated?
  • Should autonomous vehicles be allowed on public roads?
  • Is the internet making us less social?
  • Should research into cloning be banned?
  • Are there moral issues related to genetic engineering?
  • Should governments fund space exploration programs?
  • Are smart home devices making us more vulnerable to cyberattacks?
  • Should the government regulate social media use?
  • Are robots taking away jobs from humans?
  • Should nuclear energy be used as an alternative to fossil fuels?
  • Should professional athletes be drug tested?
  • Is there a gender gap in sports?
  • Should college athletes be paid for their performances?
  • Does skill or luck decide the outcome of sports competitions?
  • Are sporting events becoming too commercialized? 
  • Is it necessary to increase public funding for sporting events?
  • Is the use of performance-enhancing drugs in sports cheating or fair?
  • Should college students be able to choose their own sports teams?
  • Do professional sports hurt young people?
  • Should parents allow children to play violent video games?
  • Should schools replace textbooks with tablets?
  • Are algorithms replacing human decision-making in the workplace?
  • Is it time to regulate the use of facial recognition technology?
  • Can artificial intelligence and robots be used to improve healthcare outcomes?
  • Should autonomous vehicles be allowed on public roads? 
  • Should Internet access be a basic human right?
  • Should social media platforms do more to protect user privacy?
  • Is blockchain technology the future of banking and finance? 
  • Are virtual assistants such as Siri and Alexa invading privacy? 
  • Can we trust that autonomous weapons system will make ethical decisions in war?

Social Media

Here are a few social media persuasive essay topics. Take a look at them.

  • Is social media a positive or negative influence on society?
  • Should employers be able to access an employee's social media accounts?
  • Should people be allowed to post anonymously online?
  • How can parents protect their children from the risks of using social media?
  • Does the spread of fake news on social media hurt society?
  • Should governments regulate online speech on social media?
  • Should employers be allowed to conduct background checks using social media?
  • Is the personal data of individuals safe from exploitation by corporate interests on social media platforms?
  • Are people spending too much time on their digital devices?
  • Is the use of social media by young people making them more isolated?

Controversial Persuasive Essay Topics 

  • Should the death penalty be reinstated in all states?
  • Should gun control laws be stricter? 
  • Is global warming a real threat? 
  • Are vaccinations safe for children? 
  • Should prostitution be legalized? 
  • Should marijuana be made legal? 
  • Does school uniform violate personal freedom? 
  • Should genetically modified foods be allowed in the market? 
  • Should sex education in school be mandatory? 
  • Should animal testing be banned?

Fun Persuasive Essay Topics 

  • Should cats be allowed to go to school?
  • Should people have a minimum number of friends before they can graduate?
  • Is it okay to laugh at your own jokes?
  • Should parents be required to take parenting classes?
  • Are video games the best way to spend free time?
  • Should kids be allowed to wear pajamas in public places?
  • Should students have to pass a test before they can drive a car?
  • Are cell phones essential for teenagers or should they be limited?
  • Should everyone learn how to cook their meals?
  • Would it be better if all schools had the same uniform?

Argumentative Persuasive Essay Topics 

  • Should the electoral college be abolished? 
  • Is it ethical to eat meat? 
  • Should the internet have censorship? 
  • Are genetically modified foods safe for human consumption? 
  • Is social media good or bad for society? 
  • Should the drinking age be lowered or raised? 
  • Should school attendance be mandatory for students? 
  • Are video games too violent and negatively influencing children?  
  • Should religious education be banned from public schools?

How to Choose a Good Persuasive Essay Topic? 

Choosing a writing topic for your persuasive essay writing is essential. 

The right topic will let you draft an exceptional and well-written essay. Selecting a persuasive essay topic might sound easy, but it can be challenging. 

You cannot randomly start writing a persuasive essay about any topic and expect your essay to be brilliant. 

To select the best topic for your essay, take these essential steps:

1. Know your Interests -   You can only draft an effective essay if you are writing about something that interests you. When you write something you are passionate about, the enthusiasm helps to persuade the readers.

2. Narrow Down Ideas - Make a rough list of the topic of your interest. Then, analyze all the issues and identify topics you think you can present well.

3. Pick your Stance - Now that you know the information is sufficient on a topic, decide your stance. Pick a side to support with evidence and logic. 

4. Controversy is the Best Policy - People love to read about controversial stuff. It is more likely that the readers will go through the entire essay to ease their curiosity. 

After passing your ideas through these filters, you will have a strong and arguable topic to draft an essay on.

Tips for Writing a Compelling Persuasive Essay 

Whether you are in school, college, or university, crafting an effective persuasive essay can be difficult.

Fortunately, with a few tips and tricks, you can create a compelling, persuasive essay that will make your readers take notice. 

Here are six tips to help you write a compelling, persuasive essay:

1. Choose Your Topic Carefully

You need to select a relevant and interesting topic for your audience. Make sure you feel passionate about it and can present it logically and convincingly.

2. Do Extensive Research

Before beginning your essay, research your topic as much as possible. So you can present both sides of the argument in an informed, balanced way.

3. Identify Your Audience

 Before writing your persuasive essay, consider who will be reading it and their interests. 

This will help you write in a language that resonates with them and ensure that your arguments suit their understanding.

4. Use Logical Arguments

It is important to provide logical and compelling arguments to be persuasive. Make sure you use facts, statistics, and other evidence to make your points more convincing.

5. Structure Your Essay Well

An effective persuasive essay should be well-organized. Divide it into an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. 

Pay attention to the structure of your essay, as it can help you make your points more effectively.

Learn how to make a perfect persuasive essay outline with the help of our blog. 

6. Make It Engaging

An engaging, persuasive essay will capture your audience’s attention from beginning to end. 

Use various techniques to make your essay interesting and engaging, such as using examples, analogies, and persuasive language.

We hope you are inspired by our comprehensive list of topics. Pick up a topic that entices you and start working on it. By following these amazing tips and tricks, you can surely compose an essay that will wow your professor.

Still not sure how to draft a perfect essay? Well, leave it to us. Our essay writing service helps you craft your argument in the most effective way possible to get the desired results.

 Don't let yourself get overwhelmed with the process! Trust our professional persuasive essay writer. 

Let CollegeEssay.org's best essay writing service guide you on your journey and take your writing to the next level. 

Take the stress out of writing persuasive essays and get the results you need with our expert essay writer AI .

Frequently Asked Questions

How can i choose a good persuasive essay topic.

When selecting a persuasive essay topic, consider an issue that is interesting to you and has two or more opposing viewpoints. Research various resources about the topic to gain a better perspective

What strategies can I use for writing a persuasive essay?

When writing a persuasive essay, establish facts from reliable sources to support your argument. Be concise but thorough, and use persuasive language to strengthen your argument.

How can I make my persuasive essay stand out?

To make your persuasive essay stand out, use vivid language and strong, specific evidence to support each point. Make sure all sources are current and relevant to the argument being made. With these elements, your persuasive essay will stand out from the rest!

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75 Persuasive Essay Topic Ideas

JBirdwellBranson

The persuasive essay is one type of writing that you will likely come across in your academic career. A persuasive essay, if you're unfamiliar, is one in which you have to make an argument. You need to choose a side and prove why you're correct by using hard evidence and convincing language. The idea is that you want to convince the reader that your argument is the right one, so you'll definitely want to pick a topic that you're passionate about and something that you'll get excited about researching and writing. This exercise is designed so that you can clearly articulate your opinion and understand why it's important to have evidence to back up your claim.

Your teacher or instructor will probably have specific guidelines on what your essay should entail, but you might have a little bit of free reign on what kinds of topics you can explore and argue about in your essay. With so many things to argue about and for, it might be a little overwhelming to come up with a topic on your own. When you feel like you're stuck on brainstorming ideas, take a look at the following list of 75 persuasive essay topics. You may find something you can use, or something you can adapt for the specific guidelines of your paper. Happy writing!

Educational persuasive essay topics

There are so many things that can be discussed when it comes to education. In our country (and globally), there are many different opinions on how education should be handled and what tactics teachers or academic administrators should use. Here are a few topics on education (which could be expanded or changed to fit your teacher's guidelines) that might be of interest to you.

  • Should soda be offered in school cafeterias?
  • Should schools teach abstinence-only education?
  • Why should schools teach financial literacy?
  • Do all students need to go to college?
  • Should students take a gap year after high school?
  • Do all students need to learn a foreign language?
  • Is online or homeschool an effective way to learn?
  • Should standardized tests determine whether or not you go on to another grade level?
  • Should all students be required to participate in the arts?
  • Should a college education be free?
  • Should high school journalists be protected under the First Amendment?
  • Some universities just have pass/fail grades instead of letter grades. How do you feel about this?
  • Should teachers/professors be unbiased in the classroom?
  • Should you still learn cursive in elementary school? What are the disadvantages/ advantages?
  • Many college campuses have speakers come in occasionally. These speakers can range in political opinion and some can be controversial. Should you let speakers come to schools that have controversial rhetoric or ideas to uphold free speech?

Political persuasive essay topics

They say that you should never talk about politics or religion because it's not polite. But in a persuasive essay, that rule is completely extinguished. Politics and religion are hotbed subjects for a reason—because so many people have radically different ideas of how a society and a country should operate. What side of these political persuasive topics are you on? Take a stab at one of these and the paper will likely fly out onto the keyboard.

  • Should protesters be allowed to block traffic? Do they pose a threat to public safety?
  • Why should you vote?
  • Should same-sex marriage be legal?
  • What is your opinion on protecting religious liberties?
  • What is your opinion on separating church and state?
  • Why has the country become so divided politically over the past few years? Can it be fixed?
  • Many industries (like coal and manufacturing) are tough to find a job in and many Americans are out of work. How should we solve this problem?
  • Should citizens under 18 be able to vote?
  • Should a National Voter ID law be passed to avoid voter fraud?
  • What does the phrase "fake news" mean?
  • Local newspapers are dwindling. What should be done, if anything, about this problem?
  • Should local municipalities do more to combat global warming? If so, how?
  • How should we reduce the threat of terrorism in the United States?
  • Females have traditionally lower participation in politics. Why do you think that is?
  • Some people say that the top 1% of earners don't pay enough taxes. How do you feel about this?
  • Will a huge wall on the southern border with Mexico solve the United States' immigration problem?
  • How should we solve the United States' immigration problem?
  • The voter turnout for the 2016 presidential election was less than 60%, which is much lower than in other democratic societies. Why do you think this is and what can be done about it (or should anything be done about it)?
  • Millennials are graduating college with a lot of student loan debt. What should be done to avoid a debt crisis?
  • Many say that minimum wage jobs are low skill and the workers in them shouldn't be compensated more for their work, but others claim that a minimum wage job isn't enough money to live off of. Which side do you land on?
  • What do you think of celebrities who are vocal about environmental issues but who frequently fly on private, and not commercial, jets?

Crime and legal persuasive essay topics

Crime in any society is an unfortunate inevitability. Why does crime happen and what should be done about it? These are just a few of the things to explore in these crime/legal persuasive essay topics.

  • What should we do about a city with a high crime rate like Chicago?
  • Should guns be allowed on college campuses?
  • Should gun laws be more restrictive?
  • Do we have a right to privacy?
  • Trends have shown that many recent terrorists have been convicted or accused of domestic violence. What should be done and how do you feel about this?
  • Should we have the death penalty? If so, when should it be used?
  • Many prisoners are incarcerated for minor drug charges (such as possession of drugs or drug paraphernalia). Should we try to rehabilitate these prisoners or should they serve their full sentences?
  • Colorado has legalized marijuana for recreational purposes. What is your opinion of this?
  • Do you think marijuana is a gateway drug which leads some users to harder drugs?
  • Can criminals be rehabilitated?
  • Many prisoners who enter the system are likely to have a high recurrence of criminal activity. What can be done to solve this?
  • Many people are starting to use drones for recreational activity. Should there be restrictions on where and how you can use your personal drone?
  • Self-driving cars are expected to become increasingly used on city roads. If a self-driving car gets into an accident, whose fault is it? The engineer's?

Health persuasive essay topics

Health is something that we all have to worry about. Whether it's our own health or the health of a loved one, there are many things to think about and research on. What's your opinion on the healthcare system in our country? Should we treat drug addiction like a disease? How should we handle end-of-life care? Try out one of these essay topics to research and gain insight on some of the biggest challenges and questions that our society faces when it comes to health.

  • Opioid addiction is at an all-time high in states like Ohio. What should we do to combat this?
  • Should healthcare be universal?
  • How do you feel about paternity leave?
  • Should women get guaranteed maternity leave?
  • The state of California requires that you display nutrition facts about menu items in restaurants. Should all states do this?
  • Should fast food be "sin taxed" like cigarettes are?
  • There is an effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Should we do this or not? If we should, what improvements can be made to a replacement act?
  • Many soldiers are coming back from warfare with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. What should we do to help them?
  • Many Americans are overweight. What has caused this health crisis and what can be done about it?
  • Should vitamins and supplements be more tightly regulated?
  • Should health insurance companies provide more financial incentives for subscribers to work out and eat more healthfully?

Women's and gender persuasive essay topics

Are there inherent differences between men and women or is that just a societal myth? Women have gained a lot more rights over the last 100 years in America, but some say they still have a long way to go before they achieve equal rights. How do you feel about this and other women's and gender issues? Explore the following fascinating topics.

  • Women have what is known as the "second shift" (meaning that as soon as they get home from work they have additional responsibilities that require their attention immediately). What do you think about this concept and should anything be done about it?
  • There are many women's rights and minority rights advocates. Should there be men's rights advocacy groups? What about Caucasian advocacy groups?
  • Some people say that gender is a socially constructed norm. What do you think?
  • Women who participate in body building competitions are trying to build the "ideal" figure, which some claim is an outdated, sexist idea. But some argue that building muscles is considered a sport and a traditionally "masculine" idea. Which side do you agree with?
  • Some people think that beauty pageants are outdated and anti-feminist and shouldn't be televised anymore. How do you feel?
  • New wave feminism is the idea that feminism can encompass many different ideas of what it is to be a feminist. It's the idea that you can have choices (whether that's staying at home with children or trying to be a CEO). How do you feel about new wave feminism?

Miscellaneous persuasive essay topics

Of course, there are more categories of essay topics than what are listed above. Here are some additional essay topics if you haven't found one yet that captures your interest.

  • Does social media improve or hurt our society?
  • Is it important or frivolous to travel the world?
  • Many Americans watch a lot of reality TV shows. Why do you think this is?
  • With many people reading digital copies of books, are libraries necessary anymore?
  • Should anything be done to curb the rise in offensive lyrics in music?
  • Should pregnant women be allowed to park in handicapped parking spots?
  • Recent studies have shown that pets improve the mental and the physical health of their owners. Should pet-related expenses be tax-deductible?
  • What do you think about net neutrality?
  • With the rise in selfies and Instagram photo filtering apps, do you think we have become a more self-obsessed society?

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what is a persuasive essay topics

Writing a Persuasive Essay

Persuasive essays convince readers to accept a certain perspective. Writing a persuasive essay therefore entails making an argument that will appeal to readers, so they believe what you say has merit. This act of appealing to readers is the art of persuasion, also known as rhetoric. In classical rhetoric, persuasion involves appealing to readers using ethos, pathos, and logos.

In this tutorial, we refer to the sample persuasive draft and final paper written by fictional student Maggie Durham.

THE ART OF PERSUASION

Ethos refers to establishing yourself as a credible source of information. To convince an audience of anything, they must first trust you are being earnest and ethical. One strategy to do this is to write a balanced discussion with relevant and reliable research that supports your claims. Reliable research would include quoting or paraphrasing experts, first-hand witnesses, or authorities. Properly citing your sources, so your readers can also retrieve them, is another factor in establishing a reliable ethos. When writing for academic purposes, expressing your argument using unbiased language and a neutral tone will also indicate you are arguing fairly and with consideration of others having differing views.

When you appeal to your readers’ emotions, you are using pathos. This appeal is common in advertising that convinces consumers they lack something and buying a certain product or service will fulfill that lack. Emotional appeals are subtler in academic writing; they serve to engage a reader in the argument and inspire a change of heart or motivate readers toward a course of action. The examples you use, how you define terms, any comparisons you draw, as well as the language choices you use can draw readers in and impact their willingness to go along with your ideas.

Consider that one purpose of persuasion is to appeal to those who do not already agree with you, so it will be important to show that you understand other points of view. You will also want to avoid derogatory or insulting descriptions or remarks about the opposition. You wouldn’t want to offend the very readers you want to persuade.

Establishing an appeal of logos is to write a sound argument, one that readers can follow and understand. To do this, the facts and evidence you use should be relevant, representative, and reliable, and the writing as a whole should be well organized, developed, and edited.

STEPS FOR WRITING PERSUASIVELY

Step one: determine the topic.

The first step in writing a persuasive essay is to establish the topic. The best topic is one that interests you. You can generate ideas for a topic by prewriting, such as by brainstorming whatever comes to mind, recording in grocery-list fashion your thoughts, or freewriting in complete sentences what you know or think about topics of interest.

Whatever topic you choose, it needs to be:

  • Interesting : The topic should appeal both to you and to your intended readers.
  • Researchable : A body of knowledge should already exist on the topic.
  • Nonfiction : The information about the topic should be factual, not based on personal opinions or conspiracy theories.
  • Important : Your reader should think the topic is relevant to them or worthy of being explored and discussed.

Our sample student Maggie Durham has selected the topic of educational technology. We will use Maggie’s sample persuasive draft and final paper as we discuss the steps for writing a persuasive essay.

Step Two: Pose a Research Question

Once you have a topic, the next step is to develop a research question along with related questions that delve further into the first question. If you do not know what to ask, start with one of the question words: What? Who? Where? When? Why? and How? The research question helps you focus or narrow the scope of your topic by identifying a problem, controversy, or aspect of the topic that is worth exploration and discussion. Some general questions about a topic would be the following:

  • Who is affected by this problem and how?
  • Have previous efforts or polices been made to address this problem? – What are they?
  • Why hasn’t this problem been solved already?

For Maggie’s topic of educational technology, potential issues or controversies range from data privacy to digital literacy to the impact of technology on learning, which is what Maggie is interested in. Maggie’s local school district has low literacy rates, so Maggie wants to know the following:

  • Are there advantages and/or disadvantages of technology within primary and secondary education?
  • Which types of technology are considered the best in terms of quality and endurance?
  • What types of technology and/or programs do students like using and why?
  • Do teachers know how to use certain technologies with curriculum design, instruction, and/or assessment?

Step Three: Draft a Thesis

A thesis is a claim that asserts your main argument about the topic. As you conduct your research and draft your paper, you may discover information that changes your mind about your thesis, so at this point in writing, the thesis is tentative. Still, it is an important step in narrowing your focus for research and writing.

The thesis should

1. be a complete sentence,

2. identify the topic, and

3. make a specific claim about that topic.

In a persuasive paper, the thesis is a claim that someone should believe or do something. For example, a persuasive thesis might assert that something is effective or ineffective. It might state that a policy should be changed or a plan should be implemented. Or a persuasive thesis might be a plea for people to change their minds about a particular issue.

Once you have figured out your research question, your thesis is simply the answer. Maggie’s thesis is “Schools should supply technology aids to all students to increase student learning and literacy rates.” Her next step is to find evidence to support her claim.

Step Four: Research

Once you have a topic, research question, and thesis, you are ready to conduct research. To find sources that would be appropriate for an academic persuasive essay, begin your search in the library. The Purdue Global Library has a number of tutorials on conducting research, choosing search teams, types of sources, and how to evaluate information to determine its reliability and usefulness. Remember that the research you use will not only provide content to prove your claim and develop your essay, but it will also help to establish your credibility as a reliable source (ethos), create a logical framework for your argument (logos), and appeal to your readers emotionally (pathos).

Step Five: Plan Your Argument; Make an Outline

Once you have located quality source information—facts, examples, definitions, knowledge, and other information that answers your research question(s), you’ll want to create an outline to organize it. The example outline below illustrates a logical organizational plan for writing a persuasive essay. The example outline begins with an introduction that presents the topic, explains the issue, and asserts the position (the thesis). The body then provides the reasoning for the position and addresses the opposing viewpoints that some readers may hold. In your paper, you could modify this organization and address the opposing viewpoints first and then give the reasoning for your viewpoints, or you can alternate and give one opposing viewpoint then counter that with your viewpoint and then give another opposing viewpoint and counter that with your viewpoint.

The outline below also considers the alternatives to the position—certainly, there are other ways to think about or address the issue or situation. Considering the alternatives can be done in conjunction with looking at the opposing viewpoints. You do not always have to disagree with other opinions, either. You can acknowledge that another solution could work or another belief is valid. However, at the end of the body section, you will want to stand by your original position and prove that in light of all the opposing viewpoints and other perspectives, your position has the most merit.

Sample Outline of a Persuasive Argument

  • 1. Introduction: Tell them what you will tell them.
  • a. Present an interesting fact or description to make the topic clear and capture the reader’s attention.
  • b. Define and narrow the topic using facts or descriptions to illustrate what the situation or issue is (and that is it important).
  • c. Assert the claim (thesis) that something should be believed or done about the issue. (Some writers also briefly state the reasons behind this claim in the thesis as Maggie does in her paper when she claims that schools should supply tablets to students to increase learning , engagement, and literacy rates ).
  • 2. Body: Tell them.
  • a. Defend the claim with logical reasons and practical examples based on research.
  • b. Anticipate objections to the claim and refute or accommodate them with research.
  • c. Consider alternate positions or solutions using examples from research.
  • d. Present a final point based on research that supports your claim in light of the objections and alternatives considered.
  • 3. Conclusion: Tell them what you told them.
  • a. Recap the main points to reinforce the importance of the issue.
  • b. Restate the thesis in new wording to reinforce your position.
  • c. Make a final remark to leave a lasting impression, so the reader will want to continue this conversation and ideally adopt the belief or take the action you are advocating.

In Maggie’s draft, she introduced the topic with facts about school ratings in Texas and then narrowed the topic using the example of her local school district’s literacy rates. She then claimed the district should provide each student a tablet in order to increase learning (and thus, literacy rates).

Maggie defends her claim with a series of examples from research that proved how access to tablets, technology-integrated curriculums, and “flipped classrooms” have improved literacy rates in other districts. She anticipates objections to her proposal due to the high cost of technology and counter argues this with expert opinions and examples that show partnerships with businesses, personalized curriculums that technology makes possible, and teacher training can balance the costs. Maggie included an alternative solution of having students check out tablets from the library, but her research showed that this still left students needing Wi-Fi at home while her proposal would include a plan for students to access Wi-Fi.

Maggie concluded her argument by pointing out the cost of not helping the students in this way and restated her thesis reaffirming the benefits, and then left the reader with a memorable quote.

Click here to see Maggie’s draft with feedback from her instructor and a peer. Sample Persuasive Draft

Feedback, Revision, and Editing

After you write a draft of your persuasive essay, the next step is to have a peer, instructor, or tutor read it and provide feedback. Without reader feedback, you cannot fully know how your readers will react to your argument. Reader feedback is meant to be constructive. Use it to better understand your readers and craft your argument to more appropriately appeal to them.

Maggie received valuable feedback on her draft from her instructor and classmate. They pointed to where her thesis needed to be even more specific, to paragraphs where a different organization would make her argument more convincing, to parts of the paper that lacked examples, sentences that needed revision and editing for greater clarity, and APA formatting that needed to be edited.

Maggie also took a critical look at her paper and looked back at her writing process. One technique she found helpful was to read her paper aloud because it let her know where her wording and organization were not clear. She did this several times as she revised and again as she edited and refined her paper for sentence level clarity and concision.

In the end, Maggie produced a convincing persuasive essay and effective argument that would appeal to readers who are also interested in the way technology can impact and improve student learning, an important topic in 2014 when this paper was written and still relevant today.

Click here to see Maggie’s final draft after revising and editing. Sample Persuasive Revised

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Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics For College Students

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Table of contents

  • 1 How To Choose An Interesting Topic For a Persuasive Essay
  • 2 Essential Components of a Persuasive Essay
  • 3 What You Should Know When Writing A Persuasive Essay
  • 4 Persuasive Essay Topics on Education
  • 5 Persuasive Essay Topics on Society
  • 6 Persuasive Essay Topics on History
  • 7 Persuasive Essay Topics on Government
  • 8 Persuasive Essay Topics on Politics
  • 9 10 Funny Persuasive Essay Topics
  • 10 20 Good Persuasive Essay Topics For College Students
  • 11 20 Persuasive Essay Topics for High School
  • 12 20 Persuasive Essay Topics for Middle School
  • 13 20 Best Persuasive Essay Topics 2023

An essay is an attempt to communicate information, opinions, or feelings and usually presents an argument on a topic. In an academic context, an essay is an exercise for students to explore and clarify their ideas on a subject.

If you are thinking about how to write a persuasive essay , you need to know that writing an essay is a complex process. Issues such as choosing a topic and conducting thorough research are involved with the chosen topic. The paper’s analysis and the arguments’ design also need to support the issues presented. Therefore, an important focus will be placed on the steps to create a strong persuasive essay. Choosing an engaging and persuasive essay topic will set the rules of construction and its final form.

How To Choose An Interesting Topic For a Persuasive Essay

Hiring a writer’s  professional persuasive essay writing service can be an option when you are facing some problems in creating an essay. There are professionals available online, from people with skills in this area. This is an important option if you have to make a speech about a topic and a written presentation.

Essential Components of a Persuasive Essay

To be successful, a persuasive essay must contain several essential components:

  • Clear thesis statement: A compelling thesis statement, that clearly expresses the writer’s opinion on the subject, is essential. This statement also serves as a guide for the rest of the essay, ensuring every point made is relevant to the overall argument.
  • Strong evidence:  Solid evidence is essential for a persuasive essay. Building credibility and trust is paramount for any successful argument or attempt at persuasion. Establishing one’s authority on the topic can be done by highlighting their expertise, personal experience, or standing within a community. This will make readers more likely to believe the opinions and convictions being expressed, making the message even more powerful.
  • Counterarguments: Addressing counterarguments is an important part of a persuasive essay. The writer should acknowledge and respond to potential objections to their argument. This shows that the writer has considered opposing views and strengthens their argument.
  • Appeals to emotion: Emotional appeals are often used in persuading readers, as they help establish a connection between the writer and the reader. This can be done through personal stories, examples, and descriptive language that creates empathy or a sense of outrage. Pathos is an emotional appeal that helps create this link and make the narrative more powerful. An impacting emotional connection to the story can leave an unforgettable impression on readers and ensure the message resonates with them.
  • Call to action: It encourages the reader to take a specific action or change their behavior.

What You Should Know When Writing A Persuasive Essay

The first step in making an essay is to find a relevant topic to make the task more engaging and motivate yourself to help write a more convincing essay. At this stage, narrowing down the topic by adopting a particular position toward a subject or sub-topic is also necessary.

If you have problems establishing a position on the subject you want to address, brainstorm with others or work individually and write down the ideas that go through your mind, no matter how irrelevant or strange they may seem. At the next stage, connect ideas and group them into sub-topics, developing and exploring them in detail. And if you find yourself at a dead end, then you can buy an essay online today and get a ready-made result in the time frame you need.

Persuasive Essay Topics on Education

  • Education Impact on Psychological Development
  • Is Attending College Still Worth It?
  • The Importance of Early Childhood Education
  • The Power of Arts Education
  • The Benefits of Bilingual Education
  • Supporting Students with Disabilities
  • Promoting Critical Thinking in Education
  • Reducing Standardized Testing
  • Financial Education for Life Skills
  • Advocating for the Importance of Physical Education

Persuasive Essay Topics on Society

  • Are Immigrants Good for the Americans?
  • The State of Gun Violence in the US
  • Promoting Kindness and Empathy in Society
  • Encouraging Volunteerism and Community Engagement
  • Advancing Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment
  • Combating Climate Change
  • Embracing Diversity and Inclusion in Society
  • Advocating for Animal Rights and Ethical Treatment
  • Ensuring Affordable Housing for All
  • Creating a Safe Digital Society

Persuasive Essay Topics on History

  • Increase Of Child Labor
  • Remembering and Learning from the Lessons of World War II
  • Preserving Historical Sites for Future Generations
  • Reexamining Colonialism’s Impact on Indigenous Cultures
  • Recognizing the Contributions of Women in History
  • Exploring Marginalized Perspectives
  • Challenging Historical Narratives
  • Preserving Cultural Heritage
  • Promoting Historical Literacy for a Better Understanding of the Present
  • Analyzing its Ongoing Impact on Global Societies

Persuasive Essay Topics on Government

  • Thurgood Marshall A True Leader
  • Was President Andrew Jackson a Supervillain
  • Public Policy for Its Nationals
  • Racism is Wrong Which Should Be Stopped
  • Promoting Civic Engagement and Voter Participation
  • Balancing National Security and Civil Liberties
  • Addressing the Influence of Money in Politics
  • Strategies to Ensure Clean and Transparent Governance
  • Upholding Equal Treatment and Justice for All Citizens
  • The Importance of Government Investment in Education and Healthcare

Persuasive Essay Topics on Politics

  • Why Trump Cannot Make America Great Again
  • Why The United States Should Not Construct A Wall
  • Border Wall Critical for Reducing Crime
  • Encouraging Active Engagement in Democratic Processes
  • Ensuring Ethical Standards in Politics
  • Fostering Dialogue and Collaboration Across Partisan Lines
  • Empowering the Next Generation of Leaders
  • Advocating for Accessible and Fair Elections
  • Defending the Integrity of Information and Public Discourse
  • Building Alliances for Global Problem-solving

10 Funny Persuasive Essay Topics

If you are looking for funny and interesting persuasive topics, you should consider these topics for a persuasive essay:

  • Blondes are best in science
  • Humor can improve your work results.
  • Men cheat more than women.
  • Drinking wine every day can make you healthier.
  • Homework should be forbidden.
  • Why is it important to unfriend your parents on Facebook?
  • Moms can be excellent football players.
  • Debatable essays should be made with important speakers.
  • “Family Guy” can be a life model for children.
  • Men love pink more than women.

20 Good Persuasive Essay Topics For College Students

When you need to write a good academic essay and to impress your audience, you can check these solutions for your persuasive essay:

  • Work hard in the workplace to feel better.
  • Choose your clothes for your dream job.
  • Why do people feel the importance of always being right?
  • Do embarrassing situations make people change their life?
  • People who experience devastating situations appreciate their life more.
  • Why should people try new things?
  • If you want something strong, how do you succeed?
  • Self-confidence makes you successful.
  • Hobbies improve your personal skills.
  • Is music an efficient stress reliever in reducing depression?
  • The possibility of facing a war.
  • Homework writing assignments should be replaced with oral presentations.
  • Collecting cars or dolls is the most boring hobby in the world.
  • Students of any age should keep their phones with them.
  • School cafeterias should implement more rigorous health policies.
  • Colleges should provide their students with free food.
  • Can money make your life better?
  • Should students study each day?
  • Why do children love pets?
  • What is more important – recycling or donating?

In the next section, you will find topics on persuasive essays that can be amazing ideas for persuasive speech  and essays for both high and middle school.

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20 Persuasive Essay Topics for High School

Great persuasive essay topics for high school could be:

  • The death penalty is an effective way to scare off criminals.
  • Things the older generation can learn from the modern-day youth.
  • Higher taxes for rich people will favor financial balance.
  • People should be discouraged from keeping rare and exotic animals as pets.
  • Why it is best to always remain honest in life situations.
  • The positive role hobbies can play in people’s careers.
  • Kindness is one of the most important human qualities.
  • Joining the army should be a decision that young people should make on their own.
  • Embarrassing situations can help make people more confident.
  • Human needs should be placed before the needs of wild animals.
  • Treating animal habitats with respect and care is important.
  • Things man must learn to ensure that rare species are kept from extinction.
  • It is best for every family to have a survival plan after a natural disaster.
  • Providing free internet access is great for everyone.
  • Parenting lessons should be made compulsory for pregnant couples.
  • Life is richer and better now than it was 50 years before.
  • Everyone must recycle.
  • Man’s activities are the essential causes of climate change.
  • The use of Grades should be discouraged.
  • Adults should carry electroshock weapons to defend themselves.

Finding the perfect persuasive essay topic is not always easy. That’s why many students struggle with this task, but luckily there is a paper writing service for nursing that can help with choosing the right one for you. Whether you are trying to persuade people to buy a certain product, participate in a certain activity, or even change their opinion about a certain issue, selecting an interesting and relevant topic is of utmost importance.

20 Persuasive Essay Topics for Middle School

Some suitable topics for a persuasive essay in middle school include:

  • The ability to fly is the most amazing superpower.
  • Some scientific discoveries should not be shared with others.
  • The most boring job in the world.
  • Children and chores.
  • Kids should be paid for doing chores.
  • Children should be given larger allowances.
  • The fascinating places for summer vacation.
  • Why do I study during the summer?
  • The role of school newspaper & radio in the life of students.
  • Importance of social media in the lives of students.
  • A gym class is more important than a music class.
  • School time should be made flexible.
  • The world is ours to change.
  • Dogs make better pets than cats.
  • Schools need more holidays.
  • Schools should implement bullying awareness programs
  • Bullies should be kicked out of school.
  • How the internet has changed our lives.
  • There should be different classes for boys and girls.
  • The worst song in the world.

20 Best Persuasive Essay Topics 2023

For college, try these trendy persuasive essay topics in 2023.

  • Every American should learn to speak a second language from primary school.
  • Every immigrant should learn to speak fluent English.
  • High school campuses should be safeguarded by soldiers.
  • The legal drinking age should be 18, as it is in other countries.
  • Kids under 12 shouldn’t have a Facebook account.
  • Standardized examinations should be removed.
  • Every family should create a survival plan.
  • Parents should discuss drugs with their children from primary school age.
  • Racial offenses should be banned.
  • Gun possession should be firmly controlled.
  • Yearly driving examinations should be required for novice drivers.
  • All Americans have a constitutional right to health care.
  • Pregnant couples should receive free training for parenting.
  • Children need better sex education.
  • School examinations are not realistic.
  • Violent video games can trigger people to act aggressively in real life.
  • Nuclear power should be prohibited.
  • Climate change should be the most important political concern.
  • Medical marijuana should be universally legal.
  • People should go to prison if they beat or injure their pets.

With so many persuasive essay topics to choose from, it takes time to decide which one to write about. If you need extra help researching or writing your paper, you can always contact a custom essay writing service for assistance. These services specialize in helping students express their arguments and ideas convincingly and coherently.

Getting good grades in college is important as it is an investment in your future and a great opportunity for your future career. If you need to submit a persuasive essay and don’t feel confident, you can use our professional writing service. We can help you with papers on any subject you need, like psychology, sociology, politics, economics, management, human resources, art, history, literature, etc. Our writers provide a completely unique and high-quality assignment. If you are ready to get the best grade, buy a persuasive essay  on PapersOwl.com. We guarantee you timely delivery and satisfaction with a perfect result.

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what is a persuasive essay topics

what is a persuasive essay topics

Writing a Persuasive Essay in 7 Main Steps

what is a persuasive essay topics

In a world where being able to communicate well is so important, persuasive writing becomes invaluable. It goes beyond stating mere expression of opinions; it helps you sway others to your viewpoint and effectively convey your message. So, no more struggling to get your point across – let's learn how to make your persuasive essay both informative and truly convincing in our ultimate guide!

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

A persuasive essay aims to persuade the reader to agree with your viewpoint by presenting convincing arguments, research, and ideas. In this type of essay, you rely on logic and reason to demonstrate why your perspective is more valid than others. To achieve this, you need to present clear arguments supported by compelling facts and logical reasoning. There are several key elements that should be included in these essays:

  • A clear thesis statement or main idea that guides your essay's focus.
  • An opening paragraph that introduces your thesis statement and sets the stage for your argument.
  • Body paragraphs that use specific research evidence to support your points.
  • Smooth transitions between paragraphs that connect ideas in a clear and engaging manner.
  • Addressing counterarguments to acknowledge and refute opposing viewpoints.
  • A conclusion that reinforces your central idea without repeating it word for word.

Elements of a Persuasive Essay

Persuasive essays rely on three key elements called modes of persuasion . These were introduced by Aristotle, a famous philosopher, to help make arguments strong and convincing.

First, there's logos , which means using evidence and logical reasoning to support your points. It's crucial to clearly state your main argument and back it up with solid evidence. Remember, what counts as convincing evidence can vary depending on who you're trying to persuade.

Next up is pathos , which involves appealing to people's emotions. Sharing personal stories can be really effective here because they help readers connect emotionally with your argument. Plus, personal anecdotes can give your essay a unique voice.

Lastly, there's ethos , which is all about building trust and credibility with your audience. The way you write your essay—whether it's serious, funny, or sincere—can affect how readers see you. Using reliable sources and showing empathy can also help establish your credibility. And when you're making claims, it's important to consider what your readers already believe and try to address any doubts they might have.

Feeling overwhelmed by all this info? Just say - ' write my paper ,' and our expert writers will jump in to assist you right away!

persuasive methods

How to Write a Persuasive Essay in 7 Steps

Writing a persuasive essay usually follows a structured format: introduction, body, conclusion . Unlike argument essays, which involve discussing and attacking alternate views, persuasive essays aim to convince the reader of your argument's validity. They're a bit more gentle and understanding in tone. To craft a solid persuasive essay, follow the 7 steps in this section. And while you're at it, don't forget to explore our guide on how to write an argumentative essay , too. These two types of assignments are the most common in school and college.

How to Write a Persuasive Essay in 7 Steps

Step 1: Topic Selection and Research

Choosing a good topic is where you start when writing a persuasive essay. Think about things that really interest you and make you feel strongly. But it's not just about what you like; you also need to think about what matters to your readers. Do some digging to learn more about your topic. Look into different parts of it by checking out reliable sources like books, websites, and academic articles.

While you're doing your research, keep an eye out for different opinions and new ideas about your topic. This helps you get ready for arguments against your point of view. It's also important to see if there's enough evidence out there to back up what you believe. Having lots of evidence makes it easier to make a strong case.

For more help on picking a topic, check out our persuasive essay topics .

Step 2: Develop a Strong Thesis Statement

A well-developed thesis statement should be specific, concise, and debatable. Avoid saying things that are too vague or broad, as they won't give your essay a clear direction. Instead, try to come up with a thesis that clearly says what you believe and encourages people to think about it critically.

Make sure your thesis statement is backed up by the evidence you found in your research. Use facts, numbers, or opinions from experts to support what you're saying and make your argument stronger.

Also, think about how your thesis statement fits into your whole persuasive essay. It should not only outline your main argument but also give a hint about why it's important.

Step 3: Create an Outline

An academic persuasive essay outline typically follows the 'classical' structure, which is based on techniques used by ancient Roman rhetoricians. Here are the basic elements your outline should include:

Step 4: Write the Introduction

When writing a persuasive essay introduction, it should not only give background information but also frame it as a problem or issue, known as the exigence. Presenting a clearly defined problem and proposing the thesis as a solution makes for a compelling introduction, as readers naturally want to see problems solved.

Here's a breakdown of an effective persuasive essay introduction:

  • Hook : Begin with a brief anecdote that highlights an emerging issue, capturing the reader's attention.
  • Context : Provide background information related to the topic.
  • Problem : Connect the anecdote with the emerging issue, presenting it as a problem in need of addressing.
  • Debate : Mention briefly the existing debate surrounding how to respond to the problem.
  • Claim : Conclude the introduction by hinting at how you intend to address the problem, presented in a conversational tone as part of an ongoing dialogue.

Step 5: Delve into Body Paragraphs

The core of a persuasive essay lies in presenting a claim supported by reasoning and evidence. This means that much of the essay's body is dedicated to providing supporting reasons backed by evidence. A common approach taught in schools and colleges is the PEAS formula:

  • Point : Start by explaining your reason clearly. For example, 'Another reason why we need to recycle is because...'
  • Evidence : After explaining your reason, give proof that supports it. You can mention facts or share what experts say. You might say, ' I saw in a study that.. .' or ' Scientists have found that.. .'
  • Analysis : Explain how your proof supports your reason. You can say, ' This means that.. .' or ' This shows us that... '
  • Summary/So what? : Finish by quickly summarizing everything you said before. Then, explain why it's important or what it means for your argument.

Step 6: Address Counterarguments

When you're dealing with counterarguments, pick the response strategy that matches your argument.

support essay argument

  • If you agree with some points from the counterargument, acknowledge them and explain why they're not important for your topic. 
  • If the counterargument uses different evidence, say why it's not trustworthy. 
  • If the counterargument looks at evidence in a different way, explain why their understanding is wrong. 
  • If the counterargument weakens your point with evidence, explain why it doesn't actually disprove your argument.

Use phrases like these to introduce counterarguments:

  • Some researchers say...
  • Critics argue that...
  • Others might think...
  • There's a different view that...

And transition like this from counterargument to response:

  • While some of that makes sense, I still believe...
  • Even if that's true, it doesn't change the fact that...
  • Those points are interesting, but they don't affect my argument because...
  • I see where you're coming from, but I can't agree because...

Step 7: Conclude with a Call to Action or a Memorable Closing Statement

A good persuasive conclusion should do two things:

  • Summarize the main points of your essay. If it's a longer essay, using phrases like 'I have argued that' can help, but for shorter essays, it might not be needed since the reader will remember the main ideas.
  • Address the ' So what? ' or ' Now what? ' challenge. Imagine your reader asking, 'Okay, I'm convinced by your essay, but why are these ideas important? What should I do with them? Do you expect things to change?' Depending on whether your essay aims to change how people think or act, offer brief action points or insights into the implications of your ideas.

Consider ending with an anecdote, fact, or quote that highlights the significance of your argument.

Also, take a look at our guide on how to write a synthesis essay . It's a common type of assignment you'll encounter in school and college.

Take Your Persuasive Writing to the Next Level!

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Persuasive Essay Examples

Here are great examples of persuasive essays to inspire you. If you like the writing style of our authors, you can buy essay paper from them, who will ensure a high-quality document specifically tailored to your needs!

5 Tips for Writing a Persuasive Essay

Here are some additional tips to enhance your essay from our persuasive essay writing service :

  • Start with a Captivating Hook : Grab your reader's attention from the beginning with an engaging hook. Instead of using common approaches like surprising facts or quotes, try incorporating a unique angle or a suspenseful story related to your topic.
  • Build Your Credibility : It's crucial to establish your credibility to persuade your audience to trust your argument. In addition to presenting well-researched facts and statistics, share personal experiences or insights to demonstrate your expertise. Citing lesser-known experts or studies can also provide a fresh perspective and show a thorough exploration of the topic.
  • Clearly State Your Thesis: Craft a clear and concise thesis statement that effectively addresses the nuances of your argument. Take time to consider the wording of your thesis and how it aligns with your essay's direction. Provide a brief overview of the main points you'll cover to give readers a clear roadmap.
  • Use Persuasive Language : Choose words and phrases that evoke emotion and urgency, compelling the reader to take action. Experiment with rhetorical devices like parallelism or repetition to add depth to your argument. Maintain a tone that balances assertiveness with respect.
  • Appeal to Emotions and Logic : While emotional appeals can be powerful, support them with solid logic and evidence. Supplement personal anecdotes with relevant data, expert opinions, or logical reasoning for a well-rounded perspective. Anticipate and address potential counterarguments to demonstrate thorough consideration of the issue.

To bring it all together, you now understand the power of persuasion - it teaches you how to express your ideas clearly and convincingly. This means you can speak up for what you believe in, making society more active and informed. These skills are super useful not just in school but also in jobs and everyday life. And, if you want to make things easier, you can always check out our essay service . We'll save you time and give you some extra help with your writing!

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What are the 7 Tips for Persuasive Essays?

How do i make a persuasive essay.

Daniel Parker

Daniel Parker

is a seasoned educational writer focusing on scholarship guidance, research papers, and various forms of academic essays including reflective and narrative essays. His expertise also extends to detailed case studies. A scholar with a background in English Literature and Education, Daniel’s work on EssayPro blog aims to support students in achieving academic excellence and securing scholarships. His hobbies include reading classic literature and participating in academic forums.

what is a persuasive essay topics

is an expert in nursing and healthcare, with a strong background in history, law, and literature. Holding advanced degrees in nursing and public health, his analytical approach and comprehensive knowledge help students navigate complex topics. On EssayPro blog, Adam provides insightful articles on everything from historical analysis to the intricacies of healthcare policies. In his downtime, he enjoys historical documentaries and volunteering at local clinics.

  • Rewrote the whole article except the samples which are good and new, and FAQs section
  • Added new writing steps
  • Researched new information overall

1. Gladd, J. (2020, August 18). Tips for Writing Academic Persuasive Essays . Pressbooks. https://idaho.pressbooks.pub/write/chapter/structure-of-academic-persuasive-essays/

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Table of contents

what is a persuasive essay topics

Meredith Sell

You can make your essay more persuasive by getting straight to the point.

In fact, that's exactly what we did here, and that's just the first tip of this guide. Throughout this guide, we share the steps needed to prove an argument and create a persuasive essay.

This AI tool helps you improve your essay > This AI tool helps you improve your essay >

persuasive essay

Key takeaways: - Proven process to make any argument persuasive - 5-step process to structure arguments - How to use AI to formulate and optimize your essay

Why is being persuasive so difficult?

"Write an essay that persuades the reader of your opinion on a topic of your choice."

You might be staring at an assignment description just like this 👆from your professor. Your computer is open to a blank document, the cursor blinking impatiently. Do I even have opinions?

The persuasive essay can be one of the most intimidating academic papers to write: not only do you need to identify a narrow topic and research it, but you also have to come up with a position on that topic that you can back up with research while simultaneously addressing different viewpoints.

That’s a big ask. And let’s be real: most opinion pieces in major news publications don’t fulfill these requirements.

The upside? By researching and writing your own opinion, you can learn how to better formulate not only an argument but the actual positions you decide to hold. 

Here, we break down exactly how to write a persuasive essay. We’ll start by taking a step that’s key for every piece of writing—defining the terms.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

A persuasive essay is exactly what it sounds like: an essay that persuades . Over the course of several paragraphs or pages, you’ll use researched facts and logic to convince the reader of your opinion on a particular topic and discredit opposing opinions.

While you’ll spend some time explaining the topic or issue in question, most of your essay will flesh out your viewpoint and the evidence that supports it.

The 5 Must-Have Steps of a Persuasive Essay

If you’re intimidated by the idea of writing an argument, use this list to break your process into manageable chunks. Tackle researching and writing one element at a time, and then revise your essay so that it flows smoothly and coherently with every component in the optimal place.

1. A topic or issue to argue

This is probably the hardest step. You need to identify a topic or issue that is narrow enough to cover in the length of your piece—and is also arguable from more than one position. Your topic must call for an opinion , and not be a simple fact .

It might be helpful to walk through this process:

  • Identify a random topic
  • Ask a question about the topic that involves a value claim or analysis to answer
  • Answer the question

That answer is your opinion.

Let’s consider some examples, from silly to serious:

Topic: Dolphins and mermaids

Question: In a mythical match, who would win: a dolphin or a mermaid?

Answer/Opinion: The mermaid would win in a match against a dolphin.

Topic: Autumn

Question: Which has a better fall: New England or Colorado?

Answer/Opinion: Fall is better in New England than Colorado.

Topic: Electric transportation options

Question: Would it be better for an urban dweller to buy an electric bike or an electric car?

Answer/Opinion: An electric bike is a better investment than an electric car.

Your turn: Walk through the three-step process described above to identify your topic and your tentative opinion. You may want to start by brainstorming a list of topics you find interesting and then going use the three-step process to find the opinion that would make the best essay topic.

2. An unequivocal thesis statement

If you walked through our three-step process above, you already have some semblance of a thesis—but don’t get attached too soon! 

A solid essay thesis is best developed through the research process. You shouldn’t land on an opinion before you know the facts. So press pause. Take a step back. And dive into your research.

You’ll want to learn:

  • The basic facts of your topic. How long does fall last in New England vs. Colorado? What trees do they have? What colors do those trees turn?
  • The facts specifically relevant to your question. Is there any science on how the varying colors of fall influence human brains and moods?
  • What experts or other noteworthy and valid sources say about the question you’re considering. Has a well-known arborist waxed eloquent on the beauty of New England falls?

As you learn the different viewpoints people have on your topic, pay attention to the strengths and weaknesses of existing arguments. Is anyone arguing the perspective you’re leaning toward? Do you find their arguments convincing? What do you find unsatisfying about the various arguments? 

Allow the research process to change your mind and/or refine your thinking on the topic. Your opinion may change entirely or become more specific based on what you learn.

Once you’ve done enough research to feel confident in your understanding of the topic and your opinion on it, craft your thesis. 

Your thesis statement should be clear and concise. It should directly state your viewpoint on the topic, as well as the basic case for your thesis.

Thesis 1: In a mythical match, the mermaid would overcome the dolphin due to one distinct advantage: her ability to breathe underwater.

Thesis 2: The full spectrum of color displayed on New England hillsides is just one reason why fall in the northeast is better than in Colorado.

Thesis 3: In addition to not adding to vehicle traffic, electric bikes are a better investment than electric cars because they’re cheaper and require less energy to accomplish the same function of getting the rider from point A to point B.

Your turn: Dive into the research process with a radar up for the arguments your sources are making about your topic. What are the most convincing cases? Should you stick with your initial opinion or change it up? Write your fleshed-out thesis statement.

3. Evidence to back up your thesis

This is a typical place for everyone from undergrads to politicians to get stuck, but the good news is, if you developed your thesis from research, you already have a good bit of evidence to make your case.

Go back through your research notes and compile a list of every …

… or other piece of information that supports your thesis. 

This info can come from research studies you found in scholarly journals, government publications, news sources, encyclopedias, or other credible sources (as long as they fit your professor’s standards).

As you put this list together, watch for any gaps or weak points. Are you missing information on how electric cars versus electric bicycles charge or how long their batteries last? Did you verify that dolphins are, in fact, mammals and can’t breathe underwater like totally-real-and-not-at-all-fake 😉mermaids can? Track down that information.

Next, organize your list. Group the entries so that similar or closely related information is together, and as you do that, start thinking through how to articulate the individual arguments to support your case. 

Depending on the length of your essay, each argument may get only a paragraph or two of space. As you think through those specific arguments, consider what order to put them in. You’ll probably want to start with the simplest argument and work up to more complicated ones so that the arguments can build on each other. 

Your turn: Organize your evidence and write a rough draft of your arguments. Play around with the order to find the most compelling way to argue your case.

4. Rebuttals to disprove opposing theses

You can’t just present the evidence to support your case and totally ignore other viewpoints. To persuade your readers, you’ll need to address any opposing ideas they may hold about your topic. 

You probably found some holes in the opposing views during your research process. Now’s your chance to expose those holes. 

Take some time (and space) to: describe the opposing views and show why those views don’t hold up. You can accomplish this using both logic and facts.

Is a perspective based on a faulty assumption or misconception of the truth? Shoot it down by providing the facts that disprove the opinion.

Is another opinion drawn from bad or unsound reasoning? Show how that argument falls apart.

Some cases may truly be only a matter of opinion, but you still need to articulate why you don’t find the opposing perspective convincing.

Yes, a dolphin might be stronger than a mermaid, but as a mammal, the dolphin must continually return to the surface for air. A mermaid can breathe both underwater and above water, which gives her a distinct advantage in this mythical battle.

While the Rocky Mountain views are stunning, their limited colors—yellow from aspen trees and green from various evergreens—leaves the autumn-lover less than thrilled. The rich reds and oranges and yellows of the New England fall are more satisfying and awe-inspiring.

But what about longer trips that go beyond the city center into the suburbs and beyond? An electric bike wouldn’t be great for those excursions. Wouldn’t an electric car be the better choice then? 

Certainly, an electric car would be better in these cases than a gas-powered car, but if most of a person’s trips are in their hyper-local area, the electric bicycle is a more environmentally friendly option for those day-to-day outings. That person could then participate in a carshare or use public transit, a ride-sharing app, or even a gas-powered car for longer trips—and still use less energy overall than if they drove an electric car for hyper-local and longer area trips.

Your turn: Organize your rebuttal research and write a draft of each one.

5. A convincing conclusion

You have your arguments and rebuttals. You’ve proven your thesis is rock-solid. Now all you have to do is sum up your overall case and give your final word on the subject. 

Don’t repeat everything you’ve already said. Instead, your conclusion should logically draw from the arguments you’ve made to show how they coherently prove your thesis. You’re pulling everything together and zooming back out with a better understanding of the what and why of your thesis. 

A dolphin may never encounter a mermaid in the wild, but if it were to happen, we know how we’d place our bets. Long hair and fish tail, for the win.

For those of us who relish 50-degree days, sharp air, and the vibrant colors of fall, New England offers a season that’s cozier, longer-lasting, and more aesthetically pleasing than “colorful” Colorado. A leaf-peeper’s paradise.

When most of your trips from day to day are within five miles, the more energy-efficient—and yes, cost-efficient—choice is undoubtedly the electric bike. So strap on your helmet, fire up your pedals, and two-wheel away to your next destination with full confidence that you made the right decision for your wallet and the environment.

3 Quick Tips for Writing a Strong Argument

Once you have a draft to work with, use these tips to refine your argument and make sure you’re not losing readers for avoidable reasons.

1. Choose your words thoughtfully.

If you want to win people over to your side, don’t write in a way that shuts your opponents down. Avoid making abrasive or offensive statements. Instead, use a measured, reasonable tone. Appeal to shared values, and let your facts and logic do the hard work of changing people’s minds.

Choose words with AI

what is a persuasive essay topics

You can use AI to turn your general point into a readable argument. Then, you can paraphrase each sentence and choose between competing arguments generated by the AI, until your argument is well-articulated and concise.

2. Prioritize accuracy (and avoid fallacies).

Make sure the facts you use are actually factual. You don’t want to build your argument on false or disproven information. Use the most recent, respected research. Make sure you don’t misconstrue study findings. And when you’re building your case, avoid logical fallacies that undercut your argument.

A few common fallacies to watch out for:

  • Strawman: Misrepresenting or oversimplifying an opposing argument to make it easier to refute.
  • Appeal to ignorance: Arguing that a certain claim must be true because it hasn’t been proven false.
  • Bandwagon: Assumes that if a group of people, experts, etc., agree with a claim, it must be true.
  • Hasty generalization: Using a few examples, rather than substantial evidence, to make a sweeping claim.
  • Appeal to authority: Overly relying on opinions of people who have authority of some kind.

The strongest arguments rely on trustworthy information and sound logic.

Research and add citations with AI

what is a persuasive essay topics

We recently wrote a three part piece on researching using AI, so be sure to check it out . Going through an organized process of researching and noting your sources correctly will make sure your written text is more accurate.

3. Persuasive essay structure

Persuasive essay structure

If you’re building a house, you start with the foundation and go from there. It’s the same with an argument. You want to build from the ground up: provide necessary background information, then your thesis. Then, start with the simplest part of your argument and build up in terms of complexity and the aspect of your thesis that the argument is tackling.

A consistent, internal logic will make it easier for the reader to follow your argument. Plus, you’ll avoid confusing your reader and you won’t be unnecessarily redundant.

The essay structure usually includes the following parts:

  • Intro - Hook, Background information, Thesis statement
  • Topic sentence #1 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Concluding sentence
  • Topic sentence #2 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Concluding sentence Topic sentence #3 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Conclusion - Thesis and main points restated, call to action, thought provoking ending

Are You Ready to Write?

Persuasive essays are a great way to hone your research, writing, and critical thinking skills. Approach this assignment well, and you’ll learn how to form opinions based on information (not just ideas) and make arguments that—if they don’t change minds—at least win readers’ respect. ‍

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101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

Use your words to sway the reader.

Persuasive Essay Topics: Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

Persuasive writing is one of those skills that can help students succeed in real life.  Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative , but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader. It’s important to know your audience so you can anticipate any counterarguments they might make and try to overcome them. Try reading some mentor texts to show kids great examples of opinion writing. Then use these persuasive essay topics for practice.

School and Education Persuasive Essay Topics

Life and ethics persuasive essay topics, science and technology persuasive essay topics, sports and entertainment persuasive essay topics, just for fun persuasive essay topics.

  

  • Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?

Persuasive Essay Topics: Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?

  • Students should/should not be able to use their phones during the school day.
  • Should schools have dress codes?
  • If I could change one school rule, it would be …
  • Is year-round school a good idea?
  • Should we stop giving final exams?
  • Is it better to be good at academics or good at sports?

Is it better to be good at academics or good at sports?

  • Which is better, private schools or public schools?
  • Should every student have to participate in athletics?
  • Do you think schools should ban junk food from their cafeterias?
  • Should students be required to volunteer in their communities?
  • What is the most important school subject?
  • Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

Persuasive Essay Topics: Are letter grades helpful, or should we replace them with something else?

  • Is it ever OK to cheat on homework or a test?
  • Should students get to grade their teachers?
  • Do you think college should be free for anyone who wants to attend?
  • Should schools be allowed to ban some books from their libraries?
  • Which is better, book smarts or street smarts?

Which is better, book smarts or street smarts?

  • Should all students have to learn a foreign language?
  • Are single-gender schools better or worse for students?
  • Is it OK to eat animals?
  • What animal makes the best pet?
  • Visit an animal shelter, choose an animal that needs a home, and write an essay persuading someone to adopt that animal.
  • If you find money on the ground, should you try to find the person who lost it, or is it yours to keep?

If you find money on the ground, should you try to find the person who lost it, or is it yours to keep?

  • Who faces more peer pressure, girls or boys?
  • Should all Americans be required to vote?
  • Is it better to be kind or truthful?
  • Which is better, giving or receiving?
  • Is it OK to keep animals in zoos?
  • Should we change the minimum driving age in the United States?

Should we change the minimum driving age in the United States?

  • Which is more important, happiness or success?
  • Is democracy the best form of government?
  • Is social media helpful or harmful?
  • Should parents be punished for their children’s mistakes or crimes?
  • Should kids have set bedtimes or just go to bed when they’re sleepy?
  • Do you think the government should find a way to provide free health care for everyone?

Do you think the government should find a way to provide free health care for everyone?

  • Is it better to save your allowance or spend it?
  • Should we ban plastic bags and bottles?
  • Which is better, living in the city or in the country?
  • If I could make a new law, it would be …
  • Is Pluto a planet?
  • Should human cloning be legal?
  • Should vaccines be mandatory?
  • Is it right for countries to still maintain nuclear weapon arsenals?

Is it right for countries to still maintain nuclear weapon arsenals?

  • Should testing on animals be made illegal?
  • Will expanded use of artificial intelligence be good for humanity?
  • Should all people have free Internet access in their homes?
  • Is there intelligent life on other planets?
  • Does technology create more jobs than it eliminates?
  • Should parents use their children’s cell phones to track where they are?
  • Should scientists try to develop a way for people to live forever?

Should scientists try to develop a way for people to live forever?

  • What’s the best type of smartphone: Android or iPhone?
  • Which is better, Macs or PCs?
  • Do people rely too much on technology in the modern world?
  • Should cryptocurrencies replace cash?
  • Should there be a minimum age requirement to own a smartphone?
  • Is it important to keep spending money on space exploration, or should we use the money for other things?

Is it important to keep spending money on space exploration, or should we use the money for other things?

  • Should kids under 13 be allowed to use social media sites?
  • Should we ban cigarette smoking and vaping entirely?
  • Is it better to be an animal that lives in the water or on land?
  • Should kids be allowed to watch TV on school nights?
  • Which is better, paper books or e-books?
  • Is the current movie rating system (G, PG, PG-13, etc.) effective?
  • Are video games better than board games?
  • Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

Should we allow little kids to play competitive sports?

  • Which is better, reading books or watching TV?
  • Does playing violent video games make people more violent in real life?
  • Are graphic novels just as valuable as traditional fictional books?
  • Should everyone play on the same sports teams, regardless of gender?
  • Choose a book that’s been made into a movie. Which was better, the movie or the book?

Choose a book that's been made into a movie. Which was better, the movie or the book?

  • Who is the world’s best athlete, present or past?
  • Are professional athletes/musicians/actors overpaid?
  • Which is better, fiction or nonfiction?
  • The best music genre is …
  • What is one book that everyone should read?
  • What new sport should be added to the Olympics?

What new sport should be added to the Olympics?

  • What’s the best video game system?
  • Does playing video games make you smarter?
  • Does reality TV actually depict real life?
  • Should all neighborhoods have free parks and playgrounds?
  • What’s the best holiday?
  • The very best food of all time is …
  • Which is better, artificial Christmas trees or real ones?

Which is better, artificial Christmas trees or real ones?

  • What’s the best season of the year?
  • Should you put ketchup on a hot dog?
  • Is a taco a sandwich?
  • Does fruit count as dessert?
  • Should people have to go to school or work on their birthday?
  • Are clowns scary or funny?
  • Which is more dangerous, werewolves or vampires?

Which is more dangerous, werewolves or vampires?

  • The best pizza topping is …
  • What would be the best superpower to have?
  • Should everyone make their bed every day?
  • Which came first, the chicken or the egg?
  • Should you put pineapple on a pizza?
  • Should you eat macaroni and cheese with a spoon or a fork?

Should you eat macaroni and cheese with a spoon or a fork?

  • Describe the world’s best ice cream sundae.
  • Is Monday the worst day of the week?
  • Would you rather travel back in time or forward in time?
  • Is it better to be too hot or too cold?
  • Are there aliens living among us here on Earth?

What are your favorite persuasive essay topics for students? Come exchange ideas in the We Are Teachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, check out the big list of essay topics for high school (120+ ideas) ..

Need some ideas for practicing persuasive writing skills? These persuasive essay topics provide lots of scope for students of all ages.

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187 Impressive Higher English Persuasive Essay Topics [2024]

what is a persuasive essay topics

Persuasive essay writing is a popular assignment for students in high school and college alike. This is not surprising. After all, it is a basic of the learning process. However, finding ideas for such a task isn’t easy, especially if you’re looking for higher persuasive essay topics.

One of the subjects that requires you to write such a paper is higher English. To pass this class, you have to deal with and compose quite tricky texts. Thus, if you are studying this subject, you will have to be ready to face many writing challenges.

This is why our team has created a list of the most fruitful ideas for academic writing. For your convenience, we divided the higher English persuasive essay topics into several sections. So, navigate our page, look through all the examples, and make your search even more effective.

❓ What Is Higher English?

  • 💭 How to Choose?
  • 📎 For High School
  • ✒️ For College
  • 📖 Literature
  • 🙊 Controversial Issues
  • 🏫 Education
  • 🗳️ Politics
  • 💭 Philosophy

📃 References

If you’ve studied in any country other than the UK, you may be wondering what higher English is. Is it a course? Is it a level? Well, in this section, we dive into the definition of the phrase.

Higher English is a course typical for the UK, particularly for England and Scotland. It investigates the English language and literature on a deep level.

It can be taught both:

  • as an independent subject
  • alongside other higher science programs

Through the course of higher English, students learn to think critically and creatively.

Developing a portfolio is one of the requirements for completing an advanced higher English course. It takes 30% of the overall grade. Thus, folio plays a vital role in accomplishing the course. For a successful portfolio, students have to write two texts, no less than 1300 words each. Composing them, they have to use creative and discursive writing techniques.

Generally, higher English is focused on advancing reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. By the end of the course, students should be able to do the following:

  • use complex language;
  • apply literature knowledge in everyday life;
  • understand the core of language operation.

Students are required to write an impressive number of persuasive essays. Here is where they may face difficulties with the appropriate topic selection.

We will not let you worry about that.

You can find a list of useful higher English persuasive topics created by our team on our page. Take a look at it and choose the most exciting idea for your essay!

Before selecting a topic for a higher English essay, reread your assignment if you have one.

💭 How to Choose a Persuasive Topic for Higher Folio?

A higher folio has to include a persuasive essay in it. Therefore, first, let’s figure out what it is.

A persuasive essay is one of the types of discursive essays. Its distinctive feature is the presence of a particular situation. Discuss a problem or issue is essential to its purpose.

Now, let’s narrow down the focus:

What is the nature of persuasive writing? It is a writing technique that aims to convince readers to accept the author’s point of view. Moreover, it often includes a call to action. It motivates the audience to take specific steps to achieve the desired result.

Be careful there! Learn how to distinguish an argumentative essay from a persuasive one.

An argumentative essay is often based on a consistent explanation and logical reasoning. It shows the readers the writer’s point of view, yet doesn’t call them for any action. In contrast, a persuasive essay relies on emotions and expressions of personal opinions. A perfect way to see those differences would be by going to an essay examples database that certainly would contain a variety of paper types.

Persuasive essays attempt to make readers follow the author’s idea.

Now, let’s move to the issue of an effective selection of a persuasive topic for higher English. Our team prepared some useful tips for you. Don’t hesitate to use them.

  • Keep your goal in mind. The persuasive essay aims to present all the arguments that can convince the reader that the writer is right. So, choosing a topic, pick the one that you can elaborate on and persuade in.
  • Choose the essay idea wisely. Ensure that the topic is appropriate and relevant for the tutor who will check and grade your paper. You’re writing for them.
  • Make sure to have enough resources. Evaluate whether there is enough information on the topic so that you can write a compelling essay. Check the possible trustworthy sources for the evidence that you’ll use in the paper.
  • Show your best side. Consider whether you can demonstrate your skills, composing on the chosen idea. Remember that you’re writing an essay for your portfolio. You may want it to look as perfect as possible and highlight your strengths. That is to say, see if you can elaborate on the topic.
  • Compose a strong introductory paragraph. An introduction is crucial because it grabs the reader’s attention and presents a thesis. Think of a strong thesis statement and whether you can come up with one. If you cannot compose a powerful thesis statement, better choose a more successful topic.
  • Don’t choose an overused topic. Determine the originality of your idea and your willingness to write about it. Try to google persuasive essay examples and figure out what topics are the most common and widely used. Based on your observations, come up with a unique issue and surprise your readers with it.

Find and consider as many persuasive topics as you can to form one unique idea.

⭐ Top 12 Higher Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Unions are important.
  • Zoos are unacceptable.
  • Paper books are obsolete.
  • Graffiti is art.
  • We will live on Mars.
  • English is universal .
  • Plastic bags are useful.
  • Cloning is unethical.
  • Student uniform is obsolete.
  • UK schools are better.
  • Most effective propaganda techniques.
  • Internships should be paid.

☝️ Amazing Higher English Persuasive Essay Topics

Just like any other assignment, an essay may be of different degrees of complexity. This is how we divided our higher English persuasive essay ideas into several sections.

So don’t waste your time. Go to the corresponding section and select the most appropriate topic.

📎 Higher English Topics for High School

A subject of higher English may seem very unfamiliar and bizarre at school. Being unprepared for the complexity of the course can scare you. Pupils get extremely confused when it comes to the topic search.

You are lucky:

We prepared a list of exceptional topics for middle school and high school students. Feel free to use it. Be prepared to face any challenges of the higher English course!

  • The significance of literacy .
  • Football has a direct impact on the culture of England.
  • Foreign languages should be taught in every school.

Foreign language programs improve students’ academic performance.

  • Both abstinence and safe sex should be taught in high schools.
  • School uniforms should be mandatory to maintain discipline.
  • People should quit smoking .
  • Eating disorders among teenage girls is an issue that shouldn’t be underestimated.
  • Motivation theories are incredibly effective in education .
  • Self-esteem plays a crucial role in students’ health condition .
  • Alcohol negatively affects adolescent health , so their parents should monitor alcohol consumption by teens.
  • Children and teenagers should not be silent about domestic violence .
  • The government should ban sports betting.
  • We should drink enough water.
  • The minimization of a generation gap is crucial for a healthy relationship in a family.
  • Drug tests should be mandatory for high school sportspeople.
  • A gap year is a great idea . Convince your readers about the usefulness of taking a gap year after finishing school. Prove the rightness of your position by providing strong arguments. In case you don’t agree with the statement, provide well-developed counterarguments.
  • Alcohol consumption in the UK. The government of the UK should introduce measures to limit alcohol consumption. We have to avoid possible adverse ramifications. Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Prove your point of view by providing strong arguments.
  • Studying in the United Kingdom is a great experience. What are the positive sides of gaining an education in the UK? Convince your readers to study the UK.
  • A grade does not reflect students’ knowledge. Give your readers a clear explanation of why grades do not demonstrate a student’s performance in the class. Persuade them to pay more attention to education. You might believe that grades reflect a student’s academic performance. Then, support your position by providing counterarguments.
  • Violent video games should be banned . What are the possible negative consequences caused by video games? Prove your audience the necessity to ban violent video games.

The influence of video games on children is inconclusive.

✒️ Higher English Topics for College

The majority of UK colleges require their students to take the course of higher English. Therefore, you need to be ready. Difficulties caused by this subject should not be your worry.

Since we care about college students, we gathered persuasive essay ideas in one place. So, if you are seeking help, you are on the right page! Scroll through our topics and chose the most appropriate for you.

  • Cheating during college exams should be strictly punished because it is demoralizing.
  • The benefits of active listening are crucial in demonstrating high performance in the workplace.
  • Students’ time management strategies should be taken into consideration by every student.
  • Sleep is essential because deprivation affects college students’ academic performance.
  • Should fast food qualify as ‘food’?
  • A healthy lifestyle and eating should become the norm for every person.
  • Alternative energy sources are crucial for saving the planet.
  • A family should promote mobility, not limit it.
  • We have to implement specific strategies to combat the sexist language.
  • Communication skills are essential in a successful business leading.
  • Teaching deaf children how to read is a vital part of deaf kids’ mental development.
  • Parents should control the impact of TV cartoons on their children’s behavior .
  • Community services for mentally disabled people should be highly-developed.
  • Recycling should become mandatory.
  • Businesses should invest money in innovations.
  • Genetically modified food should not be a threat to the population. Give a clear explanation of why GMO products are safe to consume. If you disagree with the statement, provide strong counterarguments to prove your position.
  • Should smoking be banned in public places? Decide on whether it should be prohibited on not and prove your position. Your arguments should support only one side of the issue. Don’t stay somewhere in the middle.
  • We should expand the legal age for getting a driving license in the UK . Explain why 17 years old adolescents are not mature enough to drive a car. If you don’t agree with the statement, provide counterarguments to prove the rightness of your point of view.
  • E-books should not replace paper books. Express your position regarding this statement. Provide clear arguments or counterarguments to prove your point of view.

Consider every side of the debate concerning paper books and E-books.

  • English language learning should be mandatory in every country. The main idea of the essay: English is a global language. Support this statement and persuade the readers about the significance of English knowledge in the modern world.

💪 Persuasive Essay Topics: Advanced Higher English

If you are a university student in Scotland, you will be familiar with higher English. You may have to be ready for an advanced one as well.

Choose the most appropriate idea among a wide variety of persuasive essay topics about Scotland. Although the task is quite challenging, you don’t need to worry. Consider our list of cool essay topics. With it, you will write an outstanding paper without any struggles.

  • Gender equity issues in work practices should be considered while creating a healthy working environment.
  • The application of social concepts and theories is a part of the general well-being.
  • Functionalism, conflict, and interactionism are the most significant aspects of sociological theories .
  • Data collect regarding customer should be considered as a future of e-commerce.
  • Scotland’s tourism products and destination identity develop the tourism market economy.
  • Organizational behavior issues and theories are vital in leading a successful business.
  • ICT impacts curriculum development and reforms in the United Kingdom to a great extent.
  • Public sector financial management plays a crucial role in the general well-being of the country.
  • Scottish routes company establishment is a turning point in the online marketing platform development.
  • The city authorities should prevent senior citizens’ abuse .
  • Women’s rights violations should not exist in modern society.
  • Freedom of speech, religion, and religious tolerance are the fundamental concepts of modern civilized society.
  • E-Commerce adoption results in wise business positioning. How will e-commerce help to increase the dynamics of any business? Convince your audience about the significance of e-commerce by providing strong arguments.
  • Human rights play a vital role in public opinion-making. Support this idea with well-developed arguments and examples. If you disagree with the statement, provide compelling counterarguments to prove the rightness of your opinion.
  • Globalization ruins the cultural heritage of the nations . Comment on the impact of the world globalization on the national identity of every country. Persuade the readers to preserve the national culture of their home countries.

👍 Good Persuasive Essay Topics for Higher English

Our team’s main aim is to help the students in all the possible ways. So, we decided to develop one more method to divide the academic essay topics.

Find different sections that focus on specific fields for your persuasive essay.

Look through the sections, decide what is the most suitable for you, and choose a fascinating essay topic. An essay idea search has never been so easy, right?

💬 Persuasive Essay Topics on Language

Language is one of the most potent tools for communication within one nation and internationally. Moreover, it carries the cultural identity of the country, preserving a spirit.

The topic of language is too diverse and has a lot of aspects to discuss. Consequently, professors of higher English course usually give essays on it.

The section Topics For Persuasive Essay UK will provide you with a wide variety of ideas. Don’t waste your time! Choose an appropriate topic for your paper right away.

  • Language influences our attitude to a great extent.
  • Sexism is present in the English Language.
  • Language and communication are two different concepts .
  • Language has a direct influence on cognition.
  • Shakespeare affected the modern English language to a great extent.
  • To understand how language operates, we should first examine English Language Evolution .
  • Multilingualism should be accepted and encouraged in modern society.
  • Accents and dialects are the critical components of language intervention.
  • The teachers should learn linguistics.
  • The change in languages over time is harmful to the nation.
  • Scottish Gaelic and Goidelic Celtic languages should not have been restricted in the 16th century.
  • Text autocorrect negatively influences the level of literacy and language knowledge.
  • We should consider Scots Gaelic as a separate language from Irish.
  • English should become an official international language.
  • Body language can say more than verbal communication.
  • Joking or expressing love in a foreign language is harder than in a native one . Either support or contradict this statement by providing appropriate examples and clear arguments.
  • The implementation of one universal language is a bad idea . Why and how it can impact the national diversity of the world? Prove the importance of preserving national languages.
  • The Scottish language will soon disappear. Conduct research on the usage of Scottish nowadays. Is it very wide-spread? How many people know and use it in everyday life?

Try to predict the future of the Scottish language.

  • “As many languages you know, as many times you are a human being.” – Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk. Develop this thought by providing strong arguments and examples. Persuade your readers about the importance of foreign language learning.
  • Irish language learning should become mandatory in the educational institutions of Ireland . Explain the significance of the Irish language for the population of Ireland. In case you don’t agree with the statement, provide clear counterarguments to prove your position.

🙊 Persuasive Essay Topics on Controversial Issues

  • Is attention deficit disorder a real disorder?
  • To deal with girls’ discrimination in the modern educational system , girls need to receive more attention than boys.
  • Should cigarette smoking be banned?
  • LGBTQ+ communities should have equal rights all over the world.
  • Adoption, childlessness, or reproductive technology – which one is the most effective and ethical?
  • Abortion should be legalized for underaged girls.
  • Should smoking tobacco be classified as an illegal drug?
  • Are surrogacy and its effects on families harmful for children?
  • Should student diversity be present in a school classroom?
  • Tuition fees should become lower.
  • Should homelessness become a concern of city authorities or governmental representatives?
  • Should the death penalty be legalized in the United Kingdom?
  • Should sex education become mandatory in all high schools in Scotland?
  • The mental health of employees should be a concern of employers.
  • Health care should be free.
  • Should women develop a career and have a stable income before giving birth to kids?
  • Should the production and selling of energy drinks be banned? Explain the harm of energetics on the health of a human being. Decide whether energy drinks are worth consuming. Persuade the readers about the rightness of your position by presenting strong arguments.

Energy drinks can promote adverse effects on children and teenagers.

  • Suicides among male teen homosexuals: harassment, shame, or stigma? In your opinion, what is the main reason for suicides among them? Support your position with clear evidence and appropriate examples.
  • Does studying abroad result in better education? Analyze the positive and negative aspects of gaining higher education abroad. Express your own opinion regarding this issue and convince your readers about your rightness.
  • Should birth control be monitored on a governmental level? Why is birth control crucial in modern society? What are the religious, cultural, and political aspects of birth control? Explain the link between birth control and gender and sexuality issues. Support your opinion by providing well-structured arguments.

🏫 Persuasive Essay Topics on Education

  • The college students should be ready to face challenges and pressures.
  • There is a strong correlation between wearing a school uniform and academic performance .
  • Sex education plays an essential role in preventing teenage pregnancy.
  • Student diversity in school classroom influences the educational process in a positive way.
  • The curriculum approaches in England and Scotland differ to a great extent.
  • At university, acquiring skills is more significant than getting grades.
  • Cheating on college exams is demoralizing.
  • Could electronic cigarettes help university students give smoking up?
  • Athletes that represent educational institutions should receive scholarships covering their tuition fees.
  • In schools, we should teach colorblind children what colors are.
  • Art oriented activities like drama clubs, music lessons, and handicraft classes are essential for the all-round development of children.
  • A university should be a dry campus. Comment on the negative influence of alcohol on the learning process. Persuade your readers about the importance of controlling alcohol consumption while being a student.
  • Single-sex schooling in education is effective. Convince the readers about the effectiveness of single-sex education by providing strong evidence. If you don’t agree with the statement, express the opposing position. Elaborate on your arguments and provide counterarguments.

Resultsof the studies on single-sex education are inconclusive.

  • Online education cannot fully replace the regular one . Compare and contrast these two ways of gaining knowledge. Provide clear arguments to prove the significance of attending educational institutions. Explain why having in-class discussions is crucial for students’ development. Do you believe that regular education is replaceable by the remote one? Then provide counterarguments to support your position.
  • The internet has a negative influence on the educational process . How the internet stops the mental development of kids, teenagers, and grown-ups? Persuade readers to limit internet usage while studying.

🗳️ Persuasive Essay Topics on Politics

  • To prevent the adverse effects of corruption, we should eliminate its causes.
  • The political parties of the United Kingdom are way more reliable than in the United States .
  • Human rights should not intervene in public opinion-making.
  • Politics and religion interdependence impacts the general political situation of a country.
  • Political freedom is a significant key to the general well- being of modern society.
  • Terrorism should not be used as a political instrument.
  • Civil disobedience in contemporary society is a massive threat to civilians and governments.
  • International humanitarian law is a useful tool to reduce the hazardous effects of military conflicts.
  • The royal family is the indicator of the UK political system’s uniqueness.
  • We should protect the confidentiality in the health care system.
  • The voting system should be fair and transparent.
  • The COVID-19 outbreak of 2019-2020 has a direct influence on international political relations.
  • Scotland would not be a stronger country if it existed independently from the UK. What are the benefits for Scotland of being in a political union with the United Kingdom? Persuade your readers in a mutually beneficial economic and political cooperation.
  • Brexit happened against Scotland’s will. Elaborate on the wish of the Scottish population to remain the part of the European Union. Prove that the negotiation of the conflict between England, Wales, and Scotland was not diplomatic enough.
  • The retirement policy of the UK should be changed. What are the main weaknesses of the current British retirement system? Give your suggestions on how it can be improved. Convince your readers in the usefulness of the retirement policy modifications.

💭 Persuasive Essay Topics on Philosophy

  • Dystopia idea in movies and novels influences people’s perception of life in a negative way.
  • Philosophy ideology of success and failure plays a vital role in reaching high results.
  • Suicide conflicts with moral philosophy and human values.
  • Classic philosophical problems embodied in films can help people in dealing with them.
  • We cannot ignore the philosophy of critical issues in today’s society .
  • Spiritual and physical journeys play a vital role in human life.
  • The philosophy of religion helps people to dive deep into their beliefs and values.

Philosophy of religion is the examination of the themes and concepts involved in religious traditions.

  • Unethical treatment of animals contradicts the moral concepts of philosophy.
  • From the philosophical perspective, heroism should be considered as a dedication to principles.
  • Specific philosophical values help develop resilience in the face of adversity.
  • Should human rights be violated if it may help the life of a person?
  • Abortion should be band because it contradicts the ethical ideas of humanity.
  • In the battle well-paid job vs. vocation, vocation should win . Explain the philosophy of vocation. Persuade the readers to follow their hearts when it comes to a choice of profession.
  • Philosophy Issue: Truth vs. Happiness. While choosing between these two notions, what would you select? Persuade your audience about the rightness of your position by presenting well-structured and clear arguments.
  • Philosophy plays a significant role in education . Convince your readers about the importance of philosophy while gaining knowledge. In case you don’t agree with the position of philosophy in school, present the opposing opinion. Provide counterarguments to support your ideas.

🗿 Persuasive Essay Topics on History

  • The black death disease should be perceived as one of the most horrible pandemics that hit the medieval world.
  • Industrial Revolution in England opened a new era of technical advancement.
  • The conditions of the working class in England is one of the causes of the industrial revolution.
  • Great Britain Empire’ Alliances led to the break out of the European Great War.
  • Enlightenment and Romantic Age pushed the development of the British culture forward.
  • History of Celtic Christianity has a direct impact on the development of religion in the UK.
  • The provisional Irish republican army is one of the most dangerous terrorist organizations.
  • The British ideal of an orderly world shaped the world we live in today.
  • English Civil War has a direct impact on American colonists.
  • The Wars of the Three Kingdoms formed the history of modern England, Scotland, and Ireland.

The Wars of the Three Kingdoms lasted 12 years.

  • Elizabeth II -is the legend of contemporary world history . Provide a brief overview of the queen’s achievements. Convince the readers about the uniqueness of Elizabeth’s II as a historical figure.
  • The Great Fire of London is one of the darkest events in British history. Comment on the terrific outcomes of the tragedy. How did the fire impact the economic situation in the entire county?
  • Oxford University is the place where ordinary people turn into upstanding figures . Introduce three of the most influential alumnae of Oxford University. What was their input in the scientific development of the UK? Prove the crucial role of Oxford University in the British educational system.
  • William Wallace is a person who successfully fought for Scottish independence . Elaborate on his role in British history and prove the importance of his actions.
  • History, culture, and language of Wales directly influenced the development of the United Kingdom. Give a brief overview of Wales formation starting from the ancient times and mowing to the 21st century. Prove the connection between Wales and the UK historical and cultural progress.

Thank you for visiting our page! We hope our article was insightful and full of useful ideas. Don’t forget to share it with the other students!

  • Higher English, Course Overview and Resources: SQA, Scottish Qualifications Authority
  • Higher English: Planit National Qualifications
  • The Complete Guide to English-Language Certificates: Preparation Courses Portal
  • How to Create a Thesis Statement for a Persuasive Essay: Amy Mahoney, Pen and the Pad
  • 434 Good Persuasive Topics for Speech or Essay: My Speech Class
  • Senior Fiction Suggestions for Advanced Higher English Dissertations: Senior Reading by Subject, Shetland Library
  • Persuasive Essay Examples: AcademicHelp.net
  • Choose Bright Persuasive Essay Topics 6 Main Steps: Persuasive Papers
  • Strong Thesis Statements: Purdue Online Writing Lab, College of Liberal Arts, Purdue University
  • Basic Steps in the Research Process: North Hennepin Community College
  • How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Esther Lombardi, ThoughtCo
  • Persuasive Essay: Writing Resources, Hamilton College
  • Persuasive Writing: Read Write Think
  • Distinguishing Argumentation from Persuasion: Thoughtful Learning, K-12
  • Find Your Argument: Australian National University, Canberra
  • Argument: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • What Is an Essay: Library University of Leeds
  • Counterargument: Gordon Harvey (adapted from The Academic Essay: A Brief Anatomy), for the Writing Center at Harvard University
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100+ Excellent Topics for A Stellar Persuasive Speech

100+ Excellent Topics for A Stellar Persuasive Speech

What Makes a Truly Remarkable Speech?

The Ingredients of an Effective Topic

Ideas & Inspiration: 100+ Topics

Your Next Steps, Step-by-step

This comprehensive blog post serves as a vital resource for anyone looking to craft an impactful persuasive speech. It provides an extensive list of over 100 compelling topics tailored for a wide range of interests and academic fields. Additionally, it offers advanced guidance on selecting the perfect topic, structuring your arguments effectively, and employing persuasive techniques that captivate and convince your audience. Whether you're an academic achiever or an aspiring public speaker, this guide equips you with the insights to deliver a stellar persuasive speech.

Before You Pick the Perfect Topic...

If you’re struggling to find a strong topic for a persuasive speech , you’ll find 100+ ideas for subjects and topics below. Use one that grabs you, or simply find inspiration to get unstuck and come up with a topic about something you and your audience will find interesting.

To help you think about the big picture — your larger essay — we also review what makes a truly effective persuasive speech, all the ingredients of an effective topic, and how to pick the best topic for your circumstances.

Here's what's most essential as you consider your topic choices:

  • pick a topic that has the right scope, one aligned with your larger assignment
  • be sure the topic is one you're interested in researching, has meaning and relevance for your audience, and has the right level of complexity — both for your audience and for your level of speech writing prowess
  • remember your topic should align with themes and subjects related to your circumstances and the speech requirements

Finally, once you’ve picked your topic, and even if you know all the basics — which I’m guessing you do if you’re following posts from Crimson Education — you might still benefit from other advice in today's post, such as numerous speech writing tips and strategies designed to save you time and stress and improve the odds your final speech will exceed expectations.

Here's what you'll find:

  • What Makes a Truly Remarkable Persuasive Speech
  • The Ingredients of an Effective Topic, and Tips for Picking Your Topic
  • 100+ Topic Suggestions
  • How to Develop a Stellar Persuasive Speech — Step-by-Step!

Still feeling a bit hesitant or stuck?

Don’t worry. Once you've picked a really interesting and effective topic and start your research, you'll quickly become a subject-matter expert, regaining both motivation and confidence for all the remaining steps.

What Makes a Truly Remarkable Persuasive Speech?

A good persuasive speech will grab the audience’s attention, help them connect with the speaker (that’s you), and guide their reasoning process — giving the speech the power to persuade your audience why your point of view is logical and compelling, and also superior to the opposing viewpoints.

The 6 Most Essential Ingredients

  • A strong introduction that gets the audience engaged and provides context about the subject and topic, what’s at stake (why it matters), and what issues or concerns tend to be front and center
  • A clear thesis in the form of a specific point of view, opinion, or argument
  • An orderly progression of ideas and arguments, each argument or subtopic supported by logic and evidence
  • An anticipation of opposing viewpoints and arguments (the counterarguments to your opinion)
  • Your responses or ‘rebuttals’ to the opposing viewpoints , answering the anticipated objections and adding additional support for your point of view or thesis
  • A conclusion that highlights the most powerful persuasive elements in your speech and reminds listeners what's at stake, including, if suitable, a call to action

The Historical Roots of Persuasive Speech

Did you know that persuasive speech assignments may be testing your mastery of concepts that go back as far as ancient Greece?

The emergence of democracy in ancient Greece (the 6th and 5th centuries B.C.) created a space for the rule of law and political governance informed by the will of the people — making persuasive speech an essential element of social life.

From courtroom trials to political campaigns and democratic assemblies, persuasive speech emerged in 5th-century Athens as an essential tool of democracy.  Soon the brightest philosophers of the day became concerned with the principles of "rhetoric" — the study of orderly and effective persuasive speaking.

Now, thousands of years later, little has changed in Western democracies: "constructing and defending compelling arguments remains an essential skill in many settings" (Harvard U, Rhetoric ). In short, the principles of deliberation, free speech, and consensus building we use for governance, in school, extracurricular activities , at work, and sometimes our day-to-day life, still rely on persuasive speech.

In every free society individuals are continuously attempting to change the thoughts and/or actions of others. It is a fundamental concept of a free society.

- persuasive speaking, by r. t. oliver, ph.d..

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How The Rhetorical Triangle Can Turbo-charge Your Speech

The 5th-century B.C. Athenian philosopher Aristotle argued that your ability to persuade is based on how well your speech appeals to the audience in three different areas: logos, ethos, and pathos, sometimes referred to as the three points of the rhetorical triangle .

From observation and reflection Aristotle understood that humans are thinking animals (logos), social and moral animals (ethos), and emotional animals (pathos) — such that appealing to all three of these pillars of human understanding and action were essential parts of an effective persuasive speech .

1. Logos — Using clear, logical, and evidence-based reasoning and argumentation to add persuasive power to your speech.

For obvious reasons, audiences will typically expect strong arguments supported by evidence and clear reasoning and logic, all elements that are often prominent on grading rubrics for persuasive speeches.

Maybe you're thinking of speeches you've heard that utterly lacked logic and evidence? It's a reminder that persuasion as such is ultimately about points of view and not always about facts. Even without logic, a speaker can persuade, through effective uses of ethos and pathos , for example. In other instances social phenomena may underlie a lack of logic and evidence, such as "group think," for example , when people are swayed or swept up by a common point of view about an issue, instead of thinking critically about it.

2. Ethos — The component of persuasive speaking that spotlights the appeal, authority, credentials, and moral standing of the speaker .

Have you ever agreed with a speaker simply because you liked the person speaking, or rejected an argument because you disliked a speaker, responding to who the speaker is more than to their arguments? That may not be very logical, but it is very natural for us humans.

Aristotle understood this, that persuasion relies not solely on logical thinking but on relational factors too, including how much we trust a speaker, how much we believe in the integrity of their motives, and the knowledge and expertise they possess (or are perceived to possess).

Take law courts, for example. One common strategy lawyers use to undermine the force of witness testimony is to “discredit” or “taint” the witness , to undermine jurors' confidence in the veracity and motives of the witness. That's using ethos, rather than logic and facts, to impact an audience (the jury).

Likewise, when an audience has a high regard for the speaker's reputation, authority, and credibility, the more convincing that person's arguments are likely to be.

Suggestions for enhancing appeals to ethos in your speech:

  • Share a transformative journey where you shifted from an opposing perspective to your current stance due to overwhelming evidence. This approach can demonstrate your capacity for logic and open-mindedness, helping your audience see you as very rational and impartial, potentially strengthening your credibility.
  • Incorporate the viewpoints and expertise of respected authorities to bolster your arguments. Referencing reliable sources and experts boosts your credibility by showing you've grounded your arguments in established facts, perspectives, and ideas.
  • Foster a connection with your audience. For example, rather than overwhelming them with complex reasoning to showcase your intelligence, strive to comprehend and reflect their perceptions and potential biases regarding your topic. This should make your audience more receptive to your logic and perspectives as your speech progresses.
  • Employ personal anecdotes or lived experiences that unveil a deeper layer of understanding and wisdom. This personal touch not only humanizes you, the speaker, but makes your arguments more relatable and persuasive.

Depending on circumstances, you may think of additional ways to bolster your credibility and trustworthiness — enhancing your standing in the eyes of the audience in order to elevate the persuasive impact of your speech!

3. Pathos — This means injecting your speech with some powerful appeals to listeners' feelings and emotions , in addition to using logic and reason.

For example, if your speech entails persuading voters to increase foreign aide to combat world hunger, you wouldn’t just want to cite cold statistics. Painting a picture of ways malnutrition is affecting real individuals is likely to have a strong impact on listeners' emotions, appealing to their innate capacity for compassion towards others and helping them more deeply appreciate the urgency of the subject . This approach impacts listeners' emotions and highlights an urgent and universal moral imperative that adds conviction to your point of view.

In most academic settings, you'll be expected to present a speech with a strong line of evidence-based, logical reasoning, often making appeals to logos prominent in persuasive speeches in school settings. That said, by injecting and balancing appeals to logos, ethos, and pathos, based on what's most suitable for your topic, assignment, and approach, you'll add a significant measure of mastery to your persuasive writing method.

A Consistent Style and Tone

What style, voice, and tone best suit your personality, the occasion, the listeners, and your subject?

  • Consider adopting a straightforward, clear, and succinct style , reminiscent of a newspaper editorial or a no-nonsense argument in a voter guide. This approach works well for topics and settings requiring direct communication with clear insights and persuasive arguments free from subjectivity and unnecessary analysis and complexity.
  • For topics, interests, or assignments that naturally entail wading through broader philosophical and ethical debates — like debating justifications for euthanasia or arguments against the death penalty — a more introspective, contemplative voice may be expected . This style allows for a deeper exploration of moral dimensions and the broader implications of the issue at hand or the underlying logical principles involved.
  • If your inclination is towards something more unconventional, employing humor and wit could be a chance to take the road less traveled! Whether through irony or parody, for example, by showcasing a humorous topic from the outset, such as "why dog people outshine cat people," or cleverly presenting weaker arguments to underscore your point, this strategy, while offbeat, can captivate and entertain , making your speech stand out in a large class setting. Just be sure to balance the creativity with a clear demonstration of your persuasive speech skills and consider checking in with your teacher about possibilities and expectations beforehand.

With a broader understanding of what goes into a great persuasive speech, you’re better equipped for the important step of picking the topic that will guide your speech.

Picking Your Topic — Questions to Ask

Does it interest you.

Conveying passion for a topic is infectious, adding power to your speech. The more interested and invested you are in your subject and topic, the more likely you are to make your speech the best it can be.

Will the topic interest your audience?

Understanding your audience's values, interests, and views will help you make immediate connections with their own thought processes and attitudes. Try to pick a topic that will get your listeners to perk up and move to the edge of their seats.

Is the topic or point of view fresh and engaging?

Choosing a topic that's novel, contemporary, or presents a unique angle on a familiar issue should help you captivate your audience's attention. You also want the topic to be something that matters to your audience with a point of view that challenges their thinking, so you're not just "preaching to the choir."

Are there any "triggers" or otherwise "sensitive" or "inappropriate" themes?

You might not think there’s not any problem with a topic such as Should we build a wall to keep immigrants out of the country? Or, Should same sex marriage be legal? That said, topics that delve into identity politics or areas that are so controversial that they elicit anger or hostility rather than dialogue and debate may lead to emotional hurt and harm, even if not intended. If you have any doubts, check in with your teacher or a school counselor before settling on your topic!

Finding Subjects and Topics on Your Own

Before you jump ahead and grab a ready-made topic from the list below, remember that a quick brainstorming or online search could be your preferred method to find the best, most interesting topic for your audience, setting, and individual interests or class requirements. For example, an internet search with keywords such as “biggest problems or biggest issues in the world today” will quickly uncover a host of themes and subjects that are both timely and controversial.

Search Results for Keyword Phrase Contemporary World Problems and Issues

  • Water contamination
  • Human rights violation
  • Global health issues
  • Global poverty
  • Children's poor access to healthcare, education and safety
  • Access to food and hunger
  • Anti-corruption and transparency
  • Arms control and nonproliferation
  • Climate and environment
  • Climate crisis
  • Combating and crime
  • Countering terrorism
  • Cyber issues
  • Economic prosperity and trade policy
  • Technology and privacy

A General List vs. Time & Place Factors

Where you live and what’s timely for you and your audience is going to depend on your circumstances. Finding a “hot topic” in your specific time and place could be an effective way to get listeners' attention and address an issue that feels highly relevant.

  • Is there a big policy decision that’s a hot topic at your school?
  • Is there a ballot initiative your community will vote on soon that your audience has strong opinions about?
  • Is there a current events issue in your local news headlines that offers a compelling persuasive speech topic?
  • What’s before congress these days, or before the Supreme Court, or the United Nations — this week (any great topics there for your speech)?

More Inspiration: 100+ Interesting Persuasive Speech Topics for High School

If you haven’t already navigated your way to an interesting persuasive speech topic, use the list below for even more ideas and inspiration!

You can go from top to bottom, or you can jump the line and look for the themes that most interest you, such as Art and Culture or Recreation and Tourism.

Art and Culture

1. Is digital art really art?

2. Street art: vandalism or cultural expression?

3. Is there a place for censorship in the music industry?

4. Do museums promote culture or appropriate culture?

5. Should other countries have a minister of culture or similar government office, as they do in France?

6. Can schools, or art teachers, define good art vs. bad art? Should they?

7. Censorship in art: when is it justified or necessary?

8. Does creative freedom take precedence over cultural appropriation?

9. The impact of digital platforms on the consumption of art and the value of art.

10. Is there a role for public policy and public funding in arts and culture?

1. The pros and cons of minimum wage laws and policies.

2. Cryptocurrency: the future of finance or a scam?

3. Is student loan debt relief good policy?

4. Gender wage gap: are the concerns justified or unjustified?

5. Sustainable development: Is there a way to sustain economic growth and without an environmental catastrophe?

6. The role of small businesses in the economy, do they promote prosperity or undermine efficiencies?

7. Globalization: economic boon or bane?

8. Is consumerism in the general interest or a threat to the planet?

9. The economic effects of climate change, should they be paid now or later?

10. Universal Basic Income: a solution to poverty or a disincentive to work?

1. The case for and against school uniforms.

2. Should non-citizens be allowed to vote in school board elections?

3. The impact of technology on education.

4. Should college education be free?

5. The importance of teaching financial literacy in schools: promoting independent living or consumerism?

6. Should parents have the right to home school children against their will?

7. Is the grading system improving learning?

8. Is mandatory attendance a good policy for high school?

9. Addressing the mental health crisis in schools: is it an individual problem or a social one?

10. Arts education: valuable or a waste of time?

Environmental Issues

1. The urgency of addressing climate change and what to do about it.

2. Plastic pollution: are more stringent government regulations, policies, and laws the answer?

3. Should the government subsidize clean energy technologies and solutions?

4. The importance of water conservation, but whose responsible?

5. Should there be a global environmental tax? On what?

6. Should environmental costs be factored into everyday economic activity?

7. The impact of fast fashion on the environment.

8. The necessity of protecting endangered species.

9. Deforestation: Who's impacted? Who should have power (or not) to stop it?

10. Are electric cars truly better for the environment?

1. The changing dynamics of the modern family.

2. The role of the state in protecting children from parents and guardians.

3. Should adoption records be open or sealed?

4. How can employers, or employment laws, support healthy families?

5. Is there an age when euthanasia should become universally legal and accessible?

6. How to balance parental rights with child welfare.

7. Is your child's gender something they're born with, or something they should be free to choose?

8. The responsibilities of women vs. men in addressing an unplanned pregnancy.

9. Should parents restrict children's use of technology? What is too lax vs. what is too restrictive?

10. Balancing discipline and love in parenting.

Health, Nutrition, & Fitness

1. Should junk food advertising be regulated?

2. The dangers of fad diets: free market vs. consumer protection.

3. Should junk food be banned in schools?

4. Nutrition: are schools failing to teach it?

5. Should students be graded on their fitness and nutrition levels and habits?

6. Should sports programs be replaced by fitness education?

7. E-cigarettes: should they be regulated or not?

8. The obesity epidemic: a problem of individual responsibility, genetics, or social policy?

9. Are agricultural subsidies good for health and the environment?

10. Should teens have more options for balancing school attendance and individual sleep needs and preferences?

Media, Social Media, and Entertainment

1. The effects of social media on teenagers.

2. Should there be regulations on influencer marketing?

3. The impact of video games on behavior.

4. Fake news: Its impact and how to combat it.

5. The role of media in shaping public opinion.

6. Privacy concerns with social media platforms.

7. The influence of celebrities on youth culture: is there a role for rewards and consequences to impact celebrities public behaviors?

8. Digital detox: pros and cons.

9. Media portrayal of women and its societal impact.

10. Censorship in media: necessary or oppressive?

Politics and Society

1. The importance and limits of voting in a democracy.

2. Gun control laws: balancing safety and liberty.

3. The impact of immigration: universal human rights vs. national sovereignty.

4. The death penalty: justice vs. ethics?

5. The legalization of marijuana: the right policy?

6. The right to protest vs. public order.

7. Affirmative action: whose definition of "fairness" do we use?

8. The future of healthcare in America: market solutions or a public option?

9. Climate change policy: National vs. global approaches.

10. The role of the United Nations in today's world.

Recreation & Tourism

1. The benefits of outdoor recreation.

2. Sustainable tourism: protecting nature while promoting travel.

3. The impact of tourism on local cultures.

4. The future of space tourism.

5. The effects of recreational activities on mental health.

6. The importance of historical preservation in tourism.

7. Adventure tourism: reasonable or unreasonable risks vs. rewards proposition?

8. The effects of over-tourism on popular destinations and local communities.

9. Is eco-tourism the right way to promote environmental sustainability?

10. Does international tourism help or harm indigenous peoples, cultures, and communities?

1. Do the ethical downside of genetic engineering outweigh the potential benefits?

2. The potential and pitfalls of artificial intelligence in society.

3. Climate change denial: is it fully within the bounds of free speech?

4. Competing views of vaccine policies and individual rights in pandemics and other health emergencies.

5. Space exploration: is it worth the investment?

6. The use of affirmative action to diversify STEM education and workforce.

7. The impact of technology on job displacement and future employment: is a universal income the right answer?

8. Do renewable energy technologies offer a feasible substitute for eliminating fossil fuels?

9. Ocean pollution: is more government regulation the answer?

10. Protecting biodiversity vs. the right to economic prosperity.

Sports and School Athletics

1. The emphasis on athletic programs in high schools: is the hype benefiting students?

2. Should college athletes be compensated?

3. Do teamwork and group activities help or hinder academic and athletic development?

4. Should schools should require more physical education or less?

5. Should there be more emphasis on non-competitive formats in high school and college athletics?

6. The influence of professional athletes as role models: good or bad?

7. Doping in sports: are athletic programs teaching the wrong values?

8. The benefits and risks of contact sports in high schools athletics.

9. Should there be absolute gender equality in school athletics?

10. What should the educational goal of school athletics be?

These topics span a broad spectrum of interests and concerns — look for one that matters to you and your audience, is likely to prompt insightful dialogue or debate, and is challenging enough to put your individual persuasive speech skills to the test!

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1. Use Diligent Research to Make a Watertight Argument

To go from just any persuasive speech to a truly riveting one, you’ll want to dig around until you find compelling and authoritative research . Even if you're already knowledgeable about your topic, applying yourself with patience and perseverance at this early stage will usually pay off, allowing you to uncover some real gems when it comes to compelling facts and expert perspectives.

What to look for:

  • Facts, statistics, and surveys
  • An expert analysis of a policy or issue
  • Quotes from compelling experts, from books, editorials, or speeches
  • Anecdotal evidence in the form of isolated events or personal experiences that don’t have much statistical significance but can illustrate or capture something powerful that supports your point of view, or add emotional appeal
  • Graphs, tables, and charts

Riveting research will better position you to hit some home runs when you put together your speech. And remember, research is primarily to build a strong logical argument ( logos ), but citing and spotlighting reputable sources will also lend your speech greater persuasive credibility ( ethos ), just as experiential perspectives can add appeals to emotion ( pathos ).

Define Your Thesis

Clearly articulate your stance on the topic. This thesis statement will guide the structure of your speech and inform your audience of your central argument.

I like to create a "working thesis" as a planning tool, something that encapsulates and maps my point of view and essential supporting arguments, and as a way to uncover gaps in my reasoning or evidence early on. Later, it also gives me a ready guide for writing my outline.

Essential Elements of a ‘working thesis’ for a persuasive speech:

  • The subject (including how you'll frame the context for your topic and speech)
  • Your main point of view
  • List of principal arguments
  • The most important counterarguments
  • Key rebuttals to the counterarguments

As you can see, this kind of "working thesis" gives you a bird's eye view of your thesis along with all the key components of your speech and the reasoning you’ll deploy.

Marshaling Your Evidence

As you delve into researching your chosen topic, such as "Why space exploration is not worth the investment," you'll accumulate evidence, including data, anecdotes, expert opinions, and more. This evidence is vital for adding depth, credibility, and persuasion to your speech. You also need to strategically align the evidence with each of your supporting arguments , ensuring that each claim you make is substantiated.

You can use a simple table format to visually map out how you want to align your subtopics and evidence.

Here's an example using the topic Why space exploration is not worth the investment .

This table is just for illustration, and doesn't use real data and opinions, but you can see how organizing your evidence ahead of time can help you logically present and support your arguments and subtopics . It can also help you spot gaps, in case you need to do additional research, and gives you a head start on the next step: outlining your speech!

Make an Outline

Begin with a structured outline to ensure your speech flows logically from one point to the next. Your outline should include:

  • introduction elements
  • key subtopics and the relevant arguments and evidence, examples, anecdotes, or citations, all in sequential order
  • key wording for any important or challenging transitions from one line of thought to the next, or from one subtopic to the next
  • a section for responding to opposing arguments and viewpoints, with the specific rebuttals, all in sequential order
  • key points for your conclusion

Drafting Body Paragraphs, Your Introduction & Conclusion

Now you're making your first rough attempts of turning the key content of your speech into phrases, sentences, and paragraphs. So, this is a could point to refocus on the tone, style, and voice you want to use, and how to use it consistently.

Pro Tip: Write your introduction and conclusion after drafting all of your body paragraphs, because you these two sections to really capture the essence of the larger speech.

Introduction : Start with a strong hook—this could be a startling statistic, a compelling quote, or a relatable and captivating (or entertaining) anecdote— then briefly preview your main points to set the stage for your argument.

Conclusion : Reinforce your thesis with concise references to the the primary evidence you presented. End with a powerful closing statement that reminds your audience of why this topic is important. As suitable, you can also call your audience to action or leave them with something significant to ponder on their own.

Balancing Pathos, Logos, Ethos

Ensure a harmonious balance among logos (logical appeal), ethos (establishing your credibility and using evidence from credible sources and quotes or perspectives from credible authorities), and pathos (emotional appeal).

Checklist for Balancing Logos, Ethos, and Pathos

Here's a rubric, adapted from a real university writing rubric for persuasive speeches, that can help you elevate appeals to logos , ethos , and pathos in your speech.

  • Is the thesis clear and specific?
  • Is the thesis supported by strong reasons and credible evidence?
  • Is the argument logical and well organized?
  • What are the speaker’s qualifications?
  • How has the speaker connected him/herself to the topic being discussed?
  • Does the speaker demonstrate respect for multiple viewpoints, and respond to them with thoughtful arguments?
  • Are sources credible?
  • Are tone, style, and word choice appropriate for the audience/purpose?
  • Is the speech polished and written with care?
  • Are vivid examples, details and images used to engage the listeners' emotions and imagination?
  • Does the writer appeal to the values and beliefs of the listeners by using examples the audience can relate to or cares about?

Revise & Polish

Review your speech and revise for clarity, flow, sentence structure, and word choice.

Remember to use a voice and style consistent with making a speech, with the topic and subject matter, and the specific circumstances for your speech.

Remove any jargon or unnecessary details that might distract from your message.

Sharpen your arguments, making sure they are clear, concise, and compelling.

Practice the Delivery

Dedicate ample time to practicing what it will be like giving your speech. Focus on mastering the tone, pace, and volume of your delivery. If you have time limits on the speech, be sure to time your delivery as well, and make any needed adjustments. Consider body language, eye contact, and gestures, as these non-verbal cues can significantly impact your speech's effectiveness.

The more comfortable and familiar you are with your speech, the more confidently you'll present it.

Also, being nervous, for lots of people, is normal. Practice will help; with better command of your speech you'll feel more confident. Also, practicing your delivery with a friend who can listen and give you some feedback is good way to catch helpful adjustments.

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Final Thoughts

Finding a topic you like and one that your audience will be interested in is a critical foundation for an effective persuasive speech. It will also help you stay motivated and get more out of the experience!

Just remember that investing in some extra research, some thoughtful organization, anticipating counterarguments, and artfully weaving in ethos and pathos alongside a strong line of evidence-based arguments ( logos ) will help you elevate your speech and your learning experience.

With the insights we've just shared, you're more than ready to turn what is often a rote class exercise into something far more artful. In addition, your effort will help prepare you for college — for debating, editorial writing, legal argumentation, public policy advocacy, public speaking, and even running for ASB President!

If you're interested in taking on the challenge of more advanced research and persuasive writing, or even projects that involve scholarly publication, be sure to reach out to a Crimson Education Advisor for information on ways to get connected to advanced online courses and any number of cool capstone and research projects that will also connect you to networks of motivated young scholars and top-notch research and writing mentors.

About the Author

Keith Nickolaus

Keith Nickolaus

Keith Nickolaus is a former educator with a passion for languages, literature, and lifelong learning. After obtaining a B.A. from UC Santa Cruz and exploring university life in Paris, Keith earned his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley, and then worked for 16 years in K12 education before setting up shop as a freelance writer.

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what is a persuasive essay topics

112 Persuasive Speech Topics That Are Actually Engaging

What’s covered:, how to pick an awesome persuasive speech topic, 112 engaging persuasive speech topics, tips for preparing your persuasive speech.

Writing a stellar persuasive speech requires a carefully crafted argument that will resonate with your audience to sway them to your side. This feat can be challenging to accomplish, but an engaging, thought-provoking speech topic is an excellent place to start.

When it comes time to select a topic for your persuasive speech, you may feel overwhelmed by all the options to choose from—or your brain may be drawing a completely blank slate. If you’re having trouble thinking of the perfect topic, don’t worry. We’re here to help!

In this post, we’re sharing how to choose the perfect persuasive speech topic and tips to prepare for your speech. Plus, you’ll find 112 persuasive speech topics that you can take directly from us or use as creative inspiration for your own ideas!

Choose Something You’re Passionate About

It’s much easier to write, research, and deliver a speech about a cause you care about. Even if it’s challenging to find a topic that completely sparks your interest, try to choose a topic that aligns with your passions.

However, keep in mind that not everyone has the same interests as you. Try to choose a general topic to grab the attention of the majority of your audience, but one that’s specific enough to keep them engaged.

For example, suppose you’re giving a persuasive speech about book censorship. In that case, it’s probably too niche to talk about why “To Kill a Mockingbird” shouldn’t be censored (even if it’s your favorite book), and it’s too broad to talk about media censorship in general.

Steer Clear of Cliches

Have you already heard a persuasive speech topic presented dozens of times? If so, it’s probably not an excellent choice for your speech—even if it’s an issue you’re incredibly passionate about.

Although polarizing topics like abortion and climate control are important to discuss, they aren’t great persuasive speech topics. Most people have already formed an opinion on these topics, which will either cause them to tune out or have a negative impression of your speech.

Instead, choose topics that are fresh, unique, and new. If your audience has never heard your idea presented before, they will be more open to your argument and engaged in your speech.

Have a Clear Side of Opposition

For a persuasive speech to be engaging, there must be a clear side of opposition. To help determine the arguability of your topic, ask yourself: “If I presented my viewpoint on this topic to a group of peers, would someone disagree with me?” If the answer is yes, then you’ve chosen a great topic!

Now that we’ve laid the groundwork for what it takes to choose a great persuasive speech topic, here are over one hundred options for you to choose from.

  • Should high school athletes get tested for steroids?
  • Should schools be required to have physical education courses?
  • Should sports grades in school depend on things like athletic ability?
  • What sport should be added to or removed from the Olympics?
  • Should college athletes be able to make money off of their merchandise?
  • Should sports teams be able to recruit young athletes without a college degree?
  • Should we consider video gamers as professional athletes?
  • Is cheerleading considered a sport?
  • Should parents allow their kids to play contact sports?
  • Should professional female athletes be paid the same as professional male athletes?
  • Should college be free at the undergraduate level?
  • Is the traditional college experience obsolete?
  • Should you choose a major based on your interests or your potential salary?
  • Should high school students have to meet a required number of service hours before graduating?
  • Should teachers earn more or less based on how their students perform on standardized tests?
  • Are private high schools more effective than public high schools?
  • Should there be a minimum number of attendance days required to graduate?
  • Are GPAs harmful or helpful?
  • Should schools be required to teach about standardized testing?
  • Should Greek Life be banned in the United States?
  • Should schools offer science classes explicitly about mental health?
  • Should students be able to bring their cell phones to school?
  • Should all public restrooms be all-gender?
  • Should undocumented immigrants have the same employment and education opportunities as citizens?
  • Should everyone be paid a living wage regardless of their employment status?
  • Should supremacist groups be able to hold public events?
  • Should guns be allowed in public places?
  • Should the national drinking age be lowered?
  • Should prisoners be allowed to vote?
  • Should the government raise or lower the retirement age?
  • Should the government be able to control the population?
  • Is the death penalty ethical?

Environment

  • Should stores charge customers for plastic bags?
  • Should breeding animals (dogs, cats, etc.) be illegal?
  • Is it okay to have exotic animals as pets?
  • Should people be fined for not recycling?
  • Should compost bins become mandatory for restaurants?
  • Should electric vehicles have their own transportation infrastructure?
  • Would heavier fining policies reduce corporations’ emissions?
  • Should hunting be encouraged or illegal?
  • Should reusable diapers replace disposable diapers?

Science & Technology

  • Is paper media more reliable than digital news sources?
  • Should automated/self-driving cars be legalized?
  • Should schools be required to provide laptops to all students?
  • Should software companies be able to have pre-downloaded programs and applications on devices?
  • Should drones be allowed in military warfare?
  • Should scientists invest more or less money into cancer research?
  • Should cloning be illegal?
  • Should societies colonize other planets?
  • Should there be legal oversight over the development of technology?

Social Media

  • Should there be an age limit on social media?
  • Should cyberbullying have the same repercussions as in-person bullying?
  • Are online relationships as valuable as in-person relationships?
  • Does “cancel culture” have a positive or negative impact on societies?
  • Are social media platforms reliable information or news sources?
  • Should social media be censored?
  • Does social media create an unrealistic standard of beauty?
  • Is regular social media usage damaging to real-life interactions?
  • Is social media distorting democracy?
  • How many branches of government should there be?
  • Who is the best/worst president of all time?
  • How long should judges serve in the U.S. Supreme Court?
  • Should a more significant portion of the U.S. budget be contributed towards education?
  • Should the government invest in rapid transcontinental transportation infrastructure?
  • Should airport screening be more or less stringent?
  • Should the electoral college be dismantled?
  • Should the U.S. have open borders?
  • Should the government spend more or less money on space exploration?
  • Should students sing Christmas carols, say the pledge of allegiance, or perform other tangentially religious activities?
  • Should nuns and priests become genderless roles?
  • Should schools and other public buildings have prayer rooms?
  • Should animal sacrifice be legal if it occurs in a religious context?
  • Should countries be allowed to impose a national religion on their citizens?
  • Should the church be separated from the state?
  • Does freedom of religion positively or negatively affect societies?

Parenting & Family

  • Is it better to have children at a younger or older age?
  • Is it better for children to go to daycare or stay home with their parents?
  • Does birth order affect personality?
  • Should parents or the school system teach their kids about sex?
  • Are family traditions important?
  • Should parents smoke or drink around young children?
  • Should “spanking” children be illegal?
  • Should parents use swear words in front of their children?
  • Should parents allow their children to play violent video games?

Entertainment

  • Should all actors be paid the same regardless of gender or ethnicity?
  • Should all award shows be based on popular vote?
  • Who should be responsible for paying taxes on prize money, the game show staff or the contestants?
  • Should movies and television shows have ethnicity and gender quotas?
  • Should newspapers and magazines move to a completely online format?
  • Should streaming services like Netflix and Hulu be free for students?
  • Is the movie rating system still effective?
  • Should celebrities have more privacy rights?

Arts & Humanities

  • Are libraries becoming obsolete?
  • Should all schools have mandatory art or music courses in their curriculum?
  • Should offensive language be censored from classic literary works?
  • Is it ethical for museums to keep indigenous artifacts?
  • Should digital designs be considered an art form? 
  • Should abstract art be considered an art form?
  • Is music therapy effective?
  • Should tattoos be regarded as “professional dress” for work?
  • Should schools place greater emphasis on the arts programs?
  • Should euthanasia be allowed in hospitals and other clinical settings?
  • Should the government support and implement universal healthcare?
  • Would obesity rates lower if the government intervened to make healthy foods more affordable?
  • Should teenagers be given access to birth control pills without parental consent?
  • Should food allergies be considered a disease?
  • Should health insurance cover homeopathic medicine?
  • Is using painkillers healthy?
  • Should genetically modified foods be banned?
  • Should there be a tax on unhealthy foods?
  • Should tobacco products be banned from the country?
  • Should the birth control pill be free for everyone?

If you need more help brainstorming topics, especially those that are personalized to your interests, you can  use CollegeVine’s free AI tutor, Ivy . Ivy can help you come up with original persuasive speech ideas, and she can also help with the rest of your homework, from math to languages.

Do Your Research

A great persuasive speech is supported with plenty of well-researched facts and evidence. So before you begin the writing process, research both sides of the topic you’re presenting in-depth to gain a well-rounded perspective of the topic.

Understand Your Audience

It’s critical to understand your audience to deliver a great persuasive speech. After all, you are trying to convince them that your viewpoint is correct. Before writing your speech, consider the facts and information that your audience may already know, and think about the beliefs and concerns they may have about your topic. Then, address these concerns in your speech, and be mindful to include fresh, new information.

Have Someone Read Your Speech

Once you have finished writing your speech, have someone read it to check for areas of strength and improvement. You can use CollegeVine’s free essay review tool to get feedback on your speech from a peer!

Practice Makes Perfect

After completing your final draft, the key to success is to practice. Present your speech out loud in front of a mirror, your family, friends, and basically, anyone who will listen. Not only will the feedback of others help you to make your speech better, but you’ll become more confident in your presentation skills and may even be able to commit your speech to memory.

Hopefully, these ideas have inspired you to write a powerful, unique persuasive speech. With the perfect topic, plenty of practice, and a boost of self-confidence, we know you’ll impress your audience with a remarkable speech!

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what is a persuasive essay topics

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Academic Essay Writing Made Simple: 4 types and tips

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The pen is mightier than the sword, they say, and nowhere is this more evident than in academia. From the quick scribbles of eager students to the inquisitive thoughts of renowned scholars, academic essays depict the power of the written word. These well-crafted writings propel ideas forward and expand the existing boundaries of human intellect.

What is an Academic Essay

An academic essay is a nonfictional piece of writing that analyzes and evaluates an argument around a specific topic or research question. It serves as a medium to share the author’s views and is also used by institutions to assess the critical thinking, research skills, and writing abilities of a students and researchers.  

Importance of Academic Essays

4 main types of academic essays.

While academic essays may vary in length, style, and purpose, they generally fall into four main categories. Despite their differences, these essay types share a common goal: to convey information, insights, and perspectives effectively.

1. Expository Essay

2. Descriptive Essay

3. Narrative Essay

4. Argumentative Essay

Expository and persuasive essays mainly deal with facts to explain ideas clearly. Narrative and descriptive essays are informal and have a creative edge. Despite their differences, these essay types share a common goal ― to convey information, insights, and perspectives effectively.

Expository Essays: Illuminating ideas

An expository essay is a type of academic writing that explains, illustrates, or clarifies a particular subject or idea. Its primary purpose is to inform the reader by presenting a comprehensive and objective analysis of a topic.

By breaking down complex topics into digestible pieces and providing relevant examples and explanations, expository essays allow writers to share their knowledge.

What are the Key Features of an Expository Essay

what is a persuasive essay topics

Provides factual information without bias

what is a persuasive essay topics

Presents multiple viewpoints while maintaining objectivity

what is a persuasive essay topics

Uses direct and concise language to ensure clarity for the reader

what is a persuasive essay topics

Composed of a logical structure with an introduction, body paragraphs and a conclusion

When is an expository essay written.

1. For academic assignments to evaluate the understanding of research skills.

2. As instructional content to provide step-by-step guidance for tasks or problem-solving.

3. In journalism for objective reporting in news or investigative pieces.

4. As a form of communication in the professional field to convey factual information in business or healthcare.

How to Write an Expository Essay

Expository essays are typically structured in a logical and organized manner.

1. Topic Selection and Research

  • Choose a topic that can be explored objectively
  • Gather relevant facts and information from credible sources
  • Develop a clear thesis statement

2. Outline and Structure

  • Create an outline with an introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion
  • Introduce the topic and state the thesis in the introduction
  • Dedicate each body paragraph to a specific point supporting the thesis
  • Use transitions to maintain a logical flow

3. Objective and Informative Writing

  • Maintain an impartial and informative tone
  • Avoid personal opinions or biases
  • Support points with factual evidence, examples, and explanations

4. Conclusion

  • Summarize the key points
  • Reinforce the significance of the thesis

Descriptive Essays: Painting with words

Descriptive essays transport readers into vivid scenes, allowing them to experience the world through the writer ‘s lens. These essays use rich sensory details, metaphors, and figurative language to create a vivid and immersive experience . Its primary purpose is to engage readers’ senses and imagination.

It allows writers to demonstrate their ability to observe and describe subjects with precision and creativity.

What are the Key Features of Descriptive Essay

what is a persuasive essay topics

Employs figurative language and imagery to paint a vivid picture for the reader

what is a persuasive essay topics

Demonstrates creativity and expressiveness in narration

what is a persuasive essay topics

Includes close attention to detail, engaging the reader’s senses

what is a persuasive essay topics

Engages the reader’s imagination and emotions through immersive storytelling using analogies, metaphors, similes, etc.

When is a descriptive essay written.

1. Personal narratives or memoirs that describe significant events, people, or places.

2. Travel writing to capture the essence of a destination or experience.

3. Character sketches in fiction writing to introduce and describe characters.

4. Poetry or literary analyses to explore the use of descriptive language and imagery.

How to Write a Descriptive Essay

The descriptive essay lacks a defined structural requirement but typically includes: an introduction introducing the subject, a thorough description, and a concluding summary with insightful reflection.

1. Subject Selection and Observation

  • Choose a subject (person, place, object, or experience) to describe
  • Gather sensory details and observations

2. Engaging Introduction

  • Set the scene and provide the context
  • Use of descriptive language and figurative techniques

3. Descriptive Body Paragraphs

  • Focus on specific aspects or details of the subject
  • Engage the reader ’s senses with vivid imagery and descriptions
  • Maintain a consistent tone and viewpoint

4. Impactful Conclusion

  • Provide a final impression or insight
  • Leave a lasting impact on the reader

Narrative Essays: Storytelling in Action

Narrative essays are personal accounts that tell a story, often drawing from the writer’s own experiences or observations. These essays rely on a well-structured plot, character development, and vivid descriptions to engage readers and convey a deeper meaning or lesson.

What are the Key features of Narrative Essays

what is a persuasive essay topics

Written from a first-person perspective and hence subjective

what is a persuasive essay topics

Based on real personal experiences

what is a persuasive essay topics

Uses an informal and expressive tone

what is a persuasive essay topics

Presents events and characters in sequential order

When is a narrative essay written.

It is commonly assigned in high school and college writing courses to assess a student’s ability to convey a meaningful message or lesson through a personal narrative. They are written in situations where a personal experience or story needs to be recounted, such as:

1. Reflective essays on significant life events or personal growth.

2. Autobiographical writing to share one’s life story or experiences.

3. Creative writing exercises to practice narrative techniques and character development.

4. College application essays to showcase personal qualities and experiences.

How to Write a Narrative Essay

Narrative essays typically follow a chronological structure, with an introduction that sets the scene, a body that develops the plot and characters, and a conclusion that provides a sense of resolution or lesson learned.

1. Experience Selection and Reflection

  • Choose a significant personal experience or event
  • Reflect on the impact and deeper meaning

2. Immersive Introduction

  • Introduce characters and establish the tone and point of view

3. Plotline and Character Development

  • Advance   the  plot and character development through body paragraphs
  • Incorporate dialog , conflict, and resolution
  • Maintain a logical and chronological flow

4. Insightful Conclusion

  • Reflect on lessons learned or insights gained
  • Leave the reader with a lasting impression

Argumentative Essays: Persuasion and Critical Thinking

Argumentative essays are the quintessential form of academic writing in which writers present a clear thesis and support it with well-researched evidence and logical reasoning. These essays require a deep understanding of the topic, critical analysis of multiple perspectives, and the ability to construct a compelling argument.

What are the Key Features of an Argumentative Essay?

what is a persuasive essay topics

Logical and well-structured arguments

what is a persuasive essay topics

Credible and relevant evidence from reputable sources

what is a persuasive essay topics

Consideration and refutation of counterarguments

what is a persuasive essay topics

Critical analysis and evaluation of the issue 

When is an argumentative essay written.

Argumentative essays are written to present a clear argument or stance on a particular issue or topic. In academic settings they are used to develop critical thinking, research, and persuasive writing skills. However, argumentative essays can also be written in various other contexts, such as:

1. Opinion pieces or editorials in newspapers, magazines, or online publications.

2. Policy proposals or position papers in government, nonprofit, or advocacy settings.

3. Persuasive speeches or debates in academic, professional, or competitive environments.

4. Marketing or advertising materials to promote a product, service, or idea.

How to write an Argumentative Essay

Argumentative essays begin with an introduction that states the thesis and provides context. The body paragraphs develop the argument with evidence, address counterarguments, and use logical reasoning. The conclusion restates the main argument and makes a final persuasive appeal.

  • Choose a debatable and controversial issue
  • Conduct thorough research and gather evidence and counterarguments

2. Thesis and Introduction

  • Craft a clear and concise thesis statement
  • Provide background information and establish importance

3. Structured Body Paragraphs

  • Focus each paragraph on a specific aspect of the argument
  • Support with logical reasoning, factual evidence, and refutation

4. Persuasive Techniques

  • Adopt a formal and objective tone
  • Use persuasive techniques (rhetorical questions, analogies, appeals)

5. Impactful Conclusion

  • Summarize the main points
  • Leave the reader with a strong final impression and call to action

To learn more about argumentative essay, check out this article .

5 Quick Tips for Researchers to Improve Academic Essay Writing Skills

what is a persuasive essay topics

Use clear and concise language to convey ideas effectively without unnecessary words

what is a persuasive essay topics

Use well-researched, credible sources to substantiate your arguments with data, expert opinions, and scholarly references

what is a persuasive essay topics

Ensure a coherent structure with effective transitions, clear topic sentences, and a logical flow to enhance readability 

what is a persuasive essay topics

To elevate your academic essay, consider submitting your draft to a community-based platform like Open Platform  for editorial review 

what is a persuasive essay topics

Review your work multiple times for clarity, coherence, and adherence to academic guidelines to ensure a polished final product

By mastering the art of academic essay writing, researchers and scholars can effectively communicate their ideas, contribute to the advancement of knowledge, and engage in meaningful scholarly discourse.

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  5. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

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COMMENTS

  1. 113 Perfect Persuasive Essay Topics for Any Assignment

    All persuasive essays have the following: Introduction: Introduces the topic, explains why it's important, and ends with the thesis. Thesis: A sentence that sums up what the essay be discussing and what your stance on the issue is. Reasons you believe your side of the argument: Why do you support the side you do?

  2. 120+ Good Persuasive Essay Topics From Easy to Unique

    If you need to prove your point in a persuasive essay, you'll need to start with a great prompt. Check out these ideas for easy, challenging, and unique persuasive prompts in different categories. ... Persuasive Essay Topics About Science and Technology. The ever-changing world of science and technology brings lots of practical and ethical ...

  3. Top 257 Good Persuasive Essay Topics [Tips & Prompts]

    There is a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender discrimination in the Hispanic community. The causes of homosexual discrimination in American society. 6. Emotional Persuasive Essay Topics. The importance of the use of ethos, pathos, logos in essay writing. The reasons why we should protect the environment.

  4. 100 Persuasive Essay Topics

    Choosing a compelling topic that evokes emotions is crucial for crafting a strong persuasive essay. The main parts of a persuasive essay are the introduction (with a hook and thesis), body paragraphs (explaining themes supporting the thesis), and conclusion (summarizing main points and making a final appeal).

  5. 227 Amazing College Persuasive Essay Topics [Free Ideas]

    College Persuasive Essay Topics: Medicine. Strong pain killers should be sold by prescription only. Drug prices should be set ethically. Herbal medications are the safest. Self-medication is extremely dangerous, even in the case of a simple cold or an allergy. Differentiating various forms of medicines is essential.

  6. 50 Persuasive Essay Topics to Help You Ace Your Next Assignment

    In this post, we'll provide a list of 50 persuasive essay topics to help you get started on your next assignment. We'll also include some tips for writing a persuasive essay to help you craft a strong and effective argument. Whether you're a student or a professional writer, these persuasive essay topics are sure to inspire and challenge you.

  7. 120 Persuasive Essay Topics

    The Common English Assignment: Persuasive Essays. Persuasive essays, also known as argumentative essays, are one of the most common assignments handed out in English classes.From middle school to high school and college, English teachers around the world love to make their students practice writing persuasively.

  8. Persuasive Essay Topics: Igniting Debate and Driving Change

    A Comprehensive List of Persuasive Essay Topics. In this comprehensive list, our paper writing service experts have compiled an extensive range of persuasive essay topics to suit various interests and academic levels. Whether you're a college student seeking to engage in complex debates, a high school student eager to make a compelling case, or an advocate looking to address critical issues ...

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    Choosing a writing topic for your persuasive essay writing is essential. The right topic will let you draft an exceptional and well-written essay. Selecting a persuasive essay topic might sound easy, but it can be challenging. You cannot randomly start writing a persuasive essay about any topic and expect your essay to be brilliant.

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    Parents often believe sexuality, family planning, and parenting should be taught at home. But many don't believe parents sufficiently educate their children about these topics and feel the school should provide teens with training for adulthood and require parenting classes. 6.

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  12. 75 Persuasive Essay Topic Ideas

    A persuasive essay, if you're unfamiliar, is one in which you have to make an argument. You need to choose a side and prove why you're correct by using hard evidence and convincing language. The idea is that you want to convince the reader that your argument is the right one, so you'll definitely want to pick a topic that you're passionate ...

  13. Writing a Persuasive Essay

    The thesis should. 1. be a complete sentence, 2. identify the topic, and. 3. make a specific claim about that topic. In a persuasive paper, the thesis is a claim that someone should believe or do something. For example, a persuasive thesis might assert that something is effective or ineffective.

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    20 Persuasive Essay Topics for High School. Great persuasive essay topics for high school could be: The death penalty is an effective way to scare off criminals. Things the older generation can learn from the modern-day youth. Higher taxes for rich people will favor financial balance.

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    Use Persuasive Language: Choose words and phrases that evoke emotion and urgency, compelling the reader to take action. Experiment with rhetorical devices like parallelism or repetition to add depth to your argument. Maintain a tone that balances assertiveness with respect.

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    Adademic Persuasive Writing. In this type of essay or paper, your job is to make a claim and support it using facts, logic, and research. While you might use personal experience to argue "Mandatory state testing is a bad idea," you will need to go beyond your own experience by using statistics, views of experts, and other evidence.

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    63 Persuasive Essay Topics. Teens should learn etiquette at school. All teens should have the opportunity to study in a different country. Parents of a kid who bullies someone else should pay a fine. School days should start after noon. Teens should have the opportunity to determine their own curfew and bedtime.

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    The 5 Must-Have Steps of a Persuasive Essay. If you're intimidated by the idea of writing an argument, use this list to break your process into manageable chunks. Tackle researching and writing one element at a time, and then revise your essay so that it flows smoothly and coherently with every component in the optimal place. 1.

  19. 101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens

    101 Interesting Persuasive Essay Topics for Kids and Teens. Use your words to sway the reader. Persuasive writing is one of those skills that can help students succeed in real life. Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative, but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader.

  20. Persuasive Essay: Definition, Examples, Topics & Tips for ...

    What Is A Persuasive Essay? Before we begin looking at how to write this type of essay, it is important that we understand what a persuasive essay is. Below is a short description of the persuasive essay. A persuasive essay is one which is used to convince the audience of a particular viewpoint or opinion on a specific topic.

  21. 187 Impressive Higher English Persuasive Essay Topics [2024]

    The persuasive essay aims to present all the arguments that can convince the reader that the writer is right. So, choosing a topic, pick the one that you can elaborate on and persuade in. Choose the essay idea wisely. Ensure that the topic is appropriate and relevant for the tutor who will check and grade your paper.

  22. 100+ Excellent Topics for A Stellar Persuasive Speech

    1. Logos — Using clear, logical, and evidence-based reasoning and argumentation to add persuasive power to your speech. For obvious reasons, audiences will typically expect strong arguments supported by evidence and clear reasoning and logic, all elements that are often prominent on grading rubrics for persuasive speeches.

  23. 112 Persuasive Speech Topics That Are Actually Engaging

    112 Engaging Persuasive Speech Topics. Tips for Preparing Your Persuasive Speech. Writing a stellar persuasive speech requires a carefully crafted argument that will resonate with your audience to sway them to your side. This feat can be challenging to accomplish, but an engaging, thought-provoking speech topic is an excellent place to start.

  24. Types of Essays in Academic Writing

    2. Descriptive Essay. 3. Narrative Essay. 4. Argumentative Essay. Expository and persuasive essays mainly deal with facts to explain ideas clearly. Narrative and descriptive essays are informal and have a creative edge. Despite their differences, these essay types share a common goal ― to convey information, insights, and perspectives ...